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Apple
September 19th, 2006, 06:55 PM
A lot of my friends and family say that I have to get rid off my dog because finding an apartment that accepts a 35 pounds dog is going to be hard. Any suggestions?? I dont want to get rid og my dog.:(

Ninjahedge
September 19th, 2006, 07:00 PM
It will be difficult, although not impossible.

If you love your dog, keep it, but just realize it will be harder to find a place.

lofter1
September 19th, 2006, 08:29 PM
Before you hit town with your doggie you should read these ...

Pets Welcomed

NY TIMES (http://www.nytimes.com/2006/09/17/realestate/17letters.html)
September 17, 2006

To the Editor:

I read with interest the article “When Pet Friendliness Has Its Limits” (The Hunt, Sept. 3).

When we were buying our West Side co-op, we told the broker that we had a big dog. She said, “Don’t worry, it is a pet-friendly building.” When we filled out the application for the co-op board where it said, “any pets” we put, “1 dog, a Bouvier des Flandres.” True to the broker’s words, at the board interview, nobody asked any questions about the dog.

Unlike Matt Pestronk’s mastiff, our dog pees in the street. A few months after we moved in, we got a letter from the management company telling us that we should not let our dog pee in front of the building. So now, we hurry our dog along so that he can pee in the street in front of the next building.

Last year, the board announced that it was planning to adopt a pet policy and was studying the policies of other co-ops. It adopted such a policy and stated that the board had decided that the building should remain “pet friendly” and prohibited dogs over 50 pounds.

Fortunately, existing pets are grandfathered.

Kathy Abrams
Upper West Side

***

When Pet Friendliness Has Its Limits


http://graphics10.nytimes.com/images/2006/09/01/realestate/03hunt_190.jpg (http://javascript<b></b>:pop_me_up2('http://www.nytimes.com/packages/khtml/2006/09/01/realestate/20060903_HUNT_AUDIOSS.html', '600_475', 'width=600,height=475,location=no,scrollbars=yes,t oolbars=no,resizable=yes'))
Audio Slide Show: Three's Company (http://javascript<b></b>:pop_me_up2('http://www.nytimes.com/packages/khtml/2006/09/01/realestate/20060903_HUNT_AUDIOSS.html', '600_475', 'width=600,height=475,location=no,scrollbars=yes,t oolbars=no,resizable=yes'))


NY TIMES (http://www.nytimes.com/2006/09/03/realestate/03hunt.html?ex=1158811200&en=db7ab898c0a89bca&ei=5070)
By JOYCE COHEN
September 3, 2006


The Hunt


SOMETIMES you need more than a pet-friendly building. You need a pet-passionate building.


That’s what Matt Pestronk and Carrie Gross were after. Chief, their English mastiff, weighs 158 pounds.


“Big dog” were the first words out of their mouths to brokers. Despite their willingness to pay around $6,000 a month for a two-bedroom rental, the dog created a problem. Pet friendliness, they found, hit its limit at the size of this beast.


As a child, Mr. Pestronk saw the big breed on “The Tonight Show With Jay Leno.” “I don’t know what the segment was about,” he said. “I just knew I needed one.”


Until last month, Mr. Pestronk, 29, who is originally from Washington, had lived with Chief in Philadelphia. He owned a two-bedroom town house near Rittenhouse Square. A year ago, he began a wretched train commute several days a week to New York, for his job in commercial real estate financing. He was starting to hunt for a one-bedroom, but wasn’t ready to make a move.
That changed last spring after Ms. Gross, 32, originally from Gladwyne, Pa., contacted him on JDate.com, a Jewish dating Web site.


She lived in a 900-square-foot co-op loft on East 46th Street, which she had bought in 1999 for $240,000. She left her job, as an event planner for Playboy magazine, because the nonstop partying and traveling “was not a lifestyle I wanted to continue living in my 30’s,” she said. She now writes a column, “Sex and the Upper East Side” ( sexandtheuppereastside.blogspot.com ), for a neighborhood Web site called UpperEast.com.


(Yes, it’s pure coincidence she shares a first name with Carrie Bradshaw, heroine of “Sex and the City.” “I had the name long before that show,” she said.)


The upswing in her romantic fortune altered the conceit of her column, so she now focuses more on having a relationship than hunting for one, and on other people’s problems, which she calls “o.p.p.”


Within weeks, the two were making plans to live together. One option, much discussed, was that Mr. Pestronk move in to her place. But the dog’s presence made that tough. On Chief’s first night there, he climbed the stairs to the platform loft bed, but couldn’t squeeze in. So he backed down.


“I heard this running-water sound,” Ms. Gross said. “He was peeing on the floor.”


They considered renovating to make separate rooms — a pricey option that would displace them for months. “Our plan is to get engaged and married, and this is something we would be able to live in only temporarily,” Ms. Gross said. “It would either be sell now, or sell in a few years after we invested a few hundred thousand dollars.”


Most important, they wanted to start off together in a place of their own. “What we want to purchase in a couple of years is not what we want to purchase now,” she said. “The suburbs will be an option, or buying something much bigger.”


So they put their homes on the market — the Philadelphia town house for $465,000 and the East Side co-op for $685,000 — and began hunting for a two-bedroom, two-bath rental. He wanted a terrace; she required a doorman. And Chief had to be welcome.


“I see dogs all over New York,” Mr. Pestronk said. “I didn’t think it was going to be a problem.”


It was. In some cases, mentioning the dog was like “telling them we were coming in with a bomb — no one was going to take us,” Ms. Gross said.


