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londonlawyer
July 23rd, 2006, 10:06 AM
Here's an article from today's NY Times regarding a seventeenth century house in Queens.

Finding the Funds for a 17th-Century Fixer-Upper
Don Hogan Charles/The New York Times

By JEFF VANDAM
Published: July 23, 2006
The setting of the Flushing Friends Meeting House is not as tranquil as it once was. An apartment building called North Main Towers went up next door a few years ago, casting the Quakers’ backyard cemetery into shadow. And noise from Northern Boulevard is audible among the headstones, whose letters have faded over the centuries.

“It’s so out of place there, that brown-shingled building,” said Joan Kindler, 77, a longtime member of the meeting house, as she walked through it one morning last week. “It’s almost invisible.”

The neighborhood must have looked much different in 1694, when the meeting house was built.

Even today, the structure — two high-ceilinged stories with an angled roof and a front wall made of stone — looks sturdy enough. Not bad for a building that was almost a century old by the time George Washington came to visit in 1789 and ’90.

Yet the wood-shingled roof, the copper gutters, the brick chimney, the window frames and the wooden porch deck all need repairs. One wall, damaged by water, bows outward. And though funds were requested in 2004 and the city and state agreed to put up $600,000 for repairs a year later, work has not yet begun, as was first reported in The Queens Chronicle.

“We had expected to start work last year,” said Linda Shirley, who is the clerk for the Quakers’ group. Money from the state, $100,000, is being deposited with the city, which will provide the remainder of the money and execute the job, but work is not expected to begin until next year.

“These projects take longer to get under way than anybody can possibly imagine,” said Karen Ansis, fund manager for the Landmarks Conservancy, a nonprofit group that is helping the Quakers get money for the repairs. “We’re just working our way through paperwork city now.”

In this case, getting the project under way is complicated by bureaucratic novelty. “It is relatively new” for the city to finance capital projects at buildings that it neither owns nor has a long-term lease on, said John Spavins, a spokesman for the Department of Design and Construction, which will handle the work.

Before work can begin, Mr. Spavins said, the agency needs a complete architectural design of the work to be done, which must be reviewed by the Landmarks Preservation Commission. In addition, several legal documents must be filed with both the state and the city.

Meanwhile, the Quakers continue to hold their meetings at the house, and Sunday school classes upstairs. And children are as awed as ever by the building’s great age, said Ms. Kindler.

“Youngsters, when they’re told this was built before George Washington was born, they think, ‘What could be older than George Washington?’ ” she said.

More Articles in New York Region »

ablarc
July 23rd, 2006, 10:33 AM
http://66.230.220.70/images/post/flushingfriendsmeetinghouse/01.jpg

http://66.230.220.70/images/post/flushingfriendsmeetinghouse/02.jpg

http://66.230.220.70/images/post/flushingfriendsmeetinghouse/03.jpg

londonlawyer
July 23rd, 2006, 10:38 AM
Thanks for posting the photos.

ablarc
July 23rd, 2006, 10:49 AM
This is a multi-karat gem.

londonlawyer
July 23rd, 2006, 11:25 AM
I agree. There are many 17th Century houses in NYC about which most people are unaware. NY is the most historic city in the US -- not Boston or Philly (both of which I love also).

ablarc
July 23rd, 2006, 01:28 PM
There are many 17th Century houses in NYC about which most people are unaware.
Somebody ought to post a map.

czsz
July 23rd, 2006, 02:58 PM
Amazing; I had no idea this place (or any 17th century building) still existed in New York.

Are there any buildings surviving from the (pre-1664) Dutch era?

ablarc
July 23rd, 2006, 03:18 PM
Are there any buildings surviving from the (pre-1664) Dutch era?
Maybe part of a foundation on Governors Island.

Strattonport
July 26th, 2006, 09:31 PM
New York colonial-era history isn't as maintained, especially if you compare to cities like Boston or Philadelphia.

londonlawyer
July 26th, 2006, 09:35 PM
Amazing; I had no idea this place (or any 17th century building) still existed in New York.

Are there any buildings surviving from the (pre-1664) Dutch era?

