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View Full Version : Is it even possible to live off NYPD salary?



ironmike9110
September 8th, 2006, 07:57 PM
$25,000....not much money.

Schadenfrau
September 9th, 2006, 12:59 AM
That number applies for the first 6 months, when you're in police academy. The number rises ever-so-slightly to the equivalent of a 32K annual salary for the next six months after that.

You can live on that, but you will be piled up with many roommates, just like so many New Yorkers before you.

Don't forget to make sure you've got your 2 years of college credits out of the way before you apply.

OmegaNYC
September 9th, 2006, 01:51 AM
Damn, only 32K? No wonder people want to work in suburban police departments. :(

Schadenfrau
September 9th, 2006, 02:00 AM
Thank Bloomberg for that one. He's somehow convinced that every single police officer does it strictly for the prestige of being in the NYPD.

That's certainly the case in some situations, but a pathetic excuse from a mayor who seems to care little to nothing about city employees.

STT757
September 9th, 2006, 02:07 PM
I took the Port Authority police test in 2002, I passed with a high score however because I did not have prior police or military experience and because I was not a Woman nor minority I did not get the job.

At the test site ( a warehouse in Port Newark) the place was loaded with NYPD officers trying to get into the PAPD.

PAPD officers salaries started (in 2002) at $33,000 per year, however it quickly climbs to $75,000 within 5 years (thats without overtime). The Star Ledger does stories on PAPD overtime every so often, there are officers making $200,000 a year on a base $80,000 salary.

Right after 9-11 the overtime pay for the PAPD went through the stratosphere, it seemed everyone was making six figures. They have brought it back down by increasing the force.

NYC Teachers make more than NYPD and work less, NYC Teachers start at about $40,000 but only work 180 days.

NYC Teachers have much more difficult jobs than Suburban teachers, and Suburban teachers make more. The highest starting salary for a NJ teacher is $56,000 per year, toping out at about $135,000. The average starting salary in NJ for a new teacher is about $44,000.

New Jersey State Police starts at $55,000, not as good a job as the Port Authority Police (IMO) but I would much rather catch speeders on the Turnpike for $55,000 a year then to chase murder suspects into Housing Projects for $30,000.

OmegaNYC
September 9th, 2006, 07:06 PM
I'm going to take the test in October, I always wanted to be in the NYPD. I'm not in it for the money, but I sure as hell don't want to start out making 32K, in a city in which that much amount of money won't be enough to live on. But hell, it's New York, it you can make it there, you can make it it anywhere. The hard part is moving into the city. I'm from Jersey, and that can be a tough move. Especially, since you're going to need a NY state license. I'm almost finished getting my criminal justice degree, I only have 16 credits left. So, I better get on my high horse, and get my act together! ;)

sean
September 9th, 2006, 08:11 PM
Hahaa, the guy who made threads asking if the Mafia still exists in NYC wants to be a cop now. At first I thought you were coming to New York to make a name for yourself but now I see you just wanna bust the bad guys :rolleyes: Unless you're looking to be a dirty pig...

Scraperfannyc
March 14th, 2007, 03:36 AM
OK, NYC starting cops get paid a measily 25,100 per year. In NYC???

http://www.nypost.com/seven/03132007/news/regionalnews/citys_cops_get_puppet_ocked_regionalnews_philip_me ssing.htm


In San Francisco, a first year police officer gets paid anywhere between 64,000 and 84,000. See link.

http://www.sfgov.org/site/police_index.asp?id=27855

What is the scoop? Does NYC value the police. What kind of bull is it when NYC says the police are the most finest??? I say put your money where your mouth is NYC and PAY the police.

Ninjahedge
March 14th, 2007, 09:21 AM
NYC Teachers make more than NYPD and work less, NYC Teachers start at about $40,000 but only work 180 days.

OK, I stopped reading there, you are so full of misinformation.

Teachers are also required to bring work home with them. Every 20 minute assignment they give to your kids they spend AT LEAST 10 minutes making and an additional 30 minutes grading.

Many are only given 45 minutes a day to do all their prep work, so aside from Kindergarden (where one person has to keep track of 15-30 4-5 year olds all day) there is usually stuff they have to bring home almost every day and every weekend.

