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OmegaNYC
November 22nd, 2006, 12:53 PM
Finally, it is about time the falls get fixed up.

Great Falls master plan announced http://www.northjersey.com/img/email_top.gif (http://javascript<b></b>:popPrint('email.php?qstr=ZmdiZWw3Zjd2cWVlRUV5eTcw MjQ1MDMmeXJpcnk3ZjcxN2Y3dnFlZUVFeXkz');) http://www.northjersey.com/img/print_top.gif (http://javascript<b></b>:popPrint('print.php?qstr=ZmdiZWw3Zjd2cWVlRUV5eTcw MjQ1MDMmeXJpcnk3ZjcxN2Y3dnFlZUVFeXkz');) http://www.northjersey.com/img/herald_logo_sm.gif
Wednesday, November 22, 2006

By ALEXANDER MacINNES
HERALD NEWS



ELIZABETH LARA / HERALD NEWS

PATERSON -- State and federal officials descended upon the Silk City Tuesday to name the winner of the Great Falls State Park Master Plan design competition against the backdrop of the rushing falls.
A warm afternoon sun offset brisk November temperatures as officials laid out an optimistic agenda for the falls and its role in redeveloping the city -- bringing tourists to the area and offering local residents a natural respite from the urban setting.

"These falls are not just a Paterson wonder, but a national wonder," said Mayor Jose "Joey" Torres. "And, now, they are being recognized as such."
The competition winner, Field Operations of New York City, proposed a plan called "Paterson's New Outdoor Living Room," allowing residents to walk along the river, under the shade of its cliffs and up to the foot of the falls. The $10 million vision for the project's first phase centers on using a loop path to tie the park's various elements together -- linking the falls and Overlook Park to the ATP site, which would be restored as a landscaped path, the Valley of the Rocks and Mary Ellen Kramer Park.
"This could be a world-class park," said Ellen Neises , senior associate for Field Operations, the urban design firm.

When the project is complete, it will cost upwards of $100 million, according to state Department of Environmental Protection Deputy Commissioner John S. Watson, who accompanied Gov. John S. Corzine to the event. U.S. Sen. Frank Lautenburg, D-N.J., a Paterson native, also participated.
Paterson's Great Falls State Park will use state money and other funds to help make Field Operations' outdoor room a reality.
Paterson and Trenton have both received funding as urban state parks. The last urban state park created was Liberty State Park in Jersey City, created in 1976.

"We need to make dreams a reality and I pledge today that the state will be a partner in this," said Corzine.
Though the Great Falls was designated a state park by then-Gov. James E. McGreevy in 2004, the city is still waiting to see if Congress creates a Great Falls National Park.
Rep. Bill Pascrell Jr., D-N.J., spoke passionately about his push for that federal designation.

"If we do not protect the relics of the past, we will have nothing but ruins to hand to our children and grandchildren," Pascrell said.
A patchwork of local groups and falls advocates have pointed to the state's commitment as added momentum for the federal designation.
Torres highlighted the importance of the new park to help revitalize the city's center.

"This Great Falls is the foundation from which Paterson's future will be built on," Torres said.
The Field Operations design topped those of four other firms, some of which proposed building glass observation towers, indoor botanical gardens and a museum. Neises said that her firm tried to enhance what is already around the area, rather than changing it with dramatic new structures.
Reach Alexander MacInnes at 973-569-7166 or macinnes@northjersey.com.

Have anyone heard of "Field Operations"? They have a website. http://www.fieldoperations.net/

OmegaNYC
November 22nd, 2006, 01:06 PM
Here is some pics of the falls I've found online. Just to give you guys an idea of the falls. This is truly a wonderful place.

http://www.teterboro-online.com/images/scenic/falls1/falls02.jpg

The falls a few years back.

http://www.teterboro-online.com/images/scenic/falls2/falls2_01.jpg

http://www.teterboro-online.com/images/scenic/falls2/falls2_74.jpg

http://www.teterboro-online.com/images/scenic/falls2/falls2_02.jpg

Winter. When the falls freeze up.

http://www.teterboro-online.com/images/scenic/falls1/47.jpg

http://www.teterboro-online.com/images/scenic/falls1/22.jpg

This place kicks ass! :D

All of these pics are from Teterboro-online.com.

More pics could be found here. http://flickr.com/groups/123nj/discuss/72157594265211049/

NYatKNIGHT
November 22nd, 2006, 01:15 PM
Uplifting news for Paterson, and I wish there was a rendering.

I don't want to let any pessimism ruin such rare good news stemming from this old city, the park sounds great, but a National Park? I can't imagine there is any chance of achieving that premium status.

JCMAN320
November 22nd, 2006, 02:37 PM
NYatKnight I'll give you some background on the Great Falls and Paterson and how it is possible to achieve National Park status also consdiering that New Jersey has many National Parks to begin with for a state our size another one would be most welcome. Hell I think Liberty State Park should become a National Park but that's a topic for another time. lol

In 1791, Alexander Hamilton helped found the Society for the Establishment of Useful Manufactures, which helped encourage the using of energy from the Great Falls of the Passaic, to secure economic independence from British manufacturers. Paterson, which was founded by the society, became the cradle of the industrial revolution in America. Paterson was named for William Paterson, Governor of New Jersey, statesman, and signer of the Constitution.

