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NewYorkYankee
August 10th, 2006, 04:09 PM
There is a really good chance I'm bringing my car to the city this semester. So does anyone have any tips about parking, traffic, good ways to get from Harlem to Pace University etc. Thanks!

MrSpice
August 10th, 2006, 04:24 PM
There is a really good chance I'm bringing my car to the city this semester. So does anyone have any tips about parking, traffic, good ways to get from Harlem to Pace University etc. Thanks!

There are many cheaper parking lots on the edge of Upper East Side (1st/2nd Ave - 95th, 96th 97th streets) and west side (around 10th avenue and 30s streets) or in Harlem

Sunday - best day to drive in the city as many streets and meters allow parking on Sunday whereas on Saturday and other days, you cannot park in many places at all.

It's very difficult to find free or cheap parking next to Pace - you'll have to park at the parking lot - can be costly

NewYorkYankee
August 10th, 2006, 05:17 PM
I found a parking garage near my building for $120.00 a month, not bad. I just like driving and I'd like to have it with me.

NewYorkYankee
August 10th, 2006, 11:05 PM
It's very difficult to find free or cheap parking next to Pace - you'll have to park at the parking lot - can be costly

What would you say parking rates in the area would be for 6 hours and 12 hours?

krulltime
August 10th, 2006, 11:23 PM
^ My suggestion is that you should take a walk in the are next to Pace and find a garage that fits your bill. I think most people here won't be able to help you find rates for you... since most here don't park or have a car for that matter. But who knows maybe someone knows.

But I think you should do what I said. I did that when I was driving in Philadelhia and parking close to where I worked in Center City. I walk around a found the best cheapest place. I doubt the area in Pace will have anything too cheap.

If you do find something maybe you can post the rates here.

Oh and good luck driving in NYC! http://www.thesmilies.com/smilies/confused0061.gif (http://www.thesmilies.com) (I still say is a big mistake and you won't enjoy it)

NoyokA
August 11th, 2006, 12:15 AM
Take the West-Side Highway to get to Pace. You will probably be one of the few people on this forum grateful for Robert Moses. Traffic will depend on the time of your classes but there is no guarantee, ever. I would say a safe bet would be leave an hour to two hours before class you never know with Traffic in NYC. If traffic is bad on the West Side Highway take 12th or 11th Avenue south, whatever is south-going. But really there is no guarantee with traffic in NYC, I was returning home from a trip to the Jersey Shore and hit the BQE at 5pm on a weekday and I was the only car on the road, other times I've driven through the city I was waiting in traffic for 5 hours, no joke.

Im also curious, did you get a quote yet as to what car-insurance will run a college student in NYC?

NewYorkYankee
August 11th, 2006, 12:22 AM
Stern, why would I be paying for insurance? Im still a perm. resident at my dads house in Tennessee. He pays my insurance and will continue to do so. I would only be paying NYC insurance if I were a resident of the city. I still have my TN tag, license, and insurance.

Schadenfrau
August 11th, 2006, 12:35 AM
You'll probably want to make sure if that's even legal.

NewYorkYankee
August 11th, 2006, 12:38 AM
How is it not legal? I'm in a dorm, not renting an apartment.

Schadenfrau
August 11th, 2006, 12:56 AM
What I said was that you needed to check into this. Call the DMV.

You do realize that you're obligated to inform your insurance company about where the car will be garaged, and that the price will increase accordingly, right? It's not true that you only have to pay NYC insurance if you're a resident. That's where the car is parked, the insurance company doesn't care if you're registered to vote in the city.

Also, do you know if the garages you've seen require you to show proof of insurance and registration to keep your car there?

I get the feeling there there's A LOT you haven't thought out.

NewYorkYankee
August 11th, 2006, 12:59 AM
Okay, you're right. There is quite a bit I don't know. I'm just deciding right now if I want my car in NY or not. My parents are giving me the choice, they're footing the bill, if that includes a raise in insurance or not.

NoyokA
August 11th, 2006, 01:19 AM
If your parents are paying for your car make sure they are aware of the costs.

http://autos.msn.com/advice/article.aspx?contentid=4023087

kingpin8399
August 11th, 2006, 01:37 AM
yo nyyankee, pm me the info about that parking garage, i might do the same.......120 isnt bad at allllll

MrSpice
August 11th, 2006, 04:57 PM
What would you say parking rates in the area would be for 6 hours and 12 hours?

Don't know - I would think that if you park every day and only during the day, somewhere around 160-200/month

MrSpice
August 11th, 2006, 04:58 PM
Okay, you're right. There is quite a bit I don't know. I'm just deciding right now if I want my car in NY or not. My parents are giving me the choice, they're footing the bill, if that includes a raise in insurance or not.

Some people "pretend" for years they still live out of state and pay less in insurance :)

That's why you can see so many out-of-state plates in many residential neighborhoods in Manhattan...

Kadeeejah
August 11th, 2006, 10:29 PM
Listen u need to try a bike. Not a car.

lofter1
August 12th, 2006, 12:05 AM
Some people "pretend" for years they still live out of state and pay less in insurance :)

That's why you can see so many out-of-state plates in many residential neighborhoods in Manhattan...
But if you get in an accident in your new "pretend" home will your insurance company "pretend" with you?

Or will they say "breach of contract"?

milleniumcab
August 12th, 2006, 07:55 AM
Owning And Driving A Car In Nyc???????????

Fuhgetaboudit......

NewYorkYankee
August 13th, 2006, 11:12 PM
If a sign says:

"No Standing Except Trucks Loading and Unloading 7 A.M.-7 P.M."

Can you park there or not? I don't know what "Standing" is.

pianoman11686
August 13th, 2006, 11:25 PM
I'm not sure about this, but I think "no standing" is inclusive of "no parking." Standing is when you're just sitting in your car when it's parked on the street. Sometimes a sign will say "no parking", but standing is allowed. I'm not positive though, so someone, please correct me if I'm wrong.

lofter1
August 14th, 2006, 12:49 AM
You're correct ^^.

I've seen people in my neighborhood get a ticket just sitting in their car in a "No Standing" zone while waiting for friends to come out of a store.

NoyokA
August 14th, 2006, 12:51 AM
Driving in the city, your best bet is to be a delivery truck since they get away with everything...

Ninjahedge
August 14th, 2006, 08:42 AM
Driving in the city, your best bet is to be a delivery truck since they get away with everything...

No they don't.

I have regularly seen the delivery trucks with their orange "parking permits" for the day.

If the cop is in a bad mood, they will give them more than one "parking permit" in a day...

The ones I see with this the most often are the mail trucks (UPS/FedEx/DHL).

I think they figure that into the overhead of delivering in the city though....

SilentPandaesq
August 14th, 2006, 09:50 AM
120 a month is a good deal. I have had a car in NYC for 6 years. It is difficult at times, so unless you really want to put up with it, I would suggest not bringing it.

I lived in Brooklyn for 5 years with a car which was O.K (it was brooklyn heights, so it was difficult) I parked on the street and had to deal with street closures, Alternate side of the street parking, and a whole host of car related troubles.

On the other hand, I could get out the town on the fly with very little thought. Go to a Costco and buy bulk Ramen and TP, ski trips to VT, visit friends in Boston and so on. So the good times off set the bad.

I just moved the the UES and realized that the parking rules change every other day (no parking on Tues- Fri and Mon- Thurs, as opposed to BK's 1 day). I recently put the car in a lot on 97th and 1st for more that double that 120, and that was the cheapest place without parking it in the lot at the "Houses" which seamed a little sketch for me.

Good luck - Oh and never fill up on gas in the island of manhattan.

NewYorkYankee
August 14th, 2006, 12:13 PM
...and a whole host of car related troubles.


What other kind of problems were there? May I ask what kind of car you have?

Do you offer any suggestions for parking in the Financial District? (On the street) Any suggestions about street parking in general?

I know I'm probably going to get my head bit off for this question. How much of a risk is my car going to be in Harlem, parked on the street. I'm worried about it getting broke into, the out of state tag being a lure. I know it happens in every neighborhood, but is it more likely to happen in Harlem?

SilentPandaesq
August 14th, 2006, 12:39 PM
What other kind of problems were there? May I ask what kind of car you have?

I have a GMC envoy, but before that I had a Toyota 4Runner. Both Mid sized SUV

Other problems.... Well it is NYC so. Random movie shoots. Agressive parking rule enforcement, Bad parallel parking jobs, People leaving stuff on your windshield, People putting parking tickets from their car on yours, Gas prices, street fairs, pedestrians(i.e. park slope mommies chucking cans at you), Snow removal(i.e. people packing your car in snow so they can get out) and last but not least the general angst of finding a spot. I have friends who live on the West side in the 100's and they can spend an hour on sunday trying to find a spot, only to have to move it the next day for alternate side.


Do you offer any suggestions for parking in the Financial District? (On the street) Any suggestions about street parking in general?

When I was looking for an apartment I spent a lot of time in the Financial District (Gold and some other apt buildings) The street parking is insane. There is construction on almost every corner, which means that parking is tough without putting it in a lot (which were running about 400/month ).


I know I'm probably going to get my head bit off for this question. How much of a risk is my car going to be in Harlem, parked on the street. I'm worried about it getting broke into, the out of state tag being a lure. I know it happens in every neighborhood, but is it more likely to happen in Harlem?

