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pianoman11686
June 3rd, 2006, 10:57 PM
Development recharges, shakes up sleepy Riverdale

Building boom draws new blood to Bronx nook, from All-Star Yankee to Westchester tax refugees

By Marc Ferris

Vasco Da Silva, head of Halstead's Riverdale office, in front of an Arlington Avenue home in the nabe's estate area. Along the slopes of Waldo Avenue, where the clack of the No. 1 train ricochets through the streets of Riverdale, the boxy new Waterford condominium building stands on a lot that once held a century-old, single-family home.

The development symbolizes the change taking place along this bluff in the northwest corner of the Bronx, which feels like it's a world away from the rest of the borough. The grand mansions in the Fieldston section seem to be transplanted from Scarsdale or Bronxville, and subscribers to the Sunday New York Times receive the Westchester section, not the City section, with their papers.

The building explosion in Riverdale is evident along the Henry Hudson Parkway, the neighborhood's traffic artery. A hole in the ground along the thoroughfare's service road portends the arrival of a gleaming new building. A McMansion under construction is covered with Tyvek, and the glass-sheathed tower where the New York Yankees' Derek Jeter is rumored to have signed a contract to buy a place is almost complete.

East of the parkway, in an enclave known as South Riverdale, generic brick co-op buildings from the 1960s and single-family homes occupy the leafy streets. Near the core of the commercial section, which centers on Johnson and Riverdale avenues between 227th and 239th streets, construction projects are under way on what seems like every other corner.

"I've never seen this much happen so fast," said Anthony Perez Cassino, chairman of Community Board 8. "Neighborhoods are changing before our eyes."

In a land of co-ops and owner-occupied homes, around 400 new condo units are under construction, said Bradley Trebach, who has sold real estate in the neighborhood for over 20 years. Though some brokers in the Bronx see a cooling market (see The Real Deal's May issue, Advantage tilting to outer-borough buyers), he foresees a healthy market for the immediate future.

"The current purchasing market is robust, but only time will tell whether or not the boom is sustainable," Trebach said.

For a long time, homes sold on a generational cycle, with people holding on to property for a long time, but that pace is being accelerated, said Trebach.

One symbol of the neighborhood's transformation is the opening of a branch of Halstead Property along Johnson Avenue last October. On a recent weekend afternoon, dozens of people pressed their noses to the glass facade to gaze at the offerings.

Buyers include not just Manhattanites seeking bargains, but displaced Brooklynites, people from Westchester looking to cut their commute and out-of-towners seeking a toehold in the city, said sales director Vasco Da Silva.

"With taxes in Westchester skyrocketing, Riverdale is poised for long-term growth," said Da Silva.

The current spate of development has come at a literal and figurative price. A buying spree by a developer along Tulfan Terrace pitted neighbor against neighbor and turned old friends into bitter enemies. The tall, 36-unit condominium currently under construction obliterated all of the single-family homes along one half of the dead-end block and remains an open wound.

Challenging the power of the real estate interests, many residents embarked on a crusade to rezone a large swath of South Riverdale, which went into effect last year. The rezoning includes the area east of the parkway and the rambling hills west of the thoroughfare, which features narrow roads and big homesteads. In April, a large portion of the Fieldston section received landmark status, which will protect exteriors from radical alteration.

"We're trying to bring some reason to the development; we don't want to look like Manhattan," said Cassino. "For years, the developers claimed there was no more land to build on and they threw the kitchen sink at us. Now look what's happening."

The lull in tensions may be only temporary, since some developers argue that new regulations actually encourage more building in a less aesthetically pleasing style.

"The rezoning wasn't done in a way that reduces development, it's actually going to increase it," said Bill Friedlich, owner of Hudson View Construction, who is involved with several projects. "The discussion in the press got a lot of people to look at Riverdale as a place to develop."

The new zoning instituted a height limit, which Friedlich argues will inspire wider and shorter buildings that fill up lots.

East of the parkway, "it will create a wall of buildings that won't be aesthetically ideal," he acknowledged. To the west, it will foster the spread of McMansions, like the $5.6 million, 24,000-square-foot behemoth known as the "pink house" that he is building.

