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ironmike9110
May 11th, 2006, 06:06 PM
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antinimby
May 11th, 2006, 07:24 PM
Baruch (http://www.baruch.cuny.edu/), a very good business school.

Gulcrapek
May 11th, 2006, 08:45 PM
The ones that are community colleges usually have it in their name (Kingsborough CC, Borough of Manhattan CC etc). There are 7 (main) senior CUNY campuses. Each is different, with their own quirks and advantages and drawbacks.

Baruch College
Brooklyn College
College of Staten Island
City College of New York (I go here, I can tell you it's quite up to snuff...)
Hunter College
Lehman College
Queens College

Link (http://portal.cuny.edu/portal/site/cuny/?epi_menuItemID=dac6ef79a2dd419b962ac564d81010a0&epi_menuID=96c7eda6a122322b3bef4d5178304e08&epi_baseMenuID=a00e05b73704d3407d840d5541a08a0c)

There are also various divisions sprinkled in a few locations. The law school and the biomed school (Sophie Davis, on CCNY's campus) for example.

BrooklynRider
May 11th, 2006, 09:33 PM
I went to Baruch. An excellent business school.

Brooklyn College has a lovely campus.

Hunter has a great reputation.

ironmike9110
May 12th, 2006, 08:27 AM
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MrSpice
May 12th, 2006, 11:03 AM
ironmike9110: I think you should look not at the net cost of studying at the school, but at how much you will actually pay for your education and how much money you'll be able to make after you graduate.

1) If you study really well, you can get a very good financial aid/scholarship package at a private school (especially those that are less prestigious like Pace U.).

2) If you can get into a good school like NYU or Columbia, your earning potential will be much greater for many years after the graduation which can make those loans worthwhile.

3) If your family is poor, you can be eligible for state and federal grants that can help soften the blow and most private schools provide need-based scholaships that can be significant.

4) You can get a good education at a public/city school. But in my personal and somewhat biased opinion, it's more difficult because classes are large, there's a lot of beauracracy, there's less help and personal attention from the faculty members. And because virtually anybody can get in, there are lots of students in the class that don't really want to study. Yet I know several people that got good education from Brooklyn College, Baruch and Hunter.

BrooklynRider
May 12th, 2006, 02:44 PM
Sorry, apparently we need to follow MrSpice around with a "Truth Squad."

Bush: Budget will spur growth, rein in spending
CNN.com Wednesday, February 8, 2006

MANCHESTER, New Hampshire (CNN) -- President Bush on Wednesday talked up his budget on a trip to New Hampshire, hours before signing a bill he says is a major step toward cutting the nation's deficit in half by 2009.

[snip]

After returning to the White House from New Hampshire, the president signed the Deficit Reduction Act of 2005, which makes $39 billion in cuts to student loan subsidies, Medicare, Medicaid, farm subsidies and other programs.

"Spending restraints means making difficult choices, yet making those choices is what the American people sent us to Washington to do," the president said before signing the legislation.

BrooklynRider
May 12th, 2006, 02:48 PM
...I think you should look not at the net cost of studying at the school...

1) If you study really well, you can get a very good financial aid...

2) ... make those loans worthwhile.

3) ...you can be eligible for state and federal grants that can help soften the blow and most private schools provide need-based scholaships that can be significant....

Bush forced to answer for large student loan cut in Republican budget

Student loan budget cut is a symptom of reckless Republican support for special interest tax cuts at expense of parents and students struggling to pay for college

WASHINGTON, DC - Members of the House Democrat's 30-Something's working group were troubled by the President's dismissal of the $12.7 billion student loan cut in the Republican budget at a Kansas State University Q&A earlier today.

"This year's Republican budget cut $12.7 billion in funding for student loan programs over the next five years and if President Bush doesn't understand that, then either he doesn't understand the true impact this will have on American families or he doesn't care," said Representative Debbie Wasserman-Schultz (D-FL). "With tuition sky rocketing out of reach for American students and families, Congress should be increasing student loan programs, not cutting them."

This year's Republican budget cuts $12.7 billion from student loan programs over five years. The cuts eliminate all government spending to administer the loan programs, charge students higher loan fees, and raise the interest rate on parent loans from 7.9 to 8.5 percent. The Bush Administration is the first to cut Department of Education funding since 1988.

"The President's remarks show how disgracefully out-of-touch he is to the concerns of average Americans. Either President Bush doesn't know the Republican budget cuts student loans by a record amount, or he knows it and chooses to deny it. Regardless, students across America are depending on the President and the Republican Congress to stand up to the special interests and work with Democrats to restore this vital funding to the student aid program," said Representative Tim Ryan (D-OH).

The President claimed that the number of students receiving Pell Grants is growing, but did not address the fact that, for the fourth year in a row, the Republican-led Congress has failed to raise the maximum value of the Pell Grant scholarship - now set at $4,050 - even though it is worth $900 less in inflation-adjusted terms than it was in 1975-76.

The 30-Something working group is a collection of 13 Democratic Members of the House of Representatives who are under the age of 40. The group is committed to young Americans' concerns with today's government and political process.

MrSpice
May 12th, 2006, 03:30 PM
Bush forced to answer for large student loan cut in Republican budget

Student loan budget cut is a symptom of reckless Republican support for special interest tax cuts at expense of parents and students struggling to pay for college

WASHINGTON, DC - Members of the House Democrat's 30-Something's working group were troubled by the President's dismissal of the $12.7 billion student loan cut in the Republican budget at a Kansas State University Q&A earlier today.

