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View Full Version : Enjoy your B-r-r-reakfast! MMM Bacon! Thanks Mom!



Gregory Tenenbaum
January 21st, 2007, 07:53 AM
But before you eat that bacon, consider this documentary first.

http://video.google.co.uk/videoplay?docid=-513747926833909134&q=Meet+Your+Meat

It's shocking when you realise that pigs are probably as intelligent as dolphins and almost as much as humans.

In the 19th Century statutes were enacted to make the use of dogs to pull sleds and carts illegal and generally provide for the welfare of animals.

I just wonder when we will start considering treating animals bound for slaughter with greater dignity.

lofter1
January 21st, 2007, 09:54 AM
Didn't watch the vid, but ...

I've just put the uncooked bacon I was going to cook for breakfast back in the fridge :(

Alas, oatmeal sans crispy bacon this morning.

Thanks for getting my Sunday off to such a tasty start, GT :cool:

ZippyTheChimp
January 21st, 2007, 10:08 AM
Too bad, Lofter.

Had no effect on my breakfast demeanor.

http://www.localarcade.com/arcade_art/data/thumbnails/9/Homer_Simpson_Sideart_Homebrew.jpg

ManhattanKnight
January 21st, 2007, 10:09 AM
http://img264.imageshack.us/img264/7442/35208dq.jpg

NoyokA
January 21st, 2007, 12:52 PM
New Yorkers don't eat breakfast.

MidtownGuy
January 21st, 2007, 02:30 PM
Thanks GT. When I was 9 years old I checked out a book on factory farms from the local library. The next day I told my parents I would never eat meat again. And I never did.

Punzie
January 21st, 2007, 06:30 PM
I haven't eaten meat or pork since I left home in my mid-teens, but I can't watch PETA footage because it makes me feel guilty about eating poultry, fish, and even dairy.:(

Fabrizio
January 21st, 2007, 07:04 PM
I love pork: prosciutto, good salami, mortadella, pancetta, speck, coppa. I love good sausage raw... spead on bread or on grilled polenta. The best lunch I can eat is salami, cheese, bread and wine.

http://www.norciaonline.it/norcino.php

----

Thinly sliced pork fat is a great delicacy (on toasted bread is great):

http://www.lardodicolonnata.org/

---

A pork fat festival, "Festa di Lardo":

http://www.festalardo.it/

---

I only buy meat from my butcher. It is sliced in front of me. Find a good butcher... ask where the meat comes from...find out about his suppliers.

http://www.eataly.it/

http://www.slowfood.com/[/QUOTE]

NoyokA
January 21st, 2007, 07:14 PM
I love good sausage raw... spead on bread or on grilled polenta.

That must be a European thing. Half my ancestry is German with relatives that originated in a German area of Hungary. As such I'm familiar with good paprikash and goulash and I ocassionally visit the Hungarian Butcher in Yorkville, I once tried a sample of their blood-sausage and it was probably the worst thing I've ever had. My Americanized stomach just can't stomach raw red meat and blood.

Fabrizio
January 21st, 2007, 07:29 PM
Interesting: my ancestry is half Italian... my mothers side originated in a German area of Hungary.

Personally, I dont care for blood sausage or blood products. The raw sausage we eat here is meaty and fatty.

Punzie
January 22nd, 2007, 04:16 AM
The only animal my grandparents and ancestors ate was goat. The soil in the "Old Country" was very rocky and poor quality, and goats were the only creatures that fared well.

I tried goat once, and it tasted like turkey. How awful I felt when the (foreign) restaurant owner came up to me and said: "I assure the most tender meat, for that goat was a baby when she was slaughtered.":(

OmegaNYC
January 22nd, 2007, 02:55 PM
PETA can kiss my butt. I still love my meat.


http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/thumb/5/54/Steak.jpg/300px-Steak.jpg

Ninjahedge
January 22nd, 2007, 03:15 PM
It sounds bad, but I like meat too.

I feel the worst, however, about things such as veal, or stupid things like the old method of shark fin soup (cutting the fin off and then "releasing" the hark....to die from blood loss which they never admit to happening....)

I think the only thing we have to look at is the levels we consume. We do not need that 24 oz. porterhouse. We do not need to eat like Pomeranians either, but moderation is the key in so many different areas.

We also need to further the research in tissue generation. If we get to the point where we can "manufacture" beef by literally "growing" the muscle tissue, and I mean real tissue not just the protien strands, this all might be a moot point. The REALLy macabre thing about this last bit here is that we are much more likely to develop this last technology for medical purposes (transplant, grafting, etc) and then evolve it to the point where it is cheap enough to use as a grown consumable.

And no, I am not saying Soylent, but the analogy will undoubtedly be made.




One final thing though guys. This is a problem that I see in many different controvercial topics. You get all the hardliners taking a strong position about their own view on the matter. Only a few ever "convert" when things are expressed in this manner.

If we all learned to start listening to the moderates. TRUE moderates that is, not just the "center" of whatever extreme positions both sides take, maybe we would be able to work to a better solution than the small % of people that undergo total conversion.

If every person in the US had meat 1 meal less a week, I think you wuold see more of an effect than if you got millions to go vegan.

Just a thought. Or three.

Schadenfrau
January 22nd, 2007, 08:51 PM
I was a vegetarian for ten years, and now eat meat maybe once a week, if that. Call me crazy, but I don't really feel guilty, and I don't feel like like I'm missing anything, either.

pianoman11686
January 22nd, 2007, 11:30 PM
Fabrizio, I agree: pork rules. My ancestry's Polish, and we've always eaten our fair share of it. Kielbasa, anyone?

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/9/9a/Kielbasas.jpg/690px-Kielbasas.jpg

NoyokA
January 22nd, 2007, 11:31 PM
Fabrizio, I agree: pork rules. My ancestry's Polish, and we've always eaten our fair share of it. Kielbasa, anyone?

