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lessismore
October 6th, 2007, 01:10 PM
My first post... If someone wants to come to italy, i suggest to come to Bologna too... a beautiful medieval city, excellent food, and some interesting buildings (LE corbusier (http://iaakuza.blogspot.com/2007/08/lesprit-nouveau-le-cprbus-pavilion.html) and Kenzo Tange (http://iaakuza.blogspot.com/2007/08/kenzo-tange-fiera-district.html))...:)

Front_Porch
October 7th, 2007, 06:07 PM
The Le Corbusier looks great! Welcome to the forum!

ali r.
{downtown broker}

lessismore
October 8th, 2007, 01:07 PM
thanks ali... u r nice... maybe i'll post some other nice stuff from the place where I live.

kliq6
October 9th, 2007, 10:40 AM
I just got back from a two week trip to Italy in Venice, Naples and Rome. I will post picture

BrooklynRider
October 9th, 2007, 01:47 PM
I just got back from a two week trip to Italy in Venice, Naples and Rome. I will post picture

Post some descriptions and your itinerary. I'd be interested in where you went and whether you roamed on your own or as part of a tour.

pricedout
October 26th, 2007, 11:28 AM
We spent three weeks this summer in Italy. It was beautiful but exhausting. We're really lazy tourists, but this time we covered alot of ground.

I made all the arrangements myself. I can't imagine being a part of a group (even with three people finding consensus is sometimes difficult). We flew in and out of Rome, splitting up a week stay. Then we spent two weeks near San Gimignano, between Sienna and Florence. I enjoyed just about the entire trip (with the exception of finding parking, a nightmare in Sienna, Pisa and Florence) but I truly loved the following:

Volterra, the city of Alabaster, a perfectly-sized town for touring in a few hours
Colle Val d'Elsa - phenomenal smaller walled town with GREAT food, some local artisans, off the beaten track
Lucca - simply stunning
Montepulciano - great walled hill town
Sienna I liked, but what I thought was great here were the museums (very manageable and a much different style of art than that found in the Florentine museums)
The hike in Florence up to the Plaza Michelangelo and the Bergallo museum for sculpture
and
Rome. I was very surprised (I'm not sure why, I'm an extremely urban creature), but I adored Rome. Can I live there?

MidtownGuy
October 28th, 2007, 09:11 PM
BrooklynRider, include Sicily. It is absolutely fantastic. The best food (even the Northerners will often admit it), the most beautiful people with very warm hearts, gorgeous architecture from all eras, and it's an island rich in natural beauty too. Plus beaches, palm trees, and blood oranges. Don't miss it.;)

pricedout
October 28th, 2007, 10:07 PM
I actually (with the exception of Colle and a couple of other places) was not that impressed with Tuscan food (I've heard Bologna IS superb, but I didn't make it up there). I've been hearing wonderful things about Southern Italy. Do you have any specific recommendations for towns, villages, etc.?

MidtownGuy
October 28th, 2007, 11:35 PM
in Sicily I would, depending on time, see some of these:

1.Palermo (a must), also be sure to go to Mondello, the neighboring beach resort.
2.Cefalu
3.Noto
4.Taormina
5. Siracusa
and then there are the islands, which I didn't get to see but are supposed to be tremendous.

If you get a car I would just start in Palermo and travel East, stopping all along the way! The roads are generally excellent.
Beautiful Sicily, how I wish to return!
Try some 'pasta alla norma', thick spaghetti with tomato, eggplant, ricotta and basil, a famous dish on the island and very delicious.
I have a thread of trip photos from Palermo in the Travel and Photography section, check it out!
The people in Palermo were just delightful and I made some dear friends there!!

pricedout
October 29th, 2007, 12:04 AM
Thanks! We're going to try to get back to Italy in '09.

Capn_Birdseye
November 2nd, 2007, 07:24 AM
BrooklynRider, include Sicily. It is absolutely fantastic. The best food (even the Northerners will often admit it), the most beautiful people with very warm hearts, gorgeous architecture from all eras, and it's an island rich in natural beauty too. Plus beaches, palm trees, and blood oranges. Don't miss it.;)
I'm planning to visit Sicily next year, it'll be my first time. Interested in what you say about it MTG.

pscoln1
November 2nd, 2007, 02:51 PM
Im going to italy next week ... flying into Milan and then not sure if i shoud train it or rent a car and drive around. I have never been and would like to spend time in Rome and Florence. Another big issue is i will only be there for a week, which im thinking is not enough time. Any other suggestions that you think may be worth while visiting within a week?

Fabrizio
November 2nd, 2007, 05:01 PM
If I only had 2 weeks I'd spend more time in Rome. Today's Florence can disappoint: be prepared to for crowds, dirty streets, graffiti everywhere, hordes of street vendors. It's not the Florence of even 5 years ago. Reminds me of the decay that suddenly beset American cities in the early 1970's.

Hopefully someone will chime in who has been there recently and tell me I'm wrong. I'd love to hear that.

Rome has similar problems but it's a big city and can absorb them.

Also consider Siena and surrounding towns.

lofter1
November 2nd, 2007, 09:11 PM
So sad to hear that ^ about Florence :(

I second Fabrizio's suggestion about Siena ... two or three nights there could be great.

