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alexh2k
August 16th, 2006, 03:41 PM
My Wife and I currenly reside in Atlanta, and while its a great town and has much to offer, its just a little to RED down here. We are both originally from the NE and I still have a lot of family upstate. The big question is where to live in NYC? We have several needs as far as housing goes, such as: my hobbies dictate that I need a garage, my Wife needs to be located near a major university(getting her PHD at Emory and wants to go into academia), small yard would be nice, and must be pet friendly. We have a budget up to about 350-400 and are currently looking at Eastern and Northeastern Bronx(Morris Heights). Keep in mind that we currently live in an area of Atlanta that is considered to be "transitional" and like a mixed community. So, we want a place that we are not afraid to walk the dogs at night, but a gunshot here and there won't make us put up a for sale sign.

Schadenfrau
August 16th, 2006, 04:02 PM
I'd look in Port Morris and the area around Yankee Stadium.

krulltime
August 16th, 2006, 04:11 PM
I am not sure of the area in the Bronx you mention... but the Bronx is changing very fast. Lots of new immigrants are moving to this borough. It seems like is the last borough that still very afordable compare to the other boroughs. Maybe it will be a good choice to buy there before you might be price out of NYC.

Still the south you go in the Bronx the area will look like it is in need of new development. There are still patches of empty land here and there (especially from all the burnings of buildings in the 70's) But they are getting built up very fast, usually in the form of affordable housing... Not housing projects. But I assure you that it will be very hard to find lots of empty buildings... like one did back in the 90's. Most of them are been occupied by these new immigrants looking for a place to live. Usually these immigrants are less likely to commit crimes, hence lots of them come to the city to work, not to attack people. So it is a very mix of people in all.

What I recommend for you to do... is to visit the area if you can and get a feeling of the place. Things might look like the old New York (meaning you still find graffity here and there) but that doesn't mean the area is very dangerous. The Bronx is relative safer than 10 years ago or more. What you can do is drive around the area or take buses that pass through that area you are interested. Then after that, walk in the area. You can find all sort of stores but most likely they will carry lots of hispanic products (although national stores are opening here and there aswell). But you will hardly find empty stores.

Front_Porch
August 16th, 2006, 04:12 PM
It's not turning into Brooklyn's Park Slope as quickly as its proponents hope, but old Victorian houses on the park are running $600K-$800K and you should be able to get non-parkside small houses or townhouses, both with garages, in your price range.

I'm a realtor focused on NYC now, but I remember thinking when I spent time in Newark that this was one of the interesting areas, and you'd be as close to Midtown as you might be in the Bronx.



ali r.

Schadenfrau
August 16th, 2006, 04:19 PM
Also, you might have some luck in Mt. Vernon and Yonkers in Westchester for those prices. The VERY short trip north is far more convenient than the Northeast Bronx, as well.

Ninjahedge
August 16th, 2006, 04:55 PM
I would also recommend areas like Montclair (NJ). There are several burbs that are located along main line rail lines that would be an easy commute, and be relatively close to a few colleges (although maybe not as presteigous as what you woudl have in NYC proper).

All depends on your transportation and other requirements.

alexh2k
August 16th, 2006, 05:18 PM
Thanks for all the positive remarks, it just makes us more and more excited to move back. Its funny, my Uncle lives in Yonkers and we plan on staying with him when we come up to look around. I grew up in Putnam County and enjoyed the area, but my Wife and I like the city atmosphere more than the burbs. FrontPorch, interesting comments on Brooklyn, we have't ruled it out and my Wife's parents grew up there. My Wife has her eye on Columbia and wants to be as close as possible. Also, since we have about two years untill we can move, we were thinking of buying sooner and turning over to a management co to rent for a year or two, to avoid getting priced out of the city. Does this sound like a good idea or a big headache.

alexh2k
August 16th, 2006, 06:37 PM
Sorry FrontPorch, just noticed you were speaking of Newark and not of Brooklyn, which looks to be out of our pricerange.

Schadenfrau
August 16th, 2006, 07:15 PM
If you're looking for a city atmosphere, I wouldn't bother with most of the Northeastern Bronx, as it's more suburban than Yonkers and Mt. Vernon.

Morris Heights is in the Southwestern Bronx, I thought. One of us must be confused.

Some friends of ours just bought a place similar to what you're describing in the Soundview area, so you might want to check that out, too.

Edited to add that you'll probably want to stay in the more southwestern areas if your wife is looking to commute to Columbia. It cuts off a lot of time.

And, you might want to look into houses just west of the Grand Concourse, below 161st. I've seen some good prices on exactly what you're after there.

ASchwarz
August 16th, 2006, 07:19 PM
If you're looking for a city atmosphere, I wouldn't bother with most of the Northeastern Bronx, as it's more suburban than Yonkers and Mt. Vernon.

Morris Heights is in the Southwestern Bronx, I thought. One of us must be confused.

Some friends of ours just bought a place similar to what you're describing in the Soundview area, so you might want to check that out, too.

Throgs Neck is certainly denser than typical Yonkers and Mt. Vernon. Pelham Bay is probably also denser, though by a smaller margin. Both neighborhoods have primarily attached housing. I don't think Yonkers and Mt. Vernon are typified by attached homes.

All of the northeast Bronx neighborhoods within walking distance of the 6 train are quite dense, urban and walkable. Those neighborhoods closer to the water are less dense but not by much.

Schadenfrau
August 16th, 2006, 07:25 PM
See, I'd argue that Throgg's Neck is less dense than the more urban areas of Yonkers and Mt. Vernon, Mt. Vernon especially. Throgg's Neck is also a hell of a commute to pretty much anywhere, as is much of the under-serviced NE Bronx.

alexh2k
August 16th, 2006, 07:27 PM
I think Morris Heights is in southwestern Bronx, south of University Heights and North of High Bridge. But I could be confused, it happens often. I'll take a look at Grand Course also, thanks.

alexh2k
August 16th, 2006, 07:30 PM
We are looking foward to taking advantage of mass transit, so underserviced areas don't sound too appealing. However, we will be keeping at least one car and a motorcycle or two.

ASchwarz
August 16th, 2006, 07:47 PM
See, I'd argue that Throgg's Neck is less dense than the more urban areas of Yonkers and Mt. Vernon, Mt. Vernon especially. Throgg's Neck is also a hell of a commute to pretty much anywhere, as is much of the under-serviced NE Bronx.

It's tough to compare with Yonkers and Mt. Vernon because both cities have both very urban parts and completely suburban parts. Southern Mt. Vernon and Western Yonkers are the dense parts.

Throggs Neck has pretty good express bus service to Midtown and Lower Manhattan.

The alternative would be the frequent local buses on Tremont Ave. to the 6 Train at Westchester Square. You could also walk from some parts of Throggs Neck.

NE Bronx has express buses and is walking distance to the 5 or 6 Train depending on location.

OmegaNYC
August 17th, 2006, 11:40 AM
How about parts of Queens? Is that too suburban?