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/9/9a/Kielbasas.jpg/690px-Kielbasas.jpg

I love a good kielbasa.

Punzie
January 22nd, 2007, 11:39 PM
This has nothing to do with the morality of eating pork: Aren't you guys concerned about your weight, cholesterol, and overall physical fitness?

pianoman11686
January 22nd, 2007, 11:46 PM
Because I'm hardly ever at home now, I eat kielbasa only a few times a year, mainly during holidays. In Durham, the only cold cuts I'm eating are the leaner cuts at Subway and Quizno's. ;)

Overall, though, pork is still my preferred cold cut of choice.

Punzie
January 23rd, 2007, 12:01 AM
Ahh... I was under the impression that you ate platters of pork, the likes of which you displayed, every day!

Stern- You said that HALF of your family ate a lot of pork; what country was the other half of your family from, and what did they eat? And if was very different from pork, how come you don't eat like them?

Ninja- The reason why this topic probably won't be too controversial is because nobody (so far) has suggested legislating each other's eating styles. Recall from the controversial topics that some people were calling for major changes in legislation that might negatively affect others.

NoyokA
January 23rd, 2007, 12:23 AM
Stern- You said that HALF of your family ate a lot of pork; what country was the other half of your family from, and what did they eat? And if was very different from pork, how come you don't eat like them?


I didn't say that half of my family ate alot of pork. I said that half of my family is of german background, that would be on my mom's side. My father's side is jewish, that side of the family originated from Austria and Russia, since both countries kicked out there jewish populations, I claim that I am jewish, not Austrian or Russian, that side of my family has no pride or connection to those countries. That said I am half German and half Jewish. An interesting combination that perplexes almost anyone I tell it to. That said I think its probably one of the better combinations there is to be.

As far as the the concerns of weight, cholesterol, and overall physical fitness with Pork, you've seen my pictures.

Punzie
January 23rd, 2007, 12:59 AM
From the way you guys talked, and that picture of the pork... !

Stern, you have interesting ancestry, and I don't understand how people can be perplexed about a Jewish/German marriage. I think a thread on members' "roots" would be interesting.

I have eaten Kielbasa and Porterhouse steak, and they are unbelievably delicious. I definitely feel like I'm sacrificing something wonderful by foregoing meat and pork.

pianoman11686
January 23rd, 2007, 01:11 AM
Come back to the dark side, Rapunzel. :D

More Polish pork delicacies: (for anyone who would like to give some of these a shot, the meat markets in Greenpoint still turn out a very good product)


Head Cheese
http://www.polana.com/images/uploads/810504.jpg

A real Polish ham (Boars Head: eat your heart out)
http://www.polana.com/images/uploads/810411.jpg

Polish pate
http://www.polana.com/images/uploads/810506.jpg

Canadian bacon, Polish style: (also superior to the traditional canadian bacons, IMO)
http://www.polana.com/images/uploads/810507.jpg

Pork loin bacon (again Oscar Mayer, eat your heart out). You don't even have to fry this. Just put it right in your sandwich:
http://www.polana.com/images/uploads/810508.jpg

More delicious ham
http://www.polana.com/images/uploads/958_278_large.jpg

And I bet most of you have never heard of this before. It's a Polish style Wiener, made of veal:
http://www.polana.com/images/uploads/810401.jpg

Man, all this is making me hungry and homesick!

Punzie
January 23rd, 2007, 01:48 AM
Thank you for your generous offer, but I think I'll walk to the Queens Farm tomorrow and visit her:

http://thumbs.dreamstime.com/thumb_59/1147523463E00Knx.jpg

Gregory Tenenbaum
January 23rd, 2007, 04:19 AM
This has nothing to do with the morality of eating pork: Aren't you guys concerned about your weight, cholesterol, and overall physical fitness?

Apparently its the closest thing to human flesh.

Think of why we use porcine allografts (eg heart valves, other organs) from pigs for human transplantation.

They are very intelligent animals too.

Pork eaters are all closet Ed Gains , I tell you.

Psst Rapunzel my photo is up now on the other thread.

Punzie
January 23rd, 2007, 04:59 AM
This has nothing to do with the morality of eating pork: Aren't you guys concerned about your weight, cholesterol, and overall physical fitness?

I worded the intro to that question poorly. What I was really saying: "Guys, I'm not going to attack your beliefs at this moment because I'm interested in how you feel about the health aspect of eating pork."

In fact, I do think it's immoral to eat pigs, unless it's basic human survival.

In the real world, I keep my opinions about this to myself because... I like being popular.:o


Hey, I just learned that George Clooney's 18-y.o. pet pot-bellied pig died last December 1. Clooney said that the longest relationship he had ever had was with this pet:

http://static.flickr.com/37/106687035_dd71261557_o.jpg

Gregory Tenenbaum
January 23rd, 2007, 05:46 AM
I worded the intro to that question poorly.

I understood you fine.

As for last resort eating, well humans have resorted to far worse than pigs but I tend to agree with you about not eating pork after watching that video.

I do regularly eat rabbit and enjoy it, it's really the same as eating a large rat; both are rodentus.

Fabrizio
January 23rd, 2007, 05:53 AM
"Hey, I just learned that George Clooney's 18-y.o. pet pot-bellied pig died last December 1. Clooney said that the longest relationship he had ever had was with this pet.."

Actually, its been with his "bodyguard" in Como.

ZippyTheChimp
January 23rd, 2007, 07:07 AM
It's great to be alive and at the top of the food chain.

Gregory Tenenbaum
January 23rd, 2007, 07:45 AM
It's great to be alive and at the top of the food chain.

The top?

Great whites and malaria bacterium don't think like that. To them, you're just a means of survival.

Luca
January 23rd, 2007, 07:58 AM
I buy pork and beef from a farmer whose animals are 'very happy' (...well up to the point they get killed, anyhow) and live as naturally as is possible (no feedlots, etc.).

