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Ninjahedge
September 9th, 2011, 08:55 AM
I was there.

I saw the second plane hit.

I saw them collapse as most of us sat in our office just a half mile away wondering what to do next.

I was on the site 2 days later as an engineer looking at the damage.

I know how devastating the whole situation was.


But here's the question. When do we let it go? We keep calling all these services and events as "memorials", but they are still reliving the event, not just remembering those that had fallen.

The real irony being, the whole purpose OF the attack was to bring attention to the terrorists and their messages, like it or not. The succeeded well beyond what they could have ever imagined. Because of their actions they have caused more fear, strife and human life lost than they could have ever hoped for, and we continue to fight the wars it started (or was used as an excuse for) and we continue to look over our shoulder every time we get on the train or drive across the GWB.


When do we stop and say "Enough already!" to the media using 9-11 as an excuse to run "Remembering the day" programs all weekend? When do we tell our government agencies that 3 guys in full DESERT CAMO carrying assault weapons would not do jack against a suicide bomber? When do we tell our elected officials to stop beating that hurtful drum as a rallying call to spend more of our money on things that do little against a threat we can do little about directly?

I will remember that day and the things I saw for MANY years to come. I do not need someone on TV telling me to do so and showing me more pictures of what happened.


Enough already.

ZippyTheChimp
September 9th, 2011, 10:12 AM
It's only been 10 years. As you move away from the date, and especially away from the NY metro area, 09/11 is largely forgotten.

I'm more concerned with what the day-to-day normalcy will be down the road.

lesterp4
September 9th, 2011, 10:55 AM
I agree. Enough already. I was and am here that day but eall the TV stations keep acting like 9 11 was the worse event to happen in the history of mankind. I am afraid that is not the case. It was tragic, but much worse things have happened and will happpen.

Ninjahedge
September 9th, 2011, 11:05 AM
Zip, you mean like the Patriot Act et all?

I love it when a generic "evil" is used as the tool for the ruling party to remove whatever rights and freedoms the people had in the name of "protection".

I still feel more UNCOMFORTABLE seeing fully armed soldiers and cops at transit stations than safe. We are not fighting on a war front. "Terrorists" will not announce they are coming, and they will not come as a squad of heavily armed soldiers down 7th avenue. The only thing that 90% of these soldiers will be is another corpse on the pile if something happens.

I would feel MUCH more comfortable seeing more hounds being trained and used than Dogs of War.

lofter1
September 9th, 2011, 11:21 AM
When do we stop commemorating Pearl Harbor? Or the dropping of atom bombs on Japan?

The events are remembered because they caused essential change.

What we take from the commemoration is up to each person individually.

Of course the media spins the event, theatricalizes the memories and plays it for all they can. They barely leave room for folks to have a private thought. That can lead to a point where people understandably say, "Enough already." This creates the perfect atmosphere for various agendas to be put into place that enrich some while very possibly doing little to deal with the core issues.

ZippyTheChimp
September 9th, 2011, 11:29 AM
NH, are you complaining about the 09/11 anniversary events, or the day-to-day security that now exists throughout the country? Two different things.

I'm not talking about national policy, but what goes on in my own neighborhood. I want it to eventually return to normal.

And I get mixed signals from your posts:


A good remembrance, but I am kinda creeped out.....

Although I know there is a lot of grief still with the living, we seem to have this morbid attachment to the dead....


But here's the question. When do we let it go? We keep calling all these services and events as "memorials", but they are still reliving the event, not just remembering those that had fallen.

Ninjahedge
September 9th, 2011, 01:04 PM
Of course the media spins the event, theatricalizes the memories and plays it for all they can. They barely leave room for folks to have a private thought. That can lead to a point where people understandably say, "Enough already." This creates the perfect atmosphere for various agendas to be put into place that enrich some while very possibly doing little to deal with the core issues.

DING!

Here's your prize. ;)

Ninjahedge
September 9th, 2011, 01:17 PM
Zip. the crossed lines were not intentional. The problem comes in expressing a "middle of the road" attitude. Of remembering the dead without worshiping them. Remembering the past without reliving it.

The thing that bothers me the most now is like lofter says, the over-emphasis of the whole shamozzle. I turn on the TV this morning and I hear more about what I should be doing this weekend in remembrance than any other story... and it isn't even the 11th yet..... (They gotta let you know now or you might be lost this weekend!!!!)