"This year's Republican budget cut $12.7 billion in funding for student loan programs over the next five years and if President Bush doesn't understand that, then either he doesn't understand the true impact this will have on American families or he doesn't care," said Representative Debbie Wasserman-Schultz (D-FL). "With tuition sky rocketing out of reach for American students and families, Congress should be increasing student loan programs, not cutting them."

This year's Republican budget cuts $12.7 billion from student loan programs over five years. The cuts eliminate all government spending to administer the loan programs, charge students higher loan fees, and raise the interest rate on parent loans from 7.9 to 8.5 percent. The Bush Administration is the first to cut Department of Education funding since 1988.

"The President's remarks show how disgracefully out-of-touch he is to the concerns of average Americans. Either President Bush doesn't know the Republican budget cuts student loans by a record amount, or he knows it and chooses to deny it. Regardless, students across America are depending on the President and the Republican Congress to stand up to the special interests and work with Democrats to restore this vital funding to the student aid program," said Representative Tim Ryan (D-OH).

The President claimed that the number of students receiving Pell Grants is growing, but did not address the fact that, for the fourth year in a row, the Republican-led Congress has failed to raise the maximum value of the Pell Grant scholarship - now set at $4,050 - even though it is worth $900 less in inflation-adjusted terms than it was in 1975-76.

The 30-Something working group is a collection of 13 Democratic Members of the House of Representatives who are under the age of 40. The group is committed to young Americans' concerns with today's government and political process.

I know and I completely disagree with that plicy decision. I think Pell grant is a great program - one of few government programs that work and help poor people get quality education. I did not say I agree with Bush or republicans on this and I don't think this has anything to do with the question this person is asking. We don't even know if he is eligible for Pell grant.

ironmike9110
May 13th, 2006, 08:17 PM
after researching a little more,i think i would rather get a cheap apartment instead of the student housing link i put in the first post of this thread, this way i am more free and able to take all my current assets (couch, tv, bed, etc.) of my own with me. I want to live in the Bronx, but how long would it take to get to Midtown Manhattan (Baruch College) from lets say Fordham? Would i be better off in Brooklyn, what neighborhoods (Brooklyn or Bronx) would you guys recomend for a college student? I want to meet new people and have fun, not be in a quiet neighborhood, i want a city feel...

Schadenfrau
May 13th, 2006, 08:21 PM
You are a prime candidate for my neighborhood: Port Morris, in the Bronx. It takes about 15 minutes to get to midtown, on the east side.

ironmike9110
May 13th, 2006, 08:35 PM
You are a prime candidate for my neighborhood: Port Morris, in the Bronx. It takes about 15 minutes to get to midtown, on the east side.

Thats good...15 minutes, thats shorter than what its gonna take me next year --- Good neighborhood?

Schadenfrau
May 15th, 2006, 01:47 AM
I love the neighborhood, but "good" is really dependent upon what you're looking for. Many people consider the more suburban areas of the city to be "good," while thinking Port Morris "bad," so it's really a matter of opinion.

If you're interested in the area, send me a PM.

ryan
May 15th, 2006, 11:38 AM
I sort of agree with MrSpice's push for a more prestigious school. If you can get into an ivy or near ivy, I think you can more than make up for your debt with the networking, patronage and snob-appeal. More true in some fields than others - seems from the outside that 'business' is status-oriented enough that it would be a benefit. Wealthier schools are sometimes more generous with aid.

I don't think a less prestigious private school is at all worth it. You'd get debt and diminished returns on that debt. Often they have lower academic standards than competitive public schools, so the general quality of the education is lower, even if they might have a scenic campus, nice gym and tastier cafeterias. You're paying to be around a specific class of people - the value of that is a personal judgement.

In general, my advice from the other side is to figure out specifically what you'd like to do (and where you'd like to do it) - even though that's a very difficult thing to do at 18. Ask people who have the job you want how they got it and what they'd do if they could do it again. If you have a clear goal, the path to it will be much more clear.

tmg
May 15th, 2006, 07:17 PM
This is an overall thread on CUNY's capital expansion plans.

Other related threads:
Campus expansion and the economy (http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?t=5290)
Columbia University Manhattanville campus (http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?t=3683)


Plans for individual buildings:
BMCC/Fiterman Hall (http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?t=4244)
John Jay College (http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?t=5693)
Medgar Evers College Science Building (http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?t=4497)
Brooklyn College (http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?t=6313)
CCNY Architecture Building (http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?t=4138)
CCNY Dormitory (http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?t=6174)

tmg
May 15th, 2006, 07:22 PM
Krulltime posted part of this article on another thread, but there was so much good info here I thought the whole thing merited attention...



McGraw Hill Construction
Feature Story - May 2006
CUNY Construction

University Tackles Varied Goals in a $2.5 Billion Capital Program

by Diane Greer

Burgeoning enrollments, facility upgrades, and a renewed emphasis on the sciences are driving a new construction program at the City University of New York.

The 11 senior colleges, six community colleges, and graduate, law, professional studies, and biomedical education schools that make up the university already serve more than 200,000 degree candidates and another 220,000 continuing education students in more than 300 buildings. And enrollment is up 16 percent since 2000.

The need for space and for facility and program upgrades dominated the new capital plan adopted last year by New York City's public university system, said Emma Espino Macari, the vice chancellor of facilities planning, construction, and management.

"When we put together our second five-year plan, we identified a need for close to $10 billion worth of construction," she said.
advertisement

Eventually, budget constraints forced Macari's team to narrow the capital construction plan to $3.5 billion, and in mid-2005, the state legislature and governor funded it at $2.5 billion over five years.