I think sourcing is important.

And Tenebaum: people eat a lot more sharks than sharks eat people...

ManhattanKnight
January 23rd, 2007, 08:34 AM
Canadian Man Accused of Serial Killings

By JEREMY HAINSWORTH

http://img156.imageshack.us/img156/9974/bacon3rk.jpg

NEW WESTMINSTER, British Columbia (Jan. 23) - Prosecutors say accused serial killer Robert William Pickton wanted to murder 50 women, and jurors are expected to watch videotaped interviews on Tuesday in which he acknowledges coming just one victim short of his that macabre goal.

Robert William Pickton has been charged with 26 counts of first-degree murder. Pickton, 56, is charged with 26 counts of first-degree murder in what many consider the most sensational murder trial Canadians have ever faced. Most of his alleged victims were prostitutes and drug addicts who vanished from a drug-ridden Vancouver neighborhood in the 1990s. He has pleaded not guilty to the first six counts.

The other 20 counts of murder are to be heard in a separate trial.

Prosecutor Derrill Prevett opened the trial Monday, stunning the courtroom by saying Pickton had told investigators, including an undercover police officer planted in his jail cell, that he had slain 49 women.

"I was going to do one more and make it an even 50," Prevett quoted Pickton as telling investigators. "I made my own grave by being sloppy."

Pickton went on to describe himself as a mass murderer who deserved to be on death row, according to Prevett.

But defense lawyer Peter Ritchie told jurors Pickton did not kill or participate in the six murders he is on trial for now. He asked them to pay close attention to Pickton's demeanor when they watch the upcoming videotapes of his interrogations, in particular his level of sophistication. He did not address Pickton's alleged murder confessions.

"When you watch the videotapes, when you listen to them, pay close attention to what Mr. Pickton says and the manner in which he expresses himself," Ritchie told the jurors.

Ritchie also asked the jury to listen closely to details regarding Pickton's relationship with his brother, David.

Both brothers raised pigs on the family's 17-acre farm outside Vancouver, where investigators say they threw drunken raves with prostitutes and drugs. After Robert Pickton's arrest in February 2002, health officials issued a tainted meat advisory to neighbors who may have bought pork from his farm, concerned that it may have contained human remains.

Jurors had been warned that details of the case, until now under a publication ban in Canada, would be horrific. As details began to emerge Monday, some relatives of the victims began to cry and leave the courtroom.

After Pickton was arrested and the first traces of DNA from some missing women were allegedly found on the farm, the buildings were razed and the province spent an estimated $61 million to sift through soil there.

Prevett said the government would prove that Pickton murdered the six women and butchered their remains. As a successful pig farmer, he said, Pickton had the expertise and equipment to dispose of them.

The trial covers the murders of Sereena Abotsway, Mona Wilson, Andrea Joesbury, Brenda Wolfe, Georgina Papin and Marnie Frey.

When police first visited the farm in 2002 to investigate, they found two skulls in a bucket inside a freezer in Pickton's mobile home. DNA testing identified the skulls as belonging to Abotsway and Joesbury, two missing sex workers from an impoverished Vancouver neighborhood.

"The heads of the individuals had been cut in two, vertically," Prevett said. "With the skulls were left and right hands and the front parts of the left and right feet."

He said both skulls had wounds caused by 22-caliber bullets. Investigators found a Smith & Wesson rifle in Pickton's laundry room, sheathed in plastic with a sex toy attached. The toy had the combined DNA of Pickton and another victim, Wilson, Prevett said.

Prevett said one of Joesbury's earrings was found in the slaughterhouse. He said human bones were found mixed with manure and that part of Wolfe's jaw, with five teeth still attached, was found in a pig trough.

Pickton, clean-shaven with a bald crown and shoulder-length hair, sat emotionless in a specially built defendant's box surrounded by bulletproof glass. During pretrial hearings, he occasionally chuckled to himself or scribbled in a notebook.

If found guilty of more than 14 charges, Pickton would become the worst convicted killer in Canadian history, after Marc Lepine, who gunned down 14 women at the Ecole Polytechnic in Montreal in 1989 before shooting himself.

Copyright 2007 The Associated Press.

lofter1
January 23rd, 2007, 10:28 AM
Both brothers raised pigs on the family's 17-acre farm outside Vancouver, where investigators say they threw drunken raves with prostitutes and drugs. After Robert Pickton's arrest in February 2002, health officials issued a tainted meat advisory to neighbors who may have bought pork from his farm, concerned that it may have contained human remains.

... Prevett said the government would prove that Pickton murdered the six women and butchered their remains. As a successful pig farmer, he said, Pickton had the expertise and equipment to dispose of them.


^^^ Puts a wrinkle in the call to "Buy Local (http://timethief.wordpress.com/2006/06/25/buy-local-food/)" ...

:eek: :eek: :eek:

Gregory Tenenbaum
January 23rd, 2007, 11:57 AM
Ed Gein, Robert Pickton, Leatherface, Hannibal Lecter - take your pick. It's fascinating what lies under the surface of ordinary people.. Just read my post on the scariest movie thread and be sure to check out the Wayne Gacy bio. Amazing.

Ever seen a hogs head up close? Looks pretty much like us. Yet we eat them. They have amazing intelligence, more than dogs do. Yet we beat them and eat them and have the chutzpah to criticize the Chinamen who do the same with dogs.

Another thing. Very popular in Japan and Germany and other parts of Europe is horsemeat. In fact, in Japan, you can eat raw horsemeat (much like the Japanese' ancient ancestors from the wilds of Siberia and Upper Mongolia did).

I've even had raw horse meat flavored ice-cream. It's popular in Japan.

OmegaNYC
January 23rd, 2007, 12:14 PM
Pork chops anyone??

