PDA

View Full Version : In Wisconsin, GOP gambit pushes anti-union bill forward



scumonkey
March 9th, 2011, 11:35 PM
Senate Republicans omit financial provisions from legislation to curb public workers' collective bargaining rights, skirting a requirement that a quorum be present.

By Abby Sewell, Los Angeles Times March 10, 2011
Senate Republicans (http://www.latimes.com/topic/politics/parties-movements/republican-party-ORGOV0000004.topic) in Wisconsin used a surprise legislative maneuver to advance a bill that would strip collective bargaining rights from most public sector workers, a move accomplished without the presence of 14 Democratic senators who fled the state to stall the measure.
Republicans voted 18 to 1 Wednesday night to pass the non-fiscal provisions of Gov. Scott Walker (http://www.latimes.com/topic/politics/scott-walker-PEPLT006878.topic)'s budget repair bill, including those that would eliminate or severely limit collective bargaining rights for most public employees.
By omitting the financial provisions from the bill, Republicans were able to bypass a requirement that a quorum be present to vote on fiscal legislation. When all 14 Democratic state senators fled to Illinois on Feb. 17, they denied the GOP majority a quorum and thereby stymied action on the initiative.


For the rest of the story:
http://www.latimes.com/news/nationworld/nation/la-na-wisconsin-20110310,0,13926.story

lofter1
March 10th, 2011, 12:50 AM
Here comes the recall votes ...

Ninjahedge
March 10th, 2011, 08:14 AM
I see a strike coming..... during a recession.



Nice. Real nice. :(

GordonGecko
March 10th, 2011, 08:59 AM
Here comes the recall votes ...

Are you kidding, they'll all be re-elected with supermajorities. Well done

Ninjahedge
March 10th, 2011, 09:59 AM
Until their kids have crappy teachers, the roads go to hell, public service sectors just do not produce and crime starts climbing.

People want everything w/o having to pay for it. Instead of taking a more difficult route and fixing the problem (surgery) they whipped out the axe.

Lets see how many limbs they cut off before they realize what they have done.

scumonkey
March 10th, 2011, 11:16 AM
they already have over 15% of the necessary signatures needed to make it happen (start procedures for a recall) in just 2 days - good for them ;)

BBMW
March 10th, 2011, 11:19 AM
Given that it seems the Republcans there control the governors office and both houses of the legislature, you have to say the people are getting what they voted for.

I don't know if WI had a recall procedure, but the next election will be interesting. If the Reps are delivering on what they promised, they may very well get relected.

WI was always thought of as a liberal state. If it's gotten to the point wher the Reps control everything, something must have changed drastically.

Update: yes, they do have a recall procedure, but the earliest they could recall the governor is next year, and all the petitions have to be collected within 60 days of the submission (so what they collect now likely won't be usable.)

http://firstread.msnbc.msn.com/_news/2011/03/10/6235763-on-wisconsins-recall-law

GordonGecko
March 10th, 2011, 12:18 PM
They won't get the necessary majority for a recall. The truth is, most people support scaling back government worker benefits. Collective Bargaining by public employees is nothing short of extortion of taxpayers. Let the market set the wages - if they're too low teachers will leave and the school systems will have crappy education, people will get angry and the politicians will raise the salaries/benefits to attract better candidates. That's how the private sector generally works and apparently the majority of Wisconsin agrees with this

eddhead
March 10th, 2011, 12:48 PM
^^
http://www.rasmussenreports.com/public_content/politics/general_state_surveys/wisconsin/wisconsin_poll_support_for_budget_cutting_not_for_ weakening_collective_bargaining_rights

Most Wisconsin voters oppose efforts to weaken collective bargaining rights for union workers but a plurality are supportive of significant pay cuts for state workers. Governor Scott Walker is struggling in the court of public opinion, but how badly he is struggling depends upon how the issue is presented. There is also an interesting gap between the views of private and public sector union families.

A new Rasmussen Reports telephone survey of Wisconsin voters shows that just 39% favor weakening collective bargaining rights and 52% are opposed. At the same time, 44% support a 10% pay cut for all state workers. Thirty-eight percent (38%) are opposed. Thatís partly because 27% of Wisconsin voters believe state workers are paid too much and 16% believe they are paid too little. Forty-nine percent (49%) believe the pay of state workers is about right. (To see survey question wording, click here (http://www.rasmussenreports.com/public_content/politics/general_state_surveys/wisconsin/questions/questions_wisconsin_public_employees_march_2_2011) .)

