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invictus77
December 26th, 2006, 06:06 AM
What are known as the best suburbs of the New York City area? Is it Jersey City, Hoboken, Bayonne, etc..?

Which one is generally the safest along with the quickest route by train to the NYC area?

Thanks for any help.

Formula86
December 26th, 2006, 10:10 AM
Good question. :) I'd like to know this, too.

Punzie
December 26th, 2006, 11:46 AM
What are known as the best suburbs of the New York City area?

Welcome to this site. We can better answer your question if you define "suburbs" and "New York City area."

There are suburb-like areas in all four outter boroughs of New York City.

If you have ruled out living anywhere in NYC, the suburbs of NYC are in: New Jersey, lower Westchester County, and western Nassau County.

ablarc
December 26th, 2006, 12:03 PM
...the suburbs of NYC are in: New Jersey, lower Westchester County, and western Nassau County.
...and southwest Connecticut. You could regard much of Long Island as suburban New York, as well as up the Hudson to almost Poughkeepsie.

Actually, the Census Bureau defines the concept.

When you say "best suburbs", what are your criteria? If you're rich, maybe nothing less than Scarsdale, Short Hills or Hempstead will do.

If you're on more of a budget you may end up in Weehawken, which has a nice view.

Punzie
December 26th, 2006, 12:08 PM
If you're rich, maybe nothing less than Scarsdale, Short Hills or Hempstead will do.

Hempstead?:eek:

Surely you mean the Town of North Hempstead!

ablarc
December 26th, 2006, 01:12 PM
Well Ok, not all of Hempstead.

By per capita income the wealthiest New York suburb is Hewlett Bay Park a village within the Town of Hempstead. It's number 18 on the list of 100 Highest-income places in the United States.

ramvid01
December 26th, 2006, 04:35 PM
Astoria is definitely not suburb like. If you want more suburban feel, I would advise areas closer to the Nassua Border (but there are a few pockets in the middle of Queens that are suburb like).

shocka
December 26th, 2006, 06:34 PM
Are you looking to Live in an area with houses, less traffic, basically suburban life minus the hussle but close to Manhattan?

In Queens, Forest Hills Gardens is a nice area, close to Austin street, you can find some really nice houses (1 mil+). Additionally you will be about a 30 minute ride into Manhattan.

Additionally in Queens, other nabes to look into are Bayside, Hollis Hills, Oakland Gardends, Douglaston, Great Neck. In my honest opinion these areas are great except for their commute into manhattan is dificult. Since there is no subway and you will have to drive to an LIRR station. Also the LIRR Frequency is not that great.

Then Nassau Long Island, for proximity to Manhattan by public transport I think Hicksville is the best option. Hicksville has the higest frquency of trains to/from Penn Station. I currently live in Hicksville and I would not move to any other area on LI, but being close to Manhattan is top priority to me. Addtionally Hicksville is close to Garden City where Roosevelt field mall and anything you could possibly want to buy is. Another advantage of Hicksville over many of the LIRR Stations is that parking is pretty easy if you live in the "Town of Oyster Bay", which includes Hicksville, Sysoset, Oyster Bay and others. You are also a good distance between the North and South Shore. I prefer the nightlife on the south shore, as there is none on the north shore, except Huntington Village.

Here is a post in the past about Long Island (http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?t=8835).


I wanted to touch on the mention of Town of Hempstead vs. North Hempstead. Towns within North Hempstead are continually listed as most expensive zip codes in America, spefically Upper Brookville, where it seems every house has these hidden driveway/streets leading to them. Old Westbury is also up there check out Polo Dr on http://www.mynassauproperty.com These are some insane houses.

Punzie
December 27th, 2006, 12:09 AM
Well Ok, not all of Hempstead.

By per capita income the wealthiest New York suburb is Hewlett Bay Park a village within the Town of Hempstead. It's number 18 on the list of 100 Highest-income places in the United States.

This is going to sound petty to most people who are not from Queens or Nassau County, but there is a huge difference between Hempstead and the Town of Hempstead.

You (Ablarc) are on the mark about the Town of Hempstead as a whole. The infamous "Five Towns" area on Long Island's South Shore is beautiful and inhabited by the wealthy. (Exception: Inwood.)

