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xymox
March 10th, 2007, 11:07 PM
We saw the model apartments at NOVO Park Slope last Sunday. They looked pretty good and solid. However many people/blogs said that Boymelgreen has reputation of poor construction, delay of schedule and etc. , is this true? Does anyone here NOT recommend buying any of the developments by his company? Thx.

BrooklynRider
March 15th, 2007, 11:21 PM
He builds crap. There are much more interesting buildings going up in Park Slope by better builders and much better designers. This is going to be a dump in no time and it is a horrendous addition to a lovely neighborhood.

And don't get me started on the pretentious name for this incredibly dull and rather nauseatingly bland design.

bkmonkey
March 16th, 2007, 11:39 AM
cmon Bkrider.......

Say what you REALLY mean......

:)

BrooklynRider
March 16th, 2007, 04:04 PM
It's going to be a building full of unrelated people sharing apartments. It is a phenomenom in Park Slope with the new 4th Avenue construction. These new buildings are becoming Animal Houses.

scatman
April 17th, 2007, 03:01 PM
I look right across from the so-called NOVO.

I've been in the Slope for 15 years. There was a time where you got real expensive as you got closer to the park. Anything between 4th and 5th Avenue was consided seedy. Now, you have units on in that condo (4th avenue between 3rd and 5th) at 1M. Oh, well.

ernielim0216
July 10th, 2007, 08:01 PM
BrooklynRider could you name some other buildings that you would recommend instead of the Boymelgreen buildings? I'm currently looking into moving into Park Slope and would appreciate an insider view or suggestions. Thanks


He builds crap. There are much more interesting buildings going up in Park Slope by better builders and much better designers. This is going to be a dump in no time and it is a horrendous addition to a lovely neighborhood.

And don't get me started on the pretentious name for this incredibly dull and rather nauseatingly bland design.

BrooklynRider
July 11th, 2007, 09:17 AM
Many buildings in the historic district have gone co-op and the difference between living on 4th Ave and the historic district is the same as the difference between living in Bushwick vs. Brooklyn Heights. If you are looking for new developments, there are anumber of developments going up east of 4th Ave.

ASchwarz
July 13th, 2007, 02:32 PM
Many buildings in the historic district have gone co-op and the difference between living on 4th Ave and the historic district is the same as the difference between living in Bushwick vs. Brooklyn Heights. If you are looking for new developments, there are anumber of developments going up east of 4th Ave.

Apples and Oranges. Park Slope by the Park is much less expensive than Brooklyn Heights, and one can't compare the Lower Slope to Bushwick.

Those condo conversions above Fifth are only for the wealthy, which is why most folks will be buying below Fifth. If you aren't rich you aren't going to find something above Fifth, especially if you want new(er) construction. Landmarked buildings are also extremely expensive.

Also, Fourth Avenue is more democratic and diverse and will have big retail spaces with more amenties than up the hill. There's also little income or social diversity up by Seventh Avenue. It's basically a rich suburb; albiet a beautiful one.

Eugenious
July 13th, 2007, 05:17 PM
Apples and Oranges. Park Slope by the Park is much less expensive than Brooklyn Heights, and one can't compare the Lower Slope to Bushwick.

Those condo conversions above Fifth are only for the wealthy, which is why most folks will be buying below Fifth. If you aren't rich you aren't going to find something above Fifth, especially if you want new(er) construction. Landmarked buildings are also extremely expensive.

Also, Fourth Avenue is more democratic and diverse and will have big retail spaces with more amenties than up the hill. There's also little income or social diversity up by Seventh Avenue. It's basically a rich suburb; albiet a beautiful one.

You consider 600k for a 1bd/studio cheap? Maybe by Manhattan standards, but for most people in Brooklyn who make between 45k-65k it's a fortune.

ASchwarz
July 13th, 2007, 05:41 PM
You consider 600k for a 1bd/studio cheap? Maybe by Manhattan standards, but for most people in Brooklyn who make between 45k-65k it's a fortune.

I don't get it. I didn't call any neighborhood cheap.