There are about 10 17th Century buildings in NY. The Wykoff House, which was built in 1652, is the oldest.

http://www.historichousetrust.org/msmphotos/Wyckoff%20-%20snow.jpg

ablarc
July 26th, 2006, 09:36 PM
New York colonial-era history isn't as maintained, especially if you compare to cities like Boston or Philadelphia.
Lots of Federal-era buildings survived in Lower Manhattan right into the Sixties. That was the great era of demolition.

londonlawyer
July 26th, 2006, 09:47 PM
Also, NY was heavily destroyed during the Revolution. Anyway, NY has far more buildings from the 1600's than Boston or Philly and way more pre-Civil War Buildings. It probably has more from the 1700's as well though perhaps not as many percentage-wise.

czsz
July 26th, 2006, 10:09 PM
Where is the Wykoff House?

ablarc
August 8th, 2006, 07:14 AM
Where is the Wykoff House?
East Flatbush.

submachine
October 3rd, 2006, 04:50 AM
Bowne House
http://www.bownehouse.org/history/bowne_family.shtm (http://www.bownehouse.org/history/bowne_family.shtm)
The Bowne House is the oldest house in Queens and among the oldest in New York City. The house was built by John Bowne, a man who courageously defended the right of religious freedom in 1662.

Flushing Quaker Meeting House
http://www.nyym.org/flushing/hmh.html (http://www.nyym.org/flushing/hmh.html)
Built in 1694, the Quaker Meeting House is New York City's oldest house of worship in continuous use.

The Riker-Lent Smith Homestead
http://www.lentrikersmithhomestead.com/ (http://www.lentrikersmithhomestead.com/)
Built by Abraham Riker in 1656, the Riker-Lent Smith Homestead has been maintained as a private dwelling ever since. A graveyard (http://www.lentrikersmithhomestead.com/cemetery/index.htm/t_blank) is located on the property with 132 marked graves dating back to the 17th century.

Kingsland Homestead
http://www.preserve.org/queens/kingsland.htm The late 18th century Kingsland Homestead stands in a small park in Flushing, in tire shade of the landmark Weeping Beech tree, planted in 1847. It is the headquarters of the Queens Historical Society. Kingsland is located steps away G-onr tire 17th century Bowne House (the place where Quakers were first permitted to meet in New Amsterdam). Charles Doughty built the homestead about 1785.

londonlawyer
October 3rd, 2006, 06:14 PM
I never heard of the Riker-Lent house. That's interesting.

PS: In my town, Scarsdale, which is a small suburban village, there is one house from the 1600's and many from the 1700's.

pianoman11686
November 1st, 2006, 12:16 AM
Queens: National Park Review for Oldest Occupied House

By MICHELLE O’DONNELL
Published: November 1, 2006

A 350-year-old East Elmhurst farmhouse that is the city’s oldest inhabited dwelling will be studied by the National Park Service to see whether the house and its surrounding acre of land might be acquired as a national park, two lawmakers said yesterday. The property, which includes lush gardens and a historic 132-grave cemetery, is known as the Lent-Riker-Smith homestead. The land was granted to Abraham Riker in 1654 by Gov. Peter Stuyvesant. The study was announced by Representatives Joseph Crowley and Carolyn B. Maloney, whose districts include Queens.

Copyright 2006 The New York Times Company

brianac
April 3rd, 2008, 10:35 AM
http://www.flushingremonstrance.info/logo_fr_132x150.jpg
350th Anniversary of the Flushing Remonstrance: 1657-2007

A celebration of a document and the principles it embodies


The Flushing Remonstrance was a forerunner to the first amendment of the U.S. Constitution that gives people the freedom of religion, speech, press, assembly, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances. On December 27, 1657, it was signed by 30 Flushing residents who risked fines and banishment imposed by Governor Peter Stuyvesant in order to state their call for freedom
What follows is a list of programs and events surrounding the declaration of this important document in our nation's history.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ ~~~

April 2008
Commemorating the 350th Anniversary of the Flushing Remonstrance 1:
Religious Freedom in North Flushing (North of the LIRR)
In 1657 residents of Flushing petitioned the Dutch colonial government to uphold freedom of conscience and permit religious pluralism. Today's Flushing is a remarkable outcome of this policy. Every major religion in the world has a substantial church, mosque or temple in the vicinity. We'll tour some of the diversity on foot and visit the Quaker Meeting House (1692), the oldest house of worship in NY State.
Sunday, April 20, 2008 1-3pm
Meets at St George's Church
39th Avenue and Main Street (l block north of #7 Main St. station).
Sponsored by Municipal Art Society.
Fees: $12/15 (mem/non-mem.)

http://www.flushingremonstrance.info/

brianac
October 1st, 2009, 04:22 AM
Bowne House
http://www.bownehouse.org/history/bowne_family.shtm (http://www.bownehouse.org/history/bowne_family.shtm)
The Bowne House is the oldest house in Queens and among the oldest in New York City. The house was built by John Bowne, a man who courageously defended the right of religious freedom in 1662.