Community Board 8's Cassino said enough unattractive new buildings could eventually contribute to a drop in property values. "If developers want to wring every last nickel and dime out of their projects and cover every foot of a lot with an ugly building, we'll see if they get $1 million for an apartment," he said.

Though South Riverdale's residential stock has become more upscale, the enclave's retail centers along Johnson and Riverdale avenues remain frayed, dominated by stores that have been around for years.

A planned commercial complex at 230th Street and Broadway, located in nearby Kingsbridge, is to include a multiple screen cinema, a national bookstore chain and a Whole Foods. Yet the location is relatively far from South Riverdale, said Friedlich, where most new stores replicate the same pattern. "Every time there's a vacancy at a prime corner lot, a bank pops up," he said. "There are more than enough banks. We really need a Starbucks."

Chart: Condos Rise in Riverdale (http://therealdeal.net/pdf/RiverdaleCondos.pdf)

Copyright © 2003-2005 The Real Deal.

elle26
December 10th, 2006, 12:31 AM
Sorry but I am still confused.... Where does Riverdale start and end in the bronx?:( :confused:

Front_Porch
December 10th, 2006, 10:19 AM
Riverdale's big. It runs from the Harlem River, roughly 225th Street, up to the Bronx County/Westchester County line, which I think is 263rd Street.

Within that, the social hierarchy is determined by how far north or south you are, and whether you're east or west of the (Henry Hudson) Parkway.

There's a pretty good map of the different sections of Riverdale on the Trebach Realty site -- www.trebachrealty.com

ali r.
{downtown broker}

ablarc
June 17th, 2007, 10:36 AM
"We're trying to bring some reason to the development; we don't want to look like Manhattan," said Cassino. "For years, the developers claimed there was no more land to build on and they threw the kitchen sink at us. Now look what's happening."

The lull in tensions may be only temporary, since some developers argue that new regulations actually encourage more building in a less aesthetically pleasing style.

"The rezoning wasn't done in a way that reduces development, it's actually going to increase it," said Bill Friedlich, owner of Hudson View Construction, who is involved with several projects. "The discussion in the press got a lot of people to look at Riverdale as a place to develop."

The new zoning instituted a height limit, which Friedlich argues will inspire wider and shorter buildings that fill up lots.

East of the parkway, "it will create a wall of buildings that won't be aesthetically ideal," he acknowledged. To the west, it will foster the spread of McMansions, like the $5.6 million, 24,000-square-foot behemoth known as the "pink house" that he is building.

Community Board 8's Cassino said enough unattractive new buildings could eventually contribute to a drop in property values.
If this is true, it's a clear case of the community stating its goals and then --due to an insufficient technical grasp of available tools-- mandating regulations that actually thwart those goals (Fabrizio, Mr. Community-right-or-wrong, are you listening?). Shooting themselves in the foot: should we applaud that?

clubBR
July 1st, 2007, 11:22 PM
I heard Riverdale co-op board members are very judgemental in choosing tenants. True?

Schadenfrau
July 2nd, 2007, 12:27 AM
Not really- it varies from building to building. We ran through more of a gauntlet near Yankee Stadium than in Riverdale, and the prices are pretty much the same at this point.

clubBR
July 2nd, 2007, 01:05 AM
Not really- it varies from building to building.

wow i cant believe that still happens in new york

Schadenfrau
July 2nd, 2007, 01:40 AM
Really? How so?

Different buildings prefer different tenants. When you're dealing with a co-op board, you're going to be dealing with the random whims of a collective group. Even Gloria Vanderbilt has been given the thumbs-down from a co-op board.

clubBR
July 2nd, 2007, 06:44 AM
Really? How so?

Different buildings prefer different tenants. When you're dealing with a co-op board, you're going to be dealing with the random whims of a collective group. Even Gloria Vanderbilt has been given the thumbs-down from a co-op board.