Not only that, because of the attitude you just displayed here, many people are discouraged to become teachers for the lack of respect! Would you want a job where people say "oh, you have it easy, you only work 180 days a year".

Also figure in a few other things. Bathroom breaks can only be taken in the 5 minutes between periods (usually not enough if you have to get to another class, as some schools do not have the teachers in the same rooms all day and others do not want to leave their room un-attended), or your 30 minute lunch time, or your prep-period. Almost every minute of every day is scheduled for you.

Oh, also, that 180 days is a myth as well, the year has extended, and so has the shcool day. Add to it the continuing education requirements at most schools and you start to see that number (vacation) dwindle.

And, as a final cherry on top, make all teachers, no matter what level, salaried. So if you are a good teacher and put in all this extra time and effort to do right by your students, you are paid the same ammount as your slacker co-worker. No OT, no bonus.

And this is not even dealing with the "its your fault" litigeous parents that would rather blame their kids poor performance on the teachers and schools rather than their own lack of dicipline and effort.



So please. I agree that NYC cop salaries are pitiful, but try not to use another hard working, underpaid and underappreciated profession as a scapegoat! :mad:



OK, I read the rest. You partially redeemed yourself, but you seem to still be misinformed about salaries and the like. That $135K is not a very truthful figure. Mostly Admin gets over 6 figures, last time i checked, even the most elite schools were capped, at a PHD and 15+ years of experience, at 90K or so.

But you are right in saying teaching in the suburbs is better, but they still have problems attracting math/science/engineering people there too.

I would say there are quite a few public sector jobs that suck in the city.

718Bound
March 14th, 2007, 03:48 PM
New York State Police (Troopers) make $50,374 while in the academy $61,525 upon graduation and $77,218 after 5 years. Not to mention you paid more if are stationed in NYC, Long Island, Dutchess, Orange, Putnam, Rockland, and Westchester counties.

Good luck getting stationed in NYC right out of Academy though. Troopers I have talked to in the past tell me you will get stationed in areas no one else wants to be the first few years.

http://www.troopers.state.ny.us/Employment/Trooper_Employment/Salary_and_Benefits/index.cfm


OmegaNYC, ironmike did you guys check out the nypdtrainees.com forums? http://p073.ezboard.com/fnypdtraineescommunityboardfrm2 there is a lot of usefull info for people waiting to get into the academy along with officers just out of the academy sharing experiences.

I was scheduled to take the Feb. exam but found out I would be banned because I pleaded guilty to petit larceny 6 years ago. I asked if they would make an exception but they wount... Even the recruiter pointed out they would bar me for that but a drunk driver who could have killed someone could get hired. Oh well those are the rules.

It might be crappy pay at first but it makes up for it with things like retiremnt at half pay after 20 years. Get in during your 20's and you can retire in your 40's... not bad!

718Bound
March 15th, 2007, 12:00 PM
actually ive decided NOT to become NYPD. The money just isnt there, especially compared to all other departments in the area. Im going to go for Nassau County (can commute on LIRR), MTA Police, PAPD, and NJSP. If i cant be hired at any of these i probably wont be become a cop, which is a shame because i think its the only job i can see myself doing. :(

Do you think it is realistic to get a job with Nassau or Suffolk Counties with no experience, especially with what they pay... You have officers applying every day from the NYPD. I am not saying it is impossible infact I don't know it just seems if you have people applying with police officer experience it will hard to get selected with no experience.

I am sure a good number waiting for the NYPD academy have thought about starting their careers else where... infact if you go to the forums I mentioned above you will see many awaiting the academy are waiting to get hired elsewhere... many don't and join the NYPD.

Alonzo-ny
March 16th, 2007, 02:57 PM
I'm going to take the test in October, I always wanted to be in the NYPD. I'm not in it for the money, but I sure as hell don't want to start out making 32K, in a city in which that much amount of money won't be enough to live on. But hell, it's New York, it you can make it there, you can make it it anywhere. The hard part is moving into the city. I'm from Jersey, and that can be a tough move. Especially, since you're going to need a NY state license. I'm almost finished getting my criminal justice degree, I only have 16 credits left. So, I better get on my high horse, and get my act together! ;)

I lived on less than $26k when i was in ny for my two summers, it wasnt the high life but i was fine. When i come over in august ill be getting $32k and im not worried about cash.