Hempstead is one zip code (11550) within the Town of Hempstead. Hempstead (11550) is in Central Nassau County, and is part industrial, part working class, and part low-income. Certain parts of Hempstead (11550) have a criminal element and are not particularly safe at night.

Needless to say, rentals and real estate prices in certain parts of Hempstead (11550) are low. It's right by the LIRR to Manhattan, and out-of-towners who look up the zip code may think they are getting especially good value...

Punzie
December 27th, 2006, 02:48 AM
so what areas of queens & brooklyn are suburbun like?

i want to make sure when i move to NY i dont just go from one suburb to another!

Bay Ridge suburban like?
Astoria suburban like?

I lived in Philadelphia for 2 years, so I know where you're coming from. There are certain areas of Philly that have close NYC counterparts.

You should make this a new question because it needs specific attention. If you don't mind saying what part of Philly you're from, (North, South, West, etc.) -- we can tell you which parts of NYC are just like where you're from, and which parts are a little different.

I'd be one of the people contributing to your topic, but you might be surprised how many other people know your city well.

invictus77
December 27th, 2006, 03:21 AM
Welcome to this site. We can better answer your question if you define "suburbs" and "New York City area."

There are suburb-like areas in all four outter boroughs of New York City.

If you have ruled out living anywhere in NYC, the suburbs of NYC are in: New Jersey, lower Westchester County, and western Nassau County.


Thanks for the replies thus far. I'm looking mainly for a place that is within a 30 minute train ride into Manhattan.

"New York City area" for me is basically Manhattan, Brooklyn and Queens, but mostly Manhattan though.

Cost isn't a very big consideration, but I like the concept of getting more bang for your buck in places like Jersey City( on the water), etc..

Another big factor for me is safety. I know parts of Jersey City has a bad wrap, but wasn't sure if it was like this at the water front.

invictus77
December 27th, 2006, 03:29 AM
Are you looking to Live in an area with houses, less traffic, basically suburban life minus the hussle but close to Manhattan?

In Queens, Forest Hills Gardens is a nice area, close to Austin street, you can find some really nice houses (1 mil+). Additionally you will be about a 30 minute ride into Manhattan.

Additionally in Queens, other nabes to look into are Bayside, Hollis Hills, Oakland Gardends, Douglaston, Great Neck. In my honest opinion these areas are great except for their commute into manhattan is dificult. Since there is no subway and you will have to drive to an LIRR station. Also the LIRR Frequency is not that great.

Then Nassau Long Island, for proximity to Manhattan by public transport I think Hicksville is the best option. Hicksville has the higest frquency of trains to/from Penn Station. I currently live in Hicksville and I would not move to any other area on LI, but being close to Manhattan is top priority to me. Addtionally Hicksville is close to Garden City where Roosevelt field mall and anything you could possibly want to buy is. Another advantage of Hicksville over many of the LIRR Stations is that parking is pretty easy if you live in the "Town of Oyster Bay", which includes Hicksville, Sysoset, Oyster Bay and others. You are also a good distance between the North and South Shore. I prefer the nightlife on the south shore, as there is none on the north shore, except Huntington Village.

Here is a post in the past about Long Island (http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?t=8835).


I wanted to touch on the mention of Town of Hempstead vs. North Hempstead. Towns within North Hempstead are continually listed as most expensive zip codes in America, spefically Upper Brookville, where it seems every house has these hidden driveway/streets leading to them. Old Westbury is also up there check out Polo Dr on http://www.mynassauproperty.com These are some insane houses.


Good info here.

Are there any places that have an abundance of greenery, but is still within a 30 minute train ride into Manhattan?

Generally, I like the concept of being close enough to Manhattan but being just far enough where there is a little less of the congestion and bustle.

Does any such place exist?

ablarc
December 27th, 2006, 07:50 AM
Are there any places that have an abundance of greenery, but is still within a 30 minute train ride into Manhattan?

Generally, I like the concept of being close enough to Manhattan but being just far enough where there is a little less of the congestion and bustle.

Does any such place exist?
Forest Hills Gardens, Queens.