On other occasions, “brokers ‘yes yessed’ us to death,” she said. “But then the management person would say no to the dog,” which was especially exasperating. “That’s the broker’s job — to weed out what we can’t rent,” she said.


It didn’t help to explain that Chief, despite his scary size, was quiet and friendly — “a slobbering lovefest,” Ms. Gross said.


The two were encouraged when they visited a two-bedroom at 300 East 57th Street, renting in the mid-$4,000’s. With a small area of outdoor space, it was “livable but not spectacular, and we hadn’t given up on spectacular,” she said.


Several luxury rentals in Battery Park City, for $5,600 to $5,800 a month, would take the dog. But the neighborhood felt remote.


So they tried elsewhere downtown. They liked a two-bedroom penthouse duplex at 10 Hanover Square, the former Goldman Sachs headquarters, renting for $6,100. There would be savings from a free membership in the building’s fitness complex and even a year of free maid service, given to penthouse residents. But, on a Saturday afternoon, this neighborhood was barren.


They headed back uptown. They almost rented an apartment at 40 Central Park South for $6,300 a month. But this touristy area had almost too much action — it was “the epicenter of loud,” Mr. Pestronk said. Besides, he wasn’t keen on the apartment’s ornate turquoise interior, which he pronounced “schmaltzy.”


At the same time, Ms. Gross called Beverly Adlam, an agent at Citi Habitats. She suggested several pet-friendly apartments, including an 1,150-square-foot two-bedroom with a large terrace, in a building near the Queensboro Bridge. The rent was $5,100.


“This was exactly the apartment Matt described that we would never find,” Ms. Gross said. “We would walk the streets where people had planters and terraces, and he would point and say, ‘We want one of those.’ ”


The building, with almost 130 units, has about 40 dogs, said the leasing agent, Adam Rothman of Prudential Douglas Elliman. There’s even another English mastiff, though he’s smaller than Chief.


The two signed a two-year lease, which has a pet rider. The dog isn’t allowed on the terrace unattended, for example. They bought a sofa made of leather — drool and fur are easy to clean off.


In his new home, as everywhere, Chief enjoys a measure of celebrity. Heads turn as he lumbers down the street. The doormen greet him with biscuits. At least one neighbor hasn’t been so genial, refusing to share the elevator with him lest he sniff the grocery bags.


“If you love a person, you make concessions,” Ms. Gross said. “The dog has already peed in this apartment three times.”


Copyright 2006 The New York Times Company

LadyLiberty
September 20th, 2006, 08:13 AM
Hi Apple,I would NEVER give away my pet especially only for finding an apartment. And I guess if u do that u will regret about it anytime.
There must be another solution.
In germany it´s the same. It isn´t very easy to find an apartment with a dog or even with a cat. But it´s possible. So maybe u´ll need a little longer for finding an apartment but u will find...
Okay, I do not know how hard it is to find an apartment in NY but there r a lot of dogowners and they all have an apartment or house. So there IS a possibility...

Good luck!

greetings
LadyLiberty

aural iNK
September 20th, 2006, 10:47 AM
It shouldn't be a problem, but I've read that it limits you to around 15% of what little is already available. You'll still have a choice in a few places. One helpful hint: if you're not going to get rid of your dog, don't look at any apartments that do not allow pets, it'll be much harder to take that older/smaller/smellier place that does!

MikeKruger
September 20th, 2006, 10:59 AM
I didn't think having a dog would be an issue with rental apartments in NY.
Actually I thought mos buildings accept pets. Is the animal's size a big factor?
Our dog weighs less than 15lbs.

Front_Porch
September 20th, 2006, 11:01 AM
Neighborhoods around parks are going to be more dog-friendly: in Brooklyn near Prospect Park, in Manhattan on the Upper East Side near Carl Schurz Park, downtown near Washington Square.

If your dog is at all presentable, offer to have the landlord meet it: a dog that is quiet, doesn't jump, and sits when commanded can sell itself.

ali r.

MikeKruger
September 20th, 2006, 11:07 AM
ouch.:eek:

Our dog BARKS and LUNGES at everyone he doesn't know.
everyone is like...what a cute dog, why is he so mean?

I have to explain that we recently got him from a shelter and his former owners probably mistreated him.

aural iNK
September 21st, 2006, 12:16 AM
I have two 20 lbs Jack Russells that jump, bark, bite your ankles and all the rest. Luckily we signed a lease before anyone saw the dogs. You'll be alright.

Punzie
December 17th, 2006, 05:59 AM
I have two 20 lbs Jack Russells that jump, bark, bite your ankles and all the rest. Luckily we signed a lease before anyone saw the dogs.
I don't know how people who do things like this justify it to their consciences.


__________________________________________

Just today the New York Times came out with a compendium of 47 articles it had published on dogs and New York housing:

http://topics.nytimes.com/top/news/science/topics/dogs/index.html?query=HOUSING&field=des&match=exact

MrSpice
December 17th, 2006, 01:38 PM
ouch.:eek:

Our dog BARKS and LUNGES at everyone he doesn't know.
everyone is like...what a cute dog, why is he so mean?

I have to explain that we recently got him from a shelter and his former owners probably mistreated him.

I think that people should appreciate your kindness and that you adopted him. However, I would not want to ride in an elevator with this kind of dog.

MikeKruger
December 18th, 2006, 01:37 PM
:confused: Elevator=problem.