To gauge support for the Governorís stand, Rasmussen Reports asked about the dispute in two separate ways. Half the survey respondents were asked about the Governorís proposals to reduce the state budget deficit and whether they supported the Governor or state senate Democrats. The other half were asked about the plan to weaken the collective bargaining rights of state unions and asked whether they supported the Governor or the union.

(Want a free daily e-mail update (http://www.rasmussenreports.com/daily_updates)? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter (http://twitter.com/RasmussenPoll) or Facebook (http://www.facebook.com/pages/Asbury-Park-NJ/Rasmussen-Reports/86959124863?ref=nf).
The survey of 800 Likely Voters in Wisconsin was conducted on March 2, 2011 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 4 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC (http://www.pulseopinionresearch.com/). See methodology (http://www.rasmussenreports.com/public_content/about_us/methodology).

Among those asked about the state budget deficit, 52% supported the Democrats and 44% supported the Governor. Most of those 50 and over support the Governor, 40-somethings are evenly divided, and those under 40 support the Democrats.

Among those asked about weakening collective bargaining rights, 56% supported the union and 41% supported the Governor. There is a similar age dynamic on this question, even though the overall level of support for the Governor is lower.

While most voters oppose the Governorís effort to weaken collective bargaining rights, 43% believe that the public employee unions have too much influence on politics in Wisconsin while only 9% say they have too little influence. Forty-two percent (42%) say the public union influence is about right.
Additionally, 49% believe itís good that most teachers belong to a union. Among those with children in the public school system, 58% believe thatís a good thing.

Among households with a private sector union member, 44% say that public employee unions have too much influence while only 9% say they have too little influence. Those who have a public sector union employee in the household strongly believe that the level of influence is about right. Additionally, most private sector union households (57%) favor a pay cut for all state workers. Not surprisingly, households with public sector union members hold the opposite view.

Collectively, the data suggests a fluid situation. If the debate is seen to focus primarily on efforts to weaken collective bargaining rights, Governor Walker is in a weak position. If the debate is seen to focus primarily on efforts to reduce the state budget deficit, the Governor may be on stronger ground.

Nationally, 47% of voters support the Governor and 42% support the unions (http://www.rasmussenreports.com/public_content/politics/general_politics/february_2011/67_disapprove_of_legislators_fleeing_wisconsin_to_ avoid_vote).
The overall sample for the survey included 30% of union households. That includes 33% with a private sector union member and 60% with a public sector union member.

Additionally, the sample includes 46% who voted for Governor Walker last November and 45% who voted for his challenger Tom Barrett. Walker actually won the election by a 52% to 46% margin. This discrepancy may be the result of some people choosing to ďforgetĒ they voted for Walker or it could result from the fact that the Likely Voter turnout in a presidential election cycle tends to be more favorable to Democrats than the turnout during a mid-term election. In the case of a state like Wisconsin, thatís largely because younger voters are more likely to turn out in a presidential election year.

Additional data from the survey will be released soon.

eddhead
March 10th, 2011, 01:01 PM
http://www.rasmussenreports.com/public_content/politics/general_state_surveys/wisconsin/wisconsin_governor_walker_43_approval_rating

Wisconsin Governor Scott Walker won his job last November with 52% of the vote, but his popularity has slipped since then.

A new Rasmussen Reports telephone survey of Likely Wisconsin Voters finds that just 34% Strongly Approve of the job he is doing, while 48% Strongly Disapprove. Overall, including those who somewhat approve or disapprove, the new Republican governor earns positive reviews from 43% and negative reviews from 57% of voters statewide.

In addition to the usual partisan and demographic breakdowns, itís interesting to note that Walker, now engaged in a budget battle with unionized state workers, receives a total approval rating of 46% from households with private sector union members. However, among households with a public sector union member, only 19% offer their approval. Among all other households in the state, opinion is nearly evenly dividedó49% favorable and 51% unfavorable.

Itís also interesting to note that among households with children in the public school system, only 32% approve of the governorís performance. Sixty-seven percent (67%) disapprove, including 54% who Strongly Disapprove.