718Bound
March 16th, 2007, 03:13 PM
from what ive been reading, NYPD wont realease records/backgrounds to other departments meaning they cant be hired other places (i think this might be for PAPD only). And most NYPD guys applying for that job are probably in their mid 20's. When i take the test, i will be 19 (if its in august like they say), and alot of people i talk to say my advantage is how young i am.

im not saying im going to get hired by them, what i said is im not going to NYPD and will TRY to get with these other departments. If that dont happen, ill stay in college and go into business.

Listen I am trying to give you sh!t here but finishing college sems like sensable thing you have said.

Because you are 19 you think you have an advantage over most? Explain that to me.

Some might think because you 19 and still in school might put you at a disadvantage. Maybe these departments think you are immature and not a rational thinker yet... like wanting to drop out of school to persue a job making 25,100 a year (yea I know not the whole year) and then trying to live in one of the most expensive cities on that.

Are you palnning on dropping out to persue this career? Or are you going to try to stay in school while you apply? If you drop out for this you are a fool (in my opinion) whats wrong with getting your degree and then making a rational decision to go into business or become a cop. If you try to apply while in school these departments may say he is not serious he is still in school in (insert wherever it is you live).


from what ive been reading, NYPD wont realease records/backgrounds to other departments meaning they cant be hired other places (i think this might be for PAPD only) They might not release records but believe me you have alot of officers going from the NYPD to Nassau or suffolk county PD. So just because you believe because you will be 19 and have a huge advantage because you think you will be smarter or in better physical condition doesn't mean you will be on a level playing field. If they have already been through an academy they might have an advantage on the writen or physical exam.

If you do a googe serach you can find forums geared towards this type of work... That way people who know who is hiring and knowhow hard it is to get in with A as opposed to B can give you advice.

Best Of Luck!

antinimby
March 16th, 2007, 03:41 PM
You got a place to stay already, alonzo?

718Bound
March 16th, 2007, 07:38 PM
im not getting a degree.

First off, I DONT LIKE SCHOOL. I am doing terrible and struggling to keep the required 2.0gpa right now. I cant stay in school for another 3 years, which includes summer classes - its not for me, but neither is plumbing, hvac, or any other dirtball fat boy job.



You have to do what you want or you will be miserable.



Thirdly, if i cant find a police job in the NYC area then after im done college i can decide if i want to live on NYPD's salary, become a Philly cop (or any other city for that matter), or go to the academy and stay in the suburbs (last resort). Its not like if i dont get PAPD, Nassau County PD, or MTA im f*cked, by the time im 22 I GUARENTEE ILL HAVE A POLICE JOB *SOMEWHERE* and with ONLY an associates degree, hopefully it will be in NY.


I have a friend who got his associtaes degree in criminal justice from community college... went to the local academy and got job as a local cop in the town I live in. He has since moved to Florida and gotten into corrections down in the Tampa area (better pay no winter!).

Did you think about doing that in your area until you can get into a better place? I mean if it is the type of work you want to do its better to do it in an are you hate (until you leave) than to do what you hate while you live in an area you hate.... just my opinion


And lastly, i appreciate the help and i have been on numorous police forums, and no offence but my life and what i do with it is none of your business. :cool:

I didn't find out you are in college and wanted to join the NYPD or Port Authority Police because I am psychic. I found out because you posted it here looking for advice or opinions. Now what you do with your life is none of my business because I told you it might not be as easy as you think. Would it be my business if I lied to you and told you it would be no problem, any place you want to go will take you... Hell your 19 your practically a shoe in!:confused:

Alonzo-ny
March 16th, 2007, 09:40 PM
You got a place to stay already, alonzo?

Sure do, ive built up a decent amount of friends in NY over my two summers so im pretty set, even if i cant stay long term with my last roommate i can at least crash until i get somewhere more longterm.

Actually while we are on the subject, what is the situation with getting a permanent apartment, ie not sublet ,on the lease etc. I have found so far that i can find a reasonable place in queens (preferable) or brooklyn for $600 and up sublet. what could i expect in terms of a real apartment?

antinimby
May 20th, 2008, 02:47 AM
Arbitration Panel Gives Raise to City Police Officers



By AL BAKER and STEVEN GREENHOUSE
Published: May 20, 2008 (http://www.nytimes.com/2008/05/20/nyregion/20nypd.html)

Ending a protracted labor dispute, an arbitration panel on Monday awarded New York City’s roughly 23,000 police officers a retroactive 9.7 percent raise over two years and significantly increased the low starting pay for recruits by $10,781.