And as for policy? I am talking about both local and national. It just seems like we can't deal with anything on a logical long term basis. We have to have IMMEDIATE ACTION and drastic measure, or we forget about it completely and stop doing anything. So whatever.....

If balancing was so easy to do, everybody would be doing it.

ZippyTheChimp
September 9th, 2011, 01:44 PM
^
The way the media reacts to this event is no different than the way the media reacts to the Super Bowl. After all, it's only a football game. So what do you do if you have little or no interest in NFL football? Easy, ignore the coverage. There are other things you can watch or do.

I don't understand why you care whether or not others want to worship the dead. It's their business.

The people who live around here, and especially those who were here a decade ago, understand what I'm talking about. We have to make a real decision as to whether to stay or leave during these anniversaries. We like to stay because it's significant, but the oppressive security and the media attention force us to relive the same conditions that existed a decade ago. So sometimes we leave.

Ninjahedge
September 9th, 2011, 02:58 PM
Zip, I can't ignore things. Don't know why, but I find it very difficult to ignore anything. So when people act irrationally, it bugs me. I know what I should do, but my emotional matrix just does not listen to the logical side of my brain.

The other side of it is this. With enough people yelling and screaming about the dead, we get enormous monuments to them when money is needed desperately elsewhere. We are not the first to do this, or the last, but to somehow let the living suffer (and in some cases die) because we would rather spend the money on the dead...?

I am just coming on here to emote so I do not yell at someone who is still genuinely grieving over this. Yes they should move on, but hurting them more is not what I want to do. It is frustrating, but with the relative anonymity of the net, I feel like I can at least express my own frustrations on this without being publicly castigated for it. (not saying you are, BTW).

And I can understand what you are talking about, having worked just on the fringe of the original security zones, and can imagine the additional inconvenience and unpleasant reminders you must endure during these events.... :(

ZippyTheChimp
September 9th, 2011, 03:57 PM
Zip, I can't ignore things. Don't know why, but I find it very difficult to ignore anything. Just regard it as this one event. It's happening on a weekend, so a good opportunity to get away. Visit your parents or something.

It will all blow over by midweek. The media can shift attention to the just beginning NFL season. Sometimes their shallowness is an advantage.

Daquan13
September 9th, 2011, 11:48 PM
Zip, I can't ignore things. Don't know why, but I find it very difficult to ignore anything. So when people act irrationally, it bugs me. I know what I should do, but my emotional matrix just does not listen to the logical side of my brain.

The other side of it is this. With enough people yelling and screaming about the dead, we get enormous monuments to them when money is needed desperately elsewhere. We are not the first to do this, or the last, but to somehow let the living suffer (and in some cases die) because we would rather spend the money on the dead...?

I am just coming on here to emote so I do not yell at someone who is still genuinely grieving over this. Yes they should move on, but hurting them more is not what I want to do. It is frustrating, but with the relative anonymity of the net, I feel like I can at least express my own frustrations on this without being publicly castigated for it. (not saying you are, BTW).

And I can understand what you are talking about, having worked just on the fringe of the original security zones, and can imagine the additional inconvenience and unpleasant reminders you must endure during these events.... :(




I think that I'll have to agree with you on this one, Ninja.

Even though many innocent lives were lost that day in record numbers, and like it was when advocates were fighting furiously for the Twins to be rebuilt, this too, has to be let go.

Also, channels like Discovery, History, National Geographic and TLC, they get flooded and bombarded with programs about 09-11 every year. I think that in 10 more years, they'll more than likely STILL air programs and flood the news channels with 09-11 horror.

MidtownGuy
September 10th, 2011, 12:31 PM
definitely enough already. I'm so glad I'm away and missing all the hoopla!

stache
September 10th, 2011, 06:22 PM
It's really kind of a non event unless you're right downtown.

Bob
September 10th, 2011, 10:45 PM
Not enough, at least not yet. We need to keep 9/11 fresh in our minds, so that we truly never forget. In fact, I'd argue that we haven't gone far enough to reveal the magnitude of the horror that day. Passengers stabbed, throats cut, elevators crashing to the ground, people burned alive, people jumping out of windows, people trying to escape by crawling on the outside of the building...you name it. And to think the NYPD has censored those horrific 911 calls. Ya know what? We need to stay angry and take revenge against any and all of the scumbags who perpetrated this event on our country, as well as those who sympathize with them.