Gotta think of that when we move to Manhattan.

lofter1
December 18th, 2006, 04:44 PM
^^^ Get a muzzle

Formula86
January 7th, 2007, 03:27 PM
I have a question -
I am thinking of moving to Queens and living in a house with a private yard. I have two small dogs and one cat (indoor/outdoor). The house I live in now has a doggy door so that all the animals can have access to the yard whenever they want (I live in Texas).
Someone on this forum told me that in NY, rats can be a problem. They can come through the doggy door. :eek: I don't know how much my cat would catch them because he goes outside, too. So he wouldn't be here all the time.

How true is this? I am now completely freaked out.

lofter1
January 7th, 2007, 04:43 PM
Someone on this forum told me that in NY, rats can be a problem.

I only brought up the question as a possibility ...

Perhaps because I had just seen Pan's Labyrinth (http://www.apple.com/trailers/picturehouse/panslabyrinth/) :eek:

Punzie
January 8th, 2007, 04:23 AM
If it turns out that Formula86 doesn't move to NYC, it should be because she has found opportunities in other cities or her own state that better suit her life goals. It should not be because you, Lofter, saw a fantasy movie with rats and hinted that they may crawl through doggy doors here!

The chance of that happening in NYC houses is about the same as in Texas houses. I have never even heard of it around here, and I hear... a lot. I would say that rats crawling through doggy doors is a non-issue.

The problem, Lofter, is that I don't have any hard data to back up what I just asserted, and it might take a great deal of time to find it. Especially because it's not just enough to give the numbers; a relative comparison needs to be done between here and Texas.

lofter1
January 8th, 2007, 09:31 AM
LMAO --

Hello: It was a joke!

I guess the title of this thread should be changed to "SOME Animal lovers" ;)

If someone chooses NOT to move to NYC because of that they probably woulsn't have lasted long anyway ...

Formula86
January 12th, 2007, 05:14 AM
Ok, so it's a joke.

Just because I don't want rats in my house doesn't mean I can't handle NYC. It just means I don't want rats in my house.

I've never had that problem here in TX. I do get a lot of large roaches and slugs, etc. when it's warmer outside. But no rats.

- - -

On a related topic - is it SAFE to have a doggy door that is open 24/7? It would not be big enough for a human to fit through, and I would have a sliding bar lock on the very top of the door.

Thanks!!

Punzie
January 13th, 2007, 07:07 PM
On a related topic - is it SAFE to have a doggy door that is open 24/7? It would not be big enough for a human to fit through, and I would have a sliding bar lock on the very top of the door.

The safety question is on a case-by-case basis. It depends on your dogs, the neighborhood, the neighbors, the neighbors' dogs, the perceived amount of valuables that exist in your house, the hours you keep, the other members of your household, the friends that visit you, etc. etc. etc.

Unless you know exactly where you're living in NYC, assume that you need to keep the doggy door closed (1) when nobody in your household is home, and (2) during the night hours when the noise laws are more strict.

Formula86
January 14th, 2007, 03:05 AM
The safety question is on a case-by-case basis. It depends on your dogs, the neighborhood, the neighbors, the neighbors' dogs, the perceived amount of valuables that exist in your house, the hours you keep, the other members of your household, the friends that visit you, etc. etc. etc.

Unless you know exactly where you're living in NYC, assume that you need to keep the doggy door closed (1) when nobody in your household is home, and (2) during the night hours when the noise laws are more strict.

Well, I will have some valuables (big plasma TV, jewelry, etc.). So I understand that. But what do the neighbors' dogs have to do with it? Just curious! :)

The reason that I have one is:
*So the dogs can go in and out at their convenient to go potty, etc.
*So the cat can go in and out.

See, if my cat is locked in at all, for ANY length of time, he gets very freaked out and starts spraying. So it's open mostly for him.

I'm wondering if there's any other way to go about it. Hmmm.

On the topic of where - I was thinking about where you told me. Some nicer parts of Queens maybe. Or can you think of somewhere safer?

Thanks!!

Punzie
January 14th, 2007, 02:09 PM
Hmm... your cat is neutered, but he sprays out of stress... That's not uncommon, but is there any chance that he has a urinary tract problem?

Is it possible for you to get a cat door -- big enough for your cat, but not your dogs? It's very common for cats to go in and out of their owners' houses, 24/7. Not quite as common with dogs, because of the barking factor.

The neighbor's dog comes into play in a positive way if your dogs like each other. I've seen neighbors arrange to open each other's yard gates; the dogs have twice the roam space.

The neighbor's dog is obviously a negative if it's unfriendly or gets your dogs into barking competitions.

Formula86
January 14th, 2007, 07:14 PM
Hmm... your cat is neutered, but he sprays out of stress... That's not uncommon, but is there any chance that he has a urinary tract problem?

Is it possible for you to get a cat door -- big enough for your cat, but not your dogs? It's very common for cats to go in and out of their owners' houses, 24/7. Not quite as common with dogs, because of the barking factor.

The neighbor's dog comes into play in a positive way if your dogs like each other. I've seen neighbors arrange to open each other's yard gates; the dogs have twice the roam space.

The neighbor's dog is obviously a negative if it's unfriendly or gets your dogs into barking competitions.

I talked to the vet about a UTI, but he said that he would be peeing, not spraying. I'm bringing him in for shots soon anyways and may have him tested while there just in case. I've heard of Felliway (a plug-in that lets out the smell of pheromones) that is supposed to help. I'm going to try that.

I didn't "adopt" him until he was about 3-4 years old. He was just a neighborhood cat. So he has hormones running through him for a while. :rolleyes:

About the doggy door - one of my dogs is smaller than my cat! Haha! :p So she would fit through. I COULD put a cat door higher up somewhere so that only a cat could go through.

