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View Full Version : Could i make my way in NY as a Ceramic Wall/Floor tiler?



smellslikeabid
August 16th, 2008, 07:55 AM
Hey guys

Could i survive in NY on the wage of a Ceramic Wall/ Floor Tiler.

I currently work in the uk as one, and get by reasonably, but my long term goal is to one day move to NY, how easy is it to get work as a Tiler, and what are the going rates for Tilers in NY?

Any help would be appreciated!

John

stache
August 16th, 2008, 08:34 AM
While you have a skill that's in demand, much of this type of work has been taken over by illegal aliens, so the wage has dropped. I'm guessing that the tiler in my building makes about $12.00 an hour.

smellslikeabid
August 16th, 2008, 09:09 AM
While you have a skill that's in demand, much of this type of work has been taken over by illegal aliens, so the wage has dropped. I'm guessing that the tiler in my building makes about $12.00 an hour.

Thats not great.
There must be contract companies that are not allowed to hire illegals?

stache
August 16th, 2008, 09:39 AM
Possibly new buildings and government buildings.

smellslikeabid
August 16th, 2008, 10:07 AM
Possibly new buildings and government buildings.

Cool, any ideas who i would need to contact?
Shot in the dark i know.

Thanks

lofter1
August 16th, 2008, 10:27 AM
My sense is that a large number of labor jobs in NYC are now being done by immigrants, whether they be from areas south of the US, Eastern Europe or the Far East.

I wouldn't be surprised to find that many of those workers are allowed entry and the ability to work under some government agreement whereby industry lobbyists have claimed Americans no longer are willing to do such work -- and therefore workers from other countries are needed to fill the gap. Of course such talk is BS and is only a way for employers to get around such mundane things as labor laws, minimum wage laws, compensation laws, worker safety laws and anything else that might protect a worker from being exploited.

Alonzo-ny
August 16th, 2008, 12:07 PM
There is no way you will get a visa for that type of work, its hard enough when you have a professional degree.

antinimby
August 19th, 2008, 05:49 PM
Did you have trouble getting one, alonzo?

smellslikeabid
August 20th, 2008, 04:21 AM
Did you have trouble getting one, alonzo?

sounds like it!! :p;)

Alonzo-ny
August 20th, 2008, 01:36 PM
I had, according to my lawyer, a perfect application but the US government thinks the best way to get the best and brightest immigrants is to pull applications out of a big hat. So i missed out on the quota (65,000 places out of 100s of thousands of applicants). Luckily however I had decided I would pull out anyway and return to college.

antinimby
August 20th, 2008, 08:45 PM
So then it doesn't matter what type of work or professional degree one has.

Anyone has as much of a chance to get selected as anyone else (that puts in an application of course).

Is that correct?

Alonzo-ny
August 20th, 2008, 09:03 PM
No you must have a degree to be eligible. Otherwise you would be in the unskilled catagory. Meaning that the US isnt willing to let people in when there are plenty of people in the US already who could do those jobs. Obviously its less cut and dry than that but thats basically it. Bachelors or less and i cant forsee anyway of being successful short of marrying a US citizen.

KenNYC
August 21st, 2008, 05:14 PM
There are 65,000 H1B visas (like alonzo said) that are given out every year, on top of that there are 20,000 extra H1Bs which are given to people with masters or doctor degrees from an American University (all other masters and doctors are applying for the former 65k). However, the actual number of H1Bs given out every year has been around 110k to 125k, so how the heck they make that math go up, I have no idea. I'm guessing there's quite a few 'backdoors' for people in the know or with a good immigration lawyer.

As for one addition to alonzo's post; bachelors in computer sciences have a relatively good chance, other bachelors are as he says a long shot at best. Health personnel such as nurses also have some better chances than others.

ArTsYwRiTeR
August 21st, 2008, 05:24 PM
I do not think that he is coming in on a tiler's work visa alone. Maybe there is a petition involved? Fiancee maybe or a parent or something?

Alonzo-ny
August 21st, 2008, 05:50 PM
He wont get a work visa without being married to a citizen or related to one in whatever fashion to make him eligible to work in the US.

KenNYC
August 21st, 2008, 06:03 PM
Yeah, that's not going to happen. Well, legally anyway.

ArTsYwRiTeR
August 22nd, 2008, 03:39 PM
True. Why people would believe otherwise is beyond me.

195Broadway
September 4th, 2008, 09:19 PM
Could 'bid join our military? How does that work as far as someone becoming a citizen here? .....not that that is his stated goal.

joe25
September 5th, 2008, 12:17 PM
Could 'bid join our military? How does that work as far as someone becoming a citizen here? .....not that that is his stated goal.

You would be surprised at the amount of immigrants who take advantage of the serve 1 year and be an American citizen rule. I think that's a great way of them proving that they care about this country and not coming over to screw it up. ( I support immigration to the fullest by the way)

Amberlicious7583
September 6th, 2008, 12:57 PM
You would be surprised at the amount of immigrants who take advantage of the serve 1 year and be an American citizen rule. I think that's a great way of them proving that they care about this country and not coming over to screw it up. ( I support immigration to the fullest by the way)

Is that really true? I haven't ever heard of that. I think that is a great rule!

joe25
September 7th, 2008, 11:15 PM
Is that really true? I haven't ever heard of that. I think that is a great rule!

http://www.informationclearinghouse.info/article18603.htm

Yeah one of my friends in highschool had his brother do this, hes still serving tours, but its on the way.