Take the LIRR out there and look around. You'll forget about the others. At walking distance, it has a great shopping district; and it's even on the subway.

Exquisite.

JCMAN320
December 27th, 2006, 03:20 PM
The parts of Jersey City that "have a bard wrap" are Greenville and Lafayette is still in transition. Thw Waterfront and Downtown have the lowest crime rates in the city. Jersey City is the safest out of all the NJ cities. JC is like Brooklyn and Queens and the Bronx; they all have their good and bad areas.

shocka
December 29th, 2006, 01:34 AM
Good info here.

Are there any places that have an abundance of greenery, but is still within a 30 minute train ride into Manhattan?

Generally, I like the concept of being close enough to Manhattan but being just far enough where there is a little less of the congestion and bustle.

Does any such place exist?


As ablarc mentioned, Forest Hills Gardens is prob the perfect Mix of Suburb Life with City Life. The architecture of the houses in this area, are in my opinion some of the greatest in NY, then comes Garden City Park in Nassau County.. I am still pretty young and just crave the city life, but looking long term, FHG seems like the place I would like to settle down.

Greenery you can find ALL over Long Island. There are VERY few areas where you will not get a decent size front yard and back yard. The real secret if you crave greenery is to get a corner house.

millertime83
December 29th, 2006, 11:46 AM
Jersey City is the safest out of all the NJ cities.

actually, Brick, NJ is the safest city in the nation. :)

http://money.cnn.com/popups/2006/real_estate/best_worst/index.html

America's safest city
Brick Township, NJ
Key stat: 55.9 incidents of crime per 100,000 residents

This small city near the Jersey shore recorded the lowest rate of violent crime of any town of 75,000 residents or more, according to Morgan Quitno Press, an independent research publisher in Lawrence, Kansas, which used FBI statistics in its analysis.

Most of the top safest cities are small, commuter enclaves on the outskirts of much bigger cities. Many Brick Township residents, for example, commute to jobs in northern New Jersey and New York.


Hoboken is good if you plan on commuting to NYC. If you take the ferry, you can be in Manhattan in 5 minutes, or 15 minutes if you take the PATH train which is a subway.

LeCom
December 29th, 2006, 12:35 PM
Jersey City is not even a suburb. It is, so to say, an unincorporated part of the NYC that's across the river. The real "suburbs" on Jersey side begin beyond the Meadowlands.

LocoAko
December 29th, 2006, 12:55 PM
Jersey City is not even a suburb. It is, so to say, an unincorporated part of the NYC that's across the river. The real "suburbs" on Jersey side begin beyond the Meadowlands.

I'd agree. Do you mean literally RIGHT outside the city limits, or do you want the suburban feel? If you were in Jersey City you'd technically be outside city limits but you'd get the same feel as if you lived in Queens or Brooklyn. So I'm not sure how this would help you - if you were to live in JC you might as well consider the rest of NYC.

Downtown Jersey City is pretty safe as far as I can tell and it is absolutely beautiful. As JCMAN said there are good parts, and there are bad parts. Waterfront/Downtown is known for being safe though.

NewNewYorker
October 19th, 2009, 04:31 PM
Me and my partner are planning to move to NY for work and for just a fresh new start, you could say. We currently live in San Diego, CA and are planning to relocate in maybe 6 months at the earliest. I wanted to know if anyone knows a nice suburb with good schools, a low crime rate, and is gay friendly. Money wise, we're not too worried about affordability of a new home.

HoveringCheesecake
October 19th, 2009, 07:21 PM
Personally I think you should just jump right in and live in one of the boroughs. Suburbs are for chumps.

futurecity
October 19th, 2009, 08:29 PM
Stupid reply. Ignore the above poster. His response would make you believe that he actually looked like his avatar. LOL

scumonkey
October 19th, 2009, 09:07 PM
Personally I think you should just jump right in and live in one of the boroughs.I agree with this part of Hoverings response...if as you said-

Money wise, we're not too worried about affordability of a new home. It seems to me (also gay), that the further from the center you go, the less gay friendly it becomes.
As for ignoring someone... future is on quite a few ignore lists- including mine ;)

ZippyTheChimp
October 19th, 2009, 09:43 PM
future is on quite a few ignore lists- including mine ;)Did that happen after the "I wish I was born in China" remark?