I'm worried about my dogs with the barking because they are little barkers. If I'm home, I'll quiet them quickly, but I know they probably bark when I'm not there. It's mostly at other dogs, though. So I guess I'd just have to feel it out when I got there. They're just very protective of the house. :rolleyes: Joy. Haha.

Thanks. :)

lofter1
January 14th, 2007, 07:28 PM
I'm worried about my dogs with the barking because they are little barkers. If I'm home, I'll quiet them quickly, but I know they probably bark when I'm not there. It's mostly at other dogs, though. So I guess I'd just have to feel it out when I got there.

Not to scare you, but that ^^^ can be a BIG problem when living in an apartment / multiple dwelling in NYC ... especially if they bark LOUD and can be heard by the neighbors.

Just a word of warning ...

Formula86
January 14th, 2007, 07:44 PM
Yah, I hear yah. That's why I'm really only looking for a private home. That would help, at least. :)

Punzie
January 15th, 2007, 06:55 PM
If your dogs bark when you're not home, then leaving the doggy door open when you are not home is out-of-the-question in NYC and Nassau County. The dog barking laws are very strict, and they're enforced.

I couldn't give you up-to-date info about NYC anymore, but in my area, (2 blocks from Queens), if a dog barks outside for more than 15 minutes at any time, the police are authorized to do the following:

Knock on the door and ask the owner to bring his/her dogs inside. No ticket is issued and the police are pretty nice about it, even if it isn't the first time they have visited. A lot of the policemen love friendly dogs and are secretly on "your side." But if the owner isn't home, it's a whole different story: a pricey ticket is given to the residence.

Formula86
January 15th, 2007, 07:02 PM
If your dogs bark when you're not home, then leaving the doggy door open when you are not home is out-of-the-question in NYC and Nassau County. The dog barking laws are very strict, and they're enforced.

I couldn't give you up-to-date info about NYC anymore, but in my area, (2 blocks from Queens), if a dog barks outside for more than 15 minutes at any time, the police are authorized to do the following:

Knock on the door and ask the owner to bring his/her dogs inside. No ticket is issued and the police are pretty nice about it, even if it isn't the first time they have visited. A lot of the policemen love friendly dogs and are secretly on "your side." But if the owner isn't home, it's a whole different story: a pricey ticket is given to the residence.

Eek. Ok. So is it like that in all the buroughs? Just to get an idea...

We may have to just have the tiny cat door (the cat doesn't bark too much ;) ). That means I'll have to crate the dogs during the day, though. I'm not sure if they're 100% potty trained for THAT long.

Is it common to have someone come by once a day to just let the dogs out in the yard and to play with them, etc? Cause maybe I could crate them in the morning and then have that person let them out for the rest of the day. ???

Wanna come by, Laura?? Haha!

Schadenfrau
January 16th, 2007, 12:42 AM
You might want to do some research into the size of an average NYC yard, Formula86. A private yard here generally means about 15 square feet of dirt, bordered by the same.

I don't mean to sound like a downer, but I'm a pet-owner myself, and none of the things you're mentioning sound very realistic. People don't have pet doors, regardless of the size of the pet. If you're serious about a move, start training your pets now, or start looking into urine-removal products. You will not be able to have indoor/outdoor animals.

Formula86
January 16th, 2007, 12:59 AM
They are crate-trained, I just don't want to leave them in there all day long.

Why doesn't anyone have doggy doors? Cause of safety issues?

I've talked to other people who live there that have indoor/outdoor cats, etc. I just don't see what the big deal is.

I understand the barking issue, but other than that - why no doggy doors?

Schadenfrau
January 16th, 2007, 01:16 AM
There are no doggy doors because people don't have yards. A single-family house in NYC is a rarity, and when they are on the market, they generally cost far more than you're likely to be able to afford. Think of $1,000,000 as a starting price in the outer boroughs, and that's being on the cheap side for what you're thinking of.

Again, if you're serious about moving here, you should really cut out the whole doggy-door/yard aspect of your search. I saw that you had mentioned railroad apartments as a question, and if you're asking about that, the doggy door idea is definitely out.

I'm not sure how much you actually know about NYC apartments, but you have to understand that they're something far different than what you see in Denton, TX. Apartments don't have parking lots, buildings don't have yards, and people keep their pets inside.

By the way you describe them, I would even imagine that you would be able to exist by keeping your pets indoors. However, the fact that you are so insistent about keeping outdoor animals gives me pause in telling you that you should move here. It's a different life, and you should prepare yourself for that before you make a big jump.

Formula86
January 16th, 2007, 01:21 AM
First off - I never said I want to keep my animals outside. There is a big difference in letting them go in and out and in keeping them outside. Keeping any animals outside all the time is cruel.

Second, I know it's very different. But I am not talking about a house right by Manhattan. A house an hour away will be that much? Plus, I've seen places for rent for about $1300 with private yards, etc.

I know that the apartments have no parking lots or yards. That's why I don't want an apartment. I only asked about what a railroad apartment was like because a converted house mentioned that term.

My dogs are small and could be kept inside, of course. They are actually rarely in the yard. They just use the doggy door to go out to go to the bathroom, etc. However, my cat has to have 24/7 access. He just does. I won't get into all the psychological reasons why.

I've spoken with someone who says that there are people with private yards, etc. out in Queens. Does this not exist?