Macari said various factors are helping to shape the overall construction program, including the system's increasing enrollment and the need to expand and upgrade the university's aging building stock. Other trends coming into play include sustainable design strategies, flexible space-use features, and an overall effort to make new structures more functional for modern higher education needs.

But cost pressures have still made the program difficult to plan, Macari said. Construction material costs, originally estimated in the plan adopted last year to escalate at 2 to 5 percent, have skyrocketed by 20 to 25 percent because of the impact of last year's Gulf Coast hurricanes on the marketplace. The cost spikes have delayed the start of several projects, Macari said, including a new School of Architecture building on the City College campus in Manhattan.

To maximize available capital resources, Macari said CUNY is negotiating plans for public-private partnerships that will leverage the location of attractive development sites in order to create mixed use projects.

"Some of our facilities are sitting on valuable land that has a lot of air rights," she added. "We are selling those air rights to developers, and they are building us academic facilities at the bottom of the buildings."

For instance, Macari is finalizing an agreement to sell the air rights over a building at City College of Technology in downtown Brooklyn. The existing structure onsite would be demolished, and Renzo Piano of Italy has been hired as the architect for a new mixed-use facility that would replace it.

Macari said she also is exploring similar air-right sales and mixed-use projects for Hunter College on Manhattan's Upper East Side and in the Jamaica section of Queens.

New Projects across the System

The common denominator across the capital program is an attempt to address the university's pressing academic needs, said Meghan Moore-Wilk, director of space planning and capital budgets.

"The academics drive everything we do," she added.

For example, a new 600,000-sq.-ft. building planned at 11th Avenue and 59th Street in Manhattan for John Jay College of Criminal Justice specifically targets overcrowding in the rapidly expanding academic program.

"Even with the new building, John Jay will have one of the lowest square-foot-to-student ratios in the system," Moore-Wilk said.

The $457 million North Hall project will include a 14-story tower clad in a glass curtain wall. A low-rise structure with a landscaped outdoor area on its roof will link the tower to John Jay's existing Haaren Hall.

The project was slated to begin earlier this year, but legal issues have delayed demolition at the site. A major stumbling point is a pending agreement with Amtrak, the passenger rail carrier, to ensure proper ventilation of a rail tunnel running beneath the site.

Another glitch is a dispute with the current tenant of a building on the site that would be demolished to make way for the new facility. The tenant recently lost a challenge of its eviction under eminent domain proceedings, according to Claudia Hutton, a spokeswoman for the Dormitory Authority of the State of New York, which acts as the program manager for various CUNY projects.

Another program with significant space needs is Medgar Evers College in Brooklyn. Macari said her team recently completed the acquisition and conversion of a bowling alley into a student services building and purchased a city sanitation garage across the street, which will be taken down to make way for a $159 million, 188,800-sq.-ft. academic building.

Construction was slated to begin in April on the new building designed by New York-based Polshek Partnership. A joint venture of New York-based Turner Construction and Philadelphia-based McKissack and McKissack is managing the project, which will be bid out for subcontractors in 19 separate packages under a set-aside program for minority contractors. Work would be complete in April 2010.

Modern science facilities comprise another prime feature of the new capital plan because CUNY's chancellor, Matthew Goldstein, has made it a priority, Macari said.

"The chancellor has declared this the decade of science," she said.

In that vein, two new science buildings, costing $381 million and totaling 390,000 sq. ft., are planned on the system's flagship campus at City College of New York in Harlem.

The 189,000-sq.-ft. CUNY Advanced Science Research Center will focus on biosciences and biosensing studies and will serve all of the system's campuses. The second 200,000-sq.-ft. building will house a science academic program specifically for City College.

Kohn Pedersen Fox and Associates of New York and Flad & Associates of Stamford, Conn., are jointly designing the two science facilities, on which construction is slated to begin in July 2007 and finish in August 2009.

Another project that is likely to be built green is a $60 million, 55,000-sq.-ft. science building at Herbert H. Lehman College in the Bronx, which will focus on plant science and ecology.

"At Lehman, we are shooting for LEED silver certification," said Eduardo Del Valle, director of design and construction management for CUNY. He added that some of the planned features could include the installation of wind turbines and a living machine, which employs plants in greenhouses to purify wastewater from the building and in turn recycles that water for use in toilets and urinals.

The Lehman facility is under design by Perkins + Will of New York and is slated to have construction begin in June 2008 and finish in June 2010.

Flexible space use is another primary focus of the capital program. Moore-Wilk said that workrooms, study spaces, and computer labs throughout the university will be prepared to accommodate classes as enrollment increases.

The flexible push will especially apply to the science facilities, Moore-Wilk said. Laboratory space will be open, flexible, and shared.

"This allows bench space to be assigned by the size of the grants," she added.

The university's construction program also calls for replacing obsolete facilities and moving programs into more functional spaces.

For example, at Brooklyn College, a new $116 million, 141,000-sq.-ft. academic building is replacing a recently demolished antiquated structure. The new West Quad building, which has a structural steel frame with concrete decks and is clad in precast brick veneer, glass curtain wall, and metal panels, includes a new gymnasium and pool built to NCAA competition standards, said Frank Frasco, chief project manager on the effort for the Dormitory Authority.

Turner is construction manager and AMCC Corp. of Brooklyn is general contractor on the project, which was designed by Rafael Viñoly Architects of New York. Work is slated to begin this spring and wrap up in July 2008.

Similarly, a $66.6 million renovation of a vacant library on the City College campus will create a new home for its School of Architecture, which is currently cramped in an outdated facility, Moore-Wilk said. The new 105,000-sq.-ft. facility will feature a large atrium with a skylight and a rooftop amphitheater.