I don't even know what prices/neighborhoods you are referencing.

sirius
July 16th, 2007, 08:18 PM
Yes, I don't think they price new construction studios/1Br along 4th ave in the 600k. More like 450-500k. I have been looking in the area too and checked out The Crest, which was in this price range. There are a lot of new supply coming up it seems.

BrooklynRider
July 23rd, 2007, 01:53 PM
Apples and Oranges. Park Slope by the Park is much less expensive than Brooklyn Heights, and one can't compare the Lower Slope to Bushwick.

Actually, home prices in Park Slope surpassed Brooklyn Heights, making it the most "affluent" neighborhood in Brooklyn. This was reported by a number of the largest real estate firms four years ago.

ASchwarz
July 24th, 2007, 04:39 PM
Actually, home prices in Park Slope surpassed Brooklyn Heights, making it the most "affluent" neighborhood in Brooklyn. This was reported by a number of the largest real estate firms four years ago.

That's definitely false. Price per square foot is much higher in Brooklyn Heights.

If there's some existing report that claims otherwise, there is a problem with the report's methodology. If you don't believe me, go to any real estate website and make an apples to apples comparison (such as brownstones vs. brownstones). Prices aren't even close.

Also, home prices have little to do with "most affluent neighborhood" in Brooklyn or elsewhere. Most New Yorkers rent so home prices are irrelevent to most, plus tons of renters have various rent protections.

NewYorkDoc
July 28th, 2007, 05:51 PM
I went to Park Slope for the first time today. I got off the train at 7th ave and walked up and went to see an apartment. I decided to skip it because theres no parking in Park Slope. I found another in Ditmas Park/Kensignton with much easier parking. But other than that, Park Slope seems great with many restaurants and shops.

Eugenious
July 29th, 2007, 09:53 PM
I went to Park Slope for the first time today. I got off the train at 7th ave and walked up and went to see an apartment. I decided to skip it because theres no parking in Park Slope. I found another in Ditmas Park/Kensignton with much easier parking. But other than that, Park Slope seems great with many restaurants and shops.

Kensington is turning into yuppy town, unbelievable.

NewYorkDoc
July 29th, 2007, 10:58 PM
Kensington is turning into yuppy town, unbelievable.

Not yet...maybe in a few years. :cool:

Clarknt67
March 24th, 2008, 01:55 PM
New York Can Do Better Than the “New Fourth Avenue”

When the City Planning Commission upzoned Brooklyn's Fourth Avenue in 2003, it was hailed by some as a breakthrough. Borough President Marty Markowitz trumpeted Fourth Avenue as "a grand boulevard of the 21st Century." Residential development would reshape this urban speedway, the thinking went, from a pit-stop for cabs to a stately corridor of mid-rise residences -- Brooklyn's answer to Park Avenue.

In the past two years, as the dust cleared from disputes over building heights and provisions for affordable housing, Fourth Avenue's transformation has sped along. The first wave of new residential construction has hit the market, and dozens more properties from Flatbush Avenue to 15th Street are in various stages of development. But the early returns are discouraging for anyone who hoped to see a walkable, mixed-use district take shape here.

One new apartment building, the Novo, looms fortress-like over the playground next door, while another, the Crest, greets passersby with man-sized industrial vents. A new hotel, Le Bleu ("a haven of style, elegance and fine living"), meets the sidewalk with a parking lot fit for a suburban dentist's office.

Welcome to the new Fourth Avenue -- the future of Brooklyn.

While all of the new developments boast of their proximity to "neighborhood gathering places," and the "cozy" restaurants, shops, parks and public amenities of "vibrant Park Slope," developers have made no apparent effort to create a cozy, vibrant street life around their own projects.

Instead of transforming Fourth Avenue into Brooklyn's next great neighborhood, these new developments turn their back on the public realm, burdening the street wall with industrial vents, garage doors and curb cuts. That projects like these get built begs the question: What can be done to safeguard streets from bad buildings at the outset of development cycles?

