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KrissySF
December 21st, 2007, 03:55 AM
Hello!

I will be moving to New York next coming summer with my Father. I will be attending the Dwight School on financial aid but my only problem--finding an apartment.

I will be working part time to help out of Dad (he's an optician) and I'm really concerned that we won't be able to make it. My Dad is dead set on finding an apartment in the city--even after my convincing of other neighborhoods outside of the city.

I've tried telling him about less expensive areas in the city, such as Morningside Heights and etc. He originally was born and raised in New York and is dead set on not living in those areas.

I'm trying to shoot for finding a minimum wage job in the restaurant business. I have experience in waitressing, hostessing, and etc. I just need some advice on what to look for. Etc., etc., etc.

Just basic advice. Please :). I'm from San Francisco

lofter1
December 21st, 2007, 09:41 AM
Take a look in this thread: Moving to New York (http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?t=5632&highlight=moving)

There, use the "Search This Thread" option.

Do separate searches using using the words "apartment" "neighborhood" and whatever else might take you to info that you want.

If you don't find enough helpful info then I pop back here and ask something more specific.

Most important is to be realistic about your budget: What ill you have to spend / month?

antinimby
December 21st, 2007, 09:56 AM
Tell your dad that many of those "undesirable" areas that he used to think was bad are no longer that. Many of those places have been gentrified and they are much safer (and no longer that affordable either). Look on craigslist for listings.

You might have to initially do the sharing thing. That will not only cut down on costs but also be far easier to secure at first. Then after you become familiar and have jobs and so forth, then you can find a place of your own for the two of you.

By the way, if you're from SF, then you wouldn't have price shock as the prices between the two places are pretty comparable. Good luck.

KrissySF
December 22nd, 2007, 03:46 AM
Well my Dad is a licensed optician and works for Foreyes. He will be transferring to the Foreyes at Grand Central Station. He's originally from the city and has seen New York when it was really bad.

Today I tried convincing him about the changed neighborhoods. He has seemed to budge a little bit.

Yes I'm born and raised in San Francisco! The prices in San Francisco compared to New York are around the same. Except there are more acceptable and a bit affordable places in good neighborhoods here.

Oh, and my Dad has $15,000 saved up which I think will go the setting up of the apartment and etc. I will also be working part time as either a waitress or hostess. Do you know how much these types usually get paid? What is the average hourly pay?

Thanks!

lofter1
December 22nd, 2007, 09:33 AM
Waitressing / Hosting income depends entirely on the restaurant where you work and can range from measly to a pocketful of cash.

No way to give you specfics -- Be ready to hit the pavement and sell your abilities when you get to NYC.

Good luck (from another native SFBayer who moved this way eons ago).

KrissySF
December 22nd, 2007, 02:42 PM
Thanks so much! All of my family, beside me, are from New York. A lot of my cousins live in Long Island, NY Chinatown, and Jersey City. A few also live in upstate New York. So hopefully we'll be able to stay w/ them if we cannot find an apartment in time? I'm very excited because I went during the summer time and it was really beautiful! I love the rush of crowds--very unlike San Francisco in a way.

BrooklynLove
December 23rd, 2007, 12:13 AM
i'd recommend looking in the carroll gardens, boerum hill, cobble hill, brooklyn heights vicinity - all well established communities with tons of resources and relatively conveninent to manhattan. and of course, rents are cheaper than in mahanttan.

KrissySF
December 23rd, 2007, 02:58 AM
Do you know how much the rents are for 1 bedroom in the Chinatown/Little Italy area? Also, what about the Alphabet City and Delancey Street areas?

Thanks.

KrissySF
December 23rd, 2007, 06:38 AM
You got that right! He used to tell me of these stories of these junkies he'd see lining up around the corner in Harlem. He also told me of police cars just driving by like nothing was happening. He spoke of the prostitutes in Time Square and the graffiti and homeless. It doesn't seem like that at ALL anymore. I just went there this summer and everything seems so unlike what he told me! He hasn't been back since he left...which was around Lindsay's time.

But today he said: "As long as you find a place anywhere, beside Jersey, Long Island, or Queens, that is cheap with a one bedroom than I am fine." He's indeed very stubborn!

lofter1
December 23rd, 2007, 07:43 AM
NYC was also affordable back then.

Now ... well, you'll see soon enough :cool:

antinimby
December 23rd, 2007, 01:52 PM
KrissySF, don't go to Chinatown. There aren't many places available there and they're all very expensive.

If your dad will be working @ Grand Central, then the most convenient place for him would be anywhere along the #7 subway line, especially Long Island City.

Other options incude the Upper East Side where the # 4/5/6 trains run. They all go through Grand Central and it'll just be a hop, skip and jump away.