Crews began gutting the library last June and removed its exterior.

However, first-round construction bids were over budget, delaying the start of further renovations, Frasco said.

"We have implemented some value engineering and looked at other cost savings components," he added.

The project went out for rebid over the winter.

Viñoly is also designing the architecture center, which is slated for completion in fall 2009.

One of the new capital plan's signature projects will be the reconstruction of Fiterman Hall, which sits near the World Trade Center in Lower Manhattan and sustained heavy damage from the Sept. 11, 2001 terrorist attacks. The new $202 million, 377,000-sq.-ft. building will house classrooms, a library, and instructional facilities for the Borough of Manhattan Community College.

The project awaits U.S. Environmental Protection Agency approval of an environmental remediation and deconstruction plan for the existing structure. The Dormitory Authority has Requests for Proposals out for decontamination and deconstruction and expects to conduct that work during the spring and summer and start rebuilding in the winter, the authority's spokeswoman Hutton said.

Pei Cobb Freed & Partners of New York is architect on the project, which will wrap up in August 2008.

A final theme tying together the varied projects in the plan is an effort to build structures that will have a fitting and long legacy in the system, Del Valle said.

"The emphasis is on good architecture, constructing buildings that are both functional and meaningful," he added. "We are looking to leave behind future landmarks."

Construction Syllabus:
CUNY Projects on the Horizon

Project: Fiterman Hall replacement, Borough of Manhattan Community College, Manhattan
Cost: $202 million
Size: 377,000 sq. ft.
Current Phase/Expected Completion:
Design/August 2008
Architect: Pei Cobb Freed & Partners, New York
Program Manager: Dormitory Authority of the State of New York

Project: North Instructional Building, Bronx Community College, Bronx
Cost: $77.5 million
Size: 92,000 sq. ft.
Current Phase/Expected Completion: Planning/Fall 2010
Architect: Robert A.M. Stern Architects, New York
PM: DASNY

Project: West Quad, Brooklyn College, Brooklyn
Cost: $115.9 million
Size: 140,998 sq. ft.
Current Phase/Expected Completion:
Construction/July 2008
Architect: Rafael Viñoly Associates,
New York
PM: DASNY
Construction Manager: Turner
Construction, New York
General Contractor: AMCC, Brooklyn

Project: School of Architecture, City College of New York, Manhattan
Cost: $66.6 million
Size: 104,880 sq. ft.
Current Phase/Expected Completion:
Construction/Fall 2009
Architect: Rafael Viñoly Associates
PM: DASNY

Project: Tower Dormitory, City College of New York, Manhattan
Cost: $44 million (no state or city funds)
Size: 179,000 sq. ft.
Current Phase/Expected Completion:
Construction/August 2006
Developer: Capstone Development, Birmingham, Ala.
Architect: Design Collective, Baltimore; Goshow Architects, New York

Project: CUNY Law School renovation and addition, Queens
Cost: $8.6 million
Size: 12,000 sq. ft.
Current Phase/Expected Completion:
Design/August 2008
Architect: Beyer Blinder Belle Architects, New York
PM: DASNY

Project: CUNY Advanced Science Research Center, City College of New York, Manhattan
Cost: $176 million
Size: 189,000 sq. ft.
Current Phase/Expected Completion:
Design/August 2009
Architect: Kohn Pedersen Fox and
Associates, New York; Flad & Associates, Stamford, Conn.
PM: DASNY

Project: CCNY Science Facility, City College of New York, Manhattan
Cost: $205 million
Size: 200,000 sq. ft.
Current Phase/Expected Completion:
Design/August 2009
Architect: Kohn Pedersen Fox and
Associates, New York; Flad & Associates, Stamford, Conn.
PM: DASNY

Project: 500 Grand Concourse renovation, Hostos Community College, Bronx
Cost: $12 million
Current Phase: Design
Architect: Goshow Architects, New York
PM: DASNY

Project: New Science Building, Hunter
College, Manhattan
Size: 200,000 sq. ft.
Current Phase: Planning
PM: DASNY

Project: Roosevelt House, Hunter College, Manhattan
Cost: $15 million
Size: 21,000 sq. ft.
Current Phase/Expected Completion:
Design/August 2007
Architect: Polshek Partnership Architects, New York
PM: DASNY

Project: Visual and Performing Arts Center, Hunter College, Manhattan
Size: 160,000 sq. ft.
Current Phase: Planning
PM: DASNY

Project: North Hall expansion, John Jay College of Criminal Justice, Manhattan
Cost: $457 million
Size: 600,000 sq. ft.
Current Phase/Expected Completion:
Design/June 2009
Architect: Skidmore, Owings and Merrill, New York
PM: DASNY

Project: Center III Building 4th floor renovation, LaGuardia Community College, Queens
Cost: $25 million
Current Phase: Design
Architect: Helpern Architects, New York
PM: DASNY

Project: New science facility, Lehman College, Bronx
Cost: $60 million
Size: 55,000 sq. ft.
Current Phase/Expected Completion:
Design/June 2010
Architect: Perkins & Will, New York
PM: DASNY

Project: Academic building, Medgar Evers College, Brooklyn
Cost: $159 million
Size: 188,800 sq. ft.
Current Phase/Expected Completion:
Design/April 2010
Architect: Polshek Partnership Architects, New York
PM: DASNY

Project: New academic complex, New York City College of Technology, Brooklyn
Cost: $186 million
Size: 262,000 sq. ft.
Current Phase/Expected Completion:
Design/December 2009
Architect: Renzo Piano Building Workshop, Italy; Perkins Eastman, New York
PM: DASNY

Project: New science facilities, Queens College, Queens
Cost: $30 million
Size: 25,760 sq. ft.
Current Phase/Expected Completion:
Design/August 2008
Architect: Mitchell/Giurgola Architects,
New York
PM: DASNY

Project: Instructional building, Queensborough Community College, Queens
Cost: $93 million
Size: 102,000 sq. ft.
Current Phase: Planning
PM: DASNY

Fitting Out a New J-School

by Diane Greer

The $2.5 billion, five-year capital plan eventually approved last year for the City University of New York didn't include one project that was still being hashed out in the office of Matthew Goldstein, the system's chancellor.