Flushing Quaker Meeting House
http://www.nyym.org/flushing/hmh.html (http://www.nyym.org/flushing/hmh.html)
Built in 1694, the Quaker Meeting House is New York City's oldest house of worship in continuous use.

The Riker-Lent Smith Homestead
http://www.lentrikersmithhomestead.com/ (http://www.lentrikersmithhomestead.com/)
Built by Abraham Riker in 1656, the Riker-Lent Smith Homestead has been maintained as a private dwelling ever since. A graveyard (http://www.lentrikersmithhomestead.com/cemetery/index.htm/t_blank) is located on the property with 132 marked graves dating back to the 17th century.

Kingsland Homestead
http://www.preserve.org/queens/kingsland.htm (http://www.preserve.org/queens/kingsland.htm) The late 18th century Kingsland Homestead stands in a small park in Flushing, in tire shade of the landmark Weeping Beech tree, planted in 1847. It is the headquarters of the Queens Historical Society. Kingsland is located steps away G-onr tire 17th century Bowne House (the place where Quakers were first permitted to meet in New Amsterdam). Charles Doughty built the homestead about 1785.



Not the house in the title of the thread, but I think the thread is worthy of revival.



September 30, 2009, 5:24 pm

City Acquires Flushing’s Bowne House

By Sewell Chan (http://wirednewyork.com/author/sewell-chan/)

http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2009/09/30/nyregion/bowne-480.jpgHistoric House Trust
Bowne House, built around 1661, is significant in the history of religious freedom.

New York City has taken ownership of the Bowne House (http://www.bownehouse.org/), a 17th-century Anglo-Dutch structure in Flushing, Queens, that is a major symbol of the growth of religious freedom in America. The change in ownership, announced on Wednesday, clears the way for the wood-framed building, which has been closed for some time because of its poor condition, to undergo a major renovation and to be reopened by 2012.

“Not only is it one of the oldest surviving structures in New York City and the oldest in Queens, but the Bowne family has also left its mark on the city again and again, helping New York City become the cradle of tolerance and diversity,” the city’s parks commissioner, Adrian Benepe, said.

The Bowne House Historical Society, a nonprofit group established in 1947, will continue to operate the house as a museum, managing its collections, interpretation and visitor programs. But as a city-owned facility, the house, at 37-01 Bowne Street, will become the 23rd property in the Historic House Trust (http://www.historichousetrust.org/), a nonprofit group that oversees the Parks Department’s historic houses.

http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2007/12/05/nyregion/05bowne.190.jpgEugene L. Armbruster
The house will continue to be run by the Bowne House Historical Society, founded in 1947.

The three organizations will collaborate on a renovation, for which more than $3.3 million has been committed, including $1 million raised by the historical society. Scheduled to start next year, the renovation will include replacing or repairing timber framing, siding, windows, doors, shutters, brick and the wood shingle roof, and exterior painting.

In addition, a garage, built around 1925 behind the house, will be converted into a $1.7 million visitor center. An archeological investigation will also be done at the site.

The first phase of the renovation and the construction of the visitor center are expected to start next year and take about two years.

John Bowne (1627-1695) emigrated from England to Boston in 1649 and eventually settled in Flushing. A farmer, he was arrested in 1662, and then jailed and banished, for inviting Quakers to worship in his home. He traveled to the Netherlands and brought his arguments to the Dutch West India Company, which overruled the director general of New Amsterdam, Peter Stuyvesant — though largely for economic rather than idealistic reasons. Bowne returned to Queens, victorious, in 1664.

His family continued to prosper, with descendants who included businessmen, educators, politicians and horticulturists. The city said in a news release:

Robert Bowne (1744-1818) founded Bowne & Co., a financial printing company that is still in existence today, and championed free education for all New Yorkers. Walter Bowne (1770-1846), founder of the Union Engine Company, served as mayor of New York City from 1829 to 1833. Samuel Parsons Jr. (1844–1923), a matrilineal descendant of the Bownes, was the head landscape architect for New York City and served as Superintendent of City Parks. During his career he partnered with Calvert Vaux to create Christopher Street Park and Abingdon Square, restore Ladies Pond in Central Park. The two also collaborated with Stanford White to produce the iconic Washington Memorial Arch in Washington Square Park.

http://cityroom.blogs.nytimes.com/2009/09/30/city-acquires-flushings-bowne-house/

Copyright 2009 (http://www.nytimes.com/ref/membercenter/help/copyright.html) The New York Times Company (http://www.nytco.com/)