Schadenfrau
December 23rd, 2007, 03:07 PM
If your dad will be working @ Grand Central, then the most convenient place for him would be anywhere along the #7 subway line, especially Long Island City.


Which means he'll have to get over his odd aversion to Queens. I think it would help if you told us how much you're looking to spend in rent. It's hard to give you suggestions without hard numbers.

Also, congratulations on your financial aid, KrissySF. You're going to be attending a great school.

KrissySF
December 23rd, 2007, 05:56 PM
Thanks. I was scared shitless they weren't going to give me any financial aid. The school is so much better than the public one I'm attending in SF right now. So much better.

Well my Dad wants to spend no more than $1200. Which will be very hard. The only apartments I found in that price range were in Harlem. I found some in East Harlem (which I hear is becoming a very nice neighborhood?). The rest I found in that price range were in Morningside Heights and Bronx.

Don't get me started on what his reaction was about the Bronx!

Schadenfrau
December 24th, 2007, 01:09 AM
You'll honestly be hard-pressed to find an apartment anywhere in Manhattan other than East Harlem.

You seem to have a good perspective on things, but your father really needs to realize that beggars can't be choosers. The Bronx suits me just fine, and I think it would suit your father to stop turning up his nose at areas he couldn't afford to live in even if he wanted to.

I'm curious, though- which part of San Francisco do you live in? It's not like housing is that much cheaper over there.

KrissySF
December 24th, 2007, 04:56 AM
I live in Upper Nob Hill. Even though the prices are expensive down here, especially where I live, we got the place because their is some special restriction to raise the rent. I've only lived in this specific place for 2-years. We pay $1085 a month for a 1-bedroom. It's around 450sq ft.

I wouldn't mind living in any area but it's just my Dad. I'm slowly trying to chip away at him!

Where did you used to live in SF? Oh and if you don't mind me asking, do you live in the Bronx?

lofter1
December 24th, 2007, 09:37 AM
I lived in various parts of town ... initially stayed with friends in a great loft above their shop on Market at Brady Street (just west of Van Ness). After that I was on Franklin near Jackson for a few months. Then over to Nob Hill (your neck of the woods): A sublet on Sacramento above Leavenworth. That was all in my first year! And none of those places cost me more than $50 / month!!

The next year I was on Noe & 19th on the first floor of a two-unit Victorian. My room was in the converted back porch with a loft bed that looked out across the backyard and up to Twin Peaks. My share of rent there was ~ $65 / month

After that I found heaven at $75 / month: a great old Victorian house on Collingwood Street which had been built by a mayor of SF back in the late 1800s. A friend lived there and one of his roommates was moving out. I moved in. It was a one-story white Queen Anne with a red front door. There 4 bedrooms (great for the communal life) and a terrific kitchen with lots of light. The house was surrounded on 3 sides by an old and very overgrown garden. Out the back kitchen door and through the yard was found a little old playhouse tucked in the corner, covered with a sprawling bower of white climbing roses. Across the patio was a pyracantha enclosed grotto (we completed the scene by the addition of a statue of Mary we picked up down in the Mission). From the living room could be seen a side garden of camelias and calla lilies. The front yard was dominated by a huge old acacia tree which bloomed profusely in February -- the yellow blossoms intoxicatingly sweet. The trimming and care of the garden became my hobby while living there. Unfortunately that house burned down shortly after I moved from SF to NYC. Some rather unfortunate condos now sit on that lot.

SF was a great place to come of age. Back then it was cheap and full of fun. Plus I was pursuing my dream and learning a craft. All in all it was great.

tmg
December 24th, 2007, 12:37 PM
You can find a comfortable 1BR in Jackson Heights in the $1000-1200 range. It's a 15-20 minute commute from Grand Central. I moved here from Berkeley five years ago, and while I miss the Berkeley Bowl and Freight & Salvage, I don't regret my choice of a NYC neighborhood.

If you're interested, come see what the community is talking about at www.jacksonheightslife.com

KrissySF
December 25th, 2007, 06:33 PM
Ask your father why he would not consider renting an apartment in FOREST HILLS, Queens, right on the subway line to Manhattan. No doubt he will remember that it was beautiful in the 1960s.

I asked him about that. He did say it was "nice". I'm slowly chipping away at him. My Dad grew up near the Apollo theater in Harlem during those days, so I can see why he's a bit iffy. I remember visiting that area last summer around 2am. It seemed really nice actually. But everything has changed and I think he is slowly realizing this! Well he has to realize, 'cause we have no other choice!

ablarc
December 26th, 2007, 07:27 AM
It seemed really nice actually ... everything has changed ...
The downside of all this is Duane-Reade, branch banks and chain stores. :D

KrissySF
December 26th, 2007, 12:15 PM
The downside of all this is Duane-Reade, branch banks and chain stores. :D

I think those Duane Reade's are quite cute. We don't have those out here. All we have is Walgreens, Long's Drugs, and Rite Aid. But Duane Reade out there seems to be a bit excessive like Walgreens. There's like one on every block! Just like Starbucks!