"We did not know the chancellor wanted to have a graduate school of journalism when we did our five-year plan," said Emma Espino Macari, vice chancellor of facilities planning, construction, and management for the university.

So last spring, when Goldstein's office announced the creation of the new CUNY Graduate School of Journalism, the facilities team had to add one more task to its list. And it has moved quickly on it.

Preconstruction work began earlier this year, and pending final permits, construction was slated to start in March on the $10.7 million project that will build out space that could not be more fitting for the new program. The school will occupy 57,099 sq. ft. on the third and fourth floors of the former headquarters of the New York Herald Tribune on West 41st Street, where a CUNY research foundation occupies most of the rest of the building and will remain in place.

And rising beside it is a 52-story tower that will be the new headquarters for the New York Times Co.

Build-out of the space will create classrooms, administrative and faculty offices, a newsroom, TV and radio studios, and editing rooms, said Mark Varian, president of John Gallin & Son of New York, which is construction manager for the project.

To accommodate soundproofing needed for the studios and editing facilities, the project team will pour a 4-in. concrete slab over the existing floor slab. In some areas where an original two-story-high space was divided to create two floors, the project's engineers expressed concern about the structural integrity of the lighter slab, so the team will instead pour a thinner layer of concrete over soundproofing insulation, Varian said.

On the west side of the old 20-story Herald building, the project team will block windows facing the Times tower, which is rising only 6 in. away. The team must also remove some mechanical equipment and reroute infrastructure piping because of the proximity of the Times tower.

The project entails installation of energy-efficient windows and construction of a staircase linking the two floors. The team will also marry new mechanical, plumbing, and electrical systems with existing utilities in the building. A new air-conditioning system also requires replacing the cooling tower on the roof.

"We are replacing it with new cooling tower cells that are much more up to date and efficient," Varian said.

Construction of the space is slated for completion in late summer. To accommodate the aggressive schedule, Gallin issued separate bid packages in late winter for the windows, staircase, some of the structural work, and the cooling tower.

"We want to get those things started, knowing full well that we will be down to the wire with the formal build-out," Varian said.

Key Players
Developer: City University of New York
Building Owner: 230 West 41st Street LLC
Construction Manager: John Gallin & Son, New York
Architect: Thomson Architects, New York
Mechanical-Plumbing-Electrical Engineer: Concessi Engineering, New York
Structural: Anthony M. Giudice Consulting Engineers, New York
Audio/Visual-Acoustic Technology: Harvey Marshal Berling Associates, New York
Lighting Design: Hayden McKay Lighting Design, New York

rknarr
May 17th, 2006, 09:22 PM
In business its really a lot about who you know and where you came from. Schools like NYU, Columbia, St. Johns all have prestige to their names. Do you know what type of job you'd like after college. Some schools are better off for certain jobs.

atraene
May 17th, 2006, 09:44 PM
There's a CUNY in Jamaica, Queens which I heard was a good school. Never went to it though, so I don't know exactly how it's like. They got them in all boroughs, except Staten '''''.

ironmike9110
May 17th, 2006, 10:00 PM
In business its really a lot about who you know and where you came from. Schools like NYU, Columbia, St. Johns all have prestige to their names. Do you know what type of job you'd like after college. Some schools are better off for certain jobs.

I want to be a general manager of a good business or even open up my own business...

rknarr
May 17th, 2006, 10:14 PM
IMO if your looking more at opening your own business or something like that dont go overboard paying 30k/year for a school. The big name schools are really great if your looking for a corporate job but IMO a CUNY school seems to be the better choice for someone looking to open their own business.

tmg
November 16th, 2006, 05:52 PM
Here are pictures of some of the projects:
http://www1.cuny.edu/portal_ur/content/capital_budget/pdfs/2006-07Request/06-07presen_to_trustees.pdf

Gulcrapek
December 31st, 2006, 12:48 AM
Thanks for that.

A permit was filed on December 26 for the first phase of the ASRC (on the CCNY campus). I'll start a thread on the three new buildings in the plan.

NewYorkDoc
June 25th, 2007, 06:42 PM
I'm considering transferring to either Brooklyn College or City College. Can anyone give any advice which is the better move? My current college is too expensive and my debt load is already massive with three years left to go.

Gulcrapek
June 25th, 2007, 08:04 PM
It really depends on what you're doing, I'm assuming you're continuing with premed. The only academic stuff I know about Brooklyn C is from their website, which lists "biology":
http://www.brooklyn.cuny.edu/programs/index.jsp?div=U

BC has been getting a lot of rave reviews in the last few years, and the general consensus is that it's an exceptional value and a very good education.

CCNY has a premed program that's got a very good reputation, and is quite challenging as far as I can tell from being around its students... it's the Sophie Davis School of Biomedical Education,
http://med.cuny.edu/

If you want I can put you in contact with a student in the program.