Schadenfrau
January 16th, 2007, 01:42 AM
Maybe your cat is different from every other cat I've encountered, but I've never seen a feline inclined to stick within the confines of a small, gated yard. In this area, people who let their cats roam free are generally looking for a pest-control device, not a pet. If you'd like to keep your cat, you won't let it go outside. It's so much a matter of crazy cat-nappers as it is that you just can't do that in an urban environment.

Again, I don't know your situation, but unless you're buying your home in cash and don't plan on working for a living, the ideas you're talking about aren't feasible for a person just starting out. Unless you plan on driving a car into the city every day and paying hundreds of dollars in parking, you shouldn't be thinking about living anywhere that far away. Also, homes that far outside of the city (the only places you might find doggy-doors), are going to cost nearly as much as city apartments, not mentioning the significant cost of transportation.

People your age who live in Queens generally live with roommates, and in neighborhoods with subway access. None of these people would live in a single-family home, and they definitely wouldn't have private yards with doggy-doors.

I'm sorry if I've missed it, but have you ever visited NYC? I would suggest that you hit the neighborhoods you would be interested in living in, because I don't know how else to answer the questions you're asking. The specifics you mention just aren't do-able when considering the personal details you've described.

Formula86
January 16th, 2007, 01:46 AM
Maybe your cat is different from every other cat I've encountered, but I've never seen a feline inclined to stick within the confines of a small, gated yard. In this area, people who let their cats roam free are generally looking for a pest-control device, not a pet. If you'd like to keep your cat, you won't let it go outside. It's so much a matter of crazy cat-nappers as it is that you just can't do that in an urban environment.

Again, I don't know your situation, but unless you're buying your home in cash and don't plan on working for a living, the ideas you're talking about aren't feasible for a person just starting out. Unless you plan on driving a car into the city every day and paying hundreds of dollars in parking, you shouldn't be thinking about living anywhere that far away. Also, homes that far outside of the city (the only places you might find doggy-doors), are going to cost nearly as much as city apartments, not mentioning the significant cost of transportation.

People your age who live in Queens generally live with roommates, and in neighborhoods with subway access. None of these people would live in a single-family home, and they definitely wouldn't have private yards with doggy-doors.

I'm sorry if I've missed it, but have you ever visited NYC? I would suggest that you hit the neighborhoods you would be interested in living in, because I don't know how else to answer the questions you're asking. The specifics you mention just aren't do-able when considering the personal details you've described.

No, my cat wouldn't stay in the yard. I've heard that people have indoor/outdoor cats that are fine. ??? Was I mislead? Are there not any neighborhood type places in Queens (way out east)?

Yes, I've been to NYC many times.

I own my own home and could sell it. I would pay in "cash", yes. I would have a roommate.

I would drive to the subway or catch a bus there, and then take the subway to the city. I have been told this is possible from outer east Queens.

I'm not trying to be an ass, really. I just get like, three different answers from different people.

ryan
January 16th, 2007, 10:57 AM
I don't think you should fixate on Queens so much. Sounds like you want to live in a suburban, so why not just look at straight-up suburbs? You'll find lots of places in Jersey, Westchester and LI that would have a yard. Look at Clifton, NJ - it's cheap and an easy commute into the city on a bus.

You seem to be looking for validation of something you were told in another context. Maybe you should go back to that person to ask for clarification? The answers you're getting on this thread seem realistic to me. (I would never let a cat go outside in my neighborhood - there's poison everywhere & too much traffic).

Formula86
January 16th, 2007, 11:03 AM
I don't think you should fixate on Queens so much. Sounds like you want to live in a suburban, so why not just look at straight-up suburbs? You'll find lots of places in Jersey, Westchester and LI that would have a yard. Look at Clifton, NJ - it's cheap and an easy commute into the city on a bus.

You seem to be looking for validation of something you were told in another context. Maybe you should go back to that person to ask for clarification? The answers you're getting on this thread seem realistic to me. (I would never let a cat go outside in my neighborhood - there's poison everywhere & too much traffic).

Well, I found a couple of places in Westchester, but I heard that was very far from Manhattan.

I may give my cat to my best friend's mom to watch. That would really free up a lot of places for me to look.

If I just had the dogs, I could crate them during the day. My best friend may have a different schedule than me and could walk them, etc.

So we'll see.

Thanks for info. :)

lofter1
January 16th, 2007, 11:17 AM
Many parts of Jersey are much more accessible via trains / busses than Westchester. Also closer to NYC / less expensive.

Formula86
January 16th, 2007, 11:22 AM
Many parts of Jersey are much more accessible via trains / busses than Westchester. Also closer to NYC / less expensive.

How close are we talking? Are indoor/outdoor cats the norm?

ryan
January 16th, 2007, 12:08 PM
Westchester is convenient if you work around Grand Central (like me). Close is relative to where you plan to commute to. I know lots of people who would never live anywhere but Westchester or CT. Depends on what you're looking for.

No, I've never heard anyone compare the outdoor-cat-friendliness of the various burbs. For that I'd assume that further away would be better.

Formula86
January 16th, 2007, 12:47 PM
See, like two hours ago I asked my best friend to ask his mom if she would consider taking my cat. Then I go to the bedroom and see him and...it's just so hard.

This is why I've been going back and forth.

Not to mention that no matter what, it will be a big down-grade for the two dogs. Right now they have a doggy door open 24/7 with a yard that's bigger than my whole house. :rolleyes: Spoiled a bit, eh? Haha.

So it's just hard. I feel like I'm being super selfish.

lofter1
January 16th, 2007, 01:35 PM
Check out Teaneck (http://www.city-data.com/city/Teaneck-New-Jersey.html) NJ

718Bound
January 16th, 2007, 02:07 PM
No, my cat wouldn't stay in the yard. I've heard that people have indoor/outdoor cats that are fine. ??? Was I mislead? Are there not any neighborhood type places in Queens (way out east)?