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/6/64/Pork_chops_served.jpg/200px-Pork_chops_served.jpg

Gregory Tenenbaum
January 24th, 2007, 04:05 AM
That was your dinner?

OmegaNYC
January 24th, 2007, 03:31 PM
That was your dinner?


I wish. My dinner last night was:

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/thumb/2/23/Cup_noodles_1_2_3.jpg/300px-Cup_noodles_1_2_3.jpg

Yup, what a feast!

Gregory Tenenbaum
January 24th, 2007, 05:06 PM
The founder of Cup o Noodles died I think last week. One of the most wealthy men in the Land of Japan.

He invented instant noodles by finding a method to pre cook them by flash frying them. Sounds unhealthy but sure makes for a quick cup o noodles when you need them.

No pork or other meats in those I presume?

OmegaNYC
January 24th, 2007, 05:12 PM
I had the shrimp flavor. It did had the little "shrimps" in them. I Don't know if they are real, or not.

Gregory Tenenbaum
January 24th, 2007, 05:19 PM
I had the shrimp flavor. It did had the little "shrimps" in them. I Don't know if they are real, or not.

Aha Omega now this is a philosophical question that I grapple with every time I eat shrimp soup/noodles too. Dont know the answer myself either.

Punzie
January 24th, 2007, 07:07 PM
I do regularly eat rabbit and enjoy it, it's really the same as eating a large rat; both are rodentus.

Minor technical correction:

Rabbits are not Rodentus; they are Lagomorpha, family Leporidae.

A lot of people think they are rodents because they destroy crops in much the same way as rodents do.


I could never eat rabbit because a close friend of mine owns two indoor pet rabbits in his Queens home.

lofter1
January 24th, 2007, 07:13 PM
The founder of Cup o Noodles died I think last week. One of the most wealthy men in the Land of Japan.

No mo' Momofuku

newcriterion.com (http://www.newcriterion.com/weblog/2007/01/no-mo-momofuku.html)
[Posted 5:20 PM by Stefan Beck]

Speaking of college (http://www.newcriterion.com/weblog/2007/01/bug-man-on-campus.html), higher education recently lost a man to which it owes an incalculable debt: Momofuku Ando. Never heard of him? I hadn't, either, though he invented (http://www.economist.com/obituary/displaystory.cfm?story_id=8548461) the means of nutrition delivery I relied on for four undergraduate years.

In 1958 instant noodles went on the market, yellowish wormy bricks in cellophane bags, and were laughed at by fresh-noodle makers all over Japan. They were just a high-tech craze, costing six times as much as the fresh stuff; they would never catch on. By the end of the first year Mr Ando had sold 13m bags and had attracted a dozen competitors. He never looked back. In 1971 came noodles in heat-proof polystyrene cups, so that the hungry did not even need to get their bowls out of the cupboard. The Japanese voted instant noodles their most important 20th-century invention, Sony Walkmans notwithstanding. Mr Ando's firm, Nissin, became a $3 billion global enterprise. Mr. Ando was also a philosopher of sorts, justifying his admittedly less than healthy creation with these gnostic sayings:
Peace will come when people have food.
Eating wisely will enhance beauty and health.
The creation of food will serve society. It's not exactly Bushido, but it's a start. What remains for us now but to peel off the lid, add boiling water, and observe three minutes of silence?

***

http://www.space-travel.com/images/food-noodle-nissin-momofuku-ando-afp-bg.jpg
AFP Photo by Yoshikazu Tsuno

Momofuku Ando, Nissin food products chairman
and popularly known as maker of instant noodles
displays the instant noodles for astronauts called
'Space Ram' during a press conference at the company's
Instant Noodle Museum in Osaka, 27 July 2005.

Japanese astronaut Soichi Noguchi brought with her the
first 'space noodle' aboard Space Shuttle Discovery 26 July.

lofter1
January 24th, 2007, 07:16 PM
I had the shrimp flavor. It did had the little "shrimps" in them. I Don't know if they are real, or not.


... some, after many portions, could make an unthinking mantra of the list of ingredients:
Wheat Flour,


Palm Oil (Tocopherols),


Tapioca Starch,


Salt,


Dehydrated Vegetables (Cabbage, Green Onion, Carrot),


Disodium Guanylate,


Disodium Inosinate.

http://us.st11.yimg.com/us.st.yimg.com/I/mex-grocer_1932_11607680

lofter1
January 24th, 2007, 07:20 PM
My life saver in college: http://www.nissinfoods.com/topramen/

lofter1
January 24th, 2007, 07:25 PM
And wouldn't ya know ...

The Official Ramen Homepage (http://mattfischer.com/ramen)

MidtownGuy
January 24th, 2007, 08:38 PM
I remember those from college days. With toast and a soda, stood in as a complete meal plenty of nights. Now I can't look at them.

kz1000ps
January 24th, 2007, 08:42 PM
Unfortunately I'm still in a Ramen phase of life, although when I do eat the stuff I only use maybe a third to a half of the "flavoring" packet since it's pretty much straight salt. No need for 74% of my daily sodium intake on one freakin' brick!

ablarc
January 24th, 2007, 09:30 PM
Disodium Guanylate
You know what that is, don't you?

lofter1
January 24th, 2007, 10:40 PM
Hmmmm ... let's see ...

Di -- Two

Sodium -- Salt

Guan(y) -- errrr, couldn't be from the Spanish "guano" -- could it? :eek:

Late -- from the Italian for "milk" ???

If so that would mean:

" 2 - salty - merda - milk "

:confused: :eek:

I see that wikipedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Disodium_guanylate) has a clearer explanation ... and basically it's hidden MSG :mad:

Disodium guanylate (E627), chemical formula C10H14N5O8P, is a food additive (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Food_additive) used as a flavor enhancer (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flavor_enhancer), in synergy with monosodium glutamate (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Monosodium_glutamate) (the sodium (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sodium) salt (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Salt) of glutamic acid (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glutamic_acid), MSG). As it is a fairly expensive additive, it is not used independently of glutamic acid; if disodium guanylate is present in a list of ingredients but MSG does not appear to be, it is likely that glutamic acid is provided as part of another ingredient such as a processed soy protein complex.