The easy way out is to say Fourth Avenue was already a lost cause. Look at the six lanes of traffic rushing to and from Flatbush Avenue (plus two parking lanes and left turn bays). What sort of ped-friendly boulevard could flourish here without taming traffic first? But long stretches of nearby Atlantic Avenue manage to provide a decent walking environment and a dense variety of retail activity despite similarly heavy traffic volumes. New bars, restaurants, and stores have even popped up on Fourth Avenue's smaller lots and street corners, adding to a patchwork of veteran retail establishments. If small entrepreneurs believe Fourth Avenue can attract people on foot, why have big developers capitulated to the cars, trucks, and gas stations that overwhelm the avenue's pedestrian environment?

"At the time, they were making rational decisions," says Ken Freeman, a broker at Massey Knakal who has sold several properties along the corridor. "Whether residential was going to work was still a question mark, so why take the risk on retail?"

The effectiveness of government incentives may be limited. In the 2003 rezoning, the City Planning Commission included a generous allotment for retail uses, setting a maximum floor-area-ratio of 2.0 for commercial space. "I don't believe City Planning could have done much more to encourage mixed-use development," says Freeman, but that wasn't enough to overcome developers' initial hesitation.

In districts undergoing rapid transition, Freeman explains, developers generally avoid taking the mixed-use plunge without first dipping their toes in the water and building pure residential projects. Though he also notes that Two Trees, the developer behind most of DUMBO, turned that wisdom on its head by practically giving away retail space and using the resulting amenities to lure residents.

Freeman was a self-described skeptic about retail on Fourth Avenue until last spring, when he solicited offers for a property at the corner of Third Street occupied by Parkside Auto Service. "I imagined it as an office building," he says, "but we went to market and immediately we had offers well above asking from people who wanted to build retail."

Now that the perception of risk attached to mixed-use development has diminished, the next round of construction on Fourth Avenue should be a step up from what we've seen so far. "With the amount of new residents coming to the Fourth Avenue corridor, it is only natural that commercial would follow," says Joyce Kafati-Batarse, a broker at Prudential Douglas Elliman who specializes in new building development.

Those smaller restaurants and stores appearing on the avenue are harbingers of a burgeoning market for retail. "Now that we've established that there's a need, you're going to see a lot more of the cafés, bars, and shops," says Katafi-Batarse. Commercial rents have jumped from $25-$35 per square foot to $35-$50 along the Fourth Avenue corridor, and she expects them to grow further.

As a result, bigger players are now committing to mixed-use projects. Developer Isaac Katan will put a commercial tenant on the first floor of 500 Fourth Avenue, a 12-story building between 12th Street and 13th Street designed by ubiquitous Brooklyn architect Robert Scarano. (Real estate bloggers speculated that an Olive Garden had claimed the space, but the rumor proved false.)

It remains to be seen whether developers and architects will make mixed-use projects that actually enhance the pedestrian environment. But if there's a lesson to be learned from Fourth Avenue's recent history, it may be that gaining the ear of a well-connected, civic-minded broker like Freeman can sometimes yield better, quicker results than appealing for government action. Since he saw the offers for Parkside Auto, Freeman has served as an evangelist of sorts, urging many of the developers he works with to include retail in their Fourth Avenue projects. He believes the corridor can fill a need that the boutique-y Fifth Avenue cannot.

"Fourth Avenue is not constrained by the 20-foot-wide brownstone building footprint," he told me. "A different type of retail could end up there." He gave as an example Party City, a party supply store with a few Brooklyn locations. It's no Home Depot, but Party City is too big to fit anywhere on Fifth. Using Fourth Avenue's wide lots to accommodate such tenants could cut down on car trips made by Park Slope residents, enticing more of them to walk down the hill.

Over the long haul, plenty of other factors will determine Fourth Avenue's future as a walkable, mixed-use corridor. The fate of Atlantic Yards and congestion pricing, still fairly clouded by uncertainty, could either exacerbate the current traffic problem or lead to a more ped-friendly and transit-oriented allocation of street space. But for the immediate future, at least, we can expect developers (some less villainous than Bruce Ratner) to dictate events.

Even as momentum builds for retail use, however, the current cycle of development shows signs of petering out. With the real estate market generally on the downswing, the window of opportunity for investment in Fourth Avenue is closing. Developers are driving stakes in the ground now to beat the clock and take advantage of the 421-a tax incentive that "expires" in June. (Actually, they will still be able to capture the credit if they build 20 percent affordable housing on-site, but in the current market that may be enough disincentive to prevent new construction.)