Yes, I've been to NYC many times.

I own my own home and could sell it. I would pay in "cash", yes. I would have a roommate.



I just noticed you mentioned in the moving to NY thread...


I own a house now and, if I sell it, I think I can get about 90-100 thousand for it. So that could be used for a big down-payment or maybe to pay for a house out-right

Here is a quick search on Craigslist of houses with a private yard. http://newyork.craigslist.org/search/rfs?query=%22private%20yard%22

So if you got 90-100 for your house in Texas you still would be $300,000-$500,000 short of "paying cash".

You should seriously think of the type of life your animals would have in the area you want to move to. I grew up in Suffolk county (eastern LI) When I was younger one of my dogs got loose and got hit by a car, my sister watched her school bus run over one of our cats as it ran in the road (not a busy road either) and another cat got run over by a LIRR train.

Not trying to scare you, maybe my animals have bad luck, but its a real possible your cats could be in danger no matter how far out you live.

It really is unfar to make your animals give up a nice life they are used to (in and as they please nice big yard) and try to adjust to a situation that is different as night and day to them to persue your dream.

It might be hard to do but if you want to make this move you should find your pets a nice place to live in texas . Find yourself a nice apartment or roomate situation. Anything is possible, but it really is unlikely that you are going to find a place that "meets your needs" that you are going to be able to afford just starting off in your career.

Formula86
January 16th, 2007, 02:32 PM
I just noticed you mentioned in the moving to NY thread...



Here is a quick search on Craigslist of houses with a private yard. http://newyork.craigslist.org/search/rfs?query=%22private%20yard%22

So if you got 90-100 for your house in Texas you still would be $300,000-$500,000 short of "paying cash".

You should seriously think of the type of life your animals would have in the area you want to move to. I grew up in Suffolk county (eastern LI) When I was younger one of my dogs got loose and got hit by a car, my sister watched her school bus run over one of our cats as it ran in the road (not a busy road either) and another cat got run over by a LIRR train.

Not trying to scare you, maybe my animals have bad luck, but its a real possible your cats could be in danger no matter how far out you live.

It really is unfar to make your animals give up a nice life they are used to (in and as they please nice big yard) and try to adjust to a situation that is different as night and day to them to persue your dream.

It might be hard to do but if you want to make this move you should find your pets a nice place to live in texas . Find yourself a nice apartment or roomate situation. Anything is possible, but it really is unlikely that you are going to find a place that "meets your needs" that you are going to be able to afford just starting off in your career.

Yes, I know all of this. See my previous post. I already feel guilty enough.

718Bound
January 16th, 2007, 03:45 PM
I am not trying to make you feel more guilty... Just after reading some of your posts you have unrealistic expectations. You need to seriously think about what some people are telling you.

I can't say that I know from experience but 90-100,000 sounds unrealistic for buying anything in the nyc area. Even if you use it as a down payment are you going to be able to afford the mortgage payment? Are you sure you want a two hour commute after spending 8-10 hours in the office?

Just because you are used to living in a big house with a private yard in Texas doesn't mean that is what you need in NYC.
I am sure you are fully aware there are trade offs any where you live. In Texas you can have your private house with all the animals you want roaming in and out. Maybe you don't have as many opportunities to go into the line of work you want. You have that opportunity in NYC, but it means living the NYC life style... an apartment, maybe a roommate, leaving your beloved pets behind (maybe not all).

Those are two different lifestyles you have to choose one, you cannot combine them. Not now anyway you cannot afford it. Thats just my opinion feel free to prove me wrong.

I am not trying to be a downer or an a s s hole but you have to be realistic.

Have you thought about renting out your place in Texas? Maybe to a friend or fellow animal lover and take some off the rent in exchange for caring for your pets? That way you can come to NY pursue your dreams and get the full NYC experience. Then maybe in a year or so find a place Westcheser, NJ, LI, etc...

Best of Luck:)

Schadenfrau
January 16th, 2007, 03:53 PM
718Bound is giving good advice.

I do want to add that it's not impossible to have pets in the NYC area- I think the majority of people here manage it. However, people here do not have unleashed pets outside. It might be what you're used to in Texas, but it's certainly not acceptable behavior here. Your pets will just have to manage like the rest of them.

Formula86
January 17th, 2007, 12:49 AM
Thanks for your advice, guys.

I don't know...I've heard different things. I've heard that out in eastern Queens (near the Nasseau County Border), people have doggy doors. So I'm really confused.

Basically - I'm just going through a lot of guilt right now because whatever I decide, it will be a downgrade for my animals. ~Sigh~ It's like, I have to decide what's more important - their lives or my happiness (living somewhere I want). They didn't ask to be adopted, etc, etc.

718Bound - I will rent this place out, but I don't want any strangers taking care of my animals. :) If anything, I would leave my dogs with my best friend (who is supposed to be coming with me, though) and give the cat to someone I trust.

I know that at least my dogs will come with me no matter where I go.

So we'll see.

I've taken to looking at Seattle, as well. Although, Seattle sounds great and everything, I still picture NYC in my head. I'm going to Seattle for a couple of days this weekend. We'll see what I think then, I guess. :)

brianac
April 1st, 2008, 04:34 AM
March 31, 2008, 5:12 pm

Is New York the Most Pet-Friendly Place?

