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Joelio
March 26th, 2007, 02:43 AM
(Originally started in "Pics of Us", pg 14)

Ok, cool. :D

This is me doing showcase at school a year ago this week. On Wednesday night I have to perform as Macbeth. And I have to hug a girl... :confused:

http://i149.photobucket.com/albums/s62/WorkingFilms/Me008.jpg

And please don't question that CRAZY costume. It's sposedto be a maori thingy, but it looks more like a... um... thats a toughy. I'll stick with a thing. That's as good as I can get :)

lofter1
March 26th, 2007, 10:53 AM
On Wednesday night I have to perform as Macbeth. And I have to hug a girl...

Watch out for that Lady McB ... she'll only get you into trouble :eek:

In other words: Get a backbone, man! Fight that ambition. Do what's right.

And listen to those witches :cool:

They know of what they speak ...

A vid of the show would be excellent.

Joelio
March 26th, 2007, 08:44 PM
Watch out for that Lady McB ... she'll only get you into trouble :eek:

In other words: Get a backbone, man! Fight that ambition. Do what's right.

And listen to those witches :cool:

They know of what they speak ...

A vid of the show would be excellent.

My dad's gonna film it, because my mum won't be able to go, so I'll try and upload it somewhere :D

I have 27 lines. But, compared to my friendat college, it's nothing - she has 75 lines :eek:


Fight that ambition. Do what's right.

And listen to those witches :cool:

Are you trying to say I shouldn't kill Banquo, or Duncan, depending on what part of the script you're talking about? Because I'll muck it up; already, "I am settled. False face must hide what the false heart doth know." I've come too far to back out now...

lofter1
March 27th, 2007, 12:43 AM
"I am settled. False face must hide what the false heart doth know."

I've come too far to back out now...

oh ... in that case I'm sure everything will turn out just fine :cool:

when it's over you might want to check this (http://http://www.rottentomatoes.com/m/1012952-macbeth/) out ...

Joelio
March 27th, 2007, 01:29 AM
Hmm... the page didn't load.

I've already seen one of the movie versions of it though. Or, at least, a bit of it... I couldn't be bothered to watch the whole thing, so I stopped after my parts in the play. But I'll watch the rest tonight...

Joelio
March 28th, 2007, 02:36 PM
Blah. Last night I did showcase... and it kinda sucked. My teacher fitted me with a vest about two sizes too small for me and Lady Macbeth forgot her "Unsex me" lines, leaving me to go up to her and continue with the play (and continue on with the scene, which meant going up and hugging her...). I was probably the best in the play (I'm watching the video as I write) and if it weren't for the vest and the mistake, it would've rocked.

I'll try and upload the EDITED video sometime ;) with titles and ALL MISTAKES CUT FROM THE FILM.

ryeler
March 28th, 2007, 09:26 PM
I played macbeth once in a play. I was supposed to throw a goblet down on the floor in frustration. Instead of just falling it shattered, and a piece of glass fit a fellow actor in the cheek, and had to get 20 stiches :( haha :P.

Joelio
March 28th, 2007, 09:45 PM
^^ Lol! What happened to the play? Did they go, "Halt!! We need an ambulance in here! Or did that frustrating sound of quiet chatter erupt through the room?

ryeler
March 28th, 2007, 11:38 PM
we didn't notice at first, because she had red collaide on her face from earlier, but she went off stage and told a teacher, and they went to the hospital. a backup went on for her, i didn't know she was hurt tell after the play.

Punzie
March 29th, 2007, 06:36 AM
I played Lady Macbeth in a university production. I'd tell you more, but...

Moderator: Is is possible for you to break off these Macbeth posts and turn them into a topic?

NYatKNIGHT
March 29th, 2007, 10:11 AM
What's done is done.

lofter1
March 29th, 2007, 11:35 AM
What happened to the play? Did they go, "Halt!! We need an ambulance in here! Or did that frustrating sound of quiet chatter erupt through the room?