"The next development cycle may be ten years away," says Freeman. Once the current round of construction is complete, Fourth Avenue will still be a work in progress, but several gaps -- especially the ones closest to subway stations on Ninth Street and Union Street -- may be plugged with mixed-use infill. And, Freeman suggests, there's still a chance for the developers of the Novo and the Crest to redeem themselves: "I do think there's an opportunity to retrofit."


The arrival of the Novo, a sidewalk disaster, made claims of a Fourth Avenue renaissance seem premature.

Photos: Ben Fried

http://www.streetsblog.org/2008/02/06/new-york-can-do-better-than-the-new-fourth-avenue/#more-3235

BrooklynLove
March 24th, 2008, 09:27 PM
i'm definitely not even close to giving up on 4th ave. this will sort itself out over time. this is just the beginning clark! rome wasn't built in a day, son.

Jeter
April 2nd, 2008, 08:36 AM
I'm looking at a place in this bldg (now that they dropped prices 20% in the past 10 days), and I've done a lot of reading at Curbed, Brownstoner and here (my favorite site to follow Manhattan commercial development).

Is there something about the Brooklyn personality that just likes to hate on anything new?? Seriously, these are the first developments, and they're not even completed and open. Additionally, this is designed as a mid-density residential development with a park second and sidewalk level retail or office (I think in this case a medical office) as the obvious third priority.

My wife and I were inside the building on Sunday. The build-out is of first quality (I've seen better in new construction, but for $600/sqft this is by far the best I've seen anywhere in Manhattan and this is a unique and desirable site in Brooklyn). You might compare this site to some of the new buildings around 125th street in Harlem... I'd pick 4th Avenue every time.

BrooklynLove
April 2nd, 2008, 06:58 PM
^ by no means is this a "brooklyn personality", it's definitely 5 boro. i think it's driven by insecurity and lack of accountability. treat curbed and brownstoner like orbitz - go there for leads, do your fact gathering at the source.

4th ave is great assuming you're not in a short term window. it's positioned great for long-term progression - great transportation abounds and it's in the middle of so many established and developing areas.

just one comment re novo - make sure you do your diligence when dealing with a boymelgreen project ... take nothing for granted

MidtownGuy
April 3rd, 2008, 12:27 AM
One new apartment building, the Novo, looms fortress-like over the playground next door, while another, the Crest, greets passersby with man-sized industrial vents. A new hotel, Le Bleu ("a haven of style, elegance and fine living"), meets the sidewalk with a parking lot fit for a suburban dentist's office.

...

While all of the new developments boast of their proximity to "neighborhood gathering places," and the "cozy" restaurants, shops, parks and public amenities of "vibrant Park Slope," developers have made no apparent effort to create a cozy, vibrant street life around their own projects.


It seems pretty clear to me. People aren't necessarily hating on "anything new" because they are just strange nutcases. They are against the way many new developments around town are being planned at the street level. The picture above is pretty clearly what NOT to do if you want a walkable corridor to come into fruition with the retail and services that make a lively and safe streetscape.
Not talking strictly about 4th in Bklyn, why do these kind of buildings leech off nearby streetlife while dismantling it around they're own bases? They gradually break down, one badly planned streetscape at a time, the urbane qualitiy that generated interest in living there to begin with. We're told the answer is, the developers didn't want to take any chances on retail. Give me a break.
I'd have a totally different opinion of that building pictured above if it greeted the community with something better than a block of exhaust vents. Nonetheless, they'll sell all the units in no time and make a hefty profit. We see that most would-be buyers couldn't give a whoopie-do over how the building looks on the outside as long as the units are spacious and fitted with the right appliances/finishes. And who could blame buyers in these times! But the developers can be responsible, should be guided in how they must fit into the urban fabrics on which they intend to capitalize hugely, instead of being allowed to weaken them with entire blockfronts of dead and ugly space.
Almost all of us on this forum want development, but there is good and bad, just like with everything in life, so maybe the "haters' aren't hating at all, maybe they aren't that strange...it could be they're just making distinctions that others are too lazy to see, too self-absorbed to care about, or simply not in the financial position to pay any mind to.