French architect, engineer, and city planner Pierre L'Enfant, who developed the plans for Washington, D.C., was the first superintendent for the S.U.M. project. He devised a plan, which would harness the power of the Great Falls through a channel in the rock and an aqueduct. However, the society's directors felt he was taking too long and was over budget. He was replaced by Peter Colt, who used a less-complicated reservoir system to get the water flowing to factories in 1794. Eventually, Colt's system developed some problems and a scheme resembling L'Enfant's original plan was used after 1846.(Wikipedia.com)

Also, the Great Falls are the second tallest falls and second by volume on the East Coast only behind Niagra Falls!!!!

Also in June of 1976 President Ford designated the Falls and its surrounding area as a National Natural Landmark. The designation protects the site from federal development, but not from local and state development.

Given all that to me it is very possible that it can attain that status.

OmegaNYC
November 22nd, 2006, 02:44 PM
Good point. It is better to let this be a state park as of right now. Pushing for a national park is going a bit too far. I'm just glad that finally, the falls will be on a road to recovery. BTW, here are some renderings that my friend from Paterson Online.Net took pictures of a while back.

http://www.patersononline.net/images/gallery/2006_11_21_falls/2006_11_great_falls001.jpg

http://www.patersononline.net/images/gallery/2006_11_21_falls/2006_11_great_falls004.jpg

http://www.patersononline.net/images/gallery/2006_11_21_falls/2006_11_great_falls009.jpg

You could see more renderings on the Field Operations website.

JerseyBrett
November 22nd, 2006, 02:56 PM
This is great news! I really believe that Paterson can reinvent itself to be one of the great cities of the NYC metro area. It has some beautiful historic buildings and is very accessible to the city via mass transit. New Jersey needs to continue preserving open space in the western part of the state to prevent sprawl and to push people back to the urban areas such as Paterson. I really believe New Jersey's urban areas have a bright future as long as they adhere to the principles of smart growth and invest in mass transit.

OmegaNYC
November 22nd, 2006, 03:03 PM
Brett, you make some great points. Paterson has the tools to be a wonderful city. It is up to the citizens, and the people who are our elected leaders to make this happen.

urbanaturalist
November 22nd, 2006, 05:44 PM
This is great news! I really believe that Paterson can reinvent itself to be one of the great cities of the NYC metro area. It has some beautiful historic buildings and is very accessible to the city via mass transit. New Jersey needs to continue preserving open space in the western part of the state to prevent sprawl and to push people back to the urban areas such as Paterson. I really believe New Jersey's urban areas have a bright future as long as they adhere to the principles of smart growth and invest in mass transit.



I concur.

lofter1
November 22nd, 2006, 08:51 PM
Have anyone heard of "Field Operations"? They have a website. http://www.fieldoperations.net/


They're also doing the design for the controversial (http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showpost.php?p=131329&postcount=1136) Plaza at the Gehry / Ratner Beekman Tower project ...

NYatKNIGHT
November 27th, 2006, 11:24 AM
New Jersey has many National Parks to begin with ...No, you are mistaken, New Jersey has NO National Parks. The closest National Park to New York City is Shenendoah National Park in Virginia, one of the few found east of the Mississippi River. Only the most special places in the country have such status. Niagara Falls is not a National Park.

However, there are places in New Jersey that are administered by the National Park Service, and they are:

Appalachian National Scenic Trail
Delaware National Scenic River
Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area
Edison National Historic Site
Ellis Island National Monument
Gateway National Recreation Area
Great Egg Harbor Scenic and Recreational River
Morristown National Historical Park
New Jersey Coastal Heritage Trail Route
Pinelands National Reserve

I completely understand the historic and natural impact of the Falls, and perhaps it deserves to be a National Monument, National Historic Park, or something else within the National Park System. It may seem picky, but it's a little hang-up for me, as the term is so often misused. The actual National Parks are a cut way above.

And I couldn't agree with JerseyBrett more.

ZippyTheChimp
November 27th, 2006, 12:37 PM
There are 58 parks in the United States with the designation National Park. Almost all are in undeveloped areas.

The National Park System has 390 units that are administered by the NPS. Gateway National Recreation Area is in both NYC and New Jersey.

There are tens of thousands of places on the National Register of Historic Places, also administered by the NPS.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_areas_in_the_National_Park_System_of_the_U nited_States

JCMAN320
November 27th, 2006, 04:15 PM
Thx NyatKnight for the correction. I was mistaken. The whole being administered the National Park Service threw me off but thats what I meant that they are still involved with the National Parks System

OmegaNYC
November 28th, 2006, 11:15 AM
Falls' national park bid fails http://northjersey.com/img/email_top.gif (http://javascript<b></b>:popPrint('email.php?qstr=ZmdiZWw3Zjd2cWVlRUV5eTcw Mjc5NzgmeXJpcnk3ZjcxN2Y3dnFlZUVFeXkz');) http://northjersey.com/img/print_top.gif (http://javascript<b></b>:popPrint('print.php?qstr=ZmdiZWw3Zjd2cWVlRUV5eTcw Mjc5NzgmeXJpcnk3ZjcxN2Y3dnFlZUVFeXkz');) http://northjersey.com/img/herald_logo_sm.gif
Tuesday, November 28, 2006

By ALEXANDER MacINNES
HERALD NEWS



ELIZABETH LARA / HERALD NEWS

PATERSON -- The National Park Service rejected Paterson's application Monday for the Great Falls to become a national park -- citing financial constraints and its stock of current parks that already offer visitors similar natural, cultural and historic elements.
In its 100-page report, the National Park Service found the 77-foot falls historically significant, but not suitable as a full-blown national park. Instead, the study suggested that the park apply to become an "affiliated site," which means less federal oversight and funding.

