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clubBR
March 8th, 2007, 03:27 AM
I was in 8th grade in Douglaston, Queens. Our entire school was "evacuated" to the auditorium. Parents came in packs, frantically looking for their kids. It was deemed a half-a-day and I went home to turn on the TV. I just stared at the TV for an hour. The buildings were in the progress of falling.


Where were you? What did you see? What is the first thing you remember?

User Name
March 8th, 2007, 07:56 AM
I was at work when I first heard about what was happening. By the time I was able to listen to any radio reports, both towers had already fallen.

http://i3.photobucket.com/albums/y70/AceLannigan/_1546592_helmet_300afp.jpg

Sleep well my brothers...

BrooklynRider
March 8th, 2007, 08:49 AM
I was working at Tishman Realty & Construction, builders of the WTC. We had a colleague excitedly come running into our work area stating a plane hit the world trade center. We figured it was a little Cessna. Ultimately, one of my co-workers and my supervisor walked down the hall to see the TV. As we watched, the second plane hit. Talk in the offices turned to whether the buildings might collapse, which was rejected by the veterans. They had tested this exact scenario in early engineering studies.

Another colleague came running in to state that the Pentagon had just been hit. I looked at my boss. He said to hang out until a decision was made by the company as to what they would do. I replied that the country was under attack and I wasn't sticking around.

I walked down Fifth Avenue and it was eerie and surreal. It was like a super hero action film. Along the avenue, cars were stopped all askew. Doors and trunks open so that the radio reports could be heard by the masses. People were doing one of four things: (1) huddled around cars to hear the reports (2) bunched at the base of buildings of in doorways looking at the surviving tower (the first tower had fallen already) and visibly ducking and cringing as helicopters flew overhead (3) stood paralyzed in the street shocked or wailing (4) like me, were drawn to keep walking toward the WTC and the bridge to Brooklyn to escape Manhattan.

I started my walk downtown at 52nd Street. At 24th Street, the second tower came down and pandemonium ensued. I remember falling to my knees in disbelief and despair.

At Washington Square, debris from the collapse swirled in the air. Papers from WTC businesses and that Gd awful dust. South of Washington Square, survivors covered in WTC dust began appearing - totally in shock. On Thompson Street, people gathered around a first floor apartment window to watch a TV placed there by the tenant. Lines at public phones grew longer and longer.

I reached Canal Street and south of that thoroughfare was closed to pedestrians. I headed east to the Manhattan Bridge. I started crossing the bridge silently - it was mostly silence punctuated by a loud mouth here and there or people overcome with emotion. Here and there I gave directions to people who did not know Brooklyn. Mostly I was entranced by the fire, dust and void where the towers once stood. It was horrifying and surreal.

The wind was blowing the smoke and fallout directly over Brooklyn, my path home and my neighborhood. My goal was to (1) find a pay phone ASAP to call my family to let them know I was okay and to ensure others were okay. Coming off the Manhattan Bridge and walking down Jay Street, students and teachers at CUNY - NY Tech had set up tables and were handing out cups of water. It wasn't until I reached Carroll Gardens out by the Carroll Street F line subway station that I finally found a free Pay Phone. I called home. Everyone one was ok - so far.

I continued walking home to Park Slope. BY the time I got there, I was covered in the horrible dust. I looked like I walked through I gently falling snow. My neighborhood was covered as if an early snow had come. Fighter Jets streamed across the sky making regular rounds in pairs and flying in an arc that brought them directly over Seventh Ave in Brooklyn.

I went inside, showered, and turned the TV on. It would be on for days, on all through the night. I never went back to my job and spent the next two weeks between my local firehouse (11 firefighters missing / dead), Union Square, and the best place throughout the recovery: Point Thank You at Christopher Street on West Street, where we cheered rescue workers and they stopped to hug us, give us baseball caps (con ed, NYPD) and lots of free drinks.

The most horrible incident in my lifetime gave way to the most magical, memorable and peaceful time in NYC. For all that terror and horror, the days and weeks that followed were sublime. Kindness, caring and sensitivity trumped all else. Everyone was connecting and communicating on a much more visceral level.

Then the drums of war started beating and the comraderie and common bonds slowly dissipated.:(

Ninjahedge
March 8th, 2007, 08:58 AM
After hearing from a co-worker that "a plane hit the tower" we all tried to find a way to see what was going on. Some of us went next door (across the hall) to look out the windows on the other side of the building. Although the towers were about a mile away, we could see the smoke coming from one.

As we were watching, a plume of flame came out the back of the second tower. Someone said they saw something fly into it.