Campuswise, BC is green and pretty and has not quite spectacular but nice architecture in its main buidings, and the library is very cool and college-y. There's a new quad and student center/athletic center under construction by Rafael Vinoly, looks decent:

http://www.rvapc.com/Authoring/.%5CImages%5CProjects%5C139%5C139_tmp2A82.jpg
http://www.rvapc.com/Authoring/.%5CImages%5CProjects%5C139%5C139_tmp2A7B.jpg
(images from Vinoly's site)

Webcam on construction:
http://www.brooklyn.cuny.edu/bc/webcam/WestQuad3.htm


CCNY is split into two parts, north and south campuses. North campus, the original, consists mainly of a neogothic quad with 5 buildings on one side surrounding a central stepped lawn/plaza, and the purtyful Shepard Hall and its lawn across the street. You'd be mostly in this area, as Sophie Davis has its own building in Harris Hall by the quad which is also purtyful. South of that the big players are the NAC, which is expansive, and the Marshak science building.
You've seen some of south campus, and at the moment it's kind of an empty place, but by the end of this year two new science buildings will begin construction there and they'll sandwich a new "campus green." That combined with the completion of the architecture building will make the area about 349874x as active as it is now. And that lovely view you had of water pooling atop Eisner Hall will change when that's demolished either this year or next, and eventually replaced by a third science building.


Don't know where I'm going so facebook me with the email you check most if you want pics and stuff of CCNY (parts you haven't been to). Also if you want to be connected with a Sophie Davis student.

ligel
July 6th, 2007, 09:26 AM
Hi guys!

I would tremendously like to attend CUNY Queens College. This university is in Flushing, Queens. Can somebody tell me something about the university and the neighbourhood?

Thanks and take care.
Gery

NoyokA
July 7th, 2007, 01:03 PM
CUNY is a good college system, you'll generally find small classes and alot of help/outreach for foreign students as well as student organizations for foreign students. It can be somewhat overwhelming however. As far as Flushing its a busy neighborhood where you'll find whatever you need, it's safe, and has its nice areas and areas of interest. It's about half and hour to an hour train ride from Manhattan so you'll probably spend most of your time there.

clubBR
July 8th, 2007, 05:45 AM
City the flagship school
Hunter is good for anything
Queens is good too
Brooklyn is really good
Sophie Davis is biomedical
School of Law
Baruch is known for business
John Jay is criminal law
Medgar Evers is historically black
York is for health sciences
Lehman is known for its freshmen year initiative
Staten Island is a hybrid
and then theres NYC College of Technology

kyle
July 18th, 2007, 12:33 PM
I went to Queens College. It was alright. Some classes, like the 101 ones, can have a hundred students or so.

Don't know if it's true now as when I went there, but classes can fill up and you have to usually wait until next semester to get a class you want or, worse yet, need before you graduate. It left many of my friends on the 5 year plan.

Very commuter oriented too...no campus life really. No dorms.

On the other hand, some classes are awesome and you get out of it what you put in. Area around campus is a bit depressing, but you're not there for the scenery. :)

The Benniest
February 27th, 2008, 11:39 PM
Through this forum, I've been introduced to CUNY (http://portal.cuny.edu/portal/site/cuny/index.jsp?front_door=true), the City University of New York. It looks like a really great school, that has a lot of different locations throughout New York, like Brooklyn, Queens, Bronx and of course, Manhattan.

I was looking at the cost and tuition for the Borough of Manhattan Community College (http://www.bmcc.cuny.edu/j2ee/index.jsp) and I had a few questions about the sections of tuitions that they have. Below is what was on the website, and being that I will be a full-time student, those are the only prices I've included.
Residents of New York City who are:
Matriculated Students: $1,400.00 per semester
Non-Matriculated Students: $160.00 per credit
Non-Residents of New York City who are:
Residents of New York State with B-81 on file: $1,400 per semester
Residents of New York State without B-81 on file: $190.00 per credit
Out-of-State Residents: $190.00 per credit
Foreign Students: $190.00 per credit
Non-Matriculated Students: $190.00 per creditCan someone just explain that entire thing? ^^ Matriculated? B-81 file? I'm just confused. :confused:

Any help would be greatly appreciated. Thanks,
Ben

The Benniest
February 28th, 2008, 07:40 PM
If their not too expensive i was thinking i can get into a student apartment or something and maybe the cost in total could be around $20,000 or so a year instead of $40,000.
Is CUNY really $20,000 a year?! Or when ironmike9110 posted that, was he including the price for an apartment yearly? I thought this was a community college...

NoyokA
February 28th, 2008, 09:39 PM
CUNY is a city-wide college system. Not a community college in and of itself. Kingsborough is the Community College for Brooklyn. BMCC is the Community College for Manhattan and LaGaurdia is the Community College for Queens. Staten Island and the Bronx also have Community College's although I cannot think of the names off hand. CUNY has many senior colleges where you can get a degree in just about any field. Community Colleges only offer associates. From what I gather the CUNY Community College's are somewhat of a joke, supposendly if you can write your name you're guaranteed a passing grade. There main purpose is to help students where English is not their first language and they might be struggling with the language. CUNY thinks so little of their own Community College's that once you are attending a senior college they will not accept credits for any CUNY Community College. From what I understand if you are from out of state tuition at CUNY is expensive, $20,000 sounds about right. Residents pay about $4,000 a year (afterall its our tax dollars that pay for the education). I don't know how long it takes to claim residency, it might be 2 years.