OmegaNYC
October 19th, 2009, 10:10 PM
If you're looking specifically for suburbs, Northern NJ is pretty cool. Depending on your budget, you should look into parts of Bergen, Essex, or even Hudson County.

HoveringCheesecake
October 19th, 2009, 11:00 PM
I agree with this part of Hoverings response...if as you said-
It seems to me (also gay), that the further from the center you go, the less gay friendly it becomes.
As for ignoring someone... future is on quite a few ignore lists- including mine ;)

Indeed, this was my logic as well.

Good2cu
October 20th, 2009, 09:11 AM
I thought that Rochester County was quite the kind of place that the OP describes?

OmegaNYC
October 20th, 2009, 10:56 AM
^^^ If you're thinking of Monroe County ( where Rochester is located in ), that is no where near New York City.

NewNewYorker
October 20th, 2009, 12:08 PM
Are these suburbs far from the city? We will be commuting there for work. Would it better to just live in the city? And this is probably a silly question, but what is a "bourough"?

OmegaNYC
October 20th, 2009, 12:43 PM
A Borough, is one of the 5 fundamential constituents that form NYC. In short, NYC is broken up into 5 Boroughs - Manhattan, Brooklyn, Queens, The Bronx, and Staten Island.

The suburbs that I've named are located in northern New Jersey. That is a part of the NYC metro area. Depending on where you live, you can be directly across the Hudson River, or about a dozen miles away from Midtown.

The only area that is far away is Rochester, which is in Upstate NY.

futurecity
October 20th, 2009, 01:31 PM
Excuse me...... calling someone a "CHUMP" for living in a suburb is offensive and childish. :rolleyes:

HoveringCheesecake
October 20th, 2009, 02:36 PM
Excuse me...... calling someone a "CHUMP" for living in a suburb is offensive and childish. :rolleyes:

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v423/meh_cd/DoubleFacePalm.jpg

Good2cu
October 20th, 2009, 05:35 PM
^^^ If you're thinking of Monroe County ( where Rochester is located in ), that is no where near New York City.

Thanks for pointing that out, I was actually referring to Westchester county.

BrooklynRider
October 21st, 2009, 12:18 AM
I agree that living in the city is the best bet.

It is hard to point to a specifically "gay" suburb. The village of Huntington and the city of Long Beach on Long Island are both gay friendly.

I do agree that living in the city,specifically Manhattan or Brownstone Brooklyn would be your best bet. You could also check out Forest Hills, Kew Gardens, and Astoria in Queens.

With the exception of a few neighborhoods, gays are pretty much assimilated into the fabric of the city. There really aren't any "gay" areas any longer. We live everywhere.

I think that the suburbs are hit or miss. Personally, I wouldn't want to live in any NY Metro suburbs due to the traffic.

NYC or Jersey City and Hoboken on the other side of the Hudson all offer great mass transit.

For me, I could only live in a "walking city", e.g. NY, Phila., Boston, DC, Chicago, S.F.

Oh look, I made it all about me.

Maybe, you need to ask more specific questions.

BrooklynRider
October 21st, 2009, 12:20 AM
FutureCity and HoveringCheesecake-

Please take your bickering to the "Yo Momma" thread in the "Anything Goes" sub-forum.

HoveringCheesecake
October 21st, 2009, 02:20 PM
FutureCity and HoveringCheesecake-

Please take your bickering to the "Yo Momma" thread in the "Anything Goes" sub-forum.

There's nothing to bicker about. I gave my opinion and was jumped on for it.

I will not clutter up the thread further, though. My apologies.

lofter1
October 21st, 2009, 05:29 PM
The important criteria for NewNewYorker seems to be two-fold: (1) Gay-friendly and (2) Good schools for the kids.

NNY: Are you looking for good public school districts? Or are you looking to fork over a sweet $25K + per kid / per year for a good private school?

londonlawyer
October 21st, 2009, 10:44 PM
Me and my partner are planning to move to NY for work and for just a fresh new start, you could say. We currently live in San Diego, CA and are planning to relocate in maybe 6 months at the earliest. I wanted to know if anyone knows a nice suburb with good schools, a low crime rate, and is gay friendly. Money wise, we're not too worried about affordability of a new home.