This may be partly due to the fact that 77% of Wisconsin voters have a favorable opinion of the stateís public school teachers. However, only 50% have a favorable opinion of the teachersí union.
(Want a free daily e-mail update (http://www.rasmussenreports.com/daily_updates)? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter (http://twitter.com/RasmussenPoll) or Facebook (http://www.facebook.com/pages/Asbury-Park-NJ/Rasmussen-Reports/86959124863?ref=nf).

The survey of 800 Likely Voters in Wisconsin was conducted on March 2, 2011 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 4 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC (http://www.pulseopinionresearch.com/). See methodology (http://www.rasmussenreports.com/public_content/about_us/methodology).
Seventy-three percent (73%) of Wisconsin Republicans approve of the job Walker is doing. Eighty-nine percent (89%) of the state's Democrats and 56% of voters not affiliated with either of the major parties disapprove.

Among those who voted for Walker last November, 77% approve of his performance, with 67% who Strongly Approve. As for those who voted for his Democratic opponent, Tom Barrett, 93% disapprove of how Walker is governing, including 88% who Strongly Disapprove.

Polling released earlier (http://www.rasmussenreports.com/public_content/politics/general_state_surveys/wisconsin/wisconsin_poll_support_for_budget_cutting_not_for_ weakening_collective_bargaining_rights) shows that the governor is struggling in the court of public opinion in his dispute with the stateís public employee unions. Other polling shows that voters in the state prefer spending cuts over tax hikes (http://www.rasmussenreports.com/public_content/politics/general_state_surveys/wisconsin/wisconsin_voters_prefer_spending_cuts_to_reduce_st ate_budget_deficit) when it comes to reducing the stateís budget deficit.

President Obama is viewed favorably by 55% of voters statewide. Typically, a presidentís reelection vote total is similar to his job approval rating. Therefore, if the election were held today in Wisconsin, Obama would be heavily favored to win the stateís Electoral College votes.

GordonGecko
March 10th, 2011, 01:48 PM
I stand corrected on the popularity of his legislation. That being said, opinions may shift considerably as his term progresses if he's successful in reducing taxes and improving the economy in Wisconsin

BBMW
March 10th, 2011, 01:48 PM
If he isn't recalled (which I think is unlikely), by the time the next governors election comes around, this will be very old news. And if they straighten out the budget (whether or not this helped), they'll be running on this action.

lofter1
March 10th, 2011, 02:12 PM
Old news? In 3 years? By then the cuts will have kicked in and workers and their relations will truly understand the damage done.

Ninjahedge
March 10th, 2011, 02:43 PM
They won't get the necessary majority for a recall. The truth is, most people support scaling back government worker benefits. Collective Bargaining by public employees is nothing short of extortion of taxpayers. Let the market set the wages - if they're too low teachers will leave and the school systems will have crappy education, people will get angry and the politicians will raise the salaries/benefits to attract better candidates. That's how the private sector generally works and apparently the majority of Wisconsin agrees with this

Just like Wall Street?



I call BS.

scumonkey
March 10th, 2011, 03:04 PM
it's not the governor that's going to get recalled...
Posted at 11:58 AM ET, 03/10/2011 Will the Wisconsin recall effort work? (Poll)


By Rachel Weiner

Wisconsin Democrats' push to recall Republican state senators is only picking up steam now that the controversial bill to strip unions of most of their collective bargaining rights appears headed to passage (http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2011/03/09/AR2011030900299.html?hpid=topnews).
"We now put our total focus on recalling the eligible Republican senators who voted for this heinous bill," said the Wisconsin Democratic Party in a statement (http://voices.washingtonpost.com/plum-line/2011/03/happy_hour_roundup_202.html).
Maybe. But Wisconsin law is designed to make recalls difficult and rare.