By Sewell Chan (http://cityroom.blogs.nytimes.com/author/schan/)

http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2008/03/31/nyregion/31dogs.cityroom.span.jpg
Cooling off after a romp at an Upper East Side dog run. (Photo: Ruth Fremson/The New York Times)

Forget our odd tendency to keep big dogs in small apartments (http://query.nytimes.com/gst/fullpage.html?res=9D03E1DB143EF936A15756C0A9629C8B 63). Or the Metropolitan Transportation Authority’s ban on dogs on the subway (http://www.mta.info/nyct/rules/rules.htm) unless they are “enclosed in a container and carried in a manner which would not annoy other passengers” (service animals and police dogs are excepted). Or the fact that taxi drivers aren’t required to allow dogs (http://www.urbanhound.com/houndPlay/gettingAround.asp) to ride along with their owners. Or the perennial brouhaha over off-leash rules (http://travel.nytimes.com/2007/07/22/travel/22weekend.html) governing when dogs can roam free in the parks. Or the out-of-the-way nooks and crannies where the city places its dog runs (http://query.nytimes.com/gst/fullpage.html?res=950CE3DD1039F936A25753C1A9639582 60).

And don’t mention our former mayor’s dislike of ferrets (http://query.nytimes.com/gst/fullpage.html?res=9800EFD8103FF931A15755C0A9649C8B 63).

In view of all those pet-owning disadvantages, it would seem surprising that readers of Animal Fair (http://www.animalfair.com/) magazine have chosen New York City as the nation’s pet-friendliest destination (http://www.animalfair.com/events/cesar2008.html). The fourth annual Cesar Five Dog Bone Awards Winners — named for Cesar (http://www.cesar.com/), the dog-food company, not to be confused with Cesar Millan, “The Dog Whisperer,” (http://www.cesarmillaninc.com/) on the National Geographic Channel — also went to an airline (Continental), an automobile (Volvo), a hotel (the Driskill in Austin, Tex.), a product (sherpa bags), a resort (the Fairmont Scottsdale Princess of Scottsdale, Ariz.) and, finally, a noncommercial entity, an animal shelter (the Humane Society Of Louisiana).

NYC & Company (http://www.nycvisit.com/) — the city’s official tourism promotion arm — did not waste a moment before trumpeting the Animal Fair awards as a triumph for the city.

“New York City is a vibrant destination for visitors year-round — whether they’re four-legged or two-legged. We want to remind travelers that the City offers plenty of options for owners traveling with their pets,” said George A. Fertitta, chief executive of NYC & Company.

In a news release, NYC & Company cited pet-friendly hotels like the London NYC, the W hotels in New York City, the Loews Regency, the SoHo and TriBeCa Grand Hotels, the Waldorf Towers, the Carlyle and the Hilton Times Square; pet-friendly department stores like Bergdorf Goodman, Bloomingdale’s and Saks Fifth Avenue; the pet-friendly Time Warner Center at Columbus Circle (where the Bouchon Baker sells “foie gras–enriched dog biscuits”); pet-friendly salons like Le Chien in Trump Plaza on Third Avenue; a pet-friendly pub, the Brooklyn Ale House in Williamsburg; and New York’s Pet Taxi, a company that transports pets.

City Room would like to note that both Animal Fair and NYC & Company seem awfully dog-centric. One wonders how Saks would respond to a customer bearing goldfish in a bag. And a quick call to the reception desk at the luxurious Carlyle Hotel (http://thecarlyle.com/), on East 76th Street, revealed that only dogs under 25 pounds are permitted; no iguanas, cats or lizards, please.

Alexis Mainland contributed reporting.

Copyright 2008 The New York Times.

brianac
April 6th, 2008, 05:35 AM
Avella Urges Law Change On Pet-Owner Eviction

By Special to the Sun
April 4, 2008

Tenants who replace a deceased pet with a new companion would be protected from eviction if City Council Member Tony Avella (http://www2.nysun.com/related_results.php?term=Tony+Avella) gets his way.

Legally, landlords have a three-month window to take action, such as eviction, against tenants who violate a no-pet clause in their lease. But pet-owners are not home free once the time expires. If their pet dies and they replace it, the three-month clock starts all over again and the landlord can once again serve them with an eviction notice. Animal lovers have argued that the additional opportunity to evict is unfair, since they have already established their right to have a pet in their home.

Mr. Avella is holding a press conference today with animal advocacy groups, including the Humane Society and the League of Humane Voters (http://www2.nysun.com/related_results.php?term=League+of+Humane+Voters) of New York City (http://www2.nysun.com/related_results.php?term=New+York+City), to call on the speaker of the City Council, Christine Quinn (http://www2.nysun.com/related_results.php?term=Christine+Quinn), to hold a hearing on legislation he has introduced that would carry tenants' rights to own a pet over into the pet's replacement.

Copyright 2008 The New York Sun.

brianac
April 13th, 2008, 08:08 PM
ROBERT RIZZO yearned for a dog to take in and felt awful about the unwanted yellow Labrador retriever that he kept seeing on the A.S.P.C.A.’s Web site. So last summer he adopted her — a needy dog named Sarah with canine epilepsy, controlled by medication. “I like having something to take care of,” he said.
It was a decision that would have some consequences.

He knew it would be only a matter of time before he would have to relinquish the $2,500-a-month one-bedroom apartment he was renting on West 16th Street. It was in a co-op building that didn’t allow dogs.

Mr. Rizzo, 30, a native of New Haven, who graduated from Georgetown University (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/reference/timestopics/organizations/g/georgetown_university/index.html?inline=nyt-org) and Cornell Law School, is a lawyer. He had also been running a Web-based business from his apartment for a couple of years, and so that would have to move, too.