Disodium guanylate is a flavor enhancer derived from dried fish or dried seaweed. It is a by-product of disodium inosinate (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Disodium_inosinate). It is also known as Flavour enhancer 627 or Flavour Enhancer E627. It is found in instant noodles :D , potato chips and snacks, savoury rice, tinned vegetables, cured meats, packet soup :rolleyes: .

I think I'll refer to it as "Flavour Enhancer E627" from here on out ...

lofter1
January 24th, 2007, 10:43 PM
The scuttlebutt (http://www.truthinlabeling.org/nomsg.html) on places that claim "No MSG Added" :( :eek:

Ninjahedge
January 25th, 2007, 09:16 AM
1. How do you scuttle a butt.

2. Don't tell me.

3. The noodle soups acted as a good base. Getting that "$1 Chicken" from boston market and some fresh scallions made the noodle soups (or instants) taste so much better than warm chicken flavored salt water.

Gregory Tenenbaum
January 25th, 2007, 10:44 AM
Minor technical correction:

Rabbits are not Rodentus; they are Lagomorpha, family Leporidae.

A lot of people think they are rodents because they destroy crops in much the same way as rodents do.

I could never eat rabbit because a close friend of mine owns two indoor pet rabbits in his Queens home.

Thank you Rapunzel!

I think that having rabbits is a good way to eat more lettuce and cabbage - you can share it with your rabbit and you won't throw as much out. Good for developing healthy eating "habbits" (not eating rabbits).

Ninjahedge
January 25th, 2007, 11:49 AM
Rabbit habit.....
http://www.andreazuill.com/images/zuill/op-rabbitnun.jpg

lofter1
January 25th, 2007, 12:31 PM
I could never eat rabbit because a close friend of mine owns two indoor pet rabbits in his Queens home.


I understand your point, but you're missing out on something great (though maybe not for breakfast) ...

Pappardelle con Coniglio, Funghi, e Vino

RECIPE (http://ciaoitalia.com/rc_recipe_view.php?recipeid=163&SESS=897aebe429c9647cd929cec1a007d72d)

Ninjahedge
January 25th, 2007, 01:51 PM
Sounds good.......

Fabrizio
January 25th, 2007, 03:38 PM
Ok Lofter....we want you to really impress your friends:

Just put some good olive in a wide pan. When its hot add the rabbitt pieces. You can flour them before hand if you want. When the pieces are nice and brown remove and set them aside. In the hot oil add finely chopped carrot, onion, celery... a whole garlic clove... a few sage leaves (or rosemary, or bay leaf if you prefer). Saute... scape around with a wooden spoon... soften and just lightly brown. Salt. After a few min. add white wine (red if you dont have white, is ok). Boil down the wine. Add some canned tomato. Some tomato concentrate too. Put the rabbitt and juices back in the pan. Finish cooking. You might need to add a ladle of broth or hot water. Do all of this on the stove top... not an oven. Cook nice and slow.... the oil and tomato must bind. When the rabbitt is done remove. The rabbitt is your second course. You do not eat the rabbitt and the pasta together. Youll eat it with a salad and some roasted potatos that you cooked in the oven. Youll dress your pasta with the sauce remaining in the pan. You might want to cook this sauce down a bit if there is too much liquid. Id swirl in some butter. Remove the garlic clove. Maybe pass it through a food mill. If you dont want the rabbitt as a second course you can finely slice-up the rabbit and add it to the sauce if you like. If you do want to make this with mushrooms, get dried porcini. soak them in warm water, chop and add them with the carrots and onion. Use the soaking water too. You dont go through all of this trouble and add cultivated mushrooms... it just does not exist.

lofter1
January 25th, 2007, 03:48 PM
Mmmmm ^^^ What time is dinner ?? And what can I bring ????

Fabrizio
January 25th, 2007, 04:55 PM
Some good Chinese take-out. I'm dyin' for it.

lofter1
January 26th, 2007, 12:29 AM
One of the worst Chinese dinners I ever had was in the heart of Rome :eek: ...

Punzie
January 26th, 2007, 01:15 AM
Pappardelle con Coniglio, Funghi, e Vino

RECIPE (http://ciaoitalia.com/rc_recipe_view.php?recipeid=163&SESS=897aebe429c9647cd929cec1a007d72d)

I like this recipe! I'm going to substitute 4 pounds of cut-up chicken for the rabbit.:)

Gregory Tenenbaum
January 26th, 2007, 08:15 AM
One of the worst Chinese dinners I ever had was in the heart of Rome :eek: ...

Rome? You don't need to go that far for a bad Chinese dinner. In New York I once had a bad experience when I ordered the "Subway Rabbit Special with Rice".

lofter1
January 26th, 2007, 09:16 AM
"Subway Rabbit" :eek: :confused:

http://www.flickr.com/photos/zespiral/345328886/

Gregory Tenenbaum
January 26th, 2007, 11:29 AM
Source: Wall Street Journal, May 31, 1991

GUANGZHOU, China -- The Cantonese people of south China are legendary for eating anything that moves -- and some things that are still moving. The food market here features cats, raccoons, owls, doves and snakes along with bear and tiger's paw, dried deer penis and decomposed monkey skeletons.
Now, this rich culinary tradition, along with rising disposable income in this most prosperous city in China, has inspired kitchen utensil salesman Zhang Guoxun to open what is believed to be China's first restaurant dedicated to serving rat.