The rules require targeted lawmakers to have been in office for at least a year to be eligible for recall. Eight Republican senators fit that standard. To recall a state senator, Democrats need to gather signatures in each district equivalent to one-quarter of votes cast in the seat in the last gubernatorial election. In most districts, that's at least 15,000 signatures.
Once that happens, an election is set for six weeks later. (If there are multiple challengers from one party, the election is pushed back four weeks). Only two state lawmakers have been successfully recalled (http://www.jsonline.com/news/statepolitics/117501513.html) in Wisconsin history.
Signature gathering is a laborious and costly process that challenges even the best organizations. And, you can be assured that Republicans will try to disqualify as many of the petition signers as possible -- meaning that recall advocates will need well in excess of 15,000 just to be safe.
But, Democrats insist they are well on their way -- having already collected 15 percent of the signatures they needed (http://voices.washingtonpost.com/plum-line/2011/03/drive_to_recall_wisconsin_gop.html) over the weekend. Liberal groups say that have raised close (http://www.slate.com/blogs/blogs/weigel/archive/2011/03/10/the-big-liberal-money-headed-to-wisconsin.aspx) to $2 million dollars in support.
While they won't reveal where they are in each district -- saying they want to keep Republicans guessing (http://online.wsj.com/article/SB20001424052748703662804576189002398082020.html) -- efforts from some national groups have focused on three state senators (http://www.jsonline.com/blogs/news/117646763.html): Randy Hopper, Alberta Darling and Dan Kapanke.
Some Senate Democrats are even hoping that the recall drive could help them retake the majority (http://www.jsonline.com/news/statepolitics/117656563.html). There are not many safe seats in Wisconsin, as Nate Silver pointed out earlier this week (http://fivethirtyeight.blogs.nytimes.com/2011/03/07/wisconsin-is-a-swing-state-in-more-ways-than-one/?scp=4&sq=wisconsin&st=cse). Obama carried 14 of the 19 state senate districts currently held by Republicans.

http://voices.washingtonpost.com/thefix/daily-fix-poll/will-the-wisconsin-recall-effo.html

Ninjahedge
March 11th, 2011, 08:11 AM
I really wish they would stop doing this on party lines and simply state the obvious:

They do not like what these guys are doing and how they are playing the Party game rather than doing what is best for the people of the state.

So, instead of just calling them out as Republicans, simply say they are Senators whose party loyalty means more to them than the wellbeing of their constituents.


There is some sick part of me that wants to see the Republicans win this though. It is not my state, and I know the outcome may effect my own in time. But the key here is not an easy one. I want to see WI suffer. I want their schools to turn into butt-kissing boardrooms. I want to see their public services, everything from Cops to Libraries, go right down the toilet. I want to see their parks fall into disrepair. I want to see their rules for things like benefits plummet more into poverty putting a strain on their unemployment and welfare roles until THEY are changed, boosting crime rates in a state where the police forces have been cut.

I want to see ALL of this, but the nature of it is not that cut and dry. Things like this will happen, but it will take years to happen. And in years, you have plenty of time to lay the blame on something else (oil prices, "obamacare", terrorists).

The nature of modern politics is simple. If it does not happen right away, nobody gives credit. If somethnig is wrong when you are in office, it is your fault. Lets see who gets blamed for what in this.

GordonGecko
March 11th, 2011, 10:39 AM
^Oh give me a break. There's a huge difference between making it easy to fire incompetent teachers / requiring them to pay into their pensions & benefits, and between letting basic public services deteriorate as you mysteriously assume they will

Ninjahedge
March 11th, 2011, 12:43 PM
OK, tell me the difference.

Until you get into teaching, or know someone very close to you that does it, I wouldn't start professing absolute knowledge.

It is VERY political, with a VP at my school being given the choice to either leave, or go back to being a department head (yes, HEAD. You know, the ones in charge of rating the teachers beneath him) because of him being caught in the back seat of his Jeep with a 16 year old.

Looking at our owncorporate dominance in the world, I would not be so anxious to push for a privatization (or a conformance to the model used by the private sector) for teaching.

I would also look closely and compare schools and their rates of success with the areas they are in. Any school that has kids with parents that care and participate do very well. The ones that don't do jack and finger point are usually the ones that, regardless of who is teaching and how much money is being spent, do lousy.

You need the kids to want to learn to be able to teach them.