Despite the findings, Rep. Bill Pascrell Jr., D-Paterson, vowed Monday to get the Great Falls designated a national park by act of Congress. Local officials and activists blamed the Bush administration's push to maintain the current number of parks -- already under tight financial constraints -- rather than add more.

The Park Service estimated that capital improvements and management costs for a national park at the falls site could hit $21 million. The report said it could not approve adding a new park that would compete with others already established for needed federal funds.


As a natural resource, federal park officials said there were enough waterfalls already in the Park Service's 390 existing parks.

Culturally, the falls offer historic insight into America's immigration, expansion of science and technology, and development of the country's early economy. But again, the Park Service report cited numerous parks that already offer these history lessons, including the Lowell National Historical Park in Lowell, Mass.

The report came on the heels of last week's optimistic event at the falls, when a design was chosen for the Great Falls State Park. The first phase of the new park will use $10 million in state money already appropriated.
Pascrell, who has secured support from New Jersey's entire congressional delegation for the national park designation, said National Park Service officials "don't know what they're talking about."
"At no other place in the United States do we have Hamilton's image so defined, nowhere in the United States!" Pascrell said.
"You can't go anywhere in the United States and find a better mirror of hardworking Americans," he added.

Alexander Hamilton's vision of harnessing the falls' hydraulic power for manufacturing in 1790 was also questioned by federal officials, who said places like Lowell and other New England cities "were built on the firm stepping stones of less grandly conceived endeavors."
Local activists and historians disagreed, calling Paterson the "incubator" of modern industrialized America.
"The study wrongfully labels the S.U.M (Hamilton's Society for Establishing Useful Manufactures) as a failure," said Leonard Zax, a Paterson native and lawyer who lobbied for the federal designation.
"The S.U.M. continued to provide power and property for Paterson manufacturing from the 1790s until 1945. How many corporations that were born in the 1790s continued to exist through the entire 19th and the first half of the 20th century?"

Local falls proponents also disagreed with the National Park Service's assumption that the state was not able to help fund the park. They pointed to the state park division's and Gov. Jon S. Corzine's previous assurances that the state would help support the park's upgrade.
Zax said the Park Service often questions the historic relevance of a proposed site when, really, its main reason for denying a request is financial.
In the last 10 years, the Park Service has released eight positive recommendations, the last being the Carter G. Woodson Home in Washington, D.C., in 2003, according to Jeff Olson, a spokesman with the National Park Service.


Reach Alexander MacInnes at 973-569-7166 or macinnes@northjersey.com

Punzie
November 29th, 2006, 01:05 AM
Any chance that it was turned down to be a national park because the great Silk Strike of 1913 in Paterson was hailed and supported by the Communist Party?


http://i71.photobucket.com/albums/i130/Rapunzel61/EWNY/Silk-Workers-Meeting-Poster.jpg


Just throwing an idea on the table...


Full text and additional pics of Silk Strike are here:

http://patersongreatfalls.com/0325pgf/00a.cgi?cr=10a00a00&hd=dhd&tl=dtl&tr=dtr&nl=dnl&bl=dbl&br=dbr&ft=dft&crx=00n

atp_site
December 2nd, 2006, 05:00 PM
No..... You are all off base. This whole "redevelopment" of the Passaic Falls began in the mid-90's when a developer was going to build homes on the Allied Textile Printing Site (ATP Site). That idea got snuffed because some people had fluffy ideas about rebuilding the Passaic Falls in general. In other words, this whole "redevelopment" and "rebuilding" idea is just an attempt to mask the ATP Site and avoid facing it directly. It's been that way for about 30 years now. Nobody wants to hit the nail on the head and clean up the mess... Instead, attention is drawn towards enhanced photos of The Passaic Falls, whistles and bells, and red herring.

Just ask any politician in Paterson about the ATP Site and listen to him/her start telling you about grand ideas about the generalized areas surrounding the Passaic Falls and how many people have many ideas about all types of things relating to the Passaic Falls..... You'll catch on.

The ATP Site is 7 acres of abandoned factories that have all been burned and destroyed. It is in Paterson's Historic District just a short distance from the Passaic Falls.

These fantastic ideas about rebuilding The Passaic Falls are a red herring, folks. The politicians do not want you focusing on the ATP Site. Here is a web site of my own creation with ATP Site photos. http://www.geocities.com/atp_site/

Punzie
December 2nd, 2006, 06:12 PM
. . . This whole "redevelopment" of the Passaic Falls began in the mid-90's when a developer was going to build homes on the Allied Textile Printing Site (ATP Site). That idea got snuffed because some people had fluffy ideas about rebuilding the Passaic Falls in general. In other words, this whole "redevelopment" and "rebuilding" idea is just an attempt to mask the ATP Site and avoid facing it directly. . .

http://i71.photobucket.com/albums/i130/Rapunzel61/Adages/spock-fascinating2.jpg


The photos that you took right outside your window, is that the window of property you own?

If you own it, how much would its real estate value increase if the ATP site were leveled down, and a housing development were put up?

Do you have any financial interest in ATP turning into a housing development?

The upshot: you may possibly not be an unbiased source of information.

Thank you for sharing those incredible pictures, and feel free to mow me down if I'm off base again.:)

atp_site
December 2nd, 2006, 07:16 PM
The photo was taken from an apartment window. I am not a real estate investor.