I once had the unfortunate experience of slicing off the top of a knuckle during a stage fight. The familiar sound of sword blades meeting -- "klink, klink, klink" -- was interrupted by an unexpected "thump", which surprised me -- but didn't alarm me until I saw the red streaming down my arm. As the fight continued I considered "What to do?" thinking "Intermission is a mere 3 scenes away -- we'll deal with it then".

But I remembered that my leading lady was dressed all in white -- and the image of her virginal purity splattered with my blood flashed before my eyes. The thought of ruining her costume -- and the wrath of the costumer -- were more than I could bear.

Result: "Ladies and gentleman I regret to say that we must stop now."

Exit stage right. :eek:

Quick trip to the ER and six stitches later all was A-OK. Back on the boards the next night.

Sometimes the show just can't go on :cool: .

Joelio
March 29th, 2007, 02:21 PM
Sheez, I just went looking all around the place for this thread; my email notification told me it was in pics of us. Anyway....

Lol, it seems like Macbeth is unlucky. :confused:

What and incredible line!!


"Ladies and gentleman I regret to say that we must stop now."

I would've said "Holy s**t!! I need help, someone!!" Although I haven't had much experience in onstage accidents.. My one is as close as I ever got ;)

Punzie
March 30th, 2007, 10:25 PM
Things without all remedy
Should be without regard;
What's done is done.
http://i71.photobucket.com/albums/i130/Rapunzel61/EWNY/Art/macbeth.gif

Joelio
March 31st, 2007, 01:04 AM
I can't even see that picture. What is it??

lofter1
March 31st, 2007, 02:29 AM
Could it be Lady M doing her magic on poor old Duncan?

Punzie
April 3rd, 2007, 11:33 PM
http://i71.photobucket.com/albums/i130/Rapunzel61/Creepy/Fme/ladymacnude.jpg

"All our service in every point twice done and then done double... "

Joelio
April 3rd, 2007, 11:47 PM
http://i71.photobucket.com/albums/i130/Rapunzel61/Creepy/Fme/ladymacnude.jpg

"All our service in every point twice done and then done double... "





Hmm...

Thanks for that picture.. (!)

Punzie
April 3rd, 2007, 11:58 PM
Joelio, fess up...
You did not play the part of Macbeth!
Maybe you uttered one soliloquy.
:p

Joelio
April 4th, 2007, 12:32 AM
Hmm, that's strange... I distinctly remember about a week ago today being really nervous because I was about to be the main part of a Shakespearian Play called Macbeth with a cold...

Interesting how your memory makes things up. :p

Punzie
April 4th, 2007, 01:35 AM
Well then, Joelio, what's this about your hugging a girl? Macbeth would never hug his wife -- he was afraid of her!

It's clear that Lady Macbeth did all the initiatiing in this relationship. Her hugs would more resemble those of a domineering mother clasping and smothering a young child. Maybe her husband would cling... but hug?:rolleyes::p

Joelio
April 4th, 2007, 02:16 AM
I don't know!! Before this term I'd never even read a Shakespearian play. Let alone performed one. It's a friggin' Intermediate aged play!! And besides, he was afraid of her AFTER they killed Duncan.

My Performing Arts teacher just told me to hug her.

(But then I had to make it look like I was going to comfort her when she forgot her lines - an embarrassing situation. She forgets her lines, everyone (quietly) tells you just to go up and continue, and then you hug her and make it look like she needs one because she's in "A wittle bit of twouble...")

Punzie
April 4th, 2007, 03:34 AM
Before this term I'd never even read a Shakespearian play. Let alone performed one. It's a friggin' Intermediate aged play!!
OK, before I get in trouble for posting a nude in front of a kid, hear me out:

(1) I didn't know you were so young.

(2) It's not really Lady Macbeth. It's a painting of the Ancient Greek Goddess of Beauty, Aphrodite, posing on Mount Olympus.