BrooklynLove
April 4th, 2008, 09:11 PM
i think that question applied more to hating on new developments in general than ground floor retail-less development. anyway, i think that we'll see plenty new development with retail over time as development along 4th ave progresses. this is just the beginning.

Eugenious
April 4th, 2008, 09:18 PM
i think that question applied more to hating on new developments in general than ground floor retail-less development. anyway, i think that we'll see plenty new development with retail over time as development along 4th ave progresses. this is just the beginning.

Umm beginning of what exactly? The ugly condos are years away from the real gems of Brooklyn which are brownstones with they red wood interiors and old world feel...

I cannot see anything good happening on 4th ave it'll always be a highway/auto gas station/car wash heaven it has nothing to do with pedestrians or any desirable retail...infact Coney island ave is changing faster than 4th ave...

BrooklynLove
April 4th, 2008, 09:25 PM
Eug - give it 15 years then pass judgment. by the way, i'm not saying that i like what i'm seeing right now, but i don't think it's realistic to expect 4th ave to directly from car washes and warehouses to madison avenue

BrooklynRider
April 4th, 2008, 11:50 PM
I agree with Eugenious in that we have seen nothing of quality go up on 4th Avenue. I think the "hating" has to do with these second rate developers coming in and building this crap. 4th Avenue Development really could have extended Park Slope to 4th Avenue, but it's not. The developments are not "Park Slope" they are not part of any existing neighborhood. They are "4th Avenue" and ultimately, I agree with Eugenious, it remains an ugly stretch of road.

BrooklynLove
April 5th, 2008, 09:48 AM
BR - i don't really think anyone but brokers think of 4th ave as park slope - never has been - it's gowanus

NYC4Life
October 9th, 2008, 07:17 PM
Brooklyn Paper

October 8, 2008 (http://www.brooklynpaper.com/sections/31/40/) / News (http://www.brooklynpaper.com/sections/neighborhoods/) / Park Slope (http://www.brooklynpaper.com/sections/park_slope/31/40/)

Why are people living in the Novo condos?

By Sarah Portlock
The Brooklyn Paper
http://www.brooklynpaper.com/assets/photos/31/40/31_40_novoresidents01_z.jpg

Whatever happened to the deal between the city and developer Shaya Boymelgreen that barred tenants from moving into the Novo condos on Fourth Avenue until after — after — Boymelgreen completed his renovations to the cement playing area at J.J. Byrne Park?
Turns out, there never was such a deal — no matter how many community activists claim they heard there had been one.

“There’s no agreement that we’re aware of about people moving in only after the work was done,” Parks Department spokesman Phil Abramson told The Brooklyn Paper this week.

Back in 2005, the Parks Department granted Boymelgreen permission to use the park’s southern end as a staging area for construction of his Novo tower in exchange for a $1.6-million renovation of the dour cement play lot.

Many believe that the agreement required the work to be completed before the Department of Buildings would allow Boymelgreen’s tenants to move into the building at 343 Fourth Ave., at Fourth Street.

They believed wrong.

“The Buildings Department was not part of any agreement between the Parks Department and the developer,” said agency spokeswoman Carly Sullivan. “A temporary Certificate of Occupancy was issued after the Department determined that [Boymelgreen’s application for a C of O] complied with all regulations.”

As of this week, nearly three-fourths of the building’s 113 units are occupied. Yet the renovation is not finished — in fact, the city has gone ahead and started tearing up (http://www.brooklynpaper.com/stories/31/36/31_36_sp_handball.html)the northern part of the park as part of its own renovation.

“We’re very upset,” said longtime handball player and former high school champ Mike Martinez. “A couple of times, the city told us that in no way will the courts be torn down until the other courts were built up, and everybody was happy about that. And, then, all of the sudden, this [situation] happened.”

Boymelgreen missed his first deadline for reconstruction in 2006 and another in August, 2008. Yet the city has granted the building two temporary certificates of occupancy since June. As a result, at least 84 units have closed since June, a Novo sales agent confirmed this week.
Naturally, local officials and activists are howling.