If you have Google Earth, it's 3 Van Houten Street, Paterson, NJ 07501. That address will point right to the ATP Site.

spatulashack
December 3rd, 2006, 06:58 PM
No..... You are all off base. This whole "redevelopment" of the Passaic Falls began in the mid-90's when a developer was going to build homes on the Allied Textile Printing Site (ATP Site). That idea got snuffed because some people had fluffy ideas about rebuilding the Passaic Falls in general. In other words, this whole "redevelopment" and "rebuilding" idea is just an attempt to mask the ATP Site and avoid facing it directly. It's been that way for about 30 years now. Nobody wants to hit the nail on the head and clean up the mess... Instead, attention is drawn towards enhanced photos of The Passaic Falls, whistles and bells, and red herring.

Just ask any politician in Paterson about the ATP Site and listen to him/her start telling you about grand ideas about the generalized areas surrounding the Passaic Falls and how many people have many ideas about all types of things relating to the Passaic Falls..... You'll catch on.

The ATP Site is 7 acres of abandoned factories that have all been burned and destroyed. It is in Paterson's Historic District just a short distance from the Passaic Falls.

These fantastic ideas about rebuilding The Passaic Falls are a red herring, folks. The politicians do not want you focusing on the ATP Site. Here is a web site of my own creation with ATP Site photos. http://www.geocities.com/atp_site/

I'm sorry but I haven't the foggiest idea of what you are babbling on about. The two sites are completely different and one is currently far too expensive to tackle right now. We are talking about a 10 million dollar park versus a project that would most likely cost hundreds of millions.

atp_site
December 4th, 2006, 12:37 AM
The original plan was for the state to tackle the Passaic Falls and surrounding areas. The Feds were to take on the ATP Site.

The Federal plan that has just been knocked down is in reference to the ATP Site. The recent news article does not say that straight out.... Politicians are twisting and turning reporters away from the ATP Site and the reporters follow their lead.

This whole state park idea began with The ATP Site and then drifted off into anything and everything BUT the ATP Site. The federal money that just got knocked down was supposed to be for the ATP Site.

atp_site
December 4th, 2006, 01:30 AM
I'm sorry but I haven't the foggiest idea of what you are babbling on about. The two sites are completely different and one is currently far too expensive to tackle right now. We are talking about a 10 million dollar park versus a project that would most likely cost hundreds of millions.


Skim down to the middle of this site. http://cameo.njit.edu/urbanparks/paterson_competition/program/program.htm It mentions phase one and phase two of the state plans. The ATP Site is part of the picture. It should be THEE picture, but the politicians keep wiggling away from it to show you pretty pictures of the Passaic Falls.

Here is another link giving info about the feds plans that fell through and The ATP Site. It's a good link... It gives some straight info and doesn't even mention the Passaic Falls!!!
http://tps.cr.nps.gov/nhl/detail.cfm?ResourceId=945&ResourceType=District

OmegaNYC
December 5th, 2006, 10:50 AM
ATP, I wouldn't worry much. When the Great Falls were designated a state park a few years ago, the state made sure that anyone who is pick for the redeveolpment of the Falls, must design a plan that will redevelop the Falls, ATP site, and the surrounding area. A Design Team from NYC, has been picked. Well will see how they will turn the Falls AND ATP site around.

atp_site
December 6th, 2006, 04:56 PM
The Morning News, Paterson, N.J., May 6, 1970, pp. 1, 4.

89-Acre Falls Site Designated National Historic District

http://jya.com/mnpat.htm

The City of Paterson as cradle and crucible of industry and the industrial revolution in the new world has been given official recognition by the U.S. Department of the Interior and its National Park Service.
Mayor Lawrence F. Kramer announced Tuesday that he has received notification from U.S. Senator Clifford P. Case and Eight District Representative Robert A. Roe, that an 89 acre site covering the Passaic Falls, some 40 aging mill buildings, and the three level raceway, has been designated a National Historic district.

"It's exciting and thrilling news," said Kramer, who since the first year of his administration has been leading a quiet but determined campaign to have Paterson given the recognition it deserves.


Leaders Spearhead Drive



In this role, Kramer joined a long list of leading local figures, spearheaded by Harry B. Haines, publisher of the Paterson news, and involving Passaic county Congressmen George N. Seger, Gordon Canfield, Charles Joelson and incumbent Roe, and U.S. Senator H. Alexander Smith and Case.


Things looked brightest back in 1966 when Interior Department Secretary Stewart Udall made a personal survey of the falls area during a tour of metropolitan area historic sites for "Mission 66." This was a project to set up a federal registry of National Historic Landmarks.


But when the list came out in Nov. 1967 the Passaic Falls wound up with only a brief honorable mention.


The Advisory Board on National Parks, Historic Sites, Buildings and Monuments, acting on Udall's report, designated the Falls only as a National Registered Landmark. This was believed to be something of a consolation prize for all the efforts put into the local campaign for recognition of this city's historic role as first industrial City in the new world.


Contention Rejected



At that time, the National Parks Service rejected this contention, and what was even more galling, chose to designate a single mill building in Slatersville, R.I. as a National Historic Landmark, as the cradle of U.S. industry.


In time, the city received a bronze plaque from the Department of the Interior designating the Passaic Falls as worthy of inclusion in the National Registry of landmarks.


But Mayor Kramer and a handful of Paterson "loyalists" that included Mr. Haines, Mr. Canfield, Dr. D. Stanton Hammond and a number of others refused to accept the rebuff.


The plaque was "filed" in a corner of the Paterson Park board office and the campaigners regrouped to continue the fight.


