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View Full Version : 16 year old, getting a job in New York?



amiyumi
July 27th, 2008, 09:59 PM
Hi, I'm from the UK, and will have GCSE results coming out in a month (high school graduation) I was wondering how easy it is to get a job in america with these? Or will I need to complete A-levels to have a chance of getting one?

Also, are there any websites with listings for apartment rentals with roommates, i've looked around but haven't found any.

Also, continuing education at this age, would attend a high school, or continue further education. Is it compulsory to stay in education till you are 18 in NY?

stache
July 28th, 2008, 01:37 AM
You can drop out at 16 but you will need a work visa to get a job here unless you are an American citizen.

lofter1
July 28th, 2008, 12:35 PM
Or are willing to work under a slave driver for 16 hours / day for little money and no security.

joe25
July 28th, 2008, 04:03 PM
Don't drop out, go to college, and while your in college get a job in retail or food service, just dress up really nice and take the interview.

About the age Ive kept my job at Gamestop as a greeter when I was 16, now 17 and I am the 4th top seller in my store. So age doesn't matter in some fields of employment, others it does like bookstores you have to be 18 if they sell dirty magazines or 21 at a restaurant that serves alcohol.

Also craigslist has a ton of apartments, that would be optimal if you dont have lots of money or superb job http://newyork.craigslist.org/roo/ I would go to college here or in england first, then like find friends to move in with or something. well thats my 2 cents.

Ninjahedge
July 28th, 2008, 04:57 PM
I don't think he is really talking about dropping out, maybe not in our sense.

Is it structured teh same way in England, or do they have a slightly different way of doing it?

AY, if you are talking about dropping out with en equivalency, I would advise against it. Get the full degree, if possible.

College is also advisable, and England might be easier to find something a bit more affordable. College is not a meal ticket, and some degrees will get you very little. But many people I have known have been doing well only to be steimied by that "piece of paper" they do not posess (degree).

You are not really missing anything by getting out into the "real world" a few year earlier. AAMOF, you may just be making the rest of your life more difficult. I am not trying to be your folks and badger you into line. Far from it, but suffice to say that you need to seriously consider your options, and what things would take the least effort to pick back up again if dropped.

It is a LOT easier to go to college after HS than it is to go back after XX years. ESPECIALLY when you have things like a job, and possibly a woman (man?)/family of your own.

I would say, however, that 18 is advisable if you are thinking of coming here on your own. It will make some things a bit easier.

KenNYC
July 30th, 2008, 09:42 AM
You have absolutely no chance at getting working visa or a green card without (much) more education. Also, you'd be doing yourself an incredible disfavor by skipping out on education and just taking a crap job for the sake of being in New York.

fitnessyl33
July 31st, 2008, 09:58 AM
yes like most people here already said, don't waste time thinking about moving to New York to start a new life or something like that. unless you are a supermodel with a contract which lasts for a year, forget it. sorry, but that's the truth. you are just 16 years old, so better focus on your education and stop dreaming about New York, New York!

amiyumi
July 31st, 2008, 05:25 PM
Mhm, but i was wondering, if i were to leave school here in the UK, with a high school diploma (GCSEs) would i have to attend a college or community college or would i have to go to high school?

joe25
July 31st, 2008, 05:33 PM
You have absolutely no chance at getting working visa or a green card without (much) more education. Also, you'd be doing yourself an incredible disfavor by skipping out on education and just taking a crap job for the sake of being in New York.

I wouldn't say no chance, if the OP focuses on working to get into the US, he can, legally.

Although I will agree with you that skipping out on education is the worst thing he could do.

To the OP, trying applying to colleges in NYC, that's a way you can come over with a student visa.

KenNYC
July 31st, 2008, 05:51 PM
joe25; I'd love for you to tell me what kind of visa a 16 year old could legally get in terms of employment to enter the US. Models and super-talented athletes probably could, but other than that - no chance. Your US employer has to prove to the immigration authorities that the person getting the visa has qualifications they could not get from an American applicant - that's just not going to happen for a kid with a high school diploma.

As for the OP; I do believe you need A-levels to apply to college, but contact the admissions office of a random college and ask, since I'm European but not English my requirements were a bit different than yours. That being said, they are looking for what is as close as possible, and since HS graduates generally are 18 years, A-levels seems to be the closet equivalent to me.

And I have to say, I think you should be more sure about what you want when moving. I don't mean to discourage at all, but based on people I know - if you move to New York just for the sake of living in New York you're setting yourself up for failure. I think a lot of outsiders (maybe even myself?) over-glamorize life in New York a bit, and reality kicks in very fast when you're actually here. Coming to New York as a 16-18 year old with a plan might certainly work, coming to New York because New York sounds cool - I'm not so sure that is a good idea.

And the world is very quickly becoming a difficult place without a good education, I would recommend you get at least a bachelor's degree in the UK, and then rather move for graduate studies. Education in America is very expensive, even more so for foreigners.

antinimby
July 31st, 2008, 06:47 PM
I'd really be interested in hearing about the "reality" kicking in for you KenNYC since you've been here.

Start a new thread. ;)

The Benniest
July 31st, 2008, 07:50 PM
^^ I second that!! :D

joe25
July 31st, 2008, 08:01 PM
joe25; I'd love for you to tell me what kind of visa a 16 year old could legally get in terms of employment to enter the US. Models and super-talented athletes probably could, but other than that - no chance. Your US employer has to prove to the immigration authorities that the person getting the visa has qualifications they could not get from an American applicant - that's just not going to happen for a kid with a high school diploma.

