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soccerUSA
October 4th, 2006, 11:02 AM
I Know that the korean delis are a true institution and a symbol of New York City. I have some questions about they.

1. Is it true that in every corner of New York City there is at least a deli open 24/7?
2. Is it true that in a deli is possible to find every thing?
3. What is the average extension of a normal deli?

MrSpice
October 4th, 2006, 11:19 AM
I Know that the korean delis are a true institution and a symbol of New York City. I have some questions about they.

1. Is it true that in every corner of New York City there is at least a deli open 24/7?
2. Is it true that in a deli is possible to find every thing?
3. What is the average extension of a normal deli?

1. Of course not. Busier areas of the city have 24/7 delis. Some don't. And mani Deli's are not owned by Koreans.
2. No. It has many basics, but most of those stores are rather small and sell drinks, snacks, basic foods, paper towels, basic medicine, etc. Just like you local convenience store.
3. Extension - what's that?

ablarc
October 4th, 2006, 09:00 PM
So much more than a convenience store, the best deli I've ever seen. A cornucopia of prepared food at the biggest-ever buffet and salad bar. You could get all your meals at the take-out here ...and it's Korean:

http://66.230.220.70/images/post/greenwichvillage/737b.jpg
University Pl.

soccerUSA
October 5th, 2006, 06:59 PM
What is the average size ( miles square ) and how many employee there are in a normal deli?
What is the difference between deli and grocery?

ablarc
October 5th, 2006, 07:21 PM
^ They vary in size. An average deli is 1000 square feet or less, though there are much larger ones.

The word "deli" comes from "Delicatessen," a German word for fine food. New York Jews, many of whom spoke Yiddish, a German dialect, used the word for their establishments that featured kosher food. Sandwiches such as pastrami and chopped liver featured prominently on their menus. Much of their business was take-out; they would fix you a sandwich and side orders and sell you a soda. Many of these delis featured restaurant seating as well.

Jewish delicatessens are now rare. The ones that catered mostly to the take-out trade were gradually taken over by Greeks, who introduced some features of their own cuisine and elements of a convenience store, while serving up pretty gutless versions of the sandwiches that their predecessors had purveyed with such gusto.

These days delis are most commonly run by Koreans, who specialize in salad bars and buffets for the take-out trade, as well as carrying an expanded selection of grocery items --including usually a decent array of drinks. More recently, Indians have started running many delis, especially the smaller ones.

lofter1
October 5th, 2006, 08:53 PM
The Korean delis in NYC started popping up about 20 years ago -- very bare bones affairs but almost always with the salad bar.

Now they've become swankier with "cool" design elements -- and the salad bars have grown exponentially.

There must be some big building in Queens or the Bronx with lots of folks cutting stuff up into little pieces to supply all those salad bars.