The Benniest
February 28th, 2008, 10:05 PM
CUNY is a city-wide college system. Not a community college in and of itself. Kingsborough is the Community College for Brooklyn. BMCC is the Community College for Manhattan and LaGaurdia is the Community College for Queens. Staten Island and the Bronx also have Community College's although I cannot think of the names off hand. CUNY has many senior colleges where you can get a degree in just about any field. Community Colleges only offer associates. From what I gather the CUNY Community College's are somewhat of a joke, supposendly if you can write your name you're guaranteed a passing grade. There main purpose is to help students where English is not their first language and they might be struggling with the language. CUNY thinks so little of their own Community College's that once you are attending a senior college they will not accept credits for any CUNY Community College. From what I understand if you are from out of state tuition at CUNY is expensive, $20,000 sounds about right. Residents pay about $4,000 a year (after all its our tax dollars that pay for the education). I don't know how long it takes to claim residency, it might be 2 years.
Thanks for clearing the info. on CUNY up Stern. Really appreciated. So 2 years to claim residency in New York City? Hmm... that could be interesting because I would much rather pay $4,000 than $20,000 (but then again, who wouldn't?)!

An option that I'm thinking of is to move to New York City, get used to the "ropes" and find a well paying job (or two) to raise money. Then, when residency is established in the city, I can apply for CUNY or another school. Other than CUNY, will the cost of tuition lower greatly in other schools (FIT, Parson's, NYU) if I am a resident of NY?

Thanks,
Ben

NoyokA
February 28th, 2008, 10:11 PM
FIT is SUNY which is the same story. Parson's is private so you'll be paying the higher tuition for your entire time there. As for claiming residency after 2 years that was just a guess, I don't know offhand. You can find more information here:

https://portal.cuny.edu/portal/site/cuny/index.jsp

They also have a head office on 42nd Street with counselors that you can visit when you come to NYC and get more answers.

The Benniest
February 28th, 2008, 10:33 PM
In a basic sense Stern, is it going to be cheaper to go to school in New York if I am a resident, since like you said before, the taxes help pay the education there?

I googled for a few other Graphic Design/Photography schools in the area of Manhattan (besides FIT & Parson's) and found some of the following:

International Center for Photography (http://www.icp.org/)
School of Visual Arts (http://www.schoolofvisualarts.edu/index.jsp)I will be looking more into these schools until I get a reply and opinions, but just from looking at the School of Visual Arts' undergraduate programs, it looks like a really great school. It has majors like Graphic Design, Photography, and Advertising, all areas that I'm interested in.

Ben

The Benniest
May 1st, 2008, 08:40 AM
Lovelorn loony sparks gun scare panic on City College campus
BY WIL CRUZ, TANYANIKA SAMUELS, and BILL HUTCHINSON
DAILY NEWS STAFF WRITERS

Updated Thursday, May 1st 2008, 12:21 AM

Rebuffed by one woman, a lovelorn student took another coed hostage at City College Wednesday and held a gun to her head in a crowded waiting room, cops said.

"He said if anybody moves he'll kill me," the hostage, Elaishun Martin (http://www.nydailynews.com/topics/Elaishun+Martin), 21, told the Daily News.

The harrowing incident unfolded just after 2 p.m., when the suspect, Kirk Hanley (http://www.nydailynews.com/topics/Kirk+Hanley), 21, got into an argument with a 20-year-old woman who rejected him for a date, police said.

http://www.nydailynews.com/img/2008/05/01/amd_fake.jpg
Cops load Kirk Hanley into cruiser after the
City College student, spurned by one woman,
allegedly threatened to shoot another,
Elaishun Martin, with what turned out to be
a pellet gun.

The woman became frightened by Hanley's reaction and went to the Wille Administration Building on the Harlem campus, where she works in the financial aid office. She alerted a counselor, who contacted campus security. Campus officers called the NYPD (http://www.nydailynews.com/topics/New+York+City+Police+Department) for assistance.

Security officers confronted Hanley in a waiting room outside the financial aid office, asking him to leave with them, campus spokeswoman Mary Lou Edmondson (http://www.nydailynews.com/topics/Mary+Lou+Edmondson) said.

Witnesses said Hanley became agitated, pulled a pistol from his book bag and randomly grabbed Martin by her hair, pointing the gun at her head.

Martin, a psychology student, said Hanley mumbled something about the Sean Bell (http://www.nydailynews.com/topics/Sean+Bell) police shooting case and yelled at the arriving NYPD cops, "Are you going to make me do this?"

In "his suicide notes and his mutterings, he said he wanted to be killed by a cop. He said he wanted to go down like Sean Bell," a campus security source said.

Communications student Johnny Ochoa (http://www.nydailynews.com/topics/Johnny+Ochoa), 19, said Hanley kept repeating, "'I've been waiting 21 years. All I needed was help.'"

Cops ordered the 15 to 20 students in the area to hit the floor, said Ahmed Ishtiak (http://www.nydailynews.com/topics/Ahmed+Ishtiak), 20.

"It happened so suddenly, in a second," Ishtiak said. "Everyone was running."

He said Hanley, of Flatbush (http://www.nydailynews.com/topics/Flatbush), Brooklyn (http://www.nydailynews.com/topics/Brooklyn), released Martin, but did not immediately follow orders to lay down his gun.

"He was just walking around and he put the gun to his head," said Ishtiak, adding that Hanley was yelling, "I don't want to live anymore."

Cops screamed at Hanley, "Drop the gun and no one will hurt you." When Hanley dropped the weapon, police tackled him and dragged him out of the building, witnesses said.

Police said Hanley's weapon turned out to be pellet gun that looked like a real .45-caliber pistol. Cops said Hanley had a suicide note in his pocket.

He was taken to the psychiatric ward at St. Luke's Hospital (http://www.nydailynews.com/topics/St.+Luke%27s+Hospital) for observation. Cops later charged him with criminal possession of a weapon, reckless endangerment and kidnapping.