A number of years ago I spent a week in Siena during the winter -- it's an amazing city -- beautiful, great food -- and back then wasn't overrun with foreigners.

pricedout
November 3rd, 2007, 06:30 AM
Sorry Fabrizio, but I agree with you about Florence. It's difficult to say bad things about such a phenomenal city, but I felt as if I was in front of the ESB being pushed along by tourists (different architecture, though).

Rome is sensational. You could easily spend a week there. Sienna is also great.

ablarc
November 25th, 2007, 08:30 AM
Today's Florence can disappoint: be prepared to for crowds, dirty streets, graffiti everywhere, hordes of street vendors. It's not the Florence of even 5 years ago. Reminds me of the decay that suddenly beset American cities in the early 1970's.
Well, New York was cured of its malaise. What's your solution for Florence? Will it require a Giuliani?

Fabrizio
November 25th, 2007, 09:59 AM
No it will never again be the Florence the world loved. Never. Immigration is changing that. It is fast becoming a multi-ethnic city. It is of course, the way of the world. Big cities are enriched by this and become more vibrant and modern... but tiny Florence with it's delicate jewel-like environment... nothing has changed it so much... not modernization, or the bombings or the Flood. There is now all the kebab you could possibly want.

ablarc
November 25th, 2007, 10:39 AM
^ The flip side of diversity.

Fabrizio
November 25th, 2007, 03:52 PM
IMHO it makes Florence banal. A great tiny district of winding streets with Florintine trattorias, food shops, artisanal crafts... is now kebab, take-out chinese, international phoning places, Senagalese grocery stores etc..... all very ok, but are you dying to go there now? The Florentines are moving out... you can make a lot of money renting your 5 room apt to 10 Romanian immigrants. The sights, sounds, smells... the natural elegance and sense of well being that Florence is famous for goes. Streets that I once loved, now remind me of 14th St. 30 years ago.

Everything changes, time marches on.

ablarc
November 25th, 2007, 04:06 PM
A small city like Florence is about the size of a largish urban neighborhood like Harlem.

Could we say that though large cities benefit from different neighborhoods, some of those neighborhoods themselves are best --like small cities-- if they're relatively homogeneous?

I mean, who really wants Chinatown to fill up with honkies, gays or African-Americans?

Surely not the people who live there, nor the people who visit.




(That's just about everyone except the theoreticians.)

MidtownGuy
November 25th, 2007, 04:53 PM
Food for thought. I mostly agree.
I understand the lament, but I gotta say Italy could use some culinary diversity. A 14th St.-style avenue in Florence isn't what I want to see, but no matter how good a cuisine is, sometimes you want a little something else (unless you're the typical Italian;)). I once saw Italians bringing a giant pizza with them on a ferry to Corfu, God forbid they should put something in their mouths that wasn't Italian!
In some ways modern Italy could use an international flair here and there, I imagine ancient Rome was way more diverse than the modern version, what with all those barbarian slaves and foodstuffs from the 4 corners of the empire...

MidtownGuy
November 25th, 2007, 04:56 PM
oh gosh, Fabrizio's gonna flame me now...
I still love ya though, and Italy is still fabulous!

Fabrizio
November 25th, 2007, 05:08 PM
God forbid they should put something in their mouths that wasn't Italian!


Hell hath no fury like a woman scorned.


---

lofter1
November 25th, 2007, 05:55 PM
Speaking of bitter ...

From December 13 to 30, 2007 there will be a retrospective at MoMA of films by the Italian regista e sceneggiatore Giuseppe de Santis (http://www.moma.org/exhibitions/film_exhibitions.php?id=6735&ref=calendar), whose masterpice is Bitter Rice (Riso Amaro (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bitter_Rice); 1949) ...



Aiming to accord Giuseppe De Santis his proper place as one of the most important figures in the development of Italian Neorealism, MoMA presents rarely screened and newly restored films by the director, along with the premiere of a documentary by Carlo Lizzani that places De Santis's work firmly within the tradition of socially conscious filmmaking. De Santis started out as a film critic advocating a more realistic approach to filmmaking. After working on the script of Ossessione (1943) as an assistant to Luchino Visconti, the filmmaker remarkably hit his stride with his first feature, A Tragic Hunt (1946). In this debut and in the impassioned films that followed in the 1940s and early 1950s De Santis exposed the intolerable living conditions and insupportable class system of postwar Italy. His work advocated improved social conditions while eliciting luminous performances, especially from his actresses, in cleverly wrought stories, often written in collaboration with fellow filmmakers such as Elio Petri and Michelangelo Antonioni. While his plots are often melodramatic and the real issues are usually enveloped in narratives of love and disappointment, at the heart of De Santis's films are issues of class and political right and wrong. His frequent focus on dissonance within different class cultures provides his forceful Neorealist approach with colorful characters, as well as broad appeal. All films are from Italy, and in Italian with English subtitles, unless otherwise noted.


http://cnimg.realnetworks.com.cn/images/mdb/src/d179fa65d08b64bf851cb2baa0309529.jpg

Fabrizio
November 25th, 2007, 06:18 PM
The inspiration for:

"The Ricardos and Mertzes are on a train for Rome when Lucy is discovered by an Italian film director who offers her a role in his new picture, "Bitter Grapes."

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v33/ronaldo/grapes.jpg

lofter1
November 25th, 2007, 06:31 PM
But of course ^

The whole beautiful sequence ...

I Love Lucy - Bitter Grapes (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f-KvLNYGMMM)