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RobUK
November 10th, 2008, 06:20 PM
Hi All

Ok, brace yourself as this might be hard to follow :confused:
My father's parents emigrated to NY way back in the early 1930s, leaving my 2 year old father back in Ireland, they were supposed to send for him once settled but for some unbeknown reason it never happened!!
So my grandparents remained in NY and went on to have 3 more children, all born in Brooklyn.
Meanwhile, my father grew up in Ireland then moved to London and met my mother, then I come along;)
Around 5 years ago I decided to try and trace my fathers side of the family, and managed to find his 3 siblings born in NY, i've since been over to NY numerous times visiting them and have been made very welcome, not only by them but by every New Yorker i've met:)
I've now made the decision to emigrate to NY myself, but it isn't as easy as I first thought, so my question is this:
Am I eligable for entry due to my grandparents taking american citizenship? (they are now sadly passed away)
I have Aunts and Uncles, and many cousins in NY and NJ, I dont have much family here in England so it makes sence to me to live and work in the USA
I currently work in Management (warehouse and distribution) and also hold a licence / permit to operate Tower Cranes.
I would really appreciate any advice or tips on what my next course of action should be, I've thought about the diversity lottery but cannot enter that as the USA are not taking applications from the UK for the next 2 years :(
Kind Regards
Rob

Alonzo-ny
November 10th, 2008, 06:29 PM
Speak to the US Embassy for advice. I think your father would have to have taken up citizenship for you to be eligible that way. The good thing is you have a good skill and friends in NY. Try and set up a job first and apply for a visa.

stache
November 10th, 2008, 06:44 PM
Also consider speaking to a lawyer.

RobUK
November 10th, 2008, 07:23 PM
Many Thanks

I seem to recall reading somewhere that getting into the USA through family ties only counted if it was Mother Father Brother Sister Son Daughter, unfortunately i've only got aunts uncles and cousins, but deffinately be trying all avenues.
I'm coming over to NY for Christmas and New Year, i've been in the spring and also in the height of summer, but i've been told that Christmas in NY is THE place to be :)

stache
November 10th, 2008, 07:52 PM
It's very beautiful in Midtown. :cool:

scumonkey
November 10th, 2008, 09:29 PM
I seem to recall reading somewhere that getting into the USA through family ties only counted if it was Mother Father Brother Sister Son Daughter,I chose to be an American citizen.
I have a British Father and an American mother, and was born overseas. As I'm now an old fart, I'm sure the laws have changed since I dropped...However, back in the day, one of your parents had to be an American for a while (and lived here), for you to qualify for citizenship.

Form Wick:
Through birth abroad to two United States citizens

See also: jus sanguinis (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jus_sanguinis) In most cases, one is a U.S. citizen if both of the following are true:


Both parents were U.S. citizens at the time of the child's birth
At least one parent lived in the United States prior to the child's birth.

INA 301(c) and INA 301(a)(3) state, "and one of whom has had a residence." The FAM (Foreign Affairs Manual) states "no amount of time specified."
A person's record of birth abroad, if registered with a U.S. consulate or embassy, is proof of his or her citizenship. He or she may also apply for a passport or a Certificate of Citizenship to have his or her citizenship recognized.

[edit (http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=United_States_nationality_law&action=edit&section=7)] Through birth abroad to one United States citizen

For persons born on or after November 14 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/November_14), 1986 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1986), a person is a U.S. citizen if all of the following are true:[4] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_nationality_law#cite_note-3)


One of the person's parents was a U.S. citizen when the person in question was born;
The citizen parent lived at least 5 years in the United States before his or her child's birth;
A minimum of 2 of these 5 years in the United States were after the citizen parent's 14th birthday.

A person's record of birth abroad, if registered with a U.S. consulate or embassy, is proof of his or her citizenship. Such a person may also apply for a passport or a Certificate of Citizenship to have a record of his or her citizenship. Such documentation is often useful to prove citizenship in lieu of the availability of an American birth certificate.
Different rules apply for persons born abroad to one U.S. citizen before November 14, 1986. United States law on this subject changed multiple times throughout the twentieth century, and the law as it existed at the time of the individual's birth controls.

RobUK
November 11th, 2008, 12:15 AM
Thanks for the reply scumonkey, i'll start looking into it.
During my visit this coming Christmas, i'll be taking the children ice skating, so do I go to Central Park of the Rockafella Centre? :confused:

Schadenfrau
November 11th, 2008, 07:40 AM
It's Rockefeller Center, as in John D. Rockefeller, not Jay-Z's record label. You can take the kids ice-skating wherever you'd like, provided there's a rink.

Alonzo-ny
November 11th, 2008, 08:09 AM
What a lovely reply.

Either rink is good but I believe that Rockefeller gets ridiculously busy.

stache
November 11th, 2008, 08:29 AM
Bryant park has a rink this year as well.

Alonzo-ny
November 11th, 2008, 01:13 PM
I may be wrong but isnt there one in Riverside park?