718Bound
December 26th, 2007, 03:14 PM
I asked him about that. He did say it was "nice". I'm slowly chipping away at him. My Dad grew up near the Apollo theater in Harlem during those days, so I can see why he's a bit iffy. I remember visiting that area last summer around 2am. It seemed really nice actually. But everything has changed and I think he is slowly realizing this! Well he has to realize, 'cause we have no other choice!

Are you and your dad planning a visit to NY before you move out? You can fly on Jet Blue for $159 each way, even if only for a day trip (so you don't have to pay for a Hotel). It is chance to show your father how much places he is against have changed over the years.

My family is mostly from Brooklyn, my Mother and Grandpaents moved out to Long Island in the mid 70's before moving upstate 10 years ago. Believe me I can relate to your situation with your father! My Mother and Grandmother still have a mental image of Brooklyn 20-30+ years ago. Before I convinced them otherwise they thought Williamsburg was bad, "and nobody should move there..." lol

KrissySF
December 26th, 2007, 10:25 PM
Are you and your dad planning a visit to NY before you move out? You can fly on Jet Blue for $159 each way, even if only for a day trip (so you don't have to pay for a Hotel). It is chance to show your father how much places he is against have changed over the years.

My family is mostly from Brooklyn, my Mother and Grandpaents moved out to Long Island in the mid 70's before moving upstate 10 years ago. Believe me I can relate to your situation with your father! My Mother and Grandmother still have a mental image of Brooklyn 20-30+ years ago. Before I convinced them otherwise they thought Williamsburg was bad, "and nobody should move there..." lol
We already visited during the summer. My Dad just mainly stayed up in Massachusetts because we have some family up there. I just mainly stayed around the city and looked around. It's really nice during the summer time. It seems extremely safe from what my parents told me.
You should have heard my Mom when I told her about walking around New York City at 2am. "Are you crazy?"

lofter1
December 26th, 2007, 11:54 PM
Some good news to share with your folks ...

City On Pace To Have Fewest Homicides In Its History

NY 1 News (http://www.ny1.com/ny1/content/index.jsp?stid=1&aid=76912)
December 26, 2007

While the murder rate nationwide is on the rise, the city is on pace to see its fewest homicides in recorded history.

Mayor Michael Bloomberg, Police Commissioner Ray Kelly and members of Harlem's 28th Precinct were on hand Wednesday to announce the 2007 crime statistics.

They said that if patterns continue through Monday, there will have been less than 500 murders committed across the five boroughs in the past year.

The latest NYPD statistics also show overall crime is on the decline. There was a 17-percent decrease in murder, a 13-percent decrease in crime in the subway system, an 11-percent decrease in rape, and a 36-percent drop in domestic violence murders.

There was an overall drop in crime of 6 percent.

"We are not the same New York that we were in 1990 -- a year when more then 2,000 people were murdered," said Bloomberg. "But we are also not the same city we were in 2001, when many predicted that our crime fighting gains would soon reach a point of diminishing returns."

In Harlem, there has also been a significant drop in crime.

Overall crime has dropped 21 percent in that area in the past year. Murder has dropped 73 percent and rape 41 percent.

"Our philosophy has always been one crime is one crime too many," continued Bloomberg. "We've defied conventional wisdom, we've bucked national crime trends."

However, crime remains a problem in some areas of northern Brooklyn. Nearly two dozen precincts have had more murders this year compared to last.

As a result, the police commissioner said that starting in early January, the newest class of Police Academy graduates will patrol those neighborhoods as part of Operation Impact.

In fact, 1,800 Impact officers will patrol the city -- double the number at this time last year.

"We are now going to take this entire class, put them in Operation Impact, keep the officers in Operation Impact now, until we see indicators that we have to move them," said Kelly.

For the past few years, the department has taken about two-thirds of each graduating class and put them on the street in high-crime neighborhoods, replacing them after six months with the next class of recruits. Now, the last class will stay in operation impact and everyone in the latest graduating class will join them.

The announcement comes just a few weeks after Kelly said he was considering scaling back the program because of recruiting problems. He says a new analysis found it was feasible to expand it, at least for the next few months.

"Probably about a third of the officers assigned to impact will be in Brooklyn," said the police commissioner. "The precincts we're going to focus on will be the 71st Precinct, the 75th, 73rd, 77th and 79th Precincts."

Precincts in the Bronx, Manhattan and Queens will also get more officers.

NYatKNIGHT
December 27th, 2007, 01:24 AM
You should have heard my Mom when I told her about walking around New York City at 2am. "Are you crazy?"