The next XX hours I spent watching the fuzzy OTA news reports from the conference room.

My boss was a little out-of-touch and denied what was going on and said we had to finish up thi sand that. So by 2-3 o'clock, when it had already been declared an official state of emergency, we all started walkig to get to one of the ferries to get home.

It took over 2 hours to get over the 2 miles that seperated NY from NJ, and we got back just before they set up he haz-mat showers.

I was later one of the engineers on-site (about 2 days later) on an all-night shift to make sure things were OK....

It was like something out of a movie.

wns808
March 8th, 2007, 11:02 AM
I was in a library at a local college working on a homework assignment, not knowing what happened until they closed the school. On my way home I listened to the radio and heard them say both WTC towers collapsed. I said to myself "impossible." When I got home and saw what happened to both towers getting hit then later fall, I couldn't believe it. I later saw 7 WTC fall down that day. :eek:

718Bound
March 8th, 2007, 08:32 PM
I was just waking up and remember seeing a video replaying the 2nd plane hitting the tower. I remember thinking it was a movie that was playing... nope real life.

I also remember feeling scared even 300 miles away. I cannot ever remember a feeling like the feeling that day had. I also remember sitting in a friends car talking about the events of the day. We talked about how some news stations reported that if this was a first strike at war the draft might be reinstated.... So we all went to my house after that and looked up what are draft numbers would be.

Very sad, scary, emotional day.

GINGER
March 13th, 2007, 08:22 PM
We watched it all un-fold on Tv,it seemed surreal then and to be honest it doesn't seem any less surreal now,if you'd have watched a film with these sort of shocking scenes you'd class it as too far fetched to watch.
Truly shocking scenes that no one will ever forget!!

OmegaNYC
March 15th, 2007, 12:31 PM
I was in the 10th grade, and I was going to Gym class. I remember seeing some of the teachers watching the TV, I joined in and remember seeing one of the towers on fire. A few minuets later, that is when the second plane hit. I watched as both towers burned, and later collasped. School was let out early and I walked home. When I turned on the TV at my house, that I when I saw that giant smoke plume in Lower Manhattan. I never in my life would of thought something like this would happen.

millertime83
March 15th, 2007, 12:56 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3XTJ28veLn0
I was here.

bronzenine
March 15th, 2007, 10:19 PM
That was really moving.

Personally, I was in my 6th grade orchestra class in poughkeepsie and shrugged it off as no big deal.. eventually i realized what a great deal it was

Viktorkrum77
March 18th, 2007, 01:18 AM
I was living in Espoo, Finland, it was later in the afternoon and I had just returned from a conference, where at the conference they had brought a TV in a little while after the plane hit the North Tower. I left shortly after, and watched the South Tower get hit on my home television. I couldn't believe it, I had only visited the towers twice myself, but I knew someone who worked in WTC7, and I was hoping they were alright. I didn't bother calling them, figuring they wouldn't be home yet after seeing all the footage on TV of people running hectic through the streets. When WTC7 fell, I was getting ready for bed, but after that I couldn't sleep that night. It took 2 weeks to get a hold of my friend, who luckily was ok, though he was stressed with what had happened, and was confused about what to do next. He was going to quit and move back home, but somehow he got caught up in going back to work with Salomon Smith Barney, now Citigroup.

jlajoie
March 24th, 2007, 05:42 PM
I was standing on the Brooklyn Heights Promenade when the 2nd plane hit. I was trying frantically to got a hold of my wife, who worked at the World Financial Center at the time. We lived on Willow St. in the Heights, and dealt with the ash, smoke and unbearable smells for the next 5 months.

NewYorkDragon
March 30th, 2007, 10:19 PM
I was in 5th grade and at school. We received this paper but I wasn't really sure what it meant. And then, I saw the footage on TV when I got home and was wowed.

Liz
May 25th, 2007, 01:54 AM
By some miracle, I ran errands that morning. I had just dropped off dry cleaning in my apartment at 8:45am and was heading back out the door to head to the World Trade Center when my phone rang. My friend was yelling into my answering machine "PICK UP THE PHONE! PICK UP THE PHONE!!" Then all hell broke loose.

I turned on the TV to see my office building in a cloud of smoke and flames. Actually, I wasn't sure if it was my building or not. Did my Tower have an antenna? Am I in the North Tower, or the South? I only knew it as Two World Trade and right then, I was too stunned to figure it out. So, I called my office.