Hey, I had my car broken into in Brooklyn heights, across the street from multi-mil dollar homes. The issue is more what do you leave in the car. Most car thiefs are going to steal the car if they want the car. Random theifs are agents of oppertunity. If you leave a T.V. in the car it will eventully get stolen regardless of where you park it. If your car is on the most stolen list then you should think about not parking it on any street. Also, it is generally not worth the risk of breaking into a car when you have no idea of what is in the car. so the less visible stuff you have in there, the better. (i.e. no fancy stero, no xbox, no LCD screen, no bobble-head Figures and for crap's sake NO IPOD.

NewYorkYankee
August 14th, 2006, 01:30 PM
You are very helpful, thank you!

How beat and banged up have your cars became from parking in NYC? I have a Hyundai Tiburon, so I'm assuming it shoild be fairly easy to park when I find a spot. I'm glad you also mentioned the ipod, while I don't leave mine in my car, the FM transmitter is in there, so that could be bad.

SilentPandaesq
August 14th, 2006, 01:52 PM
You are very helpful, thank you!

How beat and banged up have your cars became from parking in NYC?

Not horrible, but bad enough to have you cursing when you see it. The desire for a spot is so great that people will squeeze into any spot, regardless of if it requires them to bump and scrape you several times (especially if you are parking in an area where the cars are not new)

Ipod - Basically my car was broken into for a Bass guitar amplifier which i bought used for $100, but it looked expensive. In the car at the same time was a pair of skis that was worth 5 times a much, but was left alone. The point being, if you leave something in your car that looks or is generally known to be expensive, then do not be surprised if someone decides to liberate it. (now to be perfectly honest I have left expensive looking things in my car for several days, and never had a problem.) But it is a risk.

NewYorkYankee
August 14th, 2006, 01:55 PM
Now when they are broken into, windows are shattered to get in? Do you use ypur car for an everyday commute in the city?

lofter1
August 14th, 2006, 02:07 PM
On a nearby street in SoHo (not all that heavily trafficked compared to others but by no means desolate) I see smashed windows on parked cars on a regular basis -- and not always in the dark of night. All it takes is a swift "thump" with a phillips-head screw driver and the window shatters and the car is open. Takes all of 30 seconds for someone to do this and reach in and grab what they want (warning to those SoHo day-trippers who leave their goodies on the back seat while going back for more).

I came out my back door one recent afternoon just in time to see a guy do this right down the block. I yelled and tried to get people to bring attention to him -- but he was a fast runner and long gone before anybody could get near him, and certainly before any NYPD could be called to the scene.

This happens all over NYC -- although it might be even more prevalent in popular shopping areas like SoHo where the thieving-types might figure there are goodies to be got in every other car.

NewYorkYankee
August 14th, 2006, 02:48 PM
I can't decide if I want to bring my car or not. I'd like to have it to get around in, but I'm just afraid parking will be very difficult. I'm not sure.

Schadenfrau
August 14th, 2006, 02:58 PM
Has anyone on this board EVER suggested that it was a good idea to bring your car? Don't do it.

NewYorkYankee
August 14th, 2006, 03:02 PM
Has anyone on this board EVER suggested that it was a good idea to bring your car? Don't do it.

Yes, I know that. But, I really would like to have it. Although, sometimes what you want is not the best option.

NewYorkYankee
August 14th, 2006, 03:28 PM
What's the worst part is figuring out the ridiculous parking signs. Such as this one:

http://www.orchardst.com/parking/images/sign.gif

No standing, but you can park there at the meter?

Schadenfrau
August 14th, 2006, 03:33 PM
Uh, there's no standing Monday-Friday, 6AM-7PM. You probably use the meter when it's not those hours. I don't even drive, but I could still figure that out.

NewYorkYankee
August 14th, 2006, 03:36 PM
Congrats! ::Hands Schad a cookie and pats her on the head::

pianoman11686
August 14th, 2006, 03:47 PM
As for worrying about leaving your car on the street in Harlem:

I don't really think what neighborhood you're in makes a difference. My mother used to commute to Manhattan by bus from Queens when we used to live there. She got a brand new Camry in 1996, and parked it on a quiet, many would even say a "suburban" street in a leafy enclave of Jamaica. Lots of nice houses and families. Problem was, no one was around during the day, because everyone was off at work. Criminals who know what they want will find areas where this is the case, or more specifically, will find a car they want, and take note of when the owner leaves it unattended for several hours at a time. Within the span of a year, my mother's car was stolen twice, and had to be recovered after apprehending the criminals; and another time, it was completely stripped, that is: all the valuable stuff inside, namely the stereo, the airbags, the steering wheel, the seats, etc., was removed from the car and a shell was left behind, a few blocks away from where it was parked. This all occurred, mind you, despite the presence of a factory-installed alarm, a Club, and a LoJack (the last item being what helped locate the car and catch the criminals). There were also at least three other separate occasions where hubcaps were stolen.

So, the upshot is: no matter where you leave your car, make sure it's a street where there are people constantly walking around. And check to make sure every once in a while that you're not being followed or observed. Otherwise, leave it in a garage.

SilentPandaesq
August 14th, 2006, 03:47 PM
Takes all of 30 seconds for someone to do this and reach in and grab what they want (warning to those SoHo day-trippers who leave their goodies on the back seat while going back for more).



^^Exactly.

NNY:
No I do not commute with my car. I went to law school in Brooklyn so I would walk everyday. I now go to my Office in Midtown by Subway.

I would advise against using your car everyday. It is time consuming, expensive, and in general not a good idea (not to mention that everyone you know will be asking you to take them and their girlfriend to the Airport, Fairway, Ikea, Hamptons, Jersey shore, Yankee games, and any other random place they think you would not mind driving them too.

Seriously, having a car in manhattan is not easy. It is really expensive. You want to go on a trip to Spain? Put that car in a lot, cause alternate side will get you ticketed and towed ($70 ticket and $300 impound fee)

Drive to work? Keep filing up that tank with expensive-ass manhattan gas and spend an hour trying to find a spot in morning rush, or put it in a lot for the early bird special at $10-$30.

You will find that you will not want to drive because it took so long to get a spot, and you don't want to loose it.

So in short there are not many good points to having a car in manhattan and not putting it in a lot.

NoyokA
August 14th, 2006, 03:51 PM
Congrats! ::Hands Schad a cookie and pats her on the head::

Insulting Forum Members is not allowed, you have recieved an infraction.

NewYorkYankee
August 14th, 2006, 03:56 PM
Insulting Forum Members is not allowed, you have recieved an infraction.

It was called sarcasm, not an insult. It was warranted with a comment like "I don't even drive and I could figure that out."

NoyokA
August 14th, 2006, 04:03 PM
It was called sarcasm, not an insult. It was warranted with a comment like "I don't even drive and I could figure that out."

Only yours wasn't sarcasm, whenever you involve someone's race or sex its a hate post. But don't stop there, you've already shown your chauvinism towards black people and females. Im a little hurt that my jewish background is feeling no love, just call me a kike and get over with it, I’m itching for even more reasons to ban you.

Schadenfrau
August 14th, 2006, 04:06 PM
I actually didn't even take that as a sexist comment, but NYYankee, you are really begging for snark when you write scores of posts about how important driving is to you, then show that you can't follow the logic of a street sign.

NewYorkYankee
August 14th, 2006, 04:09 PM
I actually didn't even take that as a sexist comment, but NYYankee, you are really begging for snark when you write scores of posts about how important driving is to you, then show that you can't follow the logic of a street sign.

Please keep in mind I drive in Tennessee where there are no parking signs. That sign didnt confuse me, I was just bringing up a comment about how some others are confusing to an out of towner. Do you understand now what I was saying Schad?

Schadenfrau
August 14th, 2006, 04:14 PM
No, because you're the only person on this thread who seems to be confused by parking signs.

One page ago you posted: "If a sign says: "No Standing Except Trucks Loading and Unloading 7 A.M.-7 P.M." Can you park there or not? I don't know what "Standing" is."

And you prefaced the photo by saying: "What's the worst part is figuring out the ridiculous parking signs. Such as this one... No standing, but you can park there at the meter?"

If you do bring your car, you are going to be a traffic cop's dream, because they do not care that there are no parking rules in Tennessee, just like no one in NYC cares that you grew up in a town where you never saw black people.

When in NYC...

NoyokA
August 14th, 2006, 04:17 PM
Please keep in mind I drive in Tennessee where there are no parking signs. That sign didnt confuse me, I was just bringing up a comment about how some others are confusing to an out of towner. Do you understand now what I was saying Schad?

Listen you got the infraction, its not going to be revoked. I have enough of a problem with you mentioning people's sex or race in your posts, I have a real problem when you mention sex or race in accordance with a Forum Member.

You've done enough damage already with your posts in "Driving and owning a car in Manhhattan" and "Harlem". People could understand your apprehension, but your continued barrage of excitable posts has in sensitized them.

I don't know why you're going to school in NYC. NYC is not the city for you.

NewYorkYankee
August 14th, 2006, 04:19 PM
I don't know why you're going to school in NYC. NYC is not the city for you.