Away from The City, the old stereotype is still so deeply ingrained, whatever you've been told about New York is probably wrong.

Alonzo-ny
December 27th, 2007, 02:21 AM
This may seem a dumb or insensitive question but how were the deaths of 9/11 victims recognised by the city? Weren't their deaths all homicide?

lofter1
December 27th, 2007, 12:40 PM
Property belongs to Port Authority yes? A dual-state agency with dual-state ownership ...

Is the WTC site technically part of NYC or is it a separate entity?

Alonzo-ny
December 27th, 2007, 05:36 PM
Its PA land isnt it? Not part of the city then, aha.

ManhattanKnight
December 27th, 2007, 07:45 PM
Incorrect. PA owns the land; the land remains subject to most traditional state jurisdictional powers, including criminal laws. You kill someone at the PABT, NY's court's can try and imprison you. The PA has police but no criminal courts or judges. Google "Port Authority New York Jersey Compact" for the legal stuff. Since the FBI does not track deaths by dustification, I believe that the casualties of 9/11, if they happened, were not officially recognized.

Ninjahedge
December 28th, 2007, 08:57 AM
Also, do not let your father turn his nose up on all of NJ.

It all depends on where you choose to live. Areas in Jersey City are nice, and close to transport to Midtown (PATH trains) and Hoboken is also convenient and uber-gentrified.

Some of the suburbs are nice also (Ridgewood, Montclair, etc) but may be a bit far to commute for classes.

I think you really need to spend a few days (weeks) out here and check out the areas you are thinking of moving to to see what fits you best. Crime, in all but a few areas, is a non-issue now and the important things would be:

1. Cost
2. Convenience
3. Atmosphere.

GL!

KrissySF
January 7th, 2008, 02:51 AM
Update:

My Dad's job wants him to start on the first week of March. So we'll be leaving San Francisco on February 29th for NYC!

The only problem is: my school won't take me right now. So I think I'm going to have to go to a public school for the remainder of the year and start off fresh for the next school year.

I just wanted to let all of you know! NYC is a amazing place and I cannot wait to be there! I just hear it's going to be cold around those months? My Dad is used to that kind of weather. But me...I'm a California girl!

Schadenfrau
January 7th, 2008, 11:54 PM
I think your best bet is layers- coming from San Francisco, I'm sure you can understand that. The best way to deal with the New York cold is to wear multiple items that you can remove indoors.

No one can tell what the weather will be like in February, but it would be a safe bet to wear a t-shirt, light sweater, heavy coat, and gloves/scarf/hat. Temperature changes rapidly, but those items generally get you through most, if not all, of it.

pricedout
January 8th, 2008, 04:54 PM
If you need to go to public school your neighborhood might matter a bit more. You and your father may want to find a short-term sublet for the rest of this school year, which would also give you time to look at some possible longer-term options and perhaps expand your father's horizons.

Take a look at insideschools.org for an honest discussion of the school choices and whether or not your address will allow you access. Many schools are great, but some are simply awful, and the awful ones can be found in some pretty great areas, so it's not always intuitive. Good luck.

KrissySF
January 8th, 2008, 11:23 PM
Where would you rather live, Spanish Harlem or Harlem?

Schadenfrau
January 9th, 2008, 12:31 AM
It really depends on the blocks you're talking about, KrissySF. Certain blocks are nicer than others in both areas, and you should take commutes into consideration.

KrissySF
January 9th, 2008, 12:48 AM
So I found a really great apartment on E. 110th st. between Lexington Avenue. I know this is somewhere up in Harlem. Can any of you tell me about it? Can someone tell me where exactly are the boundaries of East Harlem?

Thanks.

Scraperfannyc
January 12th, 2008, 06:32 PM
So I found a really great apartment on E. 110th st. between Lexington Avenue. I know this is somewhere up in Harlem. Can any of you tell me about it? Can someone tell me where exactly are the boundaries of East Harlem?

Thanks.

East harlem is going through alot of gentrification. The subways lead to the upper east side. Spanish harlem is not going though as much gentrification, and the subways there lead to the upper westside. Both will be very different from Nob Hill.

Schadenfrau
January 12th, 2008, 09:43 PM
East Harlem and Spanish Harlem are one and the same. The neighborhood is north of the UES. Fifth Avenue is considered the dividing line between Harlem and East/Spanish Harlem.

KrissySF
January 17th, 2008, 03:40 AM
So it is offical! We've already bought the tickets and are leaving SFO on February 29,2008! We'll be flying to LaGuardia Airport on Jet Blue. I am so excited! I love New York so much. My Dad has lightened up sooo much on the apartments. But he still wants to stay in the city. But it won't be as tough now!

I'm leaving Cali Cali Cali!!!