After several busy signals, I got through. My friend answered the phone "It's the other building, gotta go..." He hung up. Literally, 30 seconds later, the second plane smashed into Tower Two, about 20 flights below my office. I knew all my coworkers were in trouble. I tried to call my parents, but I dropped the phone to the floor. I'd never experienced a complete jolt to the nervous system, but this was a 10 on the Richter Scale. My hands were shaking. I couldn't dial the phone. So, I ran to my neighbors.

We sat and watched helplessly as Tower Two fell at 9:59am. That was the worst moment of my life. Can't even explain what it is like to loose dozens and dozens of people you know in one moment. Some very good friends. Then you compile this with the realizations of "we are at war", "I just lost my job", "I lost my medical insurance"...it was astounding. The thought of "it could've been me" didn't even sink in yet. That came in the form of nightmares days later.

9/11 was six years ago, but it shattered my nervous system for good. I see changes in myself that I know came from this experience. But, no matter what, I'm very appreciative to be alive and proud that my company rose back from the ashes. I hope that none of us have to go through something like this ever again.

Liz

Joelio
June 6th, 2007, 12:55 AM
I was six years old... I didn't really know what happened, and I can't really remember how I found out. I probably heard my parents talking about it or something, or saw something on the TV (this was half my lifetime ago, so... yeah). Anyway, that day we had a substitute teacher, and I remember being asked to write a short passage on the disaster.

I don't mean to sound really mean or anything (I was six, and didn't rally understand the scale of the disaster or how sad it really was), but one thing I really regret is being really stupid and drawing lots of fire and a guy standing on the top of the tower urinating...:(

I feel really stink about that, and I wish I had understood it more and not done it.

Punzie
June 6th, 2007, 06:14 AM
. . .one thing I really regret is being really stupid and drawing lots of fire and a guy standing on the top of the tower urinating...:(

I feel really stink about that, and I wish I had understood it more and not done it.
Do you have any idea what most six-year-olds are like?:rolleyes::D

You were in another country, the opposite side of the world; few people comprehended exactly what was happening; and you were six years old!! For Pete's sake, your response was totally normal!

Joelio
June 6th, 2007, 03:04 PM
Do you have any idea what most six-year-olds are like?:rolleyes::D

You were in another country, the opposite side of the world; few people comprehended exactly what was happening; and you were six years old!! For Pete's sake, your response was totally normal!

Meh. Respect me for being human and erm...

*Runs away*

I know. But the fact that later in my life I was totally intrigued by the whole thing kind of sucks...

Punzie
June 6th, 2007, 05:15 PM
Joelio, at least the guy you drew was trying to... umm... "put out the fire."

Ask some Americans who were 6, but didn't live near NYC or Washington, D.C. Some thought that the fire and burning buildings looked a "really cool" video clip. They didn't want the fire to go out -- they were rooting for it to spread all over Manhattan! Imagine how most of them feel now about their initial reaction. Not too good, I would guess.

You beat yourself up for the smallest things, Joelio. Which supports my feeling all the more that you should immigrate to New York as soon as you're legal.:)

Joelio
June 6th, 2007, 09:09 PM
Joelio, at least the guy you drew was trying to... umm... "put out the fire."

Ask some Americans who were 6, but didn't live near NYC or Washington, D.C. Some thought that the fire and burning buildings looked a "really cool" video clip. They didn't want the fire to go out -- they were rooting for it to spread all over Manhattan! Imagine how most of them feel now about their initial reaction. Not too good, I would guess.

You beat yourself up for the smallest things, Joelio. Which supports my feeling all the more that you should immigrate to New York as soon as you're legal.:)

Lol... putting out the fire... classic.

A lot of people have told me that I am too sorry for myself. I really need to fix it, but due to small errors in my life (girls, friends and bullies) I have a lot to be sorry about. :p

Of course I'll immigrate to New York when I'm older. For heck's sake, I'm trying to detail an untextured 3D model of New York. *FREAK* :D

clubBR
June 6th, 2007, 09:15 PM
Lol... putting out the fire... classic.

A lot of people have told me that I am too sorry for myself. I really need to fix it, but due to small errors in my life (girls, friends and bullies) I have a lot to be sorry about. :p

Of course I'll immigrate to New York when I'm older. For heck's sake, I'm trying to detail an untextured 3D model of New York. *FREAK* :D

lol Joel you are a NY freak!
Bullies, girls, friends are no problem. People come and go all the time. I practice muy thai and eat alot plus im too old to get bothered by bullies (im 20!) GIRLS ARE NO PROBLEM! LOL im too fly. and friends? damn man all you need is a handful of close buddies and you're set. Dont worry too much bout stuff like that right now because as you get older things are bound to change for the better (As long as you hold no grudges!)
Be cool