On his MySpace (http://www.nydailynews.com/topics/MySpace+Inc.) page, Hanley cryptically writes that he is a "fatal error, the Frankenstein of the 21st century, a God-like nonbeliever, the product of a racist, hypocritical world."

"To me life is nothing but a meaningless coincidence," he adds. "Every breath just brings us closer to death."

Hanley idolized mass killers, according to his Web page. As his heroes, he lists Oklahoma City (http://www.nydailynews.com/topics/Oklahoma+City) bomber Timothy McVeigh (http://www.nydailynews.com/topics/Timothy+McVeigh) and "Cho" - an apparent reference to Seung-Hui Cho (http://www.nydailynews.com/topics/Cho+Seung-Hui), the madman who killed 32 at Virginia Tech (http://www.nydailynews.com/topics/Virginia+Polytechnic+Institute+and+State+Universit y).

"I'm not supposed to be at work and receive a phone call like this," Martin's mother, Helen Martin (http://www.nydailynews.com/topics/Helen+Martin) of Harlem, told The News last night as she emerged from the 26th Precinct stationhouse with her daughter.

Copyright 2008 New York Daily News

718Bound
May 1st, 2008, 03:24 PM
Thanks for clearing the info. on CUNY up Stern. Really appreciated. So 2 years to claim residency in New York City?

Just to clarify (it really makes no difference for you anyway Ben) but you can be a resident of NYS and not NYC and get the same tuition rates for CUNY... Like I said it makes no difference for you but those of us coming from Upstate, NY don't have to wait to be able claim NYC residency to get the cheap rates. ;):)

718Bound
May 1st, 2008, 03:25 PM
Lovelorn loony sparks gun scare panic on City College campus


Yikes!:eek:

nykid17
May 7th, 2008, 12:36 AM
wow, thats all crazy. I actually got accepted to City College for the fall 2008 semester, i've been to a couple of the open houses, and im probably going to be living on campus. This is a little scary, but i realize and hope its a 'once in a blue moon' situation. I wondered if anyone knew, how is the neighborhood around this area(125-140). In the day time it seems pretty nice, but how is the crime, the murder rate, robberies, reports say not too bad but im trusting you guys who've actually lived it.

brianac
October 9th, 2008, 05:22 AM
Manhattan Community College Takes Space Near Terrorist-Damaged Fiterman Hall

by Dana Rubinstein (http://www.observer.com/2008/author/dana-rubinstein)
October 7, 2008

This article was published in the October 13, 2008, edition of The New York Observer.

http://www.observer.com/files/imagecache/vertical/files/breaks5.jpg
Property Shark

The Indiana limestone-encrusted Cunard Building at 25 Broadway, which the city calls one of “lower Manhattan’s most architecturally and historically significant edifices” in its landmark designation report, has a new tenant.

The Borough of Manhattan Community College has signed a lease for the more than 40,000 square feet on the eighth floor in the 22-story confection, built by the Cunard Steamship Line for its headquarters in 1921 on what was once known as Steamship Row.

BMCC, one of the lesser-known Sept. 11 victims, could certainly use the space. In 1993, Miles and Shirley Fiterman donated a 15-floor, 375,000-square-foot office building at 30 West Broadway to the school, perhaps the largest private donation ever made to a community college in the United States at the time. By Sept. 11, 2001, when the original 7 World Trade Center’s collapse irreparably damaged the building, the school had nearly completed renovations on its 42 classrooms.

Since that day, the school, one of 23 within CUNY, has grown from 17,000 to 22,000 students, yet has been struggling to figure out how to allocate space, according to Sunil Gupta, BMCC’s dean of continuing education and workforce development.

“It’s been a very tough situation,” he said. The school has a main campus at 199 Chambers, and a number of other satellite campuses throughout the city.

The space at 25 Broadway will house the Center for Continuing Education and Workforce Development, which serves more than 11,000 students. Its former home, at 70 Murray Street, will remain in the BMCC portfolio.

“We’ll still be short of space,” Mr. Gupta said.

CB Richard Ellis negotiated the lease on behalf of both the college and landlord, 25 Broadway Realty LLC. According to CoStar, asking rents are about $40 a square foot.

Meanwhile, just a handful of blocks west, the shell of Fiterman Hall remains. “It’s kind of an eyesore,” Mr. Gupta said


drubinstein@observer.com


http://www.observer.com/2008/real-estate/manhattan-community-college-takes-space-near-terrorist-damaged-fiterman-hall


2008 Observer Media Group,

lofter1
October 9th, 2008, 10:31 AM
Odd reporting ^

The ruins of Fiterman Hall are hardly to the "west " of the building at 25 Broadway (http://maps.google.com/maps?hl=en&q=%2225+broadway,+new+york+ny%22&ie=UTF8&ll=40.709662,-74.010429&spn=0.014932,0.027122&t=h&z=15) (which backs up onto Greenwich Street opposite the entry to the Brooklyn Battery Tunnel roadways). Rather, the burnt out hulk of Fiterman is ~ 10 blocks to the north of 25 Broadway, a long hike from the main BMCC campus at West & Chambers Streets.

brianac
October 9th, 2008, 02:11 PM
True.

It looks like they were trying to make a link between the two buildings, and did it badly.

Gray Snapper
November 25th, 2008, 03:33 PM
Looks like they're finally building the condos in the Cunard Building on floors 16-22. I work next door and can see workmen doing things.

CDA Architecture has this project:

http://cdany.com/#/PORTFOLIO/RESIDENTIAL/25%20Boadway/