Why do I feel like that was an isolated incident ;)

Merry
August 28th, 2009, 10:18 PM
Very nice view.

http://www.nypost.com/seven/08272009/photos/060_riverdale.jpg

...High above Kappock Street, with views of the Hudson River from the George Washington Bridge up to the Tappan Zee...

http://www.nypost.com/seven/08272009/realestate/riverdale__the_bronx_186611.htm

Merry
November 10th, 2009, 05:40 AM
Luxe Bronx condos hit auction block

BY Tanyanika Samuels

November 10th 2009

http://assets.nydailynews.com/img/2009/11/10/alg_solaria.jpg
Luxury apartments at the Solaria high-rise in Riverdale are going up for auction on Nov. 22,
with starting bids at nearly half-price.

http://assets.nydailynews.com/img/2009/11/10/amd_solaria.jpg
The Solaria in Riverdale.

It's either been a lonely or very exclusive three years for the occupants of 10 apartments in this fancy high-rise Bronx condo.

After years of being battered by a slumping economy and stagnant sales, developers of the swanky Solaria in Riverdale are hoping the market is back by trying a new sales technique.

They are putting 54 of the long-empty condos on the auction block - with starting bids around half the original asking prices.

The auction, slated for 1 p.m. on Nov. 22 at the Sheraton New York in Manhattan, is being billed as the largest auction in the Northeast.

"This is really a great opportunity for folks," said Jim Corum, president of Real Estate Disposition, the auction company running the sale. "I'm not aware of another luxury condominium, especially in New York City, coming up for auction."

The 20-story high-rise at 640 W. 237th St. boasts spacious apartments, low taxes, 24-hour doorman service, an observatory roof deck, health fitness center, indoor parking and a lounge with a home theater system.

"They're beautiful apartments," said Solaria developer Joseph Korff, president of Arc Development.

"And it doesn't matter where in the building you are, you get good light."

On sale are three one-bedroom apartments; 26 two-bedrooms; 21 three-bedrooms, two four-bedroom apartments (including a penthouse) and two five-bedroom units, which include a second penthouse.

Bids will start at about 55% of current listed prices, ranging from $299,000 for a one-bedroom originally listed for $660,000, to $1.9 million for the five-bedroom unit originally listed for $4.3 million.

Now that the economy is rebounding, housing prices are stabilizing and interest rates are low, Korff said interest in the condos is picking up.

There's been steady foot traffic into Solaria's sales offices. And even some current tenants are looking into purchasing a second unit, Korff said.


http://www.nydailynews.com/ny_local/bronx/2009/11/10/2009-11-10_luxe_bronx_condos_hit_auction_block.html#ixzz0W S4CeV75

Merry
November 20th, 2009, 09:45 PM
Luxury, High-Rise Condo Auction…In The Bronx

By Sara Lin


http://online.wsj.com/media/Solaria1120_DV_20091120125935.jpg
The Solaria’s glassy exterior belies a mostly-empty interior

How do you get skittish buyers to sign deals on newly constructed condos in a down market? Joseph Korff, a New York City developer thinks he has the answer: Auction.

On Sunday, 54 out of the 64 condos at Mr. Korff’s Solaria in the Bronx’s Riverdale neighborhood, hit the block in what will be New York City’s first auction of luxury high-rise apartments. Other city developers, lenders and auctioneers are watching closely, as the Solaria’s success could help determine how others try to unload their inventory during what remains an oversaturated market for high-rise new construction in the city.

“The entire city is looking at this auction on Sunday. Anyone in real estate is watching this,” says Rolan Shnayder, director of new development lending for Home Owners Mortgage, a lender to 70 new construction buildings in New York City. “If this works and [the developer] can get market-rates for these [apartments] or slightly below, other developers are going to say ‘this is a great way to get rid of real-estate quickly.’”

Throughout the five boroughs, there are 22,000 units of newly constructed high-rise apartments that have not yet hit the market, the majority of them luxury condominiums, says New York real estate appraiser Jonathan Miller, president of Miller Samuel. If those off-market units are dumped onto the market tomorrow, that’s 18-24 months of inventory at the current pace of sales, he adds.