(3) Those words are not mine. Lady Macbeth says them to King Duncan in Act I.


Joelio, my age (45) has always been in my user profile. Promise me that you'll try to stop this nature of message boarding with gals who are old enough to be your Grandmum!

Joelio
April 4th, 2007, 04:03 AM
It's ok... I thought my age was well known now that it has been revealed in "Pics of Us". Anywho, of course I will... I'll put an "R13" sign on all my posts so that users know exactly (or nearly) how old I am... :)

Punzie
April 6th, 2007, 02:16 AM
When Shakespeare productions are performed in New Zealand, do the actors use their natural, local accent -- or they put on a "proper" British accent? What did you do for Macbeth?

Joelio
April 6th, 2007, 05:02 AM
I don't know how it is done nation-wide, although someone in my class asked the same question for our play and my teacher said we would just use our own accents. So we just spoke like kiwis. Not quite Macbeth...

"Oh, sup bro?"
"Blah, these freakin witches came and told me I was gunna be king ow!!"
"Nah? Really?"
"Yea!"
"Sure ur not pissed?"
"Yea! Or maybe I dreamt it..."

^^ Nah, just kidding. but we used our own accents.

(And for an idea of exactly how that (the above speech) is said, try and get your hands on a copy of the Bro' Town DVD. Although I'm not sure if you can get it in other countries).

lofter1
April 7th, 2007, 12:10 PM
Scholars say that current upper-class British accent is far from what would have been spoken in Shakespeare's time -- and the more correct is closer to the cadences / sounds heard in some Southern US accents (with variations from the current sounds). No doubt NZ / Aussie accents capture some of those original sounds as well ...

Many Americans, Aussies & NZers were the toss-offs from Britain -- the unwanted crud that the Empire was trying to dispose of (while simultaneously using their bodies / labors to enrich the state). The Upper Class Brits adopted a purely BS accent to differentiate themselves from the other classes -- and that proper British accent that we all know so well has little to do with the sound of the English language as spoken in Shakespeare's time.

PS: I likes your new adaptation of MacB, Joelio -- you might want to try a larger chunk and see what you come up with -- get some frineds together and give it a read. Who knows where it might lead ....

Joelio
April 7th, 2007, 03:35 PM
Lol^^

I could call it "MacBro..."

You're statement is actually true... if you see the movie (1960s or something) their accent is not really British but is closer towards how we speak... Kind of American without the distinguishable pronunciation of letters like "a" in "can't". For instance, Americans say "caren't" while we say (simply) "can't". The film was somewhere in between those.

I may actually start writing that script, Lofter... I make movies, but I'm quite busy at the moment (what with all those 3D models and all ;) ) and I'm also in the middle of making a movie (well, two actually...). But it might be a good idea, if I can start with the script... maybe make it when I'm 14..

Meanwhile, I just noticed a New Release in the video shop last night - a modern-day remake of Macbeth set in the ganglands of Sydney. :cool: I'll get it out sometime. :D

lofter1
April 7th, 2007, 07:48 PM
"MacBro" -- Very good -- very commercial.

Copyright it NOW.

I'm serious -- plus this could make you lots of money.

You could definitely fit it in between all your other projects.

You might want to check out a not-so-perfect play from 1967 by Barbara Garson (http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2006/09/04/AR2006090400993.html) called MacBird! (http://www.brumm.com/MacBird/) (LBJ / Ladybird / JFK / assassinations / power / counterculture / Texas) ...

Barbara Garson (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Barbara_Garson) (born July 7 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/July_7), 1941 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1941) in Brooklyn (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brooklyn), New York City (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/New_York_City)) is an American playwright, author and social activist.