At the time, Kramer notified the Department of the Interior that "while Paterson does not intend to declare war on Slatersville," he was determined to set the historical record straight.


"History is important," Kramer said, "and we are serious about our historic legacy." He urged the Interior Department to re-examine and reevaluate Paterson's role and that of the Society for Useful Manufactures, around which the city grew to become the first industrial capital of the New World.


Graves' Committee Reborn



The initial committee that had worked with Kramer s predecessor, Mayor Frank X. Graves Jr., to create an overlook park at the Falls site was re-organized without fanfare and began a persistent but quiet campaign to "set the record straight."


Heading this group was Mrs.Mary Ellen Kramer, wife of the mayor. Among its members were Mrs. Samuel (Esther) Schwartz. a member of the National Restoration Committee for Historic Shrines; Frank Blesso of the Paterson Redevelopment Agency; John Bell, director, Model Cities, Works Board Commissioner Tippi Krugman and Donald Ferguson, senior planner of the Paterson Planning Board; Leo Fichtelberg, director, Paterson Library; Dr. Hammond and Edward Graff of the. Passaic County Historical Society.


Through what seemed almost like an act of providence, this committee was joined later by John Young, New York City architect of Urban Deadline Inc. and Columbia University, who wrote the application.


His major role in the project will be detailed in a following article spelling out in detail the campaign that led to the Department of Interior's complete reversal of its earlier position.


Charles Jacobs, Paterson industrialist, worked closely with the committee and Mr. Haines continued to lend his support and influence in the quiet but unflagging campaign.


Historian's Interest Won



Within six months, the committee had won the interest of Charles E. Peterson, FAIA, architectural historian and restoration and planning consultant of Philadelphia, who came here to make a survey of the Falls area and quickly caught the committee's enthusiasm.


"Paterson," he declared at the time of his visit, "stands as the historic dividing line between America's agricultural and industrial development."


The city's designation as a National Historic Site has far greater significance than if the Falls had been given the original designation as an historic landmark. This covers not just the Falls but the entire area of 89 acres.


As a National Historic site, it will be eligible for a number of federal programs and matching grants for restoration and improvement of the site, preservation, rehabilitation and restoration of structures.


Development Plans



Tentative plans for development of the site to make it worthy of the designation call for upgrading of the area buildings with continued utilization, expansion for industrial purposes and beautification of the raceway and necessary buildings such as the old Ivanhoe House, its dams and gateworks.


The mill buildings, most still in operation, cover the years from 1793 to 1912 represent a living chronicle of the growth of industry in the new World from its beginnings through the Industrial Revolution and the birth of the nation's modern industrial might.


The present cultural committee responsible for this achievement is to be expanded and broadened to include every segment of society and every age group.


According to Mrs. Kramer, "We anticipate the involvement of all the people of Paterson in this endeavor, from the boys and girls of the Neighborhood Youth Corps to our senior citizens."


Proud Moment



"This is one of the proudest moments of my administration," said Kramer. "It is the realization of a dream, not only by those citizens of Paterson today but many who could not live to see its fulfillment."


"This is our sacred trust, to make meaningful this designation of the Falls area as a National Historic Site; to preserve this priceless legacy for this and future generations, and in the memory of those long gone whose hands and hearts were part of its building."

dbhstockton
March 11th, 2007, 03:36 PM
The Paterson falls are indeed a vital but forgotten piece of Americana. This is an old thread but I just finished reading this biography (http://www.amazon.com/Patch-Famous-Jumper-Paul-Johnson/dp/0809083884/ref=pd_bbs_sr_1/002-8736609-0869651?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1173641100&sr=8-1) of Sam Patch -- who was a legendary Jackosonian-era proto-rock star working-class folk hero-- an American prototype, the original. His only claim to fame was that he was a hard-living, dare-devil wise-ass; he traveled around jumping off cliffs, and his jumps became mass spectacles. Anyway, its a good read, and Paterson Falls features prominently in the story.

JCMAN320
March 22nd, 2007, 07:12 PM
Feds approve $2M to fund Highlands Act
Money for conservation will be split between 4 states

Wednesday, March 21, 2007
BY LAWRENCE RAGONESE
Star-Ledger Staff

The U.S. Department of the Interior has agreed to release $2 million this year for Highlands conservation land purchases in four Northeastern states, including New Jersey, it was announced last night by Rep. Rodney Frelinghuysen (R-11th Dist.).

It falls far short of the $11 million a year over 10 years called for in the Highlands Conservation Act signed into law by President George W. Bush in 2004, but lawmakers had been concerned there would be no Highlands dollars allocated.

Six U.S. senators and 19 congressman from the four-state region, including Frelinghuysen -- the author of the Highlands Act -- sent letters to Interior Secretary Dirk Kempthorne last month urging $2 million included in Bush's fiscal year 2007 budget be appropriated.

Apparently, that pressure got results.

Frelinghuysen sent out a one-line press release last night saying he was notified by Kempthorne that the Highlands will get $1.98 million this year.

"We're really delighted. It was great news," said Frelinghuysen's spokeswoman Erin Hennessy. "Secretary Kempthorne called Rodney to personally give him the news because he was the original sponsor of the Highlands bill."

Despite passage of the Highlands Act, approving up to $110 million in federal aid for Highlands land purchases over a decade, so far only $1 million had been authorized in two years. This prompted lawmakers from the region to reach out to Kempthorne.

"We ask you to please join us in recognizing the national significance of this region and the critical natural resources it provides for millions of people," a 19-member congressional delegation wrote in a Feb. 28 letter.