BTW, teachers DO pay their Pensions and many of their benefits. Please come down from wherever you are floating and get real on this. Do your research and do not believe what the pundits cherry-pick for you.

eddhead
March 11th, 2011, 12:53 PM
This is not about making teachers pay for benefits and pensions .... the union has already agreed to give backs and probably would agree to more if presented with opportunities to negotiate. This is about union busting for the sake of undermining the democratic party. Unions are a key source of funding for democratic party, just as corporations tend to funnel large dollars to the GOP. Corporate spending is and will continue to increase as a result of the supreme court ruling re: corporate free speech. Now that a strategic source of their funding has been secured the next logical area for the GOP to focus on is undermining the largest form of institutionalized funding for the DEMs, i.e. unions. That is what makes this such a battleground issue. The Dems rightfully see a major source of their political contributions under attack, and the GOP is going in for the kill.

The issue of givebacks is secondary here ... if it were not, WI would be at the bargaining table right now. This is direct assault on the viability of the Democratic party itself

GordonGecko
March 11th, 2011, 12:59 PM
OK, tell me the difference.

Until you get into teaching, or know someone very close to you that does it, I wouldn't start professing absolute knowledge.

It is VERY political, with a VP at my school being given the choice to either leave, or go back to being a department head (yes, HEAD. You know, the ones in charge of rating the teachers beneath him) because of him being caught in the back seat of his Jeep with a 16 year old.

Looking at our owncorporate dominance in the world, I would not be so anxious to push for a privatization (or a conformance to the model used by the private sector) for teaching.

I would also look closely and compare schools and their rates of success with the areas they are in. Any school that has kids with parents that care and participate do very well. The ones that don't do jack and finger point are usually the ones that, regardless of who is teaching and how much money is being spent, do lousy.

You need the kids to want to learn to be able to teach them.

BTW, teachers DO pay their Pensions and many of their benefits. Please come down from wherever you are floating and get real on this. Do your research and do not believe what the pundits cherry-pick for you.

Right, because allowing legalized extortion is the best way to get parents involved in their kids education.

Ninjahedge
March 14th, 2011, 08:43 AM
Nope, and the teachers do not do legalized extortion.

Tell me, you always use such a broad brush when doing detail work?

scumonkey
March 18th, 2011, 02:36 PM
Wisconsin judge halts state budget law curbing unions' power


By the CNN Wire Staff
March 18, 2011 2:28 p.m. EDT

CNN affiliate WKOW (http://www.wkow.com/Global/story.asp?S=14276368) has more on the story.

http://i.cdn.turner.com/cnn/2011/US/03/18/wisconsin.budget.restraining.order/story.scott.walker.gi.jpg Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker pushed for legislation curbing the collective bargaining rights of state employees in unions.

(CNN) -- A Wisconsin judge issued a temporary restraining order Friday halting the state's controversial budget repair law that curbs the union power of most public employees, the Dane County district attorney's office said.
Gov. Scott Walker, who championed the measure and signed it into law last week, said he was confident the initiative would eventually prevail in the court system, a spokeswoman said.
"This legislation is still working through the legal process. We are confident the provisions of the budget repair bill will become law in the near future," Cullen Werwie, the governor's press secretary, said in a statement.
Wisconsin Senate Democrats called the law, which reduces the collective bargaining rights of most state employees, an attack on workers and filed a complaint with the Dane County district attorney, claiming that the Senate's Republican-led vote violated Wisconsin's open meetings law.
The ruling by Dane County Judge Maryann Sumi came in response to a lawsuit filed by District Attorney Ismael Ozanne, charging such a violation of the law.
The judge's order enjoins Wisconsin Secretary of State Douglas La Follette from publishing the new law "until further order of the court," according to court documents.
Secretary-Treasurer Stephanie Bloomingdale of the Wisconsin AFL-CIO praised the ruling.
"In Wisconsin, we have a democracy, and rules need to be followed. No one is above the law, including Scott Walker," Bloomingdale said. "This is definitely a move in the right direction for working people in Wisconsin to uphold worker rights and also to uphold democracy in Wisconsin and America."
During the controversy over the governor's budget repair bill, Democratic state senators fled the state in protest. They returned Saturday to cheering crowds and vowed to continue the fight.
"People think that this is a picnic for us. They're wrong. But I'll tell you something, we did it for the right reasons," state Sen. Dave Hansen said Saturday. "And the fight will continue. It does not end with that vote."
The senators returned to Wisconsin just one day after Walker signed the bill into law.
Republicans cleared the final hurdle to the controversial proposal last week, passing the bill after the state's GOP-controlled Senate approved an amended version of the measure -- despite the absence of the 14 Democratic senators who fled the state to prevent a necessary quorum of 20 votes.
The amended bill stripped the spending components out of the original proposal, enabling lawmakers to pass the measure with fewer votes.
GOP lawmakers say the law will help Wisconsin close a $137 million budget shortfall with a plan that requires public workers, with the exception of police and firefighters, to cover more of their retirement plan contributions and health care premiums.
Raises will be tied to the rate of inflation, unless state voters approve an exception. The legislation also requires unions to hold a new certification vote every year, and unions will no longer be allowed to collect dues from workers' paychecks.
Unions mobilized their supporters to oppose the bill, drawing tens of thousands of people to rallies opposing Walker and supporting the fugitive Democrats.
CNN's Michael Martinez and Matt Cherry contributed to this report.