By winter, the co-op board had caught on to Sarah, so he began the hunt for a dog-friendly place. His priority was space for Sarah, “because she is kind of hyper and it would be good to have somewhere she could run around,” Mr. Rizzo said.

He hoped for a one-bedroom or a large studio renting for around $2,000, although he later raised the figure to $2,500. “Like everyone else who looks for an apartment in New York,” he said, “you are optimistic and then reality slaps you in the face.”

In January, while looking for an apartment, he quit his law job to devote more time to his start-up, called Wakozi (wakozi.com (http://wakozi.com/)). He started the business after lugging home beer and wine bottles for a party, and saw a need for a site that listed liquor stores that deliver. He found office space for Wakozi in West Midtown. Still, the business, which is expanding to include listings of local grocery stores and delis that deliver in many neighborhoods in Manhattan (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/classifieds/realestate/locations/newyork/newyorkcity/manhattan/?inline=nyt-geo), was sapping Mr. Rizzo’s interest in looking for a place to live. As the boss, “you never get time off,” he said.

So when he saw a banner advertising rentals on the Hudson Crossing Building on West 37th Street, just a few blocks from his office, he called. He was shown a studio for around $2,600. It was more than he wanted to spend, “so I was going to start dipping into savings or moving things around in my budget,” he said.

Its proximity to his office meant he could pop over during the day to walk Sarah, saving money on the dog walker. But he returned later that day with his girlfriend, who noted that it overlooked the entrance to the Lincoln Tunnel.

“I can work with that,” Mr. Rizzo said. “I sleep kind of heavily. I think I am less sensitive than the average person.” Besides, drivers wouldn’t honk, would they? “I am an optimist by nature,” he said.

But his girlfriend’s hesitation “was enough to bring me to my senses, or to her senses,” he said.

Mr. Rizzo assumed rents would be lower in Williamsburg, Brooklyn (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/classifieds/realestate/locations/newyork/newyorkcity/brooklyn/?inline=nyt-geo), where a good friend lived. So he spent a rainy day there with an agent, only to find prices as high as those in Manhattan.

He was depressed after seeing a tiny fifth-floor walk-up. “I figured, I am going out to Brooklyn; I don’t need to go above two flights,” he said. There was a school across the street, which to Mr. Rizzo meant that children would be outside early in the morning. “I will live on top of the Lincoln Tunnel, but not with little kids,” he said. “I think traffic is more of a drone, whereas little kids’ screeching is tough to deal with.”

http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2008/04/13/realestate/HUNT-1.jpg

He next checked the Web site of Equity Residential, which managed Hudson Crossing, and decided to look at a building that the firm was listing in the financial district, at 71 Broadway. Downtown, he figured, he would get more space. That was true, though a large studio cost around $2,700. And the neo-Classical-style building, formerly called the Empire Building, felt too much like the office building it had once been, he said.

By this time, with the help of Alexandra Gerardi, one of his four employees, he was on to the East Village. She jumped at the chance to help.

“Rob was so miserable about having to look for another place,” she said. But she had loved looking for her own rental when she moved to New York last fall. “Every time I went into an apartment, it was a new experience,” she said.

Besides, Mr. Rizzo didn’t seem hard to please. “He has no requirements except for space for the dog,” Ms. Gerardi said. “He doesn’t care about anything as long as it is not four floors up on a walk-up.”

But “I wasn’t so optimistic about his price range,” said Ms. Gerardi, who shares a studio in the East 20s with a friend. (The full rent is $3,000.) “I was sure he was going to up his price.”

http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2008/04/13/realestate/HUNT-2.jpg

She found a listing for a one-bedroom rental on First Avenue near Seventh Street, for $2,450. The 700-square-foot apartment was above a Korean restaurant, which might be why it felt so hot inside, Mr. Rizzo said. The view was of a busy McDonald’s. “You can’t get any closer to the avenue unless you are living in the restaurant,” he said.

http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2008/04/13/realestate/HUNT-3.jpg

The listing agent, Michele Roderick of Citi Habitats, was prepared with a list of other East Village possibilities. The first one, a $2,500 ground-floor one-bedroom on East Seventh Street, wasn’t especially large, but it had a huge private backyard, perfect for a rambunctious dog.

She showed Mr. Rizzo several more, including a place on East 10th Street near the Russian and Turkish Baths, where medicinal-smelling steam billowed out.

Elsewhere in the East Village, a one-bedroom had a long, narrow hallway.

“They were billing it as 500 square feet, and it might have been close, but a lot of that square footage was a hallway that you couldn’t use for anything because it wasn’t wide enough,” Mr. Rizzo said. “You couldn’t hang out there, and you couldn’t put a table there.”

In any case, he had the yard on East Seventh Street in his head, and no other place compared. He took the apartment, after negotiating the rent to $2,400.

He and Sarah moved in last month. His new home remains partly unfurnished, largely because the entryway is so small that his couch wouldn’t fit inside. He and his friends ended up leaving it outside for trash pickup.

http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2008/04/13/realestate/HUNT-4.jpg

Meanwhile, he enjoys the yard as much as Sarah does. “She can get out some energy and that makes her less bark-ative, if that’s a word,” he said. In the morning and at night, he needn’t take her for a walk. He just opens the back door and out she bounds. The dog walker still takes her for a midday walk.

“It makes my life easier because she gets tired out,” he said. “Anyone who has big dogs, particularly Labs, knows that to have them tired is like gold.”

Copyright 2008 The New York Times.