As for the OP; I do believe you need A-levels to apply to college, but contact the admissions office of a random college and ask, since I'm European but not English my requirements were a bit different than yours. That being said, they are looking for what is as close as possible, and since HS graduates generally are 18 years, A-levels seems to be the closet equivalent to me.

And I have to say, I think you should be more sure about what you want when moving. I don't mean to discourage at all, but based on people I know - if you move to New York just for the sake of living in New York you're setting yourself up for failure. I think a lot of outsiders (maybe even myself?) over-glamorize life in New York a bit, and reality kicks in very fast when you're actually here. Coming to New York as a 16-18 year old with a plan might certainly work, coming to New York because New York sounds cool - I'm not so sure that is a good idea.

And the world is very quickly becoming a difficult place without a good education, I would recommend you get at least a bachelor's degree in the UK, and then rather move for graduate studies. Education in America is very expensive, even more so for foreigners.

I am an US citizen so I know little of the Visa department (first time I heard it I thought they meant the credit card) But I know some colleges will take applications from students under 18. That being said I totally forgot about 16 and have no Idea what visa would be good for him, unless the student visa has no age requirement. When I said he can focus getting into the states legally, I mean it will take time, maybe when hes 20 or so, many people come into the states, its possible, you did.

You don't need to have perfect 4.0 grade average to get into college, also SAT and ACT is available to international students as well. OP take that maybe see how you score, see your financial situation as well.

lofter1
July 31st, 2008, 08:14 PM
... if you move to New York just for the sake of living in New York you're setting yourself up for failure.

So sad, but true.

Seems young folks haven't been able to move to NYC on a whim since the early 90s ...

(before it became the fully corporate theme park it is now :( )

stache
August 1st, 2008, 04:47 AM
I can see the failure part, but I have also known many people that only live here for a while because they realize they can't stand it (fewer now than before), or their original plan was to just live here for a year or two for the experience. For example, lots of Japanese kids only live here for six months or so, as a rite of passage.

KenNYC
August 1st, 2008, 07:22 AM
I am an US citizen so I know little of the Visa department (first time I heard it I thought they meant the credit card) But I know some colleges will take applications from students under 18. That being said I totally forgot about 16 and have no Idea what visa would be good for him, unless the student visa has no age requirement. When I said he can focus getting into the states legally, I mean it will take time, maybe when hes 20 or so, many people come into the states, its possible, you did.


Ok, I agree more with you then :) Student visa is fairly simple (coming from developed, European countries at least - your country of origin matters a lot here). Work visa is extremely difficult. Simply said, they're more lenient letting students in because they expect them to get the heck out of the country when done ;)


I'd really be interested in hearing about the "reality" kicking in for you KenNYC since you've been here.

Start a new thread. ;)

That's still a bit early for me I'm afraid, so far my "moving to New York" experience only includes getting an apartment. I might share some more experiences as I get them though...

That being said, I'm moving to New York for law school so I like to think of myself as one of the people who comes with a plan - and more so, I don't think I'll have enough time to get bored or sick of it :p

antinimby
August 1st, 2008, 05:30 PM
Start a thread now and tell us about that apartment hunting experience and then add new posts as you go along. ;)

stache
August 1st, 2008, 05:45 PM
Or do a blog. :cool:

meakin88
August 2nd, 2008, 04:12 PM
ive moved here with only GCSEs!

but in America people are alot more shocked when you dont go to Uni, in england iits not a big deal at all.

i say dont listen to what other people say! do what you want when you want to!

you might find it hard to get a flat being 16, i found it hard being 19, people didnt even want to show me the place. go on craigs list and start looking at what its going to cost you, then save up, also i recomend that you save al least twice as much as you think at first trust me! i wish i had, get the good old english pound in your pocket then watch it double when you get here!

i didnt have to worry about the green card thing being an American citizan already

but if you want to ask any questions feel free to PM me.


-Ed

KenNYC
August 2nd, 2008, 04:22 PM
You do realize that when you add the part about you being a US citizen everything you said becomes meaningless to this person, right?

I don't mean to be an a-hole or anything, but you're really commenting on a totally different situation which doesn't really apply here.

stache
August 2nd, 2008, 06:57 PM
The saving money part is good advice. :cool:

The Benniest
August 2nd, 2008, 07:45 PM
And, personally for me ... one of the hardest. :p

Don31
August 2nd, 2008, 10:19 PM
Saving money? What's that?

stache
August 3rd, 2008, 01:52 AM
The way the economy is headed, it's something you may wish you had heard of. ;)

meakin88
August 3rd, 2008, 04:26 AM
The saving money part is good advice. :cool:

yeah it is! thank you


that is one thing that he can listen too!

the english pound is the best money to have! in! the! world!

brianac
August 3rd, 2008, 04:52 AM
the english pound is the best money to have! in! the! world!

Try telling that to folks who have cancelled their holidays in Europe because of the poor exchange rate of the Pound to the Euro.

KenNYC
August 3rd, 2008, 02:57 PM
I really can't imagine that would be too many people.

brianac
August 3rd, 2008, 03:29 PM
http://www.moneysupermarket.com/images/structure/ms-logo.gif (http://www.moneysupermarket.com/)
British holidaymakers to shun Europe this summer

According to our poll the strength of the euro is affecting people’s travel plans with nearly a third considering travelling outside Europe because of the exchange rate and others planning to stay at home. However, will you be suitably insured wherever you travel? Peter Gerrard (http://www.moneysupermarket.com/community/user/Profile.aspx?UserID=2946&source=MS) takes a look..

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KenNYC
August 4th, 2008, 06:44 PM
Outside Europe might be a different thing :) Although I would imagine quite a few would be heading for the US to take advantage of the exchange rate there.