scumonkey
May 26th, 2011, 12:11 PM
Judge voids controversial Wisconsin union law

http://www.reuters.com/resources/r/?m=02&d=20110526&t=2&i=422648108&w=460&fh=&fw=&ll=&pl=&r=2011-05-26T153004Z_01_BTRE74P165Y00_RTROPTP_0_USA-WISCONSIN-PROTESTS

By Jeff Mayers
MADISON, Wisconsin | Thu May 26, 2011 11:30am EDT

(Reuters) - A Wisconsin judge on Thursday voided a controversial Republican-backed law restricting the collective bargaining rights of public sector unions.
Dane County Judge Maryann Sumi said Republican lawmakers violated the state's open meetings law in rushing the legislation through during massive protests at the state Capitol earlier this year.
The Wisconsin proposal, championed by Republican Governor Scott Walker, eliminates most collective bargaining rights for public sector unions and requires them to pay more for pensions and health coverage.
The law has been on hold pending the legal challenge.
Mike Tate, chairman of the state's Democratic Party which opposed the measure, hailed the ruling and said: "It should be looked at as an opportunity to work together to find common sense solutions to grow our economy and get our fiscal house in order, not to tear our state apart."
Sumi, who was appointed by former Republican Governor Tommy Thompson, ruled that the evidence was "clear and convincing" that Republicans failed to comply with the law in a hastily called meeting in March to push through legislation containing the collective bargaining changes.
"The legislators were understandably frustrated by the stalemate existing on March 9, but that does not justify jettisoning compliance with the open meetings law in an attempt to move the budget repair bill to final action," Sumi wrote.
"Moreover, if there is any doubt as to the committee's awareness of its violation, one need only read the short transcript of the committee's March 9 proceedings."
Sumi said the legislators had the opportunity to correct their violation without admitting error, but failed to do so.
(Reporting by Jeff Mayers, James B. Kelleher (http://blogs.reuters.com/search/journalist.php?edition=us&n=james.kelleher&) and David Bailey (http://blogs.reuters.com/search/journalist.php?edition=us&n=david.baileycoventry&); Editing by Greg McCune (http://blogs.reuters.com/search/journalist.php?edition=us&n=greg.mccune&) and Peter Bohan (http://blogs.reuters.com/search/journalist.php?edition=us&n=peter.bohan&))
http://www.reuters.com/article/2011/05/26/us-unions-wisconsin-idUSTRE74P4PR20110526

eddhead
May 26th, 2011, 07:09 PM
^
This got surprisingly little attention on line. There is a blurb on nytimes.com, but it is not very prominent considering how much press the bill received.

Ninjahedge
May 27th, 2011, 08:02 AM
Because it is not exciting.

There were no rallies in support of the decision, and the decision itself is a technicality that did not make it seem like the judge went against party lines to stymie the whole shebang.

I am paraphrasing, of course! ;)


It is oxymoronically surprising, but not unbelievable that there is not much attention on this..... It is just not as important as the results from American Idol! :p

scumonkey
May 27th, 2011, 12:09 PM
It is just not as important as the results from American Idol!
sooo sad, but probably true.

lofter1
May 27th, 2011, 12:31 PM
AI, the perfect distraction.

Ninjahedge
May 27th, 2011, 12:43 PM
Unfortunately loft, running water would be enough for the majority that watch that stuff.

But, because of its popularity,we have so many versions of it and other "contests" that we are now living through the "reality show" era of the new millennia.