"The pristine Highlands provide millions of gallons of drinking water, a home to threatened or endangered species, and recreational areas, ... so it is essential that we protect and conserve this habitat for the benefit of future generations," wrote U.S. Sen. Christopher Dodd.

Dodd was joined last month by U.S. Sens. Robert Menendez and Frank Lautenberg (both D-N.J.), Hillary Clinton and Charles Schumer (both D-N.Y.) and Joseph Lieberman (I-Conn.) in pushing for Highlands dollars.

Hoping for funding, the governors of the four Highlands states jointly submitted conservation projects totaling $10 million to the Department of the Interior for funding this year. Those included the Wyanokie Highlands in New Jersey, Oley Hills in Pennsylvania, Litchfield Farms in Connecticut, and Great Swamp and Arrow Park in New York.

The New Jersey portion of the Highlands is slightly less than a third of a 2-million-acre area that stretches from northwestern Connecticut, across the Hudson River Valley, through North Jersey, and into east-central Pennsylvania. It includes parts of Bergen, Hunterdon, Morris, Passaic, Somerset, Sussex and Warren counties.

The Highlands are the source of much of the region's water, supplying millions of North Jersey residents. But the region is under pressure, with more than 5,000 acres developed annually, fragmenting remaining forested areas and negatively affecting water supply, according to a federal report.



Lawrence Ragonese can be reached at lragonese@starledger.com or (973) 539-7910.

JCMAN320
June 15th, 2007, 11:39 PM
EPA details Passaic cleanup options
Polluted muck along 8 miles could require up to $2.3 billion

Friday, June 15, 2007
BY ELIZABETH MOORE
Star-Ledger Staff

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency yesterday unveiled six options for cleaning up the contaminated muck along an eight-mile stretch of the lower Passaic River, ranging from a full-scale dredging of the polluted sediment to capping it with clean sand and rocks.

The estimated cost of the plans ranges from $900 million to $2.3 billion, money the government plans to get from 73 companies that have already been identified as polluters.

Alan J. Steinberg, EPA regional administrator, said by working with partner agencies including the state Department of Environmental Protection, he expects to have a single option for cleaning the lower Passaic chosen by October or November.

Now that the options have been announced, there will be an opportunity for input from environmental groups and others, he said.

"The people of New Jersey deserve a good, clean Passaic River," he said.

Though a study on the entire 17-mile stretch of the lower Passaic is continuing until 2012, he said work will begin on the cleanup of the eight miles of the lower Passaic that end in the Newark Bay.

Some of the communities along the lower Passaic include Newark, East Newark, Kearny and Harrison. The cleanup could be an economic boon to the communities, he said.

"If you have restored waterfronts in a city like Newark, it can be a tremendous tourist attraction," Steinberg said.

The options suggested are:


-Removing fine-grained sediment from the lower eight miles through dredging at a cost estimated at $2 to $2.3 billion.


-Capping the sediment in the lower eight miles by placing clean materials on top of the contaminated ones at a cost of $900 million to $1.1 billion.


-Capping and backfilling the lower eight miles, then reconstructing a current navigational channel for $1.5 to $1.9 billion.


-Constructing a new navigation channel for existing uses and capping the lower eight miles at a cost of $1.3 to $1.6 billion.


-Constructing a new channel for future uses and capping the lower eight miles at a cost of $1.4 to $1.8 billion.


Dredging the most contaminated mile of the eight, and a second mile that gets the most erosion, capping the eight-mile stretch and constructing a new navigational channel for future use for $1.5 to $1.8 billion.

Though Lisa P. Jackson, the state's DEP commissioner, stopped short of choosing which of the six options to support, she said the state favors the option that will result in a long-term solution.

"We'd like to see a remedy that provides the longest-term protection as possible," Jackson said.

Ella Filippone, executive director of the Passaic River Coalition, said she favors the dredging option, which would clean out the dioxins from the river, rather than capping the dioxins with clean sand or rock. In a tidal river like the Passaic, the strong tides can disturb clean materials and also spread dioxins to other areas, she said.

"It's now going to be a question of how do we pay for it," she said.

U.S. Rep. Bill Pascrell, whose district includes an area along the lower Passaic, called the announcement of the options "a great step forward" and called for strong negotiating to get the polluters to pay.

"We've got to keep this out of court," he said, citing delays to the cleanup that a lawsuit would bring.

Steinberg said the EPA would be aggressive. "The remedy could be expensive and we intend for the polluters to pay."

The eight-mile stretch that is the subject of the cleanup proposal includes the Ironbound area of Newark, which is home to the former Diamond Shamrock site, a company that opened there in 1951 and manufactured pesticides -- including DDT and Agent Orange -- dumping chemical contaminants directly into the river in its early years.


Elizabeth Moore works in the Essex County Bureau. She may be reached at 973-392-1852 or emoore@starledger.com.

OmegaNYC
July 9th, 2007, 04:02 PM
I forgot to post this. It seems the Great Falls are getting closer to becoming a National Park:

Great Falls park status one step closer
Tuesday, July 3, 2007
HERALD NEWS EDITORIAL


Rep. Bill Pascrell Jr., D-Paterson, has pushed long and hard to have Paterson's Great Falls and surrounding area designated as a national park. That push received a bit more steam last week when Pascrell's plan, the Paterson Great Falls National Park Act, won approval from the House Committee on Natural Resources.