That's right: Rat. Rat with Chestnut and Duck. Lemon Deep Fried Rat. Satayed Rat Slices with Vermicelli. In fact, the menu lists 30 different rat dishes, even including Liquored Rat Flambe, along with more mundane dishes such as Hot Pepper Silkworm, Raccoon With Winter Melon and Sliced Snake and Celery. And in the six months since the doors opened, customers have been scampering in at all hours to the euphemistically named Jialu (Superior to Deer) Restaurant.

"I was always eating out, but I got bored with the animals that restaurants offered," Mr. Zhang says during an interview over a plate of BlackBean Rat. "I wanted to open a restaurant with an affordable exotic animal. Then I was walking home one night and a rat ran across in front of me and gave me this idea."

Mr. Zhang's restaurant is as trendy as they come in China. The 15-table, two-story eatery is a mixture of blond wood furniture, stucco walls and wooden lattice laced with plastic vines. Tonight's crowd includes a young couple who stroll in hand-in-hand and nestle in a quiet corner for a romantic rat dinner. Other groups include engineers, office clerks, salesmen and factory workers.

Tonight's special is Braised Rat. Garnished with sprigs of cilantro, the morsels of rat meat are swaddled in crispy rat skin. The first nibble reveals a rubbery texture. But the skin coats one's teeth with a stubborn slime. The result is a bit like old chewing gum covered with Crisco.

But other dishes are better. German Black Pepper Rat Knuckle (rat shoulders, actually; the knuckles are too small) tastes like a musty combination of chicken and pork. The rat soup, with delicate threads of rat meat mixed with thinly sliced potatoes and onions, is surprisingly sweet. Far and away most appealing to the Western palate is Rat Kabob. The skewers of charcoaled rat fillet are enlivened with slices of onion, mushroom and green pepper and served smothered in barbecue sauce on sizzling iron plates that are shaped like cows.

Also on the menu: a Nest of Snake and Rat, Vietnamese Style Rat Hot Pot, a Pair of Rats Wrapped in Lotus Leaves, Salted Rat with Southern Baby Peppers, Salted Cunning Rats, Fresh Lotus Seed Rat Stew, Seven-Color Rat Threads, Dark Green Unicorn Rat -- and, of course, Classic Steamed Rat. Generally, the presentation is quite elegant, with some dishes served with lemon slices or scallions forming a border and others with carrots carved into flower shapes.

Experienced rat eaters, however, warn that this is no meat to pig out on. "Watch out," warns Wei Xiuwen, a factory manager eating at an adjacent table. "If you eat too much rat, you get a nosebleed." Several customers take off their shirts halfway through the meal because eating rat, like dog, seems to raise the body temperature for some reason. That's why rat is considered a winter food. In the summer, the restaurant does most of its business during the late-night and early-morning hours, after the weather cools down.

The restaurant is popular -- Mr. Zhang claims profits of $2,000 a month -- because it brings people back to their roots. The restaurant's cooks, and most customers, are originally from the countryside, where as children they ate air-dried rat meat. "If dried by a north wind, it tastes just like duck," Che Yongcheng, an engineer and regular customer, says wistfully of his favorite childhood snack.

For newcomers, Mr. Zhang has color brochures, featuring a photo of Rat Kabobs alongside a bottle of Napoleon X.O. In both the menu and brochure, the rats are referred to as "super deer" because Mr. Zhang says he wants to separate his fare from the common sewer rats that even Cantonese might find unappetizing. Mr. Zhang says his restaurant serves only free range rats, wild rodents that feed on fruits and vegetables in the mountains a couple of hundred kilometers to the north.

The brochure explains why rats are the health food for the 1990s. It says the rats are rich in 17 amino acids, vitamin E and calcium. Eating them promises to prevent hair loss, revive the male libido, cure premature senility, relieve tension and reduce phlegm. A rat's "liver, gallbladder, fat, brain, head, eye, saliva, bone, skin" are "useful for medical treatment," says the brochure.
The restaurant's basement kitchen is a Dante's Inferno where shirtless cooks sweat over huge woks atop howling gasfueled stoves that shoot flames five feet in the air. Dozens of fat, ready-to-cook rats are piled in a bamboo basket next to a crust-covered pump that noisily slurps up a small river of scum that runs off the stove and across the floor.

The senior chef is not here tonight. An understudy, Huang Lingtun, clad in rubber sandals and pants rolled up to his knees, explains how the rats are rounded up. They're captured and cleaned by farmers who free-lance as rat bounty hunters. Some smoke the rats out by setting fields on fire and snaring the fleeing rats in nets attached to long bamboo poles. Others string wires across fields to stun unsuspecting rodents with high voltage charges. The rats, each about a half-pound, arrive at the restaurant freshly gutted, beheaded and de-tailed.

Mr. Zhang says that the traditional recipes on his menu were suggested by Tang Qixin, a farmer honored as a model worker by Mao in 1958 for his prowess as a rat killer. Rat eradication campaigns have been a staple of Chinese life since Mao declared war on the four pests -- rats, flies, mosquitoes and bed bugs -- in the 1950s.

In 1984, the last Year of the Rat, the government launched an all-out crusade in which an estimated 526 million rats were killed. In 1985, the government tried to maintain the momentum by promoting rat meat as good food, explaining that "rats are better looking than sea slugs and cleaner than chickens and pigs."

Like most successful entrepreneurs during these times of shifting political winds in China, Mr. Zhang is quick to highlight the patriotic nature of his business rather than the personal economic benefits. "I am helping the government by eliminating some pests and helping enrich some farmers," he says.

Mr. Zhang says he's too new to the business to think about a chain of rat restaurants. But he says he's unconcerned about anyone stealing his idea. "My quality is tops," he says, "so I'm not worried about competitors."

Punzie
January 26th, 2007, 11:15 PM
There's a very interesting website entirely dedicated to what is called "weird meat":

http://www.weirdmeat.com/


The rats-as-meat entry has an article about somebody's trip to Southern Cambodia, culminating in a dinner of a large, barbecued field rat:


http://www.weirdmeat.com/uploaded_images/rat2-705799.jpg


http://www.weirdmeat.com/2006/06/rats.html


That kinda looks good! I'm usually against eating mammals, but I would have no problem digging my teeth into USDA-approved rat.:D

Schadenfrau
January 27th, 2007, 12:02 AM
Poultry's meat too, right?