“The Parks Department assured us that they had sufficient leverage to ensure that Boymelgreen would finish the job,” Hammerman said. “Whether it was implied by the Parks Department or inferred by our Parks Committee, somewhere along the way there was a clear expectation that people would not be allowed to move into the building until the work was complete on the portion of the park that they were responsible for.”
DeBlasio (D–Park Slope) has long fought — albeit unsuccessfully — for the city to hold up its end of the deal.

“The current situation of people moving into the building before repairs to the park are completed is clearly undesirable,” said DeBlasio spokeswoman Gwen Rocco.

To hold Boymelgreen somewhat responsible for his delays, the city demanded in June that the developer put up $350,000 as a security deposit. Abramson, the Parks spokesman, said the developer will get the money back if renovations — which include new basketball courts, a dog run, a garden, and a skate park — are completed quickly and up to city standards.

In other words, he’ll get the money back.

“We’re pleased that great progress has been made in the work over the last six weeks,” said Abramson, expressing little concern over the long delays. “After the job is done, we’ll inspect and assess it. If there are no flaws, [the money] will be returned.”

The work now looks like it will be done by early November, he added.

Multiple messages left with Boymelgreen were not returned.



©2008 The Brooklyn Paper

Merry
January 25th, 2010, 11:10 PM
I can relate to the annoyance of barking dogs. What a stupid idea. Serves 'em (the owners, not the dogs) bloody right IMO.


B'klyn dogs, owners 'run' from egg attack

Comments: 12 (http://www.nypost.com/p/news/local/brooklyn/klyn_dogs_owners_run_from_egg_attack_uV8eBcKEjivHA yv492wpIL#comments_block)


By JAMES FANELLI

Barking is no yolk in Brooklyn.

Petrified pooches and their owners have been walking on eggshells -- and ducking them too -- in the past month at a Park Slope dog run.

Pet owners say an angry tenant in a luxury condominium next to Washington Park has been hurling eggs at clamorous canines that use the Fido-friendly exercise area in the evening.

"Before I knew it -- 'whack' on my shoulder and 'splat' on the ground," said Ilene Cohen, 55, who was hit by an egg three weeks ago. "I looked up, but I didn't see anybody. They're not going to stand there waving at me and say, 'I'm the jerk who threw it.' "

Cohen regularly brings her black Labrador, Ace, to the dog run, which is open 24 hours a day. She said her dog wasn't making any noise but other pooches around her were barking, apparently infuriating the egg-slinger.

Kimberly Maier, the executive director of the Old Stone House, a historic center inside the recently renovated park, said Cohen's egging was the second of three aerial assaults, which were first reported by the Web site Brownstoner.com.

"It's not a group of people doing it. It's probably one person," Maier said. "[The eggs] seem to come from the same trajectory."

The condominium board notified the local police precinct and put up flyers about the incidents, Maier said.

A message left with the condominium's management company was not returned.

The 12-story luxury building known as Novo 343 opened less than two years ago. The dog run opened at the same time.

http://www.nypost.com/p/news/local/brooklyn/klyn_dogs_owners_run_from_egg_attack_uV8eBcKEjivHA yv492wpIL#ixzz0dgiH9hxS

BrooklynLove
January 26th, 2010, 07:19 AM
Hopefully when they catch this coward, he/she won't be so fortunate to escape public posting of his/her name.

BrooklynRider
January 30th, 2010, 05:23 PM
I've tossed a number of eggs out my windows at cars honking horns or playing music really loud. It's a very satisfying feeling.

infoshare
January 30th, 2010, 06:06 PM
I can relate to the annoyance of barking dogs. What a stupid idea. Serves 'em (the owners, not the dogs) bloody right IMO.


[/URL]

Every once in awhile this sort of thing (http://abcnews.go.com/Health/story?id=2605713&page=1) results in a serious injury: would you say "serves em right" then - eh, eh.

A bucket of cold water maybe: a hard, relatively, heavy projectile - not go. :eek:

Merry
January 30th, 2010, 10:19 PM
Hopefully when they catch this coward, he/she won't be so fortunate to escape public posting of his/her name.