I agree. I'll send you a postcard from Miami or L.A. :)

Edward
August 14th, 2006, 04:21 PM
Uh, there's no standing Monday-Friday, 6AM-7PM. You probably use the meter when it's not those hours.
I disagree. The meter is only for commercial vehicles from 6 am to 7 pm.

Schadenfrau
August 14th, 2006, 04:23 PM
You're probably right, but hey, I tried. It's a good thing that the only thing I park is my ass on a subway seat.

Ninjahedge
August 14th, 2006, 05:31 PM
Do you guys have anything more interesting to get into an argument about?

NewYorkYankee
August 14th, 2006, 10:01 PM
SilentPandaesq, what about harm done to your car due to NYC street conditions. Everytime I'm in a cab I can't help but notice how huge the pot holes are. My car sits low on the ground, so the suspension isnt good as your Envoy or a Town Car.

i_commit_sins
August 15th, 2006, 01:40 AM
my partner in nyc has a hummer h2...

I'm amazed at how he gets around.

120 for the night for him!!!!

SilentPandaesq
August 15th, 2006, 08:47 AM
what about harm done to your car due to NYC street conditions.

None really, but my car(s) sat high off the ground.


Everytime I'm in a cab I can't help but notice how huge the pot holes are. My car sits low on the ground, so the suspension isnt good as your Envoy or a Town Car.

Well this is NYC so the road conditions are...variable. Common sense is more the rule of the day than anything else. If you see a huge hole in the road, avoid it. Generally, there are pleanty of crappy cars driving around NYC on a daily basis so it is not that bad. Then again, there are a lot of broken down cars on the streets of New York too....

Listen, while the benefits of having a car are nice, it is really more of a hardship than anything else. I keep a car so I can visit my parents who live north of the city but not really close to the metro north (also my mom will give me tons of food to take home). I do this about every 6 weeks or so, so it does not make sense to rent a car.

You should really think long and hard about bringing a car to the city if most of your time will be spent on Manhattan on in metro Brooklyn and Queens.

Ninjahedge
August 15th, 2006, 08:59 AM
Listen to me.


Do NOT drive your car in the city.

Don't.

No no no.

Am I getting through to you?

I have Mazda MX6 manual and it is hell to drive through the city. From playing slalom around pedestrians, potholes and creative parkers, it is NOT a fun town to drive through on ANY basis.

I have felt physical pain as my car has hit ruts and holes in NYC and know that every bump adds up in the long run. To boot, parking is a biatch and everything cost mega moolah here to keep going.

If I were you, and I still needed my car, I would find a garage somewhere on the outskirts of town where you can get to easily from mass transit, and pay a monthly fee. Your car will be safer and there is a LOT less stress. Although it will cost you.

But, look at it this way, with parking tickets costing ove $100 for just about anything, the first couple of months may end up being very expensive for you anyway.

SilentPandaesq
August 15th, 2006, 10:01 AM
^^Listen to the Hedge. Listen to me.

Unless you have tons of cash and tons of time it is just not worth it. (not implying that I have either, but I have been doing it for 6 years so I know the secrets... and I have my car in a lot and pay monthly. )

HansonNY
August 15th, 2006, 03:05 PM
I agree with what everyone else has said; cars and New York don’t mix very well together. Please don't bring your car with you. There's already enough congestion on the streets already.

Why don't you sell the car? You'll have more rent money.

NewYorkYankee
August 15th, 2006, 03:11 PM
Why don't you sell the car? You'll have more rent money.

I live in a dorm, so I don't have rent. I'm hopefully going to just be in NY for one or two more semester. So, Im going to need my car for Miami or L.A.

Well, I've came to the conclusion, I'm leaving the car at home. I've decided the wear and tear isnt good for my car, and I need to keep it in good condition. Let's just say I can't wait to get to another city, where cars are part of everyday life.

HansonNY
August 15th, 2006, 03:24 PM
Miami or L.A.? You're leaving New York?

When I started to follow the forum (way back in 04) you we're so excited about moving to New York. You couldn't wait to get here but now you can't wait to leave.:confused: It isn't what you thought it would be?

Anyway good decision about the car. If you're living in a dorm you'll have that extra money to do... whatever you want (well almost).

shocka
August 15th, 2006, 03:56 PM
Good decision on leaving it at home, college years were the one time I really never needed car, and I went to Stony Brook.

You really do not need it.. unless u wanna become the Pace taxi.. i will let all my younger cousins know to get in touch with u :p

Ninjahedge
August 15th, 2006, 03:56 PM
I live in a dorm, so I don't have rent.

Um, duh. Money is money.


Let's just say I can't wait to get to another city, where cars are part of everyday life.

Dude, you are REALLY not winning anyone over with that attitude.

You sound like you are hating NY already.

NewYorkYankee
August 15th, 2006, 04:49 PM
Ninjah, Im not trying to win anyone over here. Those here that like me, thanks. Those who dont, I dont care this is the internet. I dont hate NY, I just dislike some things about it.

HansonNY- Yeah I was excited, and Im glad I came to NY. It has been an experience most people dont get the chance to do. I like NY, but there are some things I dont like about it. I want a more car friendly city, with a warm climate year round. L.A. and Miami fit that bill. Plus, they offer the same type of stuff NYC does.

ryan
August 15th, 2006, 08:21 PM
Just curious - what is it about having a car that's so appealing to you? Where do you plan to drive to?

NewYorkYankee
August 15th, 2006, 11:02 PM
I just like to drive, and I dont care for the subway. Cars are a passion of mine. I would drive from my building in Harlem, to school at Pace and to work in Midtown.

pianoman11686
August 15th, 2006, 11:47 PM
I'm not a big fan of subways either, but they're the best way to get around in Manhattan, (second only to walking, for not-too-long distances). I would never, ever consider driving to work or school in New York City, especially if my residence were located in the same borough.

I can understand your passion for cars, NYYankee. I'm fond of them too, and I do enjoy driving. But I plan on living in Manhattan when I'm older, and unless I am well enough off to store a car in my apartment building for occasional weekend use, I don't expect to own one. The costs would just outweigh the enjoyment for me.

I would also like to add that if you do indeed move to a car-centric city such as an Atlanta, or Miami, or Los Angeles, that you will find your enjoyment of driving will decrease proportionally with how necessary driving becomes to your everyday life. I have a friend who lives 20 miles away from his place of work in downtown Atlanta, and it takes him over an hour on average (and sometimes close to two hours) to get to work, or to get home. And he sacrifices an ungodly amount of his earnings on gas, insurance, and maintenance. The worst part is: he has no other option, because there is no train, or bus, or subway, that can get him there from his suburb.

I've come to the realization that enjoyable driving is becoming increasingly rare all over the country, not only as traffic gets worse in our major metropolitan areas, but as gas prices continue to rise and every additional minute you spend sitting in traffic is a fraction of a gallon wasted. The only kind of enjoyable driving I can imagine would occur on back country roads and coastal highways - exactly the kind of driving that is least likely to be perfunctory.

I can only hope that if driving is really a long-term interest of yours, that you find a place where you can really enjoy it and not come to regret that you did not to choose to live in a city where owning a car is not a disadvantage.

NewYorkYankee
August 16th, 2006, 12:41 AM
I understand what you're saying Pianoman. But, I see it as, would I rather sit in traffic or use the subway. My choice is, obviously, the traffic. Thanks to all who replied in this thread. This will be my last post on this forum.

HansonNY
August 16th, 2006, 01:22 AM
I agree with pianoman11686.

I’m around your age and love cars myself but while the subway is sometimes behind schedule, smelly and dirty in parts, it's the best way to get around the city. The MTA is using the brand new R160's, R143's, and 142's, which are cleaner than the older redbirds. I'm not fond of some aspects of the subway either but those aspects come with underground transit. Your dorm is close to the A train one the higher of the rated subway lines in the city according to Straphangers. In my view the New York subway is the best system in the world.

If you really dislike subways you could always catch a cab or phone a livery cab. You can also rent a car when you want to get out of town. I understand New York isn't for everyone but it's possible to live in New York without a car, millions of New Yorker's have been doing it their entire life.

In New York it's better to watch the cars stream by rather than to drive them. New York is also a very walkable city and getting around by foot is not only healthy but enjoyable when the weather is nice. You can hop off the subway and walk through Chinatown on your way to school. Make a route your route. Personally, I love getting off the bus or subway in the morning and walking the rest of the way to school. It's also nice to see morning happenings and the rhythm on the street.

Sorry to hear that you're leaving the city. I and many other members of this fourm would love to be in your situation right now. New York is the only city I can imagine myself moving to but it's not for everyone. I hope you don't move away from New York only to resent this decision a couple months later.

Ninjahedge
August 16th, 2006, 09:01 AM
I understand what you're saying Pianoman. But, I see it as, would I rather sit in traffic or use the subway. My choice is, obviously, the traffic.

And how old are you?

I rest my case.

shocka
August 16th, 2006, 09:23 AM
I understand what you're saying Pianoman. But, I see it as, would I rather sit in traffic or use the subway. My choice is, obviously, the traffic. Thanks to all who replied in this thread. This will be my last post on this forum.

HAHAHA in 2 years of working I want to hear that you would rather traffic...