Aside from Pascrell, other members of the New Jersey delegation, including Reps. Jim Saxton, Frank Pallone and Rush Holt, spoke out in favor of this long-needed legislation. Next stop is the House of Representatives, where the measure will get a full hearing and be considered for a vote by the entire House.

To restate the obvious, Pascrell's plan should be approved, with bipartisan support in the House and Senate, and sent on to the White House to be signed into law. Though the Bush administration has favored a moratorium on making new national park designations, the Great Falls and environs is a worthy exception.

This page has long supported national park status for the 109 acres of city land, land once viewed by founding father Alexander Hamilton as a place of great potential in which to harness the full power of the coming industrial revolution. Paterson, the nation's first industrial city, and the falls, have truly earned national park status.

Indeed, there is a growing consensus in Washington that the bill should be passed and signed into law, in part because of renewed local efforts and strong backing and funding from Trenton. Though a federal report issued by the Department of the Interior failed to recommend full park status, the plan continues to have the backing of the New Jersey delegation.

It is hard to overstate the importance of the Great Falls area, and Paterson in general, to this nation's history. Because of power generated by the falls, the new nation began to transition away from a purely agrarian society, based on slavery, to an automated industrial society, based on free will, imagination and the manufacturing of goods. As the nation's first treasury secretary, Hamilton envisioned the power of the falls supplying the energy for the mills to be built on the banks of the Passaic River. He further believed that the young nation had to manufacture its own goods in order to break its economic dependence on Great Britain and Europe.

Paterson, which eventually came to be known as the "Silk City" because of the fabrics it produced, also built locomotives, plane engines and the first submarine. It was here that the legendary Colt Revolver was designed and manufactured. And the list could go on, but it would more than fill the rest of this page.

The people of Paterson continue to strive to maintain the city's rich history and to use it as a way to enrich its future.

The city's historians, public officials and investors have long labored, through public and private means, and often, against the odds, to find ways to rehabilitate the Great Falls and the lands around it.

National Park status would make that quest so much easier. It would bring needed federal monies, park rangers and a certain prestige that the Great Falls has so long deserved.

JCMAN320
October 22nd, 2007, 10:05 PM
House OKs bill to make Paterson's Great Falls national park

by Claire Heininger Monday October 22, 2007, 7:20 PM

The U.S. House of Representatives tonight passed a bill to establish the Great Falls of Paterson as a national park.

The 256-122 vote represents one hurdle cleared in the recent push to better showcase the 77-foot-high landmark along the Passaic River. The national park designation would enable the Falls to receive federal money, which would boost the $10 million set aside by the state for initial construction on a plan unveiled last month.

The federal legislation passed today was introduced by Rep. William Pascrell Jr. (D-8th Dist.), a leading Falls advocate who has estimated the park - built with state help - will cost $22 million. The bill would designate about 109 acres of the Paterson Great Falls Historic District as a new unit of the National Park Service, which would be charged with operating the park, restoring and preserving historic structures and creating new exhibits.

A companion bill has been introduced in the Senate, co-sponsored by Sens. Frank Lautenberg and Robert Menendez (D-N.J.), which has had one hearing so far by the Energy and Natural Resources Committee.

"This is a landmark moment for the city of Paterson and state of New Jersey," Pascrell said in a written statement issued after today's House vote. "A Paterson Great Falls national park designation represents countless economic, recreational, cultural and educational opportunities for one of America's most densely populated, diverse and historic urban communities."

The state's plan, championed by the state Department of Environmental Protection, would create a 60-acre state park linking existing open space with historic factory buildings, and would offer spectacular new viewing areas.

A 2006 study by the National Park Service, however, found that the Great Falls would not qualify for designation as a national park because its proposed themes of industry and technology were already prevalent in other national parks.

JCMAN320
March 25th, 2009, 05:54 PM
Congress passes bill making Paterson's Great Falls a national park

by The Associated Press
Wednesday March 25, 2009, 3:48 PM

http://blog.nj.com/ledgerupdates_impact/2009/03/medium_great%20falls.JPG
Ed Murray/The Star-Ledger
Paterson's Great Falls, which under a bill passed today by the U.S. House would become a national park.

New Jersey may soon have a new national park: a bill designating Paterson's Great Falls as a national park was passed by the U.S. House today. It now goes to President Obama.

Introduced by Democrats Rep. Bill Pascrell Jr. and Sen. Frank Lautenberg, both Paterson natives, The bill overrules a 2006 decision by the National Parks Service, which did not recommend that status.

The state has long sought national status for the 77-foot falls in Paterson, 15 miles west of Manhattan, with the hope that doing so would help attract more visitors to the site.

A national park designation would also make the area eligible for millions of dollars in federal funds.

Encideyamind
March 26th, 2009, 01:16 PM
My pops used to take us on walks there all the time.

Hamilton
March 28th, 2009, 05:19 PM
Good day for Paterson. My hometown doesn't get any respect.

OmegaNYC
March 29th, 2009, 10:33 AM
The bill passed? That is good. I love the falls, especially in the winter.

http://i610.photobucket.com/albums/tt182/Omega0416/340.jpg?t=1238336274

http://i610.photobucket.com/albums/tt182/Omega0416/341.jpg?t=1238336341

http://i610.photobucket.com/albums/tt182/Omega0416/342.jpg?t=1238336420

even the Downtown area, has some beauties when it comes to historic buildings:

http://i610.photobucket.com/albums/tt182/Omega0416/309.jpg?t=1238336624

http://i610.photobucket.com/albums/tt182/Omega0416/333.jpg?t=1238336799

http://i610.photobucket.com/albums/tt182/Omega0416/326.jpg?t=1238336910

http://i610.photobucket.com/albums/tt182/Omega0416/335.jpg?t=1238337016

Paterson, dispite some of her problems, is a great city; I really am proud to be from there. Hopefully, the city can get back on its feet. Though, it will take time, energy, and investment.