In my experience, people who have no respect or consideration for others rarely tend to be very approachable or remorseful and I don't think it's cowardly to avoid the often inevitable unpleasant (and sometimes more serious) confrontation. In this case, where the identity of the dog owner(s) may not be known, it's also difficult to employ more conciliatory and less confronting methods to resolve the issue.

IMO, the decision to locate a dog run in a place like that and have it available 24 hours a day is unbelievably ill-conceived and short-sighted.

Common sense and courtesy should, however, surely dictate that barking dogs and other noise is not appropriate 24 hours a day in proximity to a residential area.


Every once in awhile this sort of thing (http://abcnews.go.com/Health/story?id=2605713&page=1) results in a serious injury: would you say "serves em right" then - eh, eh.

No need to be condescending. I understand and appreciate the potential seriousness of such action.

Of course, it would be much more preferable to be able to sort these things out amicably, but human beings, individually and collectively, don't work like that sometimes. I'm sure a lot of us have experienced the frustration of feeling helpless to right an injustice, perceived or real, and unfortunately we don't all deal with it appropriately.

ZippyTheChimp
January 30th, 2010, 10:43 PM
In this case, where the identity of the dog owner(s) may not be known, it's also difficult to employ more conciliatory and less confronting methods to resolve the issue.Cool Hand Luke recommends paprika.

MidtownGuy
January 31st, 2010, 12:06 AM
I've tossed a number of eggs out my windows at cars honking horns or playing music really loud. It's a very satisfying feeling.

LOL. I may try this. There's a Fresh Direct truck (for douchebags too lazy or precious to go buy their groceries themselves) and a paper shredder truck (that one is really loud) that both idle their engines under our windows early in the morning, for what seems like forever, a couple times a week.

BrooklynLove
January 31st, 2010, 07:18 PM
Merry - do you know anyone who takes their dog to the dog run when it's dark out?

This is likely some cowardly prick who wants to sleep until 10 AM and take a mid-afternoon nap everyday. He/she/it should move to the burbs if he/she/it can't deal with ambient noise.

What would really be entertaining if someone were to unleash a pitbull on the pathetic shmo. then he/she/it would have something to cry about.

Merry
February 1st, 2010, 07:10 AM
Merry - do you know anyone who takes their dog to the dog run when it's dark out?

The one at Novo?...no, I live in Australia :). I am however surrounded by dog owners (in the burbs) whose dogs bark incessantly, thankfully not too often during sleeping hours, but that kind of "ambient noise" I can live without.


This is likely some cowardly prick who wants to sleep until 10 AM and take a mid-afternoon nap everyday. He/she/it should move to the burbs if he/she/it can't deal with ambient noise.

What would really be entertaining if someone were to unleash a pitbull on the pathetic shmo. then he/she/it would have something to cry about.

Without some facts, we don't know for sure what motivates this person. Nobody should have to move because of avoidable noise.

I guess we'll both have to agree to disagree since our respective pet hates are clearly not the same ;).

scumonkey
February 1st, 2010, 02:56 PM
From what i've read that dog park was there before the guy moved in (built at the same time as the building)...
He should have known better if that type of noise disturbs him.

BrooklynRider
February 2nd, 2010, 09:59 AM
LOL. I may try this. There's a Fresh Direct truck (for douchebags too lazy or precious to go buy their groceries themselves) and a paper shredder truck (that one is really loud) that both idle their engines under our windows early in the morning, for what seems like forever, a couple times a week.

I'm in a four floor walk up and there happens to be a firehydrant in front of m building. It's a natural place for livery drivers to pull over and honk for a fare to come out, for a loud music vehicle to stop to chill out and/or smoke weed, cars try to go around other cars with no luck - it's annoying.

Speaking to Merry's safety issue of projectiles: welob these out, so they fall straight down out of the sky. No overhand firing of the eggs.

Anothger very useful item useful in dipersing crowns or ending parties still loud at 3:00AM: Piss Balloons. They work quickly.

brianac
February 3rd, 2010, 08:03 AM
HEEL, SIT, WHISPER. GOOD DOG (http://wirednewyork.com/forum/showpost.php?p=315249&postcount=14)