I currently own 2 cars (thus I dont live in Manhattan) a Mazda Rx-8 (3rd Person on LI to take delivery :) ) and a Galant (its my daily driver/station car) i have had a moded Civic EX Coupe, a Grand AM GT.. and Auto Cross, I think I would go on the list of those who might be called an auto enthusiasts.

But let me tell you driving to work is one of the worst things in the world! If you live in any major city it will waste so much of your life you will just dispise driving for work..it becomes a chore over a passion at that point.

And LA!!!! Car Friendly.. LA is a town you NEED a car to get around and traffic is worse then NYC!

To each his own.. and I guess we only learn from our own mistakes I know I have!

NoyokA
August 16th, 2006, 12:06 PM
...This will be my last post on this forum.

Thats too bad, I was looking forward to the following posts, with the subline "How come no one warned me?"

1. I was three hours late for class but only two hours late for work.
2. Good body-shop in Manhattan?
3. My car was ripped off.
4. I used mace on a gang trying to rob me and was pistol whipped instead.
5. I decided this is not my last post on Wired New York, because Im afraid to leave my apartment.

HansonNY
August 16th, 2006, 12:54 PM
shocka is right driving becomes a chore more than a leisurely activity.

We've offered advice and tried reasoning but, I can't understand why someone would be so adamant about driving with today's gas prices and highway congestion. Maybe you had a very bad experience on the subway (we've all had our fair share and we still ride it) but it sounds like you still have some growing up to do.

BTW, didn't I read a post from you last month where you wrote "this is my last post."?

Ninjahedge
August 16th, 2006, 01:41 PM
He wants to tell everyone that his feelings are paramount and that at his age, he knows far more than the rest of us about what he wants.

That is all possible, but him saying he would rather be in traffic tells me that he has never really spent every workday IN traffic.

The major bother, aside from all those mentioned, is that while you are in traffic, you can't DO anything else! You can't read, watch video on your PSP/Ipod or whatever other device you cart along, you can't sleep either. You have to remain alert for 40 minutes to 1:20 on a regular basis!

And then he goes on to say that LA is car friendly. Look, while you are online busy downloading...um..."art", take some time to look up the Steve Martin flik "LA Story" and see how he drives to work in the morning. It is not far from the truth, sadly enough (Funny as hell to watch though).



One thing for you NYY, if you are still lurking, that would be good for you to keep in mind.

The reason why so many people have cars OUTSIDE of the city is because there is NOTHING TO DO THAT THEY CAN GET TO WITHOUT THEM!

Although NYC is a little busy and crowded for my taste, and not having a yard is kind of depressing, I know that when I am out of Hoboken, I am going to miss being able to walk to the restaurant, go to a dozen different bars, or hop on the bus that stops across the street to go into the city for a day (in 15 minutes if you time it right!). Having to drive to meet your friends at a bar has to be one of the worst things I can think of.


But on that note. Hope you do not get mugged by a group of minorities trying to steal the ipod you left on the backseat of your car when you parked it in Harlem.

:P

shocka
August 16th, 2006, 10:31 PM
oh oh oh I want to add.. i had a car in astoria.. a man hole exploded under it... ConEd actually has a process for this.. I was told this is extremly common.. some crazy stuff happens with cars in nyc!

NoyokA
August 17th, 2006, 02:19 PM
HansonNY- Yeah I was excited, and Im glad I came to NY. It has been an experience most people dont get the chance to do. I like NY, but there are some things I dont like about it. I want a more car friendly city, with a warm climate year round. L.A. and Miami fit that bill. Plus, they offer the same type of stuff NYC does.

Just because LA and Miami dont have subway systems doesn't equate to them being more car friendly. In fact the traffic in LA is worse than NYC.

krulltime
August 17th, 2006, 02:45 PM
Plus, they offer the same type of stuff NYC does.

also this is not true.

ryan
August 22nd, 2006, 11:32 AM
I feel like I fell asleep in the middle of the movie and can't figure out the plot holes. Is this the same NYYankee?

kliq6
August 22nd, 2006, 12:05 PM
Its funny actually, Yankee posts for years about NYC and moving here and then when he is here he leaves right away becuase he cant drive everywhere and loves his car. Well Yankee if you new anything about NYC and maybe studied it before coming here, its a mass transit town, not a great place to take the old car out for a joy ride!!!

LonelyRoad
August 24th, 2006, 05:43 AM
I hated working with stupid 16 year olds at my old job; they are just not very smart.

"I just love to drive!!" --they why not move to Nebraska where there is no sign of life? Driving isn't even cool.

He asked for people's opinion and 1,000 people said "don't bring a car!!" No one said to bring it and still every other post was "I still don't know what to do?!?" Seems he just needs to take 15 years to grow up. He'd rather "drive around" somewhere then live in the greatest city on earth.

:rolleyes:

Ninjahedge
August 24th, 2006, 08:53 AM
All he had to do was move to a suburb.

:rolleyes:

lofter1
August 24th, 2006, 06:53 PM
... what about harm done to your car due to NYC street conditions.

Everytime I'm in a cab I can't help but notice how huge the pot holes are.


How HUGE ???

Take a look ...

http://photos1.blogger.com/blogger/4575/3193/1600/nyc2.jpg

That ^^ is the famous PHOENIX (she has her own dog-gone BLOG (http://www.nycpitbull.com/) !!)

So HUGE they're admired by the stalwart members of the NYPD ...

http://photos1.blogger.com/blogger/4575/3193/1600/nyc3.jpg

***

NewYorkDoc
August 18th, 2007, 10:07 PM
If a NY state license plate says MD on it is that person a doctor? I would make that guess, but I've never see it before.

BrooklynRider
August 24th, 2007, 01:13 PM
MD = Doctor
NYP = Press

RICKOWENS
September 12th, 2007, 07:58 PM
Driving is so easy, I don't see why people complain. Maybe I've become accustomed to it. But it's quite funny that the people who complain about driving in Manhattan have never even driven in the city in their life. Almost everybody who could easily afford to own a car would.

I drive most days, and when I go out on the town in the evening and real late at night it's so easy to drive back to my place instead of looking for a cab or waiting for a subway at 4 am. Parking and traffic are not even too bad in the early evenings and weekends too. Let's not forget about the occasional trip to The Hamptons. I would hate feeling so controlled by public transportation all the time.

Luckily, my garage is adjacent to my apartment and the valet leaves it out for me.

Front_Porch
September 14th, 2007, 04:19 PM
I am a newbie driver, and I find driving in Manhattan pretty intimidating.

In addition to the "only in New York" other drivers (there's a whole chapter of my book about somebody trying to do a drug deal with me when I'm driving uptown) people just tend to stop and double-park when they feel like it . . . for a new driver, this leads to having to change lanes at the drop of a hat into a dense traffic stream.

It's not as crazy as Boston but I certainly understand why people prefer having drivers or cabs!!

ali r.
{downtown broker}
the book: http://tinyurl.com/2ag28z

viralmd
September 15th, 2007, 03:00 PM
If, after all this, he still brings his car to NYC, he deserves what he gets. NO WAY would I think a car is an important part to life in NYC and I've lived here most of my life, in Manhattan.

Ninjahedge
March 28th, 2008, 09:23 AM
Driving is so easy, I don't see why people complain. Maybe I've become accustomed to it. But it's quite funny that the people who complain about driving in Manhattan have never even driven in the city in their life. Almost everybody who could easily afford to own a car would.

I hate driving in the city. HATE it.

I have done it, on many occasions. People are aggressive, discourteous, and generally (or at least in enough quantity to seem like a majority) breaking the law with many of the things they do.

I have driven in the city many times and I still don't like it.


I drive most days, and when I go out on the town in the evening and real late at night it's so easy to drive back to my place instead of looking for a cab or waiting for a subway at 4 am. Parking and traffic are not even too bad in the early evenings and weekends too. Let's not forget about the occasional trip to The Hamptons. I would hate feeling so controlled by public transportation all the time.

You are siting exceptions to the rule. Driving at 4am. Going to the Hamptons. Not all people have those needs. Not all people can find parking in odd areas where people pretty much spend time camping and staking out their spot on alternate side parking days.

And not everyone has the money to put it somewhere else.....


Luckily, my garage is adjacent to my apartment and the valet leaves it out for me.

That's great. Your Valet. Does your Doorman call your Valet to let him know when you need your car to drive to the Hamptons?

You sound like Joe Average to me! ;)

NoyokA
March 28th, 2008, 01:13 PM
Driving is so easy, I don't see why people complain. Maybe I've become accustomed to it. But it's quite funny that the people who complain about driving in Manhattan have never even driven in the city in their life. Almost everybody who could easily afford to own a car would.

I drive most days, and when I go out on the town in the evening and real late at night it's so easy to drive back to my place instead of looking for a cab or waiting for a subway at 4 am. Parking and traffic are not even too bad in the early evenings and weekends too. Let's not forget about the occasional trip to The Hamptons. I would hate feeling so controlled by public transportation all the time.

I cannot take the above seriously because of what you wrote below:


Luckily, my garage is adjacent to my apartment and the valet leaves it out for me.

How many NY'ers can claim this?

Schadenfrau
March 28th, 2008, 03:23 PM
How many trolls own townhouses under the Brooklyn Bridge?