With New York real estate prices off by 25% from their peak in summer of 2007, many developers have been slow to adapt their housing prices to the new market. “They didn’t build in a 20-to-30 percent margin of error,” Mr. Miller said. “Instead it’s pray-and-delay.”

At the Solaria, units first hit the market as pre-construction offerings in the fall of 2006 with sales on just 10 units closing, the last in September 2008. None have closed since, but the auction has already helped build buzz.
“Before, I might have had 11 or 12 people coming through a week. Last weekend, we had a few hundred,” Mr. Korff says.

Starting bids, set at about 55% of current asking prices, range from $299,000 for a low floor one-bedroom now listed for $660,000, to $1.99 million for a five-bedroom top-floor apartment currently listed at $4.3 million. Mr. Korff, along with the auctioneer, Real Estate Disposition, LLC, has set undisclosed minimum reserve levels – winning bids that do not meet the minimum reserve could be rejected by the developer.

Local press in Riverdale took issue with the minimum reserves, claiming that opening bids could be far below what the developer will actually accept and that the developer will have its own bidders in the audience to bid up prices.

“If I were going to test the market and set reserve prices artificially high, I would be the biggest fool to offer all 54. I’d offer 10,” Mr. Korff said. As for fake bidders, “There is no shill in the room. We’re not having anybody in the audience to boost up the bids,” Mr. Korff said.

Some industry experts say regardless of the results, Sunday’s auction will be the first of many to come for high-rise developers, especially in 2010.
“The barbarians are at the gate,” said Jon Gollinger, chief executive officer of Accelerated Marketing Partners which put on 35 high-rise auctions in the last 18 months. His company is in talks with several lenders and developers in New York City and last month held what many consider a successful auction of luxury condos in Boston.

http://blogs.wsj.com/developments/2009/11/20/luxury-high-rise-condo-auctionin-the-bronx/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+wsj%2Fdevelopments%2Ffeed+%28 WSJ.com%3A+Developments+Blog%29

Merry
November 24th, 2009, 06:00 AM
More Than 50 Units at Riverdale's Solaria Sell at 45 Percent Off

November 23, 2009, by Sara

http://curbed.com/uploads/2009_10_solaria.jpg

The first developer blowout auction (http://curbed.com/archives/2009/11/12/on_the_block_results_five_greenpoint_condos_sell.p hp) came to New York City earlier this month, when five Greenpoint condos flew off the block for prices in the $200,000s and $300,000s. Yesterday saw another auction "first," the first luxury condo auctions in the Bronx's Riverdale neighborhood. (And yes, we predict that the "firsts" will become increasingly far-fetched as developers try to draw bidding crowds.)

Fifty-four apartments at the Solaria (a former Development Du Jour (http://curbed.com/archives/2006/06/09/development_du_jour_solaria.php)) went up for auction, most with original asking prices of more than $1 million, according to broker-blogger (http://malcolmcarter.wordpress.com/2009/11/23/auction-of-riverdales-solaria-ends-with-a-whimper/) Malcolm Carter. The winning bids averaged 35 to 45 percent below list prices, but, the developers said, were within 5 to 10 percent of the current going rates for the neighborhood.

The first unit to go under the gavel, a 2BR, 2BA with a balcony and a list price of $1.125 million, sold for $790,000, AM New York reports (http://www.amny.com/urbanite-1.812039/luxury-condo-units-at-riverdale-s-solaria-sell-for-discount-at-auction-1.1616977). (Take a look back at the list prices and starting bids for everything on offer here (http://www.redcauctionhome.com/auction-detail.php?page=2&auctionID=D-048&showFields=&showFields=&pagegroup=1).) A 1BR, 1BA with an original ask of $660,000 sold for $415,000. A 4BR, 4.5BA asking $3.85 million initially sold for $1.7 million. (All winning bids are still contingent on the seller's approval.) The average price per square foot for luxury Riverdale condos, then? $440. And that's for the ones with the rooftop observatory!