Punzie
January 27th, 2007, 12:21 AM
Yes, it's the edible "meat" part of a bird.

NYatKNIGHT
January 27th, 2007, 12:36 AM
What's that quote...."If God intended for us to be vegetarians, why did he make all the animals out of meat?"

My heart goes out to the poor pigs, but I just like pork too much to give it up. It's delicious. I could give up chicken easier. Especially since there are so many things that taste "like chicken". I'll draw the line at things like eyeballs, tripe, and brains.


I think a thread on members' "roots" would be interesting.There is one that needs reviving called Nationalities (http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?t=3843).

ZippyTheChimp
January 27th, 2007, 07:51 AM
Poultry's meat too, right?
Fish is meat too.

Look how we kill them - depriving them of oxygen.

I won't give up bouillabaisse.

lofter1
January 27th, 2007, 01:22 PM
What's that quote...."If God intended for us to be vegetarians, why did he make all the animals out of meat?"

And consider the structure / development of human teeth (http://mistupid.com/health/teeth.htm) -- not just made for munching veggies :cool:

Punzie
January 28th, 2007, 05:18 PM
Top 10 Foods for a Good Night's Sleep

by Real Age (http://food.yahoo.com/blog/beautyeats/profile/real-age;_ylt=AhtkedN8YbR7SCFdEbM65NBjY.Y5)
January 23, 2007

(http://food.yahoo.com/blog/beautyeats/746/top-10-foods-for-a-good-night-s-sleep#post)What is the secret to getting a solid 7 to 8 hours of sleep? Head for the kitchen and enjoy one or two of these 10 foods. They relax tense muscles, quiet buzzing minds, and/or get calming, sleep-inducing hormones - serotonin and melatonin - flowing. Yawning yet?

Bananas. They're practically a sleeping pill in a peel. In addition to a bit of soothing melatonin and serotonin, bananas contain magnesium, a muscle relaxant.

Chamomile tea. The reason chamomile is such a staple of bedtime tea blends is its mild sedating effect - it's the perfect natural antidote for restless minds/bodies.

Warm milk. It's not a myth. Milk has some tryptophan - an amino acid that has a sedative - like effect - and calcium, which helps the brain use tryptophan. Plus there's the psychological throw-back to infancy, when a warm bottle meant "relax, everything's fine."

Honey. Drizzle a little in your warm milk or herb tea. Lots of sugar is stimulating, but a little glucose tells your brain to turn off orexin, a recently discovered neurotransmitter that's linked to alertness.

Potatoes. A small baked spud won't overwhelm your GI tract, and it clears away acids that can interfere with yawn-inducing tryptophan. To up the soothing effects, mash it with warm milk.

Oatmeal. Oats are a rich source of sleep - inviting melatonin, and a small bowl of warm cereal with a splash of maple syrup is cozy - plus if you've got the munchies, it's filling too.

Almonds. A handful of these heart-healthy nuts can be snooze-inducing, as they contain both tryptophan and a nice dose of muscle-relaxing magnesium.

Flaxseeds. When life goes awry and feeling down is keeping you up, try sprinkling 2 tablespoons of these healthy little seeds on your bedtime oatmeal. They're rich in omega-3 fatty acids, a natural mood lifter.

Whole-wheat bread. A slice of toast with your tea and honey will release insulin, which helps tryptophan get to your brain, where it's converted to serotonin and quietly murmurs "time to sleep."

Turkey. It's the most famous source of tryptophan, credited with all those Thanksgiving naps. But that's actually modern folklore. Tryptophan works when your stomach's basically empty, not overstuffed, and when there are some carbs around, not tons of protein. But put a lean slice or two on some whole-wheat bread mid-evening, and you've got one of the best sleep inducers in your kitchen.

What if none of these foods help you get your zzz's? Check out your sleep habits with this quick RealAge test to find out what?s keeping you up at night. http://www.realage.com/health_guides/RLS/intro.aspx (http://us.lrd.yahoo.com/_ylt=AiAq1eSR5iZnPzLtvt11ZYVjY.Y5/SIG=11omkbe9h/**http%3a//www.realage.com/health_guides/RLS/intro.aspx)

(The rest of the article is a muffin recipe)
(http://us.lrd.yahoo.com/_ylt=AiAq1eSR5iZnPzLtvt11ZYVjY.Y5/SIG=11omkbe9h/**http%3a//www.realage.com/health_guides/RLS/intro.aspx)
http://food.yahoo.com/blog/beautyeats/746/top-10-foods-for-a-good-night-s-sleep
(http://us.lrd.yahoo.com/_ylt=AiAq1eSR5iZnPzLtvt11ZYVjY.Y5/SIG=11omkbe9h/**http%3a//www.realage.com/health_guides/RLS/intro.aspx)

OmegaNYC
January 29th, 2007, 04:35 PM
What! No ribs!!! :mad:

Punzie
March 29th, 2007, 04:14 AM
Burger King Shifts Policy on Animals

By ANDREW MARTIN
March 28, 2007

In what animal welfare advocates are describing as a “historic advance,” Burger King, the world’s second-largest hamburger chain, said yesterday that it would begin buying eggs and pork from suppliers that did not confine their animals in cages and crates.

The company said that it would also favor suppliers of chickens that use gas, or “controlled-atmospheric stunning,” rather than electric shocks to knock birds unconscious before slaughter. It is considered a more humane method, though only a handful of slaughterhouses use it.

The goal for the next few months, Burger King said is for 2 percent of its eggs to be “cage free,” and for 10 percent of its pork to come from farms that allow sows to move around inside pens, rather than being confined to crates. The company said those percentages would rise as more farmers shift to these methods and more competitively priced supplies become available.