OmegaNYC
March 28th, 2008, 03:42 PM
That RickOwens post, is over 6 months old. :p

ZippyTheChimp
March 28th, 2008, 10:49 PM
HA HA HA.

This thread got bumped by a spam post today that has been removed.

RICKOWENS was a troll posting from Houston.

brianac
March 31st, 2008, 04:16 AM
Faster, Maybe. Cheaper, No. But Driving Has Its Fans.

By DIANE CARDWELL (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/reference/timestopics/people/c/diane_cardwell/index.html?inline=nyt-per)
Published: March 31, 2008

It was the birth of her son a year and a half ago that put Eden Matteson, 30, behind the wheel in Manhattan.

It is the guarantee of a plush seat that spurs Eugene Yates, 62, to steer his creamy white Jaguar to his maintenance job at a courthouse downtown.

And it is the ease of ferrying supplies for construction jobs to the soundtrack of his own choosing that draws Warren William, 32, to the Nissan Pathfinder that he has outfitted with a touch-screen radio and DVD player and speakers lining the doors and trunk.

“I really make my car comfortable,” Mr. William said as he waited for a parking space to open up on Church Street in Lower Manhattan on a rainy afternoon.

“Every time I step in my car, I have my system, I have my music. I like it really nice and quiet. I like the peacefulness.”

In his administration’s quest to charge drivers to enter the busiest parts of Manhattan, Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/reference/timestopics/people/b/michael_r_bloomberg/index.html?inline=nyt-per) has promised to greatly improve mass transit, including increased subway service and faster bus routes with high-tech systems to speed them through intersections.

But in a city known for crowded subway platforms and standing-room-only buses, many residents, even those with robust public transit options, remain fiercely loyal to their cars. Despite the threat of traffic jams, honking horns and the urban version of road rage, these New Yorkers choose to drive, whether to shave time off their commutes, run their errands with less hassle or have a few moments to themselves inside mobile oases.

“New York is a transit-rich and transit-oriented place,” said Bruce Schaller, a transportation consultant who is now a deputy commissioner for planning and sustainability at the city’s Department of Transportation.

Notwithstanding the fact that 1.74 million cars are registered in the city, most New Yorkers travel by public transportation. But for that committed knot of drivers, even enhanced services may not lure them onto fancy new buses, given that, according to Mr. Schaller, 80 percent of the people who drive into Manhattan during the workday already have access to mass transit that would take no more than 15 minutes longer.

“Most people who are driving will continue to drive,” he said, adding that the reasons are generally convenience and speed, or having waited for a bus in the rain one too many times.

Indeed, a poll conducted last year for the Partnership for New York City, a business advocacy group that has helped devise and promote the fee proposal, known as congestion pricing, found that most of those who drive do so by choice, not by necessity. As a result, congestion-pricing proponents concluded that the only way to reduce an estimated 810,000 daily vehicle trips into and below Midtown was to charge a fee.

The proposal, whose future is still in question as it approaches the end of a politically tortuous path through the City Council and the State Legislature, would charge most drivers $8 to enter a zone below 60th Street from 6 a.m. to 6 p.m. on weekdays. Whether drivers would face a charge to move across town on 60th Street has not yet been determined.

In the partnership survey, the most frequent reasons given by drivers for shunning public transportation were the freedom to come and go as they liked and the ability to avoid dealing with other people. Mr. William — who lives within 10 minutes of a subway station in East Flatbush, Brooklyn, but said he drove into Manhattan below 60th Street every day — put himself in that camp, saying, “I am just really more comfortable in my car.”

He said that if the congestion pricing proposal went through, he would pay the fee, and simply charge his customers more to compensate.

Mr. Yates, too, said he would continue to drive to work despite living in the Bronx only two blocks from the No. 4 train, although he expects it will be in a Jeep once he sells the Jaguar.

“It’s bad enough, 10 minutes for 25 cents,” he said, feeding the meter on Third Avenue near 76th Street between stretches of shopping for a friend’s daughter at Gymboree. “Then you have to drive around and wait for parking, then you can’t double-park or they make you move.” But he puts up with all this, he said, paying $100 a week for parking, to avoid the subway.

“I hate standing up when I get in the train station,” he said. “Then you got to wait on the train, then the train is late, then it’s this, then it’s that. I can’t stand the hassle.”

For some drivers, like Ms. Matteson, who lives on City Island in the Bronx, simply getting a few more minutes of sleep is the key. “It’s just the ease,” she said, sitting in her car on Central Park West near the American Museum of Natural History (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/reference/timestopics/organizations/a/american_museum_of_natural_history/index.html?inline=nyt-org) as her son, Elijah, slept in the back seat.

“It’s just I have to wake up so much earlier now with the baby, that getting up even earlier ...” she trailed off, shuddering slightly.

Some New Yorkers, like George Ballina, 65, would drive all the time if there were more parking spots available. A supermarket meat department manager who lives in Bensonhurst, Brooklyn, and works in the East 20s in Manhattan, Mr. Ballina said he drove in two or three times a week but would stop if the congestion charge was approved.

“It gets me closer to the job,” he said, sitting in the car with his wife in Lower Manhattan. “From the train you have to walk.” In addition, he said, “it’s an hour and 15 minutes with the train and about 18 minutes with the car. Big difference.”

Of course, there are others who avoid driving whenever they can. “I just went to pick something up in Midtown, and I thought I was going to shoot myself,” said Judy Aita, 63, as she got out of her car on Central Park West, near where she lives. Ms. Aita said she drives mainly to take her toy poodle, Niles, with her to and from Pennsylvania on weekends, adding that she was in favor of the mayor’s plan.

“I just see too many people driving when there’s so much available in mass transit, and I guess people take it for granted,” she said. “I think people should just park it and take public transportation.”

Copyright 2008 The New York Times.

brianac
March 31st, 2008, 08:34 AM
I have just read through this entire thread, and it contains some very important lessons.

Lessons, not only for future New York drivers, but also for the increasing number of starry eyed future New Yorkers.

Ask your questions about the city by all means, but do a little homework yourself.

And at the end of the day, read and take in the valuable information you are getting for free on this forum. Don't just ignore it and go your own way.

Read this thread from the begining, and learn how not to do it.

The Benniest
March 31st, 2008, 05:10 PM
I agree with Brian. I to have just read through the entire thread, and have some very important points that many forumers here mentioned, like:
The costs of having a car in any part of New York City is going to be expensive.
Not worth it, with NYC's mass transit system and buses. Just after being in the city for 4 days, I prefer the subway over any type of transportation! I love it.
Finding a parking space (like the price, anywhere!) is going to be very, very hard and by the time you find one .. you're probably going to be late to that place that you needed to drive to quickly.With the subway .. it's fast, and rarely is it late. Unless they switch your subway line from express to local like they did when I was riding one morning. Boy were there some ticked off New Yorkers. ;)

Like Brian said, the free advice you can get here from actual New Yorkers is very impressive and extremely helpful for someone like me (a tourist) or someone who is planning to move to New York (again .. like me). Take the advice that these people are giving you, and use it!

MrSpice
April 3rd, 2008, 11:12 AM
Not worth it, with NYC's mass transit system and buses. Just after being in the city for 4 days, I prefer the subway over any type of transportation! I love it.
Finding a parking space (like the price, anywhere!) is going to be very, very hard and by the time you find one .. you're probably going to be late to that place that you needed to drive to quickly.
What do you mean "not worth it"? Isn't it a relative term?

Some people say it's not worth going to restaurants because you can cook food for much less at home - and you need to leave tips to all those waiters...

I have a car. I pay 300 bucks per month for parking. It is expensive, but I love to be able to drive around every weekend. It's actually not that difficult to find metered parking on Saturday in some places in the city - especially during the day, and all metered parking is free on Sunday. I have friends and relatives in other parts of the city. Taking a subway train during the weekend is a pain. Also, having the ability to drive to upstate NY, NJ or Long Island to visit beaches, parks, malls, etc. is very convenient.

I am glad that most people here in the city feel it's not worth having a car. Otherwise, I would be paying even more for parking, and it would be even more difficult to find a parking space anywhere.

The Benniest
April 3rd, 2008, 11:28 AM
Maybe it's just a personal preference then. I live in Iowa and I don't like to drive, so that must be it. Again, maybe it's just a personal preference that I like the subway system more than driving in the city.

Also, when I move, if I'm going to make trips upstate, to NJ or to Long Island, I'll most likely be renting a car or carpooling with friends.

EDIT: According to CarRentals.com, to rent a nice car for 2 days, it's going to cost me $117.88, which is including tax. Like I said, if I'm going upstate, NJ or Long Island, I'm going to want to rent a car, instead of spending $300+/month to keep a car full time.

lofter1
April 3rd, 2008, 12:13 PM
That $$ ^ for car rental @ weekend is very low -- where is the pickup?

Info please.

The last time I rented a car in Manhattan it = $300 + / weekend

Next time I will check out rentals from Newark Airport or some other easily accessible spot off the island.

The Benniest
April 3rd, 2008, 12:17 PM
At CarRentals.com, it just asked for a pick-up place and at random I just put New York, NY. I'm sure people can go into more detail and put JFK, and LaGuardia, but I was simple.

http://www.carrentals.com/rentalrates.jsp?r=1207239281984

^^ Those are just random car rentals at very low prices apparently (for 2 days). The cars and prices available appear to be changing throughout the day though.