The panel’s decision was unusual in that it broke with tradition by giving the police officers a larger percentage raise than the one the city’s firefighters received over the same two-year period.

In exchange, the panel exacted significant concessions from the officers’ union, the Patrolmen’s Benevolent Association, reducing annual vacation to 10 days a year from 20 during officers’ first five years on the job.

The panel voted 2 to 1 in favor of the decision, with the police union’s representative on the panel the lone dissenter; the independent arbitrator and the city’s representative both approved the deal, officials said.

Even though the union representative refused to sign the deal, its president, Patrick J. Lynch, hailed it as a victory because it broke a tradition under which the city’s police officers and firefighters have received the same percentage raise in a given round of negotiations.

Mr. Lynch, in a statement, said the decision sent a strong message “that pay should be based upon the responsibilities employees have, the hazards and dangers they face, the skills and education required for the job and not antiquated pay relationships of a bygone era.”

City officials acknowledged the higher raise for the police officers but said it was largely offset by concessions worth 2.8 percent a year.

James F. Hanley, the city’s labor commissioner, said he expected the firefighters’ union, as well as other uniformed unions, to exercise their option to reopen their contract to try to attain the same raise granted the police. Mr. Hanley said that if the other unions agreed to similar concessions, they were likely to receive the same raises.

The panel’s decision in effect awards the police officers a new contract running from Aug. 1, 2004, to July 31, 2006, with a 4.5 percent raise the first year and 5 percent raise the second year. Over the comparable period, the firefighters’ now-expired contract for that period gave them raises of less than 3 percent the first year and of 3.15 percent the second year.

“You’re always happier if you can settle these things by negotiation,” Mr. Hanley said Monday evening, “but we’re really happy we could take care of the salary issue.”

He said the union was “very unhappy” about the concessions. A spokesman for Mr. Lynch said the union representative on the panel did not sign the decision because it did not go far enough in making police salaries competitive in the metropolitan area.

Police Commissioner Raymond W. Kelly sounded a similar note. “While we wished the starting pay was higher, this is a step in the right direction,” Mr. Kelly said through a spokesman.

Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg said the increases won by the union would be financed, in part, by increased productivity, which he says is a hallmark of his administration.

In particular, he pointed to the panel’s decision to reduce new officers’ vacation days. He also said the panel’s decision provided for more flexibility in deploying officers, thereby saving on overtime costs. Overtime is a prime way officers increase their pay.

The decision increases the maximum basic pay to $65,382 from $59,588.

It is a financial boon for those veterans who have not seen a raise since 2004. Because the arbitration award gives police officers retroactive raises going back to 2004, many police officers will receive one-time checks of about $15,000, before taxes.

Those now being trained in the academy will get an immediate raise of more than $10,000, city officials said. The last arbitrator’s award set the pay for that six-month training period at an annual rate of $25,100, and this decision raises that figure to $35,881.

City officials said the increase in starting pay could help ease the recruiting difficulty the department has had recently.

The department is set to hire 1,250 recruits in July to meet the new authorized headcount of 36,838 officers. A higher starting salary might attract more recruits, though the proposed budget from the Bloomberg administration would hold the headcount unchanged through the 2010 fiscal year, officials said.

Currently, there are 35,700 officers in the department, down from a high of 40,800 in 2001, when a federal program allowed the department to hire as many as 1,900 officers in a year.

The award issued on Monday covers the two years from Aug. 1, 2004, through July 31, 2006. The city and the police union now must begin negotiations on a new retroactive contract, dating from Aug. 1, 2006.

Negotiations for the award settled Monday began in 2006, but reached an impasse after several rounds. The city and the union took months to agree on a three-member panel, which held 12 hearings from November 2007 through January 2008, and submissions of briefs and closing arguments after that.