Auction of Riverdale's Solaria Ends With a Whimper (http://malcolmcarter.wordpress.com/2009/11/23/auction-of-riverdales-solaria-ends-with-a-whimper/) [Malcolm Carter]
Luxury Condo Units at Riverdale's Solaria Sell for Discount At Auction (http://www.amny.com/urbanite-1.812039/luxury-condo-units-at-riverdale-s-solaria-sell-for-discount-at-auction-1.1616977) [AMNY]
On the Block: Riverdale's Solaria Dumping Over 50 Units (http://curbed.com/archives/2009/10/26/on_the_block_riverdales_solaria_dumping_over_50_un its.php) [Curbed]

http://curbed.com/archives/2009/11/23/more_than_50_units_at_riverdales_solaria_sell_at_4 5_percent_off.php

Merry
February 19th, 2010, 09:52 PM
I think this falls into the "I can't believe this is in NYC" category.


Move to Riverdale, Defend Yourself Against Viking Invasion!

February 19, 2010, by Sara

http://cdn2.curbednetwork.com/cache/gallery/4054/4371238184_9207af42fc_o.jpg

http://cdn2.curbednetwork.com/cache/gallery/2744/4370488371_bea2ce8db9_o.jpg

http://cdn2.curbednetwork.com/cache/gallery/2794/4370488431_ebdabb7f46_s.jpg (http://cdn2.curbednetwork.com/cache/gallery/2794/4370488431_237f3c0978_o.jpg) http://cdn2.curbednetwork.com/cache/gallery/4053/4371238378_4724f90ce6_s.jpg (http://cdn2.curbednetwork.com/cache/gallery/4053/4371238378_32c1db7c0b_o.jpg) http://cdn2.curbednetwork.com/cache/gallery/2428/4371238428_248f2a66c1_s.jpg (http://cdn2.curbednetwork.com/cache/gallery/2428/4371238428_f991fb3c23_o.jpg) http://cdn2.curbednetwork.com/cache/gallery/2801/4370488591_8847b6f4a9_s.jpg (http://cdn2.curbednetwork.com/cache/gallery/2801/4370488591_b40f0262c6_o.jpg)
(click to enlarge)

Finally, a rival for Bay Ridge's fairytale Gingerbread House (http://curbed.com/archives/2009/11/03/on_the_market_hansel_and_gretels_bay_ridge_hidey_h ole.php). This one's in Riverdale, and it was built in 1926 by Guiseppe Cousulich, apparently a well-known Italian ship builder. We've never heard of the guy, but we're digging his house, which is asking $3.75 million for 5,158-square-feet. The 5BR, 4.5BA home still has its original woodwork, but in case of a lumber emergency, there's a carpentry shop in the basement. Plus, turret breakfast room! We have no idea if all this is typical in a place like Riverdale, but if it is, why aren't we all living in Riverdale?

Listing: 4720 Grosvenor Avenue (http://www.stribling.com/propinfo.asp?webid=1133814&type=TOWNHOUSE) [Stribling]
On the Market: Hansel and Gretel's Bay Ridge Hidey Hole (http://curbed.com/archives/2009/11/03/on_the_market_hansel_and_gretels_bay_ridge_hidey_h ole.php) [Curbed]

http://curbed.com/archives/2010/02/19/move_to_riverdale_defend_yourself_against_viking_i nvasion.php

Merry
June 26th, 2010, 01:35 AM
Riverdale: Landscaped Corner of the Bronx

By BRITTANY HUTSON

http://si.wsj.net/public/resources/images/NY-AH765_OPENHO_G_20100625193614.jpg
Visitors stroll through Wave Hill in Riverdale, the former estate of Mark Twain that
is now a public garden on the Hudson. The area in the northwest Bronx abuts
Van Cortlandt Park and a range of housing stock.

A serene and scenic landscape gives Riverdale a suburban feel that attracts a wide range of New Yorkers, from baby boomers to retirees to young families.

Located in the Northwestern section of the Bronx and sandwiched between Manhattan and Westchester, Riverdale has views of the Palisades and the Hudson. Many residents commute via Metro-North's 25-minute run to Grand Central Terminal. Riverdale has several subsections: north, central, south, Fieldston and Spuyten Duyvil. The subway stops at Van Cortlandt Park and MTA buses are available. Street parking is difficult.