NYC has some of the nicest suburbs in the country. Westchester County and Connecticut have the following magnificent towns:

Westchester:

Bronxville (20 miles from Manhattan)
Scarsdale (25 miles from Manhattan)
Larchmont (25 miles from Manhattan)
Harrison (25 miles from Manhattan)
Rye (27 miles from Manhattan)
Purchase (27 miles from Manhattan)
Armonk (30 miles from Manhattan)
Bedford (35 miles from Manhattan)
Pound Ridge (40 miles from Manhattan)

Fairfield Cty. in CT:

Greenwich (35 miles from Manhattan)
Darien (40 miles from Manhattan)
New Canaan (40 miles from Manhattan)
Westport (50 miles from Manhattan)

NJ also has scores of unbelievably beautiful towns, but the train connections are not nearly as good as they are in Westchester and CT. LI has nice towns too; however, LI is so densely packed that stunning towns are sandwiched near crappy ones.

If you want to research these towns, look at these websites:

www.houlihanlawrence.com (Westchester)

www.raveis.com (Ct)

NewNewYorker
October 28th, 2009, 04:32 PM
The important criteria for NewNewYorker seems to be two-fold: (1) Gay-friendly and (2) Good schools for the kids.

NNY: Are you looking for good public school districts? Or are you looking to fork over a sweet $25K + per kid / per year for a good private school?

We definetly prefer a good public school.

BrooklynRider
October 30th, 2009, 11:11 PM
I'm in Park Slope. You won't find a better elementary school than P.S. 321. People lie about their address to get their kids into this school. Park Slope is an historic district in Brooklyn. It borders Prospect Park and is served by multiple subway lines. It was built as a suburb tothe city in the late 19th century. It is a landmarked district, which preserves the low-rise brownstone neighborhood. There are taller condo hi-rises by the park. It is a very LGBT friendly neighborhood and has the best (if not only) gay bar in Brooklyn. It hosts Brooklyn's Gay Pride Parade, but also hosts a great Halloween Parade that brings out the whole neighborhood. It's a progressive neighborhood and voted something like 98% Democrat in the last election. It is also home to the prestigious Berkley-Carroll School. A lot of kids going to P.S. 321 ultimately switch to this private school for secondary education. For kids in the NYC public school system there are choices as they advance, often based on academic standings. For example, Brooklyn Tech and Stuyvesant High Schools are very prestigious schools. They are both public schools. If you want more info on the neighborhood, feel free to Private Message me.

00100CNichols
January 2nd, 2010, 05:00 PM
If you're looking specifically for suburbs, Northern NJ is pretty cool. Depending on your budget, you should look into parts of Bergen, Essex, or even Hudson County.

I'm kinda looking for the same things as the OP. I'm also from CA but my concern is the snow - what's the weather like in the places mentioned above? I know there's snow and it's cold etc... not to sound stupid but what areas have the least amount of snow?

NYatKNIGHT
January 4th, 2010, 03:12 PM
Usually areas north and west of the city get more snow. Usually.

bestplace2move.com
May 24th, 2010, 03:40 PM
You might want to try a community search here (http://www.bestplace2move.com/). It does a comparison of suburbs, towns and villages all within commute distance of NYC, highlighting the strengths of each community. Everyone's needs are different. Its quite hard to find this kind of comparative information on the web.

bestplace2move.com
July 12th, 2010, 01:31 PM
We've put up a searchable database designed to help folks find suburbs and towns that suit the values and lifestyles that are their own. It can be found here (http://www.bestplace2move.com/). Its pretty easy to use and it integrates information from greatschools.org (http://www.greatschools.org/) - a great site - as well as important aspects of commuting for those that want to be in easy reach of NYC, among other things. But one is always looking for features that reflect the changing needs and varied ways that people look to find where is the best places to live.

In our computer, social media age we all have a better chance than ever to discover neighborhoods and towns where we would never have thought of living in before. Word of mouth and statistics are everywhere. What are things that would be important to you when figuring out where you would like to live outside of New York City?