I still can't see how ANY government agency can make it illegal to negotiate as a group!

It is rather unfair that teachers cannot do things like strikes when they are not being taken seriously (and abominantions like a binding arbitration that is not forced to consider anything... kind of a do or... well...don't). The reasons always being skewed towards something that does not really apply "Well, we have to think of the CHILDREN! A strike would be bad for them!!"

So would paying a bunch of professionals that have more education, both before and during their career, than 95% of the others and compares to education levels present in much more advanced fields such as R+D.....

Anyway, what is important is that this was edged off the track. Lets see if it can stay there long enough to get something else in there that will actually do the state, and by almost direct relation and precedent, the country GOOD.

scumonkey
July 28th, 2011, 01:41 AM
Scott Walker Accused of Seeking to Rig 2012 Election (http://www.casavaria.com/cafesentido/2011/07/27/8269/scott-walker-accused-of-seeking-to-rig-2012-election/)













27 July 2011 :: staff
Wisconsin’s governor Scott Walker has signed into a law a controversial requirement that voters present photo ID in order to exercise their right to vote. Now, he has announced plans to close as many as 16 motor vehicle offices, every one of them in districts that favor Democrats. What’s more, Walker’s plan includes expanding hours at facilities where Republicans are more likely to obtain their driver’s license or photo ID.

Democratic leaders say the move is clearly designed to deny photo ID to voters more likely to vote Democratic, and then deny them the right to vote. It is the latest in a series of policy changes, enacted by Gov. Walker and the brothers Fitzgerald, the Republicans who control the legislature, specifically designed to make it more difficult for Democrats to win elections, beginning with what many say was an illegal legislative maneuver to strip public servants of basic labor rights.

More than one top Wisconsin Republican openly stated in televised interviews that the collective bargaining ban was specifically designed to “break the unions” or to “crush the Democrats”. This latest move comes as Walker’s government is releasing a radical redistricting map, changing all of the borders of every district in the state, just before voters are scheduled to cast votes to recall six Republican state senators—an effort critics say is designed to confuse voters.

When asked by Current’s Keith Olbermann whether it was an exaggeration to classify Walker’s actions as “fixing an election”, John Nichols referred him to the history of the infamous Boss Tweed (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_M._Tweed) and 19th century New York City’s Tammany Hall, to this day viewed as possibly the most significant example of pervasive and outright public corruption in US history. Tweed’s methods were similar in many ways to Walker’s, nibbling around the edges to get the outcome he wanted.

Scott Walker’s term has been laced with one after another accusation of corruption and abuse of office. As protests mounted in Madison, against the bid to strip the state’s public servants of collective bargaining rights, Walker attempted to mobilize the National Guard against the demonstrators, attempted to have protesters arrested for free speech, illegally sealed the state Capitol building, and is accused of using state troopers to harass and intimidate the families of Democratic legislators who fled the state to deprive Walker’s Republicans of a legislative quorum in the Senate.

He named the father of the Fitzgerald brothers—who control both houses of the state legislature—to be head of the state police. And it was the father of the two men he was counting on to carry out illegal actions in the legislature to force through votes on a rights-stripping measure, designed to undermine unions and give Republicans and edge in elections, that he asked to send troopers to the homes of individuals he knew to be out of the state, to harass their families.

It was alleged in more than one report that Scott Walker was considering ordering the state police to attack demonstrators (http://www.rawstory.com/rs/2011/02/21/exclusive-police-would-absolutely-carry-out-order-to-clear-wisc-capitol-union-president-tells-raw/) in order to disperse the crowds, with multiple top police commanders calling for restraint and saying they would not recognize such a scene as American democracy.

Some state police joined the protesters in denouncing Walker’s actions as corrupt and undemocratic. On February 25, 2011, FireDogLake published this report (http://my.firedoglake.com/rayne/2011/02/25/video-wisconsin-state-police-join-protesters-in-show-of-solidarity/):
Rainforest Action Network’s Jenn Breckenridge posted around 8:00 p.m. EST that the Wisconsin State Police had arrived at the capitol building (http://understory.ran.org/2011/02/25/breaking-wisconsin-police-have-joined-protest-inside-state-capitol/) in Madison, Wisconsin, joining the protesters in solidarity against Gov. Scott Walker and his attack on state employees’ collective bargaining.
The move may have come in response to an apparent order by the state’s assembly to close the capitol building at 4:00 p.m. on Sunday. RAN’s Ryan Harvey said the state police are rejecting the order and are planning to sleep in the building along side the protesters.
The police officer says in this video, “Let me tell you Mr. Walker, this is not your house, this is all our house.”