Author Mark Twain's former Riverdale estate currently is the home of Wave Hill, a botanical garden with sweeping views of the Palisades. Riverdale has a growing orthodox Jewish population as well as large Russian and Irish-American communities.

Housing stock in the neighborhood ranges from older co-operative apartment buildings with units that can cost as little $200,000 to grand estates and mansions priced as high as $10 million. Many of the larger homes are built in traditional architectural styles such as Tudor revival, Georgian and Columbian.

http://sg.wsj.net/public/resources/images/NY-AH753_OPENHO_NS_20100625184428.gif

In the past few years, there have been numerous condominium developments in south and central Riverdale. One is the Solaria, a 20-story glass and steel building with 64 units with one to five bedrooms that range from $600,000 to $4.35 million. "The new condos are not moving nearly as quickly as the developers would've liked," says Brad Trebach, a broker with Trebach Realty. "They were and are too ambitious in their pricing."

Solaria developer Joe Korff said, "If you look at per square footage prices, we are top of the range but cheaper than Manhattan, Brooklyn and Queens."

Residents boast about Riverdale's low crime rate and clean streets. But the retail and shopping mix is limited to local mom-and-pop stores and boutiques.

Riverdale's YM-YWHA hosts programs for all age groups. But despite such local offerings, "A lot of social and cultural things are lacking here," says Amy McDevitt, a 14-year resident. "You want a family atmosphere, but it would be nice to have more options of things to do."

Parks: Van Cortlandt Park, New York's fourth largest park, offers a golf course and access to the Riverdale Equestrian Centre. Wave Hill features art exhibitions and a variety of events.

Schools: Riverdale's two public elementary schools, Robert J. Christen (P.S. 81) and Spuyten Duyvil (P.S. 24), are both highly rated. Riverdale is also home to top private schools, including Riverdale Country, Fieldston and Horace Mann.

Riverdale is in District 10, which includes many other Bronx communities. In 2009, 78.2% of students in District 10 received a proficient score on the math exam, and 59.3% of students received a proficient score on the English Language Arts exam. In 2006, the results were 46.9% for math and 44.2% for reading.

Dining: Chinese, Japanese, Thai and Indian can be found along Johnson and Riverdale avenues. Popular spots include Madison's Restaurant and Bar. On Broadway, across from Van Cortlandt Park, is Jake's Steakhouse.

http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052748703615104575329152641002886.html?m od=WSJ_NY_RealEstate_LEADNewsCollection

Merry
March 29th, 2011, 06:19 AM
Oh, for goodness sake :rolleyes: (chuckle at EaMa :)).


Lame, Allegedly Untrendy Riverdale Being Marketed As NoMa

by Bilal Khan

http://ny.curbed.com/uploads/noma.png

Oh, Solaria, how do I love thee? Let me count the ways. First you tried to talk smack on your fellow new developments, along with giving out free iPods. And who could forget the auction, where you sold units at 45% off. Well, it's been a while since you captured our hearts, but you've really outdone yourself. Shedding yourself of the stodgy Riverdale name, you're going by NoMa now, short for North Manhattan. Thinking outside of the box, we love it. Who really needs to color inside the lines, or stay inside their borough?

We think Queens could use the next rebranding, maybe EaMa?

http://ny.curbed.com/archives/2011/03/26/lame_allegedly_untrendy_riverdale_being_marketed_a s_noma.php

Merry
May 7th, 2011, 12:47 AM
Curbed's favourite is quite spectacular, too.


Inside a Robert A.M. Stern-Designed Home in Riverdale

May 6, 2011, by Sara Polsky
http://cdn.cstatic.net/cache/gallery/5182/5693892702_e08f7ed11c_o.jpg

We've occasionally mentioned Villanova Heights, the McMansion community in Riverdale designed by Robert A.M. Stern. And by McMansions, we mean houses that aren't only huge in comparison to Manhattan apartments—the smallest Bobby A.M. creations in Villanova Heights are around 11,000 square feet. The rents are similarly hefty, with the first two completed homes in the development renting for $13,000 and $16,000 per month. Now we're finally getting a peek inside one of these things, with the new listing for 5020 Iselin Avenue, an 11,000-square-footer on a 25,000-square-foot lot that contains a heated swimming pool and cabana. In fact, we'd be amazed if there were anything this house didn't contain.