OmegaNYC
March 31st, 2009, 10:22 AM
Video: Obama signs land bill into law
Monday, March 30, 2009
Last updated: Monday March 30, 2009, 6:33 PM
BY HERB JACKSON
NorthJersey.com
WASHINGTON CORRESPONDENT

The 77-foot-high Great Falls on the Passaic River that powered Patersonís rise as one of the nationís first industrial cities will be preserved as a National Historical Park under a bill President Obama signed today.

The 35-acre Paterson Great Falls National Historical Park will include the falls and the channels that powered textile mills that gave the Silk City its nickname, as well as the ruins of the first Colt firearms factory and a factory that was the nationís leading supplier of railroad locomotives in its day.

The park was just one provision in a massive public land preservation package Congressional leaders crafted from 170 other bills that had broad support but stalled last session. Praised as one of the most significant land preservation acts in decades, the law gives protected wilderness status to 2 million acres in nine states.

"This legislation guarantees that we will not take our forests, rivers, oceans, national parks, monuments, and wilderness areas for granted," Obama said during a ceremony in the ornate East Room of the White House.

In the audience was Rep. Bill Pascrell, who championed the park designation with fellow Paterson native Sen. Frank Lautenberg. Pascrell said his family insisted he come to Washington to see the bill signed, even though his mother died on Saturday.
Patersonís industrial history started with the nationís first treasury secretary, Alexander Hamilton, who advocated harnessing the power of the falls to break American dependence on manufacturing in Great Britain.

"Itís very important to the history of our country once you know what Hamilton had in mind," said Pascrell, a Democrat and former Paterson mayor.
The current mayor, Joey Torres also was at the ceremony, and was excited about the possibility that a national park would attract visitors and private sector investment.

"The idea is to create a destination thatís also a learning tool, that tells people this is where it all started, the move away from an agrarian to an industrial society," said Torres.
Pascrell said the first step in developing the park will be to build a partnership of city, state and federal officials and resources to craft a plan to preserve buildings and sites and develop appropriate programs for visitors.

The law does not provide federal funding yet, but Pascrell said he will seek to add a Paterson component to the Interior Department budget this year.
Leonard Zax, an expert in historic preservation and Paterson native leading a partnership to revitalize the cityís historic area, said new construction at the park could start ďin the next couple of years.Ē

The law Obama signed also gives national park status to the existing National Historic Site in West Orange where Thomas Edison made many of his discoveries. Lautenberg also sponsored provisions creating a commission to study rising acidity in oceans, and a grant program for states to protect environmentally sensitive coastal lands.

E-mail: jackson@northjersey.com

The 35-acre Paterson Great Falls National Historical Park will include the falls and the channels that powered textile mills that gave the Silk City its nickname, as well as the ruins of the first Colt firearms factory and a factory that was the nationís leading supplier of railroad locomotives in its day.

The park was just one provision in a massive public land preservation package Congressional leaders crafted from 170 other bills that had broad support but stalled last session. Praised as one of the most significant land preservation acts in decades, the law gives protected wilderness status to 2 million acres in nine states.

"This legislation guarantees that we will not take our forests, rivers, oceans, national parks, monuments, and wilderness areas for granted," Obama said during a ceremony in the ornate East Room of the White House.

In the audience was Rep. Bill Pascrell, who championed the park designation with fellow Paterson native Sen. Frank Lautenberg. Pascrell said his family insisted he come to Washington to see the bill signed, even though his mother died on Saturday.

Patersonís industrial history started with the nationís first treasury secretary, Alexander Hamilton, who advocated harnessing the power of the falls to break American dependence on manufacturing in Great Britain.
"Itís very important to the history of our country once you know what Hamilton had in mind," said Pascrell, a Democrat and former Paterson mayor.

The current mayor, Joey Torres also was at the ceremony, and was excited about the possibility that a national park would attract visitors and private sector investment.
"The idea is to create a destination thatís also a learning tool, that tells people this is where it all started, the move away from an agrarian to an industrial society," said Torres.

Pascrell said the first step in developing the park will be to build a partnership of city, state and federal officials and resources to craft a plan to preserve buildings and sites and develop appropriate programs for visitors.

The law does not provide federal funding yet, but Pascrell said he will seek to add a Paterson component to the Interior Department budget this year.
Leonard Zax, an expert in historic preservation and Paterson native leading a partnership to revitalize the cityís historic area, said new construction at the park could start ďin the next couple of years.Ē

The law Obama signed also gives national park status to the existing National Historic Site in West Orange where Thomas Edison made many of his discoveries. Lautenberg also sponsored provisions creating a commission to study rising acidity in oceans, and a grant program for states to protect environmentally sensitive coastal lands.
E-mail: jackson@northjersey.com

NYatKNIGHT
March 31st, 2009, 04:04 PM
National Historical Park, thank you. I was wondering what the actual designation was.
Very cool they have that. Now, keep it nice and attract some visitors.

mq2007
May 28th, 2009, 02:34 PM
Hi ..

My friends dad says that he received a letter saying that they have to move within 18 months..

They live 2 blocks away from Great Falls..

What could be the plans for the Great Falls..

Any Ideas?