BrooklynRider
September 7th, 2008, 11:34 PM
Cool, any ideas who i would need to contact?
Shot in the dark i know.

Thanks

There are definitely jobs that you could bid on that pay well. In addition, there are many condo and co-op owners that will pay for high quality work.

I work for a major intenational interior design firm. These skills are paid well by people not looking to cut corners.

smellslikeabid
September 8th, 2008, 08:05 AM
There are definitely jobs that you could bid on that pay well. In addition, there are many condo and co-op owners that will pay for high quality work.

I work for a major intenational interior design firm. These skills are paid well by people not looking to cut corners.

I have a certain skill as it were, and im deffo not one to cut corners, im sure people out there would be happy after seeing one of my jobs, its just getting the guarenteed work!

Alonzo-ny
September 8th, 2008, 09:42 AM
Have you researched viability of getting the appropriate visas?

BrooklynRider
September 14th, 2008, 02:38 AM
A reliable contractor that can meet schedule deadlines is valuable in this city.

smellslikeabid
September 14th, 2008, 06:30 AM
Have you researched viability of getting the appropriate visas?

Not yet, i did for Canada (we were planning Canada before my daughter was born) And it was really easy. We had well over enough points!

I guess its harder with NY!

smellslikeabid
September 14th, 2008, 06:31 AM
A reliable contractor that can meet schedule deadlines is valuable in this city.

Surely there are plenty of New Yorkers that are proud enough of their work, as you all seem so proud of your city!

check out my website (shameless plug alert!)

http://www.jlktiling.info

stache
September 14th, 2008, 07:58 AM
Surprisingly enough, while there is pride in workmanship among many here, there is also a great deal of slipshod standards as well. The dirty little secret about New Yorkers is that we're lazy. I see this all the time.

smellslikeabid
September 16th, 2008, 04:33 AM
Surprisingly enough, while there is pride in workmanship among many here, there is also a great deal of slipshod standards as well. The dirty little secret about New Yorkers is that we're lazy. I see this all the time.

Well as long as i dont fall into that catogory, i should be fine!

smellslikeabid
November 13th, 2012, 08:34 AM
Ive just re-read this, is this still an option?

Id happily serve the military for a few years, if i was stationed in or around new york?

lofter1
November 15th, 2012, 01:52 AM
You wouldn't get to choose where you're stationed. Are you a gambling man?

IrishInNYC
November 20th, 2012, 01:08 PM
Ive just re-read this, is this still an option?

Id happily serve the military for a few years, if i was stationed in or around new york?

It's not like the military back home man. You'd as quickly end up in Afghanistan. (Iran, North Korea, Libya and several other candidates could easily come into play in the coming years).

Regardless, there is no option available for an immigrant to simply apply to the military in return for legal status.

Getting legal here is the main issue, and unfortunately it's almost impossible for someone in your shoes. If you knew a company here, offering a job, and you had money and time, you could apply for a visa as a "specialty worker". I've helped people do this in the past but it's tedious, expensive and temporary.

Beyond coming here and flying under the radar (i.e. worst wage levels). Options are limited.

smellslikeabid
November 28th, 2012, 05:56 AM
It's not like the military back home man. You'd as quickly end up in Afghanistan. (Iran, North Korea, Libya and several other candidates could easily come into play in the coming years).

Regardless, there is no option available for an immigrant to simply apply to the military in return for legal status.

Getting legal here is the main issue, and unfortunately it's almost impossible for someone in your shoes. If you knew a company here, offering a job, and you had money and time, you could apply for a visa as a "specialty worker". I've helped people do this in the past but it's tedious, expensive and temporary.

Beyond coming here and flying under the radar (i.e. worst wage levels). Options are limited.

Then how do so many people come and live in NY then?
There must be easy ways, surely the Guvornment wants able bodied, hard working imigrants who will give rather than take away from the system?
What about setting up a business?

Its more tax dollars in the guvornments pockets surely?

smellslikeabid
November 28th, 2012, 06:23 AM
What about moving in with relatives?
Is there different rules guvorning that?

Also, is there more of an option, say if i moved to New Jersey, say within 70 miles of NYC?

John.

IrishInNYC
November 28th, 2012, 10:48 AM
It's not about where you live or who with. The legality of being in the country for an extended period of time is a federal issue, not state by state.

The government absolutely wants able bodied, hardworking people...problem is, there are millions of them trying to get in.

If you were trying to set up a business, that is an option. You can apply for an "E" visa for investors. It has drawbacks though, such as lawyer involvement and the need to have $75,000 in your bank account for a period of time during the application. It can be renewed indefinitely, I believe.

In terms of the "many people" who come and live in NY you have large populations of illegal immigrants, you have large populations of people from countries who are eligible for the green card lottery (UK is not eligible due to the volume of immigrants in the previous 5 years). Chinese, Bangladeshi, Indian and other populations have swelled in the NY area with these green card handouts....now they're closed out of that option.

You further have many people sponsored on temporary work visas by multinational companies.

I'm not trying to rain on your parade John, I've clambered through the visa and green card maze for almost 12 years...it's tedious, expensive but necessary.

I suggest if you are very serious about this, finding a lawyer/solicitor in the UK who specializes in US based visa programs. I have no doubt there are many of them. It's worth the fee to sit with one and lay out the possibilities.