MrSpice
April 3rd, 2008, 12:37 PM
At CarRentals.com, it just asked for a pick-up place and at random I just put New York, NY. I'm sure people can go into more detail and put JFK, and LaGuardia, but I was simple.

http://www.carrentals.com/rentalrates.jsp?r=1207239281984

^^ Those are just random car rentals at very low prices apparently (for 2 days). The cars and prices available appear to be changing throughout the day though.

It's not that simple. Rentals for a weekend in NYC are more expensive than you indicate. You also want to pay full insurance. Otherwise, you will pay dearly for any scratch/damage to the car. That makes it more expensive. Secondly, it's also a question of luxury. Imagine it's very cold (or very hot) outside. I like to be able to get into my own car, put on heat (air conditioner) and drive anywhere I want to drive without dealing with car rentals or friends... You're lucky if you have a friend with a car that you can carpool with. I don't. In fact, most of my friends are looking for me to give them a lift... :)

In my case, my parents live in Brooklyn and I visit them every weekend. Taking a subway Friday night to Brooklyn and then back is not something I want to do. Driving is very convenient, comfortable and fun.

adchick82
April 3rd, 2008, 01:55 PM
The only time I've missed having a car actually has very little to do with having a car, and much more to do with just general life in the city.

(the situation in question? having a random craving for some sort of (most likely junk) food from the grocery store at a relatively late hour, and not being able to hop in the car and drive to a 24-hour grocery store. which, in the grand scheme of things, isn't exactly a situation worth crying about ;)

Ninjahedge
April 7th, 2008, 08:53 AM
It's not that simple. Rentals for a weekend in NYC are more expensive than you indicate. You also want to pay full insurance. Otherwise, you will pay dearly for any scratch/damage to the car. That makes it more expensive. Secondly, it's also a question of luxury. Imagine it's very cold (or very hot) outside. I like to be able to get into my own car, put on heat (air conditioner) and drive anywhere I want to drive without dealing with car rentals or friends... You're lucky if you have a friend with a car that you can carpool with. I don't. In fact, most of my friends are looking for me to give them a lift... :)

In my case, my parents live in Brooklyn and I visit them every weekend. Taking a subway Friday night to Brooklyn and then back is not something I want to do. Driving is very convenient, comfortable and fun.

Sounds like you are very self serving and have the money to waste on parking, gas and insurance.

Seriously, $300 a month? How much do you pay for auto insurance? How much did you pay for your car? Take ALL of that $$ and see how much it costs you for the time you actually spend on it.

The only thing making me keep my own vehicle in Hoboken (where the costs are about half of what you are saying on a vehicle that was paid off 10 years ago, yes, 10) are my parents in teh burbs and their house at the Jersey Shore. Otherwise, with the milage I puton it, even a Zip car would be less expensive.

Now with the way I started this post, I know I have put you on the defensive, but you have to realize MS, you are coming off like anyone who does not like a car has something wrong with them. It just sounds funny.

Justifying a car because you can turn on the AC? :confused:

adchick82
April 7th, 2008, 06:37 PM
And not to go all hippie tree-hugger, but seriously? This is not a city where you need (nor should you have, honestly) a car for daily driving purposes 99% of the time. I just don't see the point of blatantly wasting resources when you don't need to, I guess. If you own a car for some of the other reasons outlined (parents in the suburbs, etc.), by all means - that makes sense. But for daily driving purposes in Manhattan? WTF?

heygirliewhatup
June 10th, 2008, 03:31 AM
Hi all,

I'm originally from Philadelphia, where I would leave my car in the street for weeks (sometimes months) on end without moving it. Philly only has street cleaning in a couple areas. The rest of the city has dirty streets and that's the way people like it.

Then I moved to New Jersey, where I became acquainted with the joys of street cleaning and moving it every week between the months of April and October.

Now I'm moving on up to Manhattan. What's the deal with street cleaning restrictions? How many times a week do you typically have to move it (2, 3+ a week?) Are there really no streets on the entire island that don't have street cleaning? I'm moving to Harlem, if that makes a difference.

How about parking near a train station in an outer borough, or somewhere close-by in Hudson County or Westchester?

I'm probably going to sell my car eventually, but I'm wondering what my options would be until then.
Thanks in advance.

MidtownGuy
June 10th, 2008, 04:05 PM
The only time I've missed having a car actually has very little to do with having a car, and much more to do with just general life in the city.

(the situation in question? having a random craving for some sort of (most likely junk) food from the grocery store at a relatively late hour, and not being able to hop in the car and drive to a 24-hour grocery store. which, in the grand scheme of things, isn't exactly a situation worth crying about

You could lace up your sneakers and walk a couple blocks, couldn't ya?

Most of the pharmacies and many mom-and-pops are open all night with any kind of junk food snack you could want, and they're all over the place. I never drive and I've never gone hungry in Manhattan because there's usually one every few blocks. So many that we often criticize their ubiquity here. Then there are the Korean delis that are always open if you're willing to pay a little extra.

If, however, you are living in one of those new "neighborhoods" like West 42nd then I understand, it's like a no man's land over there. A person could starve to death.

Ninjahedge
June 10th, 2008, 06:25 PM
You could lace up your sneakers and walk a couple blocks, couldn't ya?

Most of the pharmacies and many mom-and-pops are open all night with any kind of junk food snack you could want, and they're all over the place. I never drive and I've never gone hungry in Manhattan because there's usually one every few blocks. So many that we often criticize their ubiquity here. Then there are the Korean delis that are always open if you're willing to pay a little extra.

If, however, you are living in one of those new "neighborhoods" like West 42nd then I understand, it's like a no man's land over there. A person could starve to death.

Yeah, you could be walking for DAYS before you ever saw a place to get a bite to eat!!!



;) Funny, but OT.... Lets get back to topic! :D

MidtownGuy
June 10th, 2008, 07:16 PM
:D OK, so maybe "starve to death" is a bit of an exagerration, but it is desolate over there.

NewYorkDoc
June 11th, 2008, 12:05 AM
If, after all this, he still brings his car to NYC, he deserves what he gets. NO WAY would I think a car is an important part to life in NYC and I've lived here most of my life, in Manhattan.

If that "he" you're talking about is me, then no, I didn't bring it. My father sold it actually. I do drive Zipcars to the airport and NJ at times though. They're better for my needs.

I've actually made an entire change of mind regarding car ownership in NY.

I ride my bicycle to college and to work now. Who would've thunk it right!? :p

MrSpice
August 24th, 2008, 12:11 PM
Sounds like you are very self serving and have the money to waste on parking, gas and insurance.

Seriously, $300 a month? How much do you pay for auto insurance? How much did you pay for your car? Take ALL of that $$ and see how much it costs you for the time you actually spend on it.


I did not notice this outrageous post in April :)

I don't have that much money "to waste". However, I find having a car very convenient. As I said, both me and my wife have parents and friends in Brooklyn. Visiting them on a weekend by subway would be very difficult and time-consuming. So, having a car helps. I can also get to the beach or park in the summer - or a good store (like Fairway on 125th St) easily. So again, it's about convenience. I pay around $1000/year for insurance. What you spend or waste money on is a question of preference. Some people spend a lot of money of clothes or buy expensive shoes.

How much did I pay for my car? About 25K. But I did not try to buy the least expensive one (mine has leather, climate control, wood trip, etc) and I bought it brand new. I know people who buy a BWM 3-series for 37K and simply love it. One of my relatives bought a used Mercedes for 28K and cannot be happier. So again, it's a question or personal preference. Relatively speaking, I spend way more on my apartment than on my car. My mortgage for a relatively small Manhattan apartment is by far the biggest chunk of my expenses here. Before that, I lived in Brooklyn in a rent-stabilized apartment - paid $1000/mo and paid $140/mo for parking (rented a driveway). I may go back to that lifestyle because it's the apartment costs that are killing me every month...

aliendroid
August 27th, 2008, 01:27 PM
I understand what you're saying Pianoman. But, I see it as, would I rather sit in traffic or use the subway. My choice is, obviously, the traffic. Thanks to all who replied in this thread. This will be my last post on this forum.

You need a reality check; you would prefer to live in a city with poor mass transit so that you can sit in traffic for hours (maybe more than 10) per week? I grew up in Houston and I’ve lived in San Antonio and Lubbock and I hate driving. When you don’t have access to a car or when you only own a car as a luxury you enjoy driving, especially out in the country or when you go on a rare roadtrip; however, when your daily life depends on the car, when you must drive to work, you will hate your car and driving, you will hate your city and your situation, you will hate your life. You will also hate the fact that you have to drive in order to do anything, like grocery shopping, eating out and entertainment.

Ninjahedge
August 27th, 2008, 01:44 PM
I hate it already!!! ;)

Actually, I have gotten spoiled being within walking distance to just about anything I need on a day-to-day basis. Coming from the suburbs, I was never that put-off by driving to the mall, or the store or anywhere a short distance away, I just walked out the door, got in, and found parking easily atthe place I was going. Almost no traffic.

but in the city? Where it takes 10 minutes to walk to my car which I pay $185 a month to park and $700 a year (down from the $2000 a year when it, and I, were relatively "new") to fight through traffic to get across manhattan to Queens, or out of the city area to almost anywhere (mall, family, whatever) is just a PITA.