When it comes to Riverdale, though, this one's (http://ny.curbed.com/archives/2010/02/19/move_to_riverdale_defend_yourself_against_viking_i nvasion.php) still our favorite.

Listing: 50201 Iselin Avenue (http://www.citi-habitats.com/viewlisting.php?adID=160623&scroll=1) [Citi Habitats]
Villanova Heights coverage (http://ny.curbed.com/tags/villanova-heights) [Curbed]

http://ny.curbed.com/archives/2011/05/06/inside_a_robert_am_sterndesigned_home_in_riverdale .php#iselin-avenue-4

Myra Hill
February 26th, 2013, 09:36 PM
I went to the Solaria a couple of years ago. I was really fascinated with the Solaria that I wanted to check it out when I was off from work. The lady showed me a couple of units. The apartments with their views looked so stunning. I was even at the rooftop to to look through a telescope. I could all of the Bronx, Long Island Sound, midtown Manhattan, etc..

If I have that kind of money, I would not hesitate to buy a condo there. The apartments are sound proof. You cannot hear the traffic on the Henry Hudson Parkway unless you open the windows. Also you cannot hear neighbors next door.

Merry
March 2nd, 2013, 02:24 AM
Also you cannot hear neighbors next door.

That would be pure bliss!

RoldanTTLB
March 2nd, 2013, 08:08 AM
I think I'd sooner drop the extra money to be in a new DUMBO highrise that is soundproofed on account of the bridge. Nothing against Riverdale, as it certainly has the correct blend of isolation, racism, and lack of transit that defines a hoity-toity neighborhood, but it's weird up there. Weird like a rich Roosevelt Island weird.

Nexis4Jersey
March 2nd, 2013, 07:33 PM
This is actually Fieldston and not Riverdale...

ASchwarz
March 3rd, 2013, 12:41 AM
I think I'd sooner drop the extra money to be in a new DUMBO highrise that is soundproofed on account of the bridge. Nothing against Riverdale, as it certainly has the correct blend of isolation, racism, and lack of transit that defines a hoity-toity neighborhood, but it's weird up there. Weird like a rich Roosevelt Island weird.

I wouldn't call Riverdale racist or particularly isolated. Parts are hoity-toity, but most of it, no.

I mean, Riverdale has Orthodox Jews, Irish, Hispanics, lots of UN & Consulate employees, and regular middle class and affluent folks. It has the subway on its eastern edge, and metro north on its western edge, plus express bus service.

It isn't super central to everything, but I wouldn't call it isolated, and I don't see why it would be characterized as less-than-tolerant. It's certainly politically well left-of-center, and very mixed.

LeCom
October 21st, 2013, 11:42 AM
Oh, for goodness sake :rolleyes: (chuckle at EaMa :)).


Lame, Allegedly Untrendy Riverdale Being Marketed As NoMa

by Bilal Khan

http://ny.curbed.com/uploads/noma.png

Oh, Solaria, how do I love thee? Let me count the ways. First you tried to talk smack on your fellow new developments, along with giving out free iPods. And who could forget the auction, where you sold units at 45% off. Well, it's been a while since you captured our hearts, but you've really outdone yourself. Shedding yourself of the stodgy Riverdale name, you're going by NoMa now, short for North Manhattan. Thinking outside of the box, we love it. Who really needs to color inside the lines, or stay inside their borough?

We think Queens could use the next rebranding, maybe EaMa?

http://ny.curbed.com/archives/2011/03/26/lame_allegedly_untrendy_riverdale_being_marketed_a s_noma.php

I don't mean to support the craptacular hip hood moniker trend, but they aren't wrong in their nomenclature. There's quite a difference between North Manhattan and an area that is north of Manhattan.