Garson is best known for the play MacBird (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MacBird), a 1966 political parody of MacBeth (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MacBeth) that sold over half a million copies as a book and had over 90 productions world wide. The play was originally intended for an anti-war teach-in at the University of California, Berkeley. The first published edition was printed on an offset press that Garson had restored the year before in order to print The Free Speech Movement Newsletter (http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=The_Free_Speech_Movement_Newslette r&action=edit) which she edited. She was one of 800 arrested with Mario Savio during these early student protests of the 1960s. Garson's self-published edition of MacBird had sold over 200,000 copies by 1977 when the play opened in New York in a production starring Stacey Keach (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stacey_Keach), Bill Devane, Cleavon Little (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cleavon_Little) and Rue McClanahan (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rue_McClanahan). While these then unknown actors went on to become fixtures in American theater, movies and television, the author disappeared from public view at the height of fame.

Joelio
April 7th, 2007, 07:59 PM
How would I copyright it?? Wouldn't it cost like, hundreds of dollars??

Yay! I'm over 300 posts. probably about 200 were in the WTC model thread...

Which, I must say, is a little embarrassing...

lofter1
April 7th, 2007, 08:09 PM
Yay! I'm over 300 posts. probably about 200 were in the WTC model thread...

Which, I must say, is a little embarrassing...


Only embarassing in the half of those 200 posts where you were talking to yourself :p

Joelio
April 7th, 2007, 08:32 PM
Yeah, you have a point there... still, I had some pretty good things to say to myself. And I don't have the time or energy to remember EVERYTHING. So you can't really blame me.

It's Easter, it's Easter in Heaven, there's lots of films on TV...
The Sound of Music, twice an hour,
And JAWS, 1, 2 and 3...

Sorry, that was a direct spoof of Monty Python's "The Meaning of Life".

Besides, it's my thread... I can post whatever the hell I want.


Talking to myself again...

Joelio
April 8th, 2007, 02:16 AM
OK, I've just figured it out;

I can't think of any way to set it in NZ, so I've decided to make it kiwis in NYC. Three gang members predict that "Macbro" will become President of the United States. Later, Bush arrives in NYC for a visit (for some business meeting, I dunno) and Macbro murders him in his sleep. He eventually kills his best friend (Broquo!) and is killed by Macbuff.

I'm very proud of these names, here... Macbro, Broquo, Macbuff... <my favourite one! Macbuff!! Classic.

That's a very simple outline, mixed with all the other things that happen in Macbeth. Oh, and I'm not necessarily saying this will be filmed - it's just an idea. Anyone else who wants to have the script (when it's finished) they can just email me and I'll send it to them so that they can film it themselves.

Punzie
April 15th, 2007, 04:05 AM
"Poor prattler, how thou talk'st!"
- Lady Macbuff

Joelio
April 15th, 2007, 04:11 AM
Meh. Sadly, I'm not as acquainted with the Shakespearian language anymore. I know, it's sad - six weeks after learning about it I've forgotten.

Translation please? Thanks :D

Punzie
April 15th, 2007, 04:49 AM
She said that to her young son right before the two of them were lynched.:o


So you memorized a Gargantuan portion of Shakespeare without knowing what you were saying... :confused:(profoundly)

Joelio
April 15th, 2007, 05:01 AM
She said that to her young son right before the two of them were lynched.:o


So you memorized a Gargantuan portion of Shakespeare without knowing what you were saying... :confused:(profoundly)

Nope. Wrong again... they wouldn't give us a full Shakespeare script. They script was about 6 pages long and was shortened quite a lot for timing and content reasons. For example, I've looked through the "original" script (the original was never preserved) and one line is "Come to my women's breasts and take my milk for gall". Not exactly suitable for a cast aged 11-13 years...

In the version we did, Lady McD. never said that. I think she didn't... She had two simple lines and one complicated line... I can remember the simple lines but not the complicated one.

And I did know what I was saying. I said ""Six weeks after learning about it I've forgotten", meaning I've forgotten what I was talking about but I did know on the night. :p