I am not going to give it up, however. I am at a balance point. The car itself is 13.5 years old now with less than 90K on it. I paid $20K for it new. It gets me to my parents, her parents, the malls that are not Jersey City oriented and located, and down the shore.

But I don't know if I would be able to do the same in NYC. The insurance would go up, parking is either $$$ or a daily PITA, and you are starting in the center of traffic no matter what direction you go! family might be a reason to keep the car, but who knows.....

So my position stands. There are very few mitigating circumstances, besided just plain old being spoiled, that validate car ownership in NYC. I don't think people coming into the city should plan on that, especially in Manhattan. The further out you go, the moe likely you will not only want one, but need one as well. But in the city center? 99.99% nope.

Bronxbombers
December 26th, 2008, 12:22 AM
I hate it already!!! ;)

Actually, I have gotten spoiled being within walking distance to just about anything I need on a day-to-day basis. Coming from the suburbs, I was never that put-off by driving to the mall, or the store or anywhere a short distance away, I just walked out the door, got in, and found parking easily atthe place I was going. Almost no traffic.

but in the city? Where it takes 10 minutes to walk to my car which I pay $185 a month to park and $700 a year (down from the $2000 a year when it, and I, were relatively "new") to fight through traffic to get across manhattan to Queens, or out of the city area to almost anywhere (mall, family, whatever) is just a PITA.

I am not going to give it up, however. I am at a balance point. The car itself is 13.5 years old now with less than 90K on it. I paid $20K for it new. It gets me to my parents, her parents, the malls that are not Jersey City oriented and located, and down the shore.

But I don't know if I would be able to do the same in NYC. The insurance would go up, parking is either $$$ or a daily PITA, and you are starting in the center of traffic no matter what direction you go! family might be a reason to keep the car, but who knows.....

So my position stands. There are very few mitigating circumstances, besided just plain old being spoiled, that validate car ownership in NYC. I don't think people coming into the city should plan on that, especially in Manhattan. The further out you go, the moe likely you will not only want one, but need one as well. But in the city center? 99.99% nope.I don't care for public transportation. I also don't like public transportation. I am from L.A. I will save up money my brother will help me buy a used car after I will have a new job. Right now I have been unemployed since November 17th,2008. I will rent a car in Manhattan while I will be on vacation in New York City.

stache
December 26th, 2008, 06:54 AM
And you claim to have visited NYC in the past??????

718Bound
December 26th, 2008, 05:18 PM
I don't care for public transportation. I also don't like public transportation. I am from L.A. I will save up money my brother will help me buy a used car after I will have a new job. Right now I have been unemployed since November 17th,2008. I will rent a car in Manhattan while I will be on vacation in New York City.

Good luck with that! Out of curiosity why after reading 8 pages of NYers telling other how much it is a bad idea to drive in NYC and you will not take their advice? A great thing about NYC is it's public transportation! Maybe if you don't like the idea of taking of public transportation you should stick with LA... Maybe you are set in the LA "I must drive everywhere" mentality. Maybe when in New York you should experience it how NY'ers do? What do you have against public transit? In a city where Owen Wilson takes the subway and Jon Stewart takes cabs why do you feel you are above it?

It's just amazing how people come here looking for advice read 8 ages of NY'ers telling them not to drive, but you have some who feel they need to, or are above the great transportation system NYC has...

NYC4Life
December 26th, 2008, 05:40 PM
^^ Well said. NYC is the only major U.S. city where more than half of households do not own a vehicle.

stache
December 26th, 2008, 05:49 PM
Mainly because we don't have room for them lol!

Bronxbombers
December 26th, 2008, 11:35 PM
Mainly because we don't have room for them lol!Next time I will be in New York City even Manhattan I will use public transportation for the first time instead of riding rental cars riding to Southern Connecticut to see my relatives on my mom's side of the family. Yes Los Angeles is automobile friendly. Some streets in L.A. the buses on both sides of the streets only run once and hour on Sundays,holidays the those buses don't run at all. On my street in L.A. the buses on both sides of the street only run once and hour the buses don't run on Sunday and also on holidays. Other streets in Los Angeles the buses don't run at all during the weekends. Los Angeles is so wide spread out. New York City is close to together. And I will be in New York City next summer on vacation.

ZippyTheChimp
December 27th, 2008, 10:18 AM
Renting a car for a trip to Connecticut is acceptable.

However, renting a car while in Manhattan is foolish. Besides the rental fees, you will spend much of your time sitting in traffic, and pay to park the car.

718Bound
December 27th, 2008, 05:59 PM
I think one of the biggest things with people coming into NYC and wanting to drive and own a car and not want to use public transportation is because of the stigma associated with the type of person who must rely on public transportation in their city. Hopefully they will check out the transportation and see it's the most common, cheapest, and easiest way to get around from just every type of New Yorker out there, from rich to poor...

stache
December 27th, 2008, 07:21 PM
Or just take cabs. :)

718Bound
December 27th, 2008, 08:32 PM
Blah, I will only use gypsy cabs. :cool: :D

Bronxbombers
December 28th, 2008, 01:55 AM
Blah, I will only use gypsy cabs. :cool: :DI also will ride in different taxi cabs in Manhattan. And including the rest of New York City.

lofter1
December 28th, 2008, 09:39 AM
Driving a car in NYC can be bad for your health.

Road rage is always just around the corner. Witness those sorry individuals leaning on the horn as traffic crawls to a stop when some impatient fool blocks the box.

Walking along Downtown sidewalks during the rush hour (or cautiously venturing out into the street on these busy Holiday afternoons when vendors jam the pedestrian walkways) I can beat a slow string of vehicular traffic navigating the narrows of Lower Broadway.

At almost any time when the sun is up the subway will get me from Downtown to Harlem in 20 minutes. Up above on the crowded streets it would easily take twice that time (if not more).

stache
December 28th, 2008, 10:40 AM
Contrast that to the individuals leaning on their horns because the lead car has decided to not block the box. :p

lofter1
December 28th, 2008, 11:30 AM
That ^ is the other type of idiot :cool: .

Ninjahedge
December 30th, 2008, 09:02 AM
Next time I will be in New York City even Manhattan I will use public transportation for the first time instead of riding rental cars riding to Southern Connecticut to see my relatives on my mom's side of the family. Yes Los Angeles is automobile friendly.


Friendly? GMAMFB!!!! Driving through LA was a NIGHTMARE in some situations. Highways 7+ lanes wide and having to drive everywhere when everyone else was driving!

EEK!

Although not the BEST of movies, Steve Martin's LA story kind of summed it up best about getting through traffic. Rent it, you will get a chuckle! ;)



Some streets in L.A. the buses on both sides of the streets only run once and hour on Sundays,holidays the those buses don't run at all.

Most of Cali is like that. I still find it odd that the state with the MOST stringent environmental advocates in the nation has the worst urban mass transit I have seen in a major city environment.

San-fran had, I think, maybe 2 main bus lines. If you did not have a car in college/grad school, you were stuck on campus.

Hell, if you did not have a car you could not even get to some areas of CAMPUS easily!!! (My classes were over a mile from the dorms!!!!)


On my street in L.A. the buses on both sides of the street only run once and hour the buses don't run on Sunday and also on holidays.

You kind of said that already, only it was "some streets" and not "my street"...:confused:


Other streets in Los Angeles the buses don't run at all during the weekends. Los Angeles is so wide spread out. New York City is close to together. And I will be in New York City next summer on vacation.

OK. A little disjointed there.

LA does have SIGNIFICANT sprawl. It is not as confined as NYC, so it just spread everywhere. There were no docks or other districts founded, so it did not have to merge quite as much as you see in Queens and Brooklyn.

But LA could still be a major mass transit hub if they did it right. They would just have to think about it differently. They would have to get people concentrated at certain drop points (park-and-ride) and make it so that they saved money, time or just plain effort coming in in the morning.

In NYC, it is all three in a lot of cases! (Car commute can have you sitting at a bridge/tunnel for an hour on some days).


So BB, unless you are planning to go FAR outside of NYC (like you said, CT), don't even bother renting. It just is not worth it. Get a weekly unlimited pass and just go around town!

24/7!

Ninjahedge
December 30th, 2008, 09:04 AM
That ^ is the other type of idiot :cool: .

That aint no idiot.

That, my friend, is an impatient arse.

ZippyTheChimp
December 30th, 2008, 12:14 PM
From a Brookings Institution report on carbon footprints for US metro areas:

Lowest per-capita metro areas

In 2000

1. Honolulu
2. New York
3. Los Angeles
4.Portland

In 2005

1. Honolulu
2. Los Angeles
3. Portland
4. New York

During the period 2000-2005, the average per capita footprint of the 100 largest metro areas and of the nation increased 1.1 percent (transportation) and 2.2 percent (residential).

Metropolitan Los Angeles’s combined per capita footprint increased 0.35 percent.The transportation portion of Los Angeles’s per capita footprint decreased 1.0 percent. The residential portion of Los Angeles’s per capita footprint increased 4.2 percent.

Metropolitan New York’s combined per capita footprint increased 7.73 percent. The transportation portion of New York’s per capita footprint increased 12.5 percent.. The residential portion of New York’s per capita footprint increased 2.4 percent.