The cage-free eggs and crate-free pork will cost more, although it is not clear how much because Burger King is still negotiating prices, Steven Grover, vice president for food safety, quality assurance and regulatory compliance, said. Prices of food at the chain’s restaurants will not be increased as a result.

While Burger King’s initial goals may be modest, food marketing experts and animal welfare advocates said yesterday that the shift would put pressure on other restaurant and food companies to adopt similar practices.

“I think the whole area of social responsibility, social consciousness, is becoming much more important to the consumer,” said Bob Goldin, executive vice president of Technomic, a food industry research and consulting firm. “I think that the industry is going to see that it’s an increasing imperative to get on that bandwagon.”

Wayne Pacelle, president and chief executive of the Humane Society of the United States (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/reference/timestopics/organizations/h/humane_society_of_the_united_states/index.html?inline=nyt-org), said Burger King’s initiatives put it ahead of its competitors in terms of animal welfare.

“That’s an important trigger for reform throughout the entire industry,” Mr. Pacelle said.

Burger King’s announcement is the latest success for animal welfare advocates, who were once dismissed as fringe groups, but are increasingly gaining mainstream victories.

Last week, the celebrity chef Wolfgang Puck announced that the meat and eggs he used would come from animals raised under strict animal welfare codes.

And in January, the world’s largest pork processor, Smithfield Foods (http://www.nytimes.com/mem/MWredirect.html?MW=http://custom.marketwatch.com/custom/nyt-com/html-companyprofile.asp&symb=SFD), said it would phase out confinement of pigs in metal crates over the next decade.

Some city and state governments have banned restaurants from serving foie gras and have prohibited farmers from confining veal calves and pigs in crates.

Temple Grandin, an animal science professor at Colorado State University (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/reference/timestopics/organizations/c/colorado_state_university/index.html?inline=nyt-org), said Smithfield’s decision to abandon crates for pregnant sows had roiled the pork industry. That decision was brought about in part by questions from big customers like McDonald’s (http://www.nytimes.com/mem/MWredirect.html?MW=http://custom.marketwatch.com/custom/nyt-com/html-companyprofile.asp&symb=MCD), the world’s largest hamburger chain, about its confinement practices.

“When the big boys move, it makes the entire industry move,” said Ms. Grandin, who serves on the animal welfare task forces for several food companies, including McDonald’s and Burger King.

Burger King’s decision is somewhat at odds with the rebellious, politically incorrect image it has cultivated in recent years.

Its commercials deride “chick food” and encourage a more-is-more approach to eating with its turbo-strength coffee, its enormous omelet sandwich, and a triple Whopper with cheese.

Burger King executives said the move was driven by their desire to stay ahead of consumer trends and to encourage farmers to move into more humane egg and meat production.

“We want to be doing things long before they become a concern for consumers,” Mr. Grover said. “Like a hockey player, we want to be there before the puck gets there.”

He said the company would not use the animal welfare initiatives in its marketing. “I don’t think it’s something that goes to our core business,” Mr. Grover said.

Beef cows were not included in the new animal welfare guidelines because, unlike most laying hens and pigs, they continue to be raised outdoors. Burger King already has animal welfare standards for cow slaughter, he said.

The changes were made after discussions with the Humane Society and People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/reference/timestopics/organizations/p/people_for_the_ethical_treatment_of_animals/index.html?inline=nyt-org), known as PETA.

PETA, in particular, has started a series of high-profile campaigns to pressure fast-food companies to change their animal welfare practices, including a “Murder King” campaign that ended in 2001 when Burger King agreed to improve its animal welfare standards to include, among other things, periodic animal welfare audits.

Since that time, PETA officials said they had met periodically with Burger King officials to encourage them to adopt tougher standards. About a year ago, the Humane Society began its own efforts to encourage Burger King to improve its farm animal standards.

Mr. Grover said his company listened to suggestions from both groups, but ultimately relied on the advice of its animal welfare advisory board, which was created about six years ago and includes academics, an animal welfare advocate, an executive of Tyson Foods (http://www.nytimes.com/mem/MWredirect.html?MW=http://custom.marketwatch.com/custom/nyt-com/html-companyprofile.asp&symb=TSN) and Burger King officials.

“Where we think we can support what our animal advisers think is right, we do it,” Mr. Grover said.

The changes apply to Burger King suppliers in America and Canada, where the chain purchases more than 40 million pounds of eggs a year and 35 million pounds of pork, he said.

A reason that such a small percentage of purchases will meet the new guidelines is a lack of supply, Mr. Grover said.

Burger King plans to more than double its cage-free purchases by the end of this year, to 5 percent of the total, and will also double its purchases of pork from producers who do not use crates, to 20 percent.

Most laying hens in the United States are raised in “battery cages,” which are usually stacked on top of each other three to four cages high. Sows, during their pregnancies, are often kept in gestation crates, which are 24 inches across and 7 feet long.

Matt Prescott, PETA’s manager for factory farm campaigns, argued that both confinement systems were filthy and cruel because the animals could barely move and were prone to injury and psychological stress.

Under Burger King’s initiative, laying hens would be raised in buildings where they would be able to wander around. Similarly, sows would be raised indoors, most likely in pens where they would be able to move freely.

“This is not free range, but simply having some room to move around inside a controlled environment,” Mr. Grover said.

While converting barns for crate-free sows is relatively simple, Ms. Grandin said it was much more difficult and expensive to raise cage-free hens because not nearly as many birds fit in one building.

Burger King officials say they hope that by promoting controlled-atmosphere stunning, more slaughterhouses will adopt the technology. Currently, there are only a few in the United States using the technique, and most of them process turkeys.

http://www.nytimes.com/2007/03/28/business/28burger.html?pagewanted=1&_r=1