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Capn_Birdseye
September 19th, 2007, 01:07 PM
Chalfont St Giles is a lovely village in Buckinghamshire, England where John Milton finished "Paradise Lost".

Below are some links to pictures (old & more modern) plus history.

http://www.webdoc.co.uk/cstg/images/c%20st%20g%20from%20the%20air1.jpg

http://www.webdoc.co.uk/cstg/images/panorama%20big.jpg

http://www.chalfontstgiles.org.uk/

londonlawyer
September 19th, 2007, 05:56 PM
I love that town. I visited Milton's cottage a few years ago.

It's amazing how bucolic it is since it's so close to London. Another stunning town nearby is Hambleden, which, I believe, was the actual location for the Vicar of Dibley.

czsz
September 20th, 2007, 10:29 AM
I would visit for Milton's cottage, but the town itself looks rather dull.

Capn_Birdseye
September 20th, 2007, 11:55 AM
I would visit for Milton's cottage, but the town itself looks rather dull.
Its not a town, its a village about 25 miles from London nestling in the delightful Buckinghamshire countryside.
It's church, St Giles, dates from 1150-1180, and the village was recorded in the Domesday Book of 1086.
John Milton left London during the Great Plague of 1665 to live in a cottage in Chalfont St Giles where he finished his epic poem Paradise Lost.

As a matter of interest there is a Chalfont in Bucks County, Pennsylvania, that takes it name from the villages of Chalfont St Giles & Chalfont St Peter, in Buckinghamshire, England.

A few miles away in the village of Jordans is the burial place of William Penn, the founder of the state of Pennsylvania, in the grounds of the Quaker Meeting house. It is said that a nearby barn was made from the old timbers of the Mayflower that carried the Quakers to America.

czsz
September 20th, 2007, 12:26 PM
Forgive me, the village looks rather dull (though I don't doubt its historical significance).


It is said that a nearby barn was made from the old timbers of the Mayflower that carried the Quakers to America.

Most likely it's another ship you're thinking of...the Mayflower carried the Pilgrims to Massachusetts, and had nothing to do with Penn or the Quakers in Pennsylvania.

londonlawyer
September 20th, 2007, 02:12 PM
Its not a town, its a village about 25 miles from London nestling in the delightful Buckinghamshire countryside.
It's church, St Giles, dates from 1150-1180, and the village was recorded in the Domesday Book of 1086.....

If a tourist has a car, it would be nice to take a drive through Chalfont St. Giles, Hambleden and wind up in Henley. It's a beautiful drive.

Capn_Birdseye
September 21st, 2007, 01:26 PM
Forgive me, the village looks rather dull (though I don't doubt its historical significance).
Dull for some, lively enough for others ..... horses for courses ......


Most likely it's another ship you're thinking of...the Mayflower carried the Pilgrims to Massachusetts, and had nothing to do with Penn or the Quakers in Pennsylvania.
The village of Jordans was a mainly Quaker village and even to this day it still has a large Friends Meeting House and a Quaker cemetery that contains graves dating back many centuries. There is a large old barn there called the Mayflower Barn which historically has always been associated, (rightly or wrongly), with the Pilgrim Fathers.

On the dull subject of English villages, just a few miles away is the village of Penn.

Meerkat
September 27th, 2007, 12:30 AM
Just out of interest, why have you started a thread about Chalfont St.Giles? Does this place have any particular significance? I would have thought an old sea dog like you would have gone for a coastal village.

Capn_Birdseye
September 27th, 2007, 11:48 AM
Just out of interest, why have you started a thread about Chalfont St.Giles? Does this place have any particular significance? I would have thought an old sea dog like you would have gone for a coastal village.
I was born there Meerkat but as soon after we moved to the coast where my yearning for the open seas began, as I looked out from my bedroom window across the salty brine, watching the waves devour the shore as the wind howled and rattled around my bedroom window. I vowed then the land would not hold me and decided to make my fortune on the seas of the world and thats precisely what I did.

Meerkat
September 27th, 2007, 06:23 PM
I was born there Meerkat but as soon after we moved to the coast where my yearning for the open seas began, as I looked out from my bedroom window across the salty brine, watching the waves devour the shore as the wind howled and rattled around my bedroom window. I vowed then the land would not hold me and decided to make my fortune on the seas of the world and thats precisely what I did.

Ah, i thought there was a reason you started a thread about this town.

As for me i come from England's largest land locked county, 70 miles form the azure seas.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shrewsbury

http://www.webbaviation.co.uk/shrewsbury/shrewsbury.htm

Very pictuesque, but a bit too dull for a city boy like me!!