NY metro still ranks first in carbon emitted from highway usage, but we're going in the wrong direction.

Full report (http://www.brookings.edu/reports/2008/~/media/Files/rc/reports/2008/05_carbon_footprint_sarzynski/carbonfootprint_report.pdf)

Metro area profiles (http://www.brookings.edu/reports/2008/~/media/Files/rc/papers/2008/05_carbon_footprint_sarzynski/metroprofiles.pdf)

Ninjahedge
December 30th, 2008, 12:34 PM
The question is raised:

What caused the increase?

It isn't automotive traffic, we are at the max sustainable now and i do not see cars getting smokier....

Is it the increase in permanent residents in NYC proper? Offices need to be heated less than homes, maybe people living AND working in the city has caused the shift.....

ZippyTheChimp
December 30th, 2008, 12:43 PM
Yes, it is automotive traffic.

The residential portion is not at issue, insofar as the increase is similar to the national metro average.

But clearly an increase of 12.5% vs 1.1% is a red flag.

The report covers metro-areas; it's not broken down to cities. But as was shown in various studies conducted in the Congestion Charge thread, even within NYC limits, auto usage has been increasing.

Bronxbombers
December 30th, 2008, 02:29 PM
I also mean my street in L.A. The street north of my street the buses run once and 7 days a week and the street south of my street buses any where bewteen every eight minutes to once an hour at different times from morning to night time. When I saw the outside of Old Yankee Stadium? I saw a bus goint toward old Yankee Stadium on Wednesday,October 10th,2007. I don't know the bus routes and I also don't know the buses. How often do the buses run in Manhattan,The Bronx,Queens,Brooklyn and Staten Island all of New York City?

ZippyTheChimp
December 30th, 2008, 02:36 PM
Bronxbombers: It's not necessary to quote entire posts, especially posts directly above your own, which don't have to be quoted at all.

See Forum Issues > Forum Rules of Conduct > Posting Guidelines

Ninjahedge
December 30th, 2008, 02:38 PM
Yes, it is automotive traffic.

The residential portion is not at issue, insofar as the increase is similar to the national metro average.

But clearly an increase of 12.5% vs 1.1% is a red flag.

The report covers metro-areas; it's not broken down to cities. But as was shown in various studies conducted in the Congestion Charge thread, even within NYC limits, auto usage has been increasing.

It's a small quote! ;)

Wow, I can't see how automotive could have gone up THAT much in NYC is such a short space!!!!

Where were they all coming from? Or was this the tail end of the SUV Explosion?

ZippyTheChimp
December 30th, 2008, 02:53 PM
Don't make me come over there.

I know the reports are long, but the profiles one is set up so that you can go forward through the pages quickly, and the only text that changes is the study area.

The NY metro area used for this report is listed as:
New York-Northern New Jersey-Long Island, NY-NJ-PA

It's a bit confusing, but NYC alone is not being measured.

We know that outside NYC, mass transit is not exactly exemplary in the region; so as the suburbs increase in population and spread out in area, it's easy to see why the numbers are going up.

Bronxbombers
December 31st, 2008, 01:38 AM
Don't make me come over there.

I know the reports are long, but the profiles one is set up so that you can go forward through the pages quickly, and the only text that changes is the study area.

The NY metro area used for this report is listed as:
New York-Northern New Jersey-Long Island, NY-NJ-PA

It's a bit confusing, but NYC alone is not being measured.

We know that outside NYC, mass transit is not exactly exemplary in the region; so as the suburbs increase in population and spread out in area, it's easy to see why the numbers are going up.While I will be in Manhattan I will be taking public transportation and looking out the windows on buses and taxi cabs. to see people that own cars in Manhattan.

ZippyTheChimp
December 31st, 2008, 02:48 AM
Bronxbombers: I sent you a PM. I suggest you read it.

Merry
September 4th, 2010, 05:19 AM
:)...


The 3rd line of the billboard read "about parking your car"....but we know that...


People don't think in their car!...especially when they use it in NYC.

http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4096/4739034675_12bb399a24_b.jpg

http://www.flickr.com/photos/placenamehere/4739034675/

RoldanTTLB
February 23rd, 2015, 01:02 AM
This thread has been enlightening, and I'm glad, after all these years, I found it. Since I'm in a posting mood, I'll discuss (my) cars in the city and also a few quick tips for this and that. So when I moved to NYC in 2007, I brought my car with me. My wife to be and I were living on Roosevelt Island (in the Octagon). After 1 month of paying, I believe, $300, and using the car once (some kind of shopping trip), I quickly abandoned it back to my parents. I then, happily went 7 years without a car (although with a super handy zipcar membership) until it was getting close to leaving the city last year. We bought a car in anticipation, and it was the worst 2 months of my life. In the Heights it would take an hour sometimes to find a non-garage space, and in fact, I would frequently park up by Dyckman and ride the subway back to the apartment on 181st. Never again (on the assumption I move back to NYC someday, potentially). Ok, but now for a few good car tips:

1.) If you own your own car and feel like going for an evening drive, the carwash at Dyckman and Broadway is only $3 from 7pm-7am. THE BEST.
2.) Rentals get cheaper as you move up (and off) the island. A day in a car from the Battery Tunnel Garage (I believe it's Hertz in the garage) was over $400 the last time I checked. If you need a car but don't want to 'leave town,' then it's about $100/day from the garages on 116th, 145th, and 190th sts. All have great subway access. If you want to rent really cheap and have an extra 20 minutes on your hands (and are travelling north or east, but preferably not south/west), rentals from Yonkers are excellent. It's your average $30 a day. They will pick you up from either the Yonkers MNR, the 1 (242nd st), or the 2 (241st st). I bet they'd get you from Woodlawn or Wakefield on MNR too, but I never tried it. If you're traveling to points south (like AC, Wildwood, Ocean City, Newark Delaware, etc.), the rentals from 30th St Station in Philly are fair (~$50 a day last time I went), and you can just take the train there first, which is faster than driving down there anyway.
3.) Parking was such a bear some mornings, with alternate side parking, that I just drove to work because it was $23 a day at the 2 garages closest to my apt and only a few bucks more in Chelsea. I recommend the garage behind Gristedes between 8th and 9th on, hmm, maybe 26th? The guys there always took good care of the car and were good driving a manual.
4.) There are a number of garages in the Heights with pretty good monthly rates (well below the Manhattan avg), if you're looking to stash the car somewhere in Manhattan. The best daily rate was in the garage at Tryon Gardens on Broadway between the 1 and the A stops at 190th. If I recall correctly, it was the only place under $20 all in per day.
5.) It's not generally cheap, but due to weather and delays, one of the better ways to get out of town can be a one way rental from either of the NYC airports to any number of places. You can do this to/from almost any city upstate (Buffalo, Rochester, Albany, etc), as well as major cities along the coast.

Anyway, hope all that helps a little bit, thanks to anyone crazy enough to show up to this thread 4 years late with me and take notice.

eddhead
February 23rd, 2015, 09:58 AM
Good post.

I did not own a car while I lived in Manhattan, but I did prior to that when I lived in Brooklyn and Staten Island. Street parking in Bay Ridge was tough but doable. Basically I lived 10 blocks from the point where the alternate side parking rule hours changed - so I would park on the "wrong side" until 7:45 or so, drive the 10 blocks, and park again when once it was legal to do so. . This worked out pretty well for me but that was a long time ago. I have no idea if the rules have changed since.

In Staten Island I had a space.

It was much easier for me to rent a car than own one once I moved to Manhattan. I could usually get decent corporate rates at the major airports sometimes even in the city- $60 - $120 a weekend day (normally more toward the $60 range) depending on the days and availability. If you work for a major NYC based corporation, there is a chance you can get a discounted rate through your employer.

If, as I, many of your excursions are to Long Island, you might also consider off-peak fares on the LIRR. I found it reliable, and efficient.

EDIT:

One other tip for potential NYC car owners. Many of my friends who owned cars would essentially chase the 3 month teaser rates that would always seem to be available on the far west side. Basically, they would get coupons with introductory pricing for monthly spaces at $250- $300 or so,that would expire in 3 months. As the teaser rates expired, they would find another lot offering another 3 month introductory rate and park there. The lots were not conveniently located, and they were outdoor, but if you didn't use your car a lot, it could work.

I have another friend who parks his car in a lot in Brooklyn about 45 minute subway ride from where he lives on the UWS. Not cheap, but I believe cheaper.

GordonGecko
February 27th, 2015, 08:42 AM
Driving in Manhattan should be avoided during business hours, and often during weekend days too. Some neighborhoods have good availability of parking meters, but the city now charges about the same as private lots average rates. That is, Manhattan meters are now generally $3.75/hour which really adds up fast. But after business hours, I would say driving is not a big hassle. There is no shortage of commercial parking that opens up at 7:00 PM for everyone.

At other times, there are many secrets that allow you park for free. Some legal, some not. I stick to the legal, and I have ways to get free parking in Manhattan by knowing all the parking regulations very precisely. And for those who may not know, there are easily accessible & close parts of Queens with NO street cleaning regulations ;) You can leave your car indefinitely for free, just make sure to clean it off every once in a while