When a critic staged a fake call from one of the Koch brothers, who were spending millions to help finance the Republican response to the massive Madison protests, Gov. Walker accepted a gift in kind, in the form of an expensive vacation, as a reward for his hard work. And allegations of corruption only mounted.
According to the watchdog site Scott Walker Watch (http://scottwalkerwatch.com/2011/07/07/wisconsin-democracy-campaign-exposes-walker-donors-violating-campaign-finance-law/):
Thanks to the great work by the Wisconsin Democracy Campaign, it has become apparent that dozens of Walker supporters were illegally donating more that the $10,000 limit in campaign contributions during the 2010 election season.

There is now an official complaint against Gov. Walker and his campaign, for seeking and accepting illegal contributions.

With mounting evidence that a significant portion of the Walker governing agenda is going toward rigging the 2012 election to favor Republicans, critics and election watchdogs are now calling for an investigation into election tampering and voter suppression.

A recall petition is almost certain to emerge after the one-year-in-office requirement is met. Already, there are petitions circulating calling for a bid to recall him. One accuses him of “economic treason” (http://scottwalkerwatch.com/sign-recall-petition/) for what many view as a war against the middle class. Over 11,000 people have already joined a Facebook page (http://www.facebook.com/pages/Recall-Scott-Walker/140797569305051) devoted to removing Gov. Walker from office.

The pro-business lobbying organization ALEC (the American Legislative Exchange Council) has actually gone as far as to pair corporate interests with Republican legislators interested in working with them, to essentially push legislation written by industry. John Nichols, reporting for the Nation (http://www.thenation.com/article/161978/alec-exposed), writes:
“Never has the time been so right,” Louisiana State Representative Noble Ellington told conservative legislators gathered in Washington to plan the radical remaking of policies in the states. It was one month after the 2010 midterm elections. Republicans had grabbed 680 legislative seats and secured a power trifecta—control of both legislative chambers and the governorship—in twenty-one states. Ellington was speaking for hundreds of attendees at a “States and Nation Policy Summit,” featuring GOP stars like Texas Governor Rick Perry, former House Speaker Newt Gingrich and House Majority Leader Eric Cantor. Convened by the American Legislative Exchange Council (ALEC)—“the nation’s largest, non-partisan, individual public-private membership association of state legislators,” as the spin-savvy group describes itself—the meeting did not intend to draw up an agenda for the upcoming legislative session. That had already been done by ALEC’s elite task forces of lawmakers and corporate representatives. The new legislators were there to grab their weapons: carefully crafted model bills seeking to impose a one-size-fits-all agenda on the states.


The radical Walker agenda has many of the hallmarks of such model bills, and his Republican majority has been accused of selling its role as legislative majority, in exchange for financial support from industry. There are calls for a comprehensive corruption investigation into the dealings of the Wisconsin Republican party, to look into illegal campaign fundraising activity, illegal legislative process, potential quid-pro-quo, abusive of power and extortion.

There is even an allegation that Mr. Walker had been illegally funneling low-interest government bonds to his employer (http://www.nwcitizen.com/entry/scott-walker-corruption-ignored-by-herald)—BP Rifinery, in Whatcom County—for as long as 10 years. While he was able to deliver $180 million in low-interest bonds to that one entity, all other businesses in the county received only $13 million of the same bonds.

It is alleged Walker routinely manipulated the process for debate and for public hearings, to obscure a decision-making process that was flagrantly corrupt and which would have raised opposition from the community, from businesses and from the federal government.

lofter1
July 28th, 2011, 02:17 AM
Damn, the country is being overwhelmed by slugs. Is it the heat or the humidity that's encouraging these soft-brainers?

eddhead
July 28th, 2011, 09:59 AM
Reiterating my post from 3/26, the attempt to bust the teachers union was nothing more than a direct assault on the democratic party in WI. This substantiates that.