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View Full Version : 5 Years Ago Today....



Taz
April 4th, 2011, 02:42 PM
Time flies. It seems like just yesterday that I registered here to talk about JB with all you guys, like Maggie's Garden was being planned out last week. It also seems like most of the guys who were active on here both before and after JB died have kind of vanished into obscurity. I don't really see a lot of the guys who were involved in getting the garden project up and running posting here anymore, with the exception of a few.

Almost seems like everything went back to "normal". This world was a better place before April 4, 2006. Hard to believe it's been so long already. I found this on my Photobucket account earlier, thought I'd post it again:

http://i170.photobucket.com/albums/u274/WiebanngPhatchix/tloz0pv.jpg
J.B. Hehman
5-28-85 - 4-4-06
Rest in Peace

Ninjahedge
April 11th, 2011, 08:29 AM
Some are still major players, but some had their own difficulties in life (or one in particular, politics... I will not say who/what).

For better or worse, life moves on. the death of someone special is a loss felt by all, but it is always a good sign when that loss is both remembered, and healed.

What happened to the kids that caused this? Have they been "healed" or will they do something like this again in the future?

Taz
April 11th, 2011, 07:57 PM
What happened to the kids that caused this? Have they been "healed" or will they do something like this again in the future?

No idea. All I know for sure is they're all out already, which is a disgrace in itself.

lofter1
April 11th, 2011, 10:51 PM
The longest sentence, handed down on 13 November 2006 (http://wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?t=8889&p=131120#post131120), was given to the 16-year old involved in JB's death. He was to serve 5 years in a state facility. So he may still be incarcerated.

The other three, aged 15 and under, were all sentenced to 18 months (http://wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?t=8889&p=125549&viewfull=1#post125549) in the fall of 2006.

I've searched around and can find no news on any of those involved beyond the sentencings.

UnknownGirl
April 13th, 2011, 12:01 AM
For better or worse, life moves on. the death of someone special is a loss felt by all, but it is always a good sign when that loss is both remembered, and healed.

I agree. A part of me was appalled at how unobtrusive the thought of this anniversary was to me, especially because it was five years (five years...God, I still can't believe that), but the rest of me was able to say "Hey, life happens. You're busy now, leading your life. Maybe not the life you thought you'd have five years ago, but a good and full one just the same. It's okay to let the pain die a little as time goes on, as long as you remember the good parts." And I do remember the good parts, and speak of them often. I can't truly say I feel healed, or, honestly, that I'm sure I ever will, but I do feel that the best way I can honor JB's memory is to go on living my lives to the fullest as best I can, because I still don't think I've ever met anyone who had the same kind of love of life that JB did. And if that means accepting the passing of the date with a twinge of pain rather than a flood of tears, I can't fully see how that's a bad thing.


The longest sentence, handed down on 13 November 2006 (http://wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?t=8889&p=131120#post131120), was given to the 16-year old involved in JB's death. He was to serve 5 years in a state facility. So he may still be incarcerated.

The other three, aged 15 and under, were all sentenced to 18 months (http://wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?t=8889&p=125549&viewfull=1#post125549) in the fall of 2006.

I've searched around and can find no news on any of those involved beyond the sentencings.

Five years on, I'm still not 100% sure how I feel about this. All I know is that it seems unfair that they should be able to go free so soon, or what feels like "so soon" to me (and, I think from several comments here, to others as well). It feels weird to know that in just a few months, if not already, that particular chapter of this whole tragic affair will be closed. On the other hand, while a part of me will always long for vengence far more extreme than what the courts could have legally dished out, and part of that is my fervent wish that they (or at least the oldest) should go through life with scarlet letters pinned to themselves showing the wolrd what they took away from it, it seems like it can't be anything but a good sign that you haven't found any further information on any of them, considering I can't imagine that any further crimes on any of their parts would go unnoticed. So perhaps, in this case, no news really is good news.

lofter1
April 13th, 2011, 12:17 AM
I think your last statement covers it. Nothing done to them will bring back TLOZ. Hopefully these guys did some serious thinking and are now doing something good with their lives.

Ninjahedge
April 13th, 2011, 08:14 AM
Well, you know how good our system works.

I bet they are all charity workers helping inner city kids get a good education and a place in life! :(




Seriously though? The only other thing we have to keep in mind is that these kids did want to hurt, but I don't think they wanted to kill. I REALLY hope their incarceration did not harden them into the very things we were punishing them for acting like that one day.

But life is not a movie, we will probably never know, and in that we need to remember, learn SOMETHING from the tragedy. We need to take comfort that as far spread and anonymous we all are in this forum, we still do value each other and feel for the loss of anyone in the virtual community.....

UnknownGirl
April 14th, 2011, 01:01 AM
Seriously though? The only other thing we have to keep in mind is that these kids did want to hurt, but I don't think they wanted to kill. I REALLY hope their incarceration did not harden them into the very things we were punishing them for acting like that one day.

This nails (and far more succintly than I could ever say it) what I thought of as the great dilemma of the sentencings: on the one hand, I wanted to see these kids locked up forever for what they did not only to JB, and not only to everyone who knew him, but to the world. I would have been completely satisfied if the 16-year-old had been charged with felony murder, along with the sentence that carries. On the other hand, since I knew that wasn't going to happen (and, truthfully, shouldn't happen, at least not to the younger boys), and since I honestly believed that not only were they not planning to kill anyone, but that it's possible that the younger ones, at least, weren't even capable of seeing the possibility that it could have worked out the way it did, I kind of wanted them to be given light sentences, only because I felt (and still feel) that all being in a juvenile lockup center could possibly achieve would be for them to become smarter, more hardened criminals. I stand with you in hoping that they somehow came out of the system better people than they were when they went in.