The panel’s chairwoman, approved by both sides, was Susan T. Mackenzie, who has arbitrated between the Communications Workers of America and Verizon, and between the Association of Flight Attendants and United Airlines. The police union’s appointee to the panel was Jay W. Waks, a lawyer and partner in Kaye Scholer LLP, an international law firm in New York, while the city’s appointee was Carol O’Blenes, a partner in the labor department of Proskauer Rose LLP.

Mr. Hanley, the city’s labor commissioner, said the police union had recently boasted that it would get an arbitration award with raises of 5 percent a year without concessions. Mr. Hanley said the award announced on Monday was significantly less generous than that because it contained raises of 4.5 percent the first year and 5 percent the second, and concessions that he said totaled 2.81 percent of the officers’ yearly compensation.

Copyright 2008 The New York Times Company

Ginge
July 26th, 2008, 08:18 AM
I would love to join the NYPD, but unless you are a citizen then you cant. I am a police officer in London and I am (if the reasearch goes well) going to apply for a 911/dispatchers post to get me out there and then i will hopefully be able to look at the Police within a couple of years....but the clock is ticking I am 38 now and I dont know what the cut off age is...:)

KenNYC
July 26th, 2008, 08:37 AM
Age requirements to be a NYPD Officer


"Only persons who are less than 35 years of age on the first date of the application period for the examination may be appointed as a Police Officer. Thus, a candidate must not have reached his/her 35th birthday by May 16, 2008 for Exam. No. 8050, September 16, 2008 for Exam. No. 8051, or January 16, 2009 for Exam. No. 8052 to be appointed as a Police Officer."

I would, perhaps, not completely rule out being older than 35 when you have prior police experience though. I would recommend getting in touch with them, have a look at http://www.nyc.gov/html/nypd/html/home/home.shtml

nicksinif
September 6th, 2008, 04:52 PM
go for lapd. they are paying 50k straight out of high school. many prisons in california are also paying that.

TheFivePoints
September 29th, 2008, 04:55 PM
As a copper after 5.5 yrs you can make a buck and a dime with ot now that a new contract is in effect.
A detective more than that and as a sgt.....if ya hustle now.......buck thirty to buck fourty

lofter1
September 29th, 2008, 08:30 PM
I'd go for the NYPD job.

The gun might come in handy in the coming months.

NYC4Life
October 1st, 2008, 02:16 AM
New York Sun

Captain Fined for Having Officers Remodel Home

By Special to the Sun | September 30, 2008

A police captain who ordered six of his subordinates to remodel his house is being ordered to pay $5,000 in fines by the city's Conflict of Interest Board.

According to the board, the officer, Michael Byrne, has agreed to pay the fine after he recruited several officers under his command to help with remodeling and landscaping work around his house. While Mr. Byrne compensated some of the employees for their work, city law prevents officers from using their position for financial gain or entering into a business relationship with another public servant under their command.


© 2008 The New York Sun, One, SL, LLC.

TheFivePoints
October 1st, 2008, 05:27 PM
New York Sun

Captain Fined for Having Officers Remodel Home

By Special to the Sun | September 30, 2008

A police captain who ordered six of his subordinates to remodel his house is being ordered to pay $5,000 in fines by the city's Conflict of Interest Board.

According to the board, the officer, Michael Byrne, has agreed to pay the fine after he recruited several officers under his command to help with remodeling and landscaping work around his house. While Mr. Byrne compensated some of the employees for their work, city law prevents officers from using their position for financial gain or entering into a business relationship with another public servant under their command.


© 2008 The New York Sun, One, SL, LLC.

Spidy
I thought when I read this thread it wasn't a cop bashing thread but a $$$$$$$$$$ one, please submit those elsewhere.

joe25
October 3rd, 2008, 03:08 AM
New York Sun

Captain Fined for Having Officers Remodel Home

By Special to the Sun | September 30, 2008

A police captain who ordered six of his subordinates to remodel his house is being ordered to pay $5,000 in fines by the city's Conflict of Interest Board.

According to the board, the officer, Michael Byrne, has agreed to pay the fine after he recruited several officers under his command to help with remodeling and landscaping work around his house. While Mr. Byrne compensated some of the employees for their work, city law prevents officers from using their position for financial gain or entering into a business relationship with another public servant under their command.


© 2008 The New York Sun, One, SL, LLC.

That's hilarious, I don't know, it just is.