ZippyTheChimp
September 10th, 2011, 11:22 PM
When we were really angry, we went into Iraq, where more Americans died than on 09/11.

After several years, when we started to calm down, we killed bin Laden.

Daquan13
September 11th, 2011, 09:40 AM
I heard that the forces that were given the order by President Barack Obama to kill Osama, were also killed themselves in a chopper accident.

Does anyone know this to be true? And if so, how do we know for sure if the Al Quaeda network didn't set that up as retaliation for taking out their #1 top mastermind leader / terrorist?

Dr.T
September 11th, 2011, 10:40 AM
Not enough, at least not yet. We need to keep 9/11 fresh in our minds, so that we truly never forget. In fact, I'd argue that we haven't gone far enough to reveal the magnitude of the horror that day. Passengers stabbed, throats cut, elevators crashing to the ground, people burned alive, people jumping out of windows, people trying to escape by crawling on the outside of the building...you name it. And to think the NYPD has censored those horrific 911 calls. Ya know what? We need to stay angry and take revenge against any and all of the scumbags who perpetrated this event on our country, as well as those who sympathize with them.

I agree with you, memory is part of our mind and we must remember all innocent people who lost their life on this terrible terrorist attack. Maybe it's time to leave the hate inside our hearts, but not to forget those who died unjustly. Today is time to forgive, but not to forget this tragedy... maybe, in a few years, american people will be able forget... today is early to do it !

dougm
September 11th, 2011, 01:38 PM
I have mixed feelings about this. I agree the media overhypes everything, and it can get annoying. I also agree that by overreacting to 9/11 we have, in many ways, changed our society in ways that Al Queda could not have even hoped for when they planned the attack.

However, this was one of the most unique and amazing things that has happened in the history of the world. Not just because it happened to America -- it has ramifications world wide. I intended to avoid most of the coverage today, but MSNBC is replaying the coverage from Sept. 11, 2001, and I can't stop watching it. Although there have been wars where many more people were killed, and many horrible tragedys that have happened to people that exceed this, the idea that a small band of terrorists would comandeer huge commercial planes and use them as bombs, for the reasons they did, is bizarre and still unbelievable. And it has permanently affected our nation in many, many ways.

So I have mixed feelings. I understand those who feel the coverage is too much. But I can't agree that this is not one of the great events in history. And it's affects will be felt for hundreds of years.

Fabrizio
September 11th, 2011, 04:38 PM
Of the coverage I only saw Paul Simon singing Sounds of Silence. It was breathtakingly beautiful. That voice is a little battered now but it still sounds amazingly young. And the song was poignant.

Daquan13
September 11th, 2011, 06:38 PM
Must Read?Thank YouYes 12 (http://wirednewyork.com/forum/#)http://por-img.cimcontent.net/api/assets/bin-201109/ce82-Obama-Sept-11-Pentagon.jpg (http://xfinity.comcast.net/slideshow/news-general/news-general-20110911-US.Sept.11.Obama/)

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WASHINGTON — On a day of serenity and remembrance, President Barack Obama honored the dead of Sept. 11 with his quiet presence Sunday at the three most tangible reminders of both the incredible loss and dauntless resilience of a country rebuilding a decade later.
At New York's ground zero, Obama touched the names of the lost etched into bronze at a memorial pool created in the footprint of one of the downed World Trade Center towers.

In a field in rural Pennsylvania, he walked the marbled Wall of Names and placed a wreath memorializing the 40 people who crashed at Shanksville after fighting back against the hijackers and driving their plane into the ground.

At the Pentagon, too, the president placed a wreath at a memorial where each of 184 victims is remembered with a bench and small reflecting pool. A brass quartet played a soulful rendition of "Amazing Grace" as the president greeted visitors to the memorial.
This was not a day centered on presidential speechmaking. Rather, Obama's principal role was simply to be there as the nation paused to remember the nearly 3,000 lives lost and ponder all that has transpired.

At a ceremony at ground zero, Obama read Psalm 46, which he chose because it speaks of perseverance through challenges.
"God is our refuge and strength," Obama intoned, "a very present help in trouble. Therefore, we will not fear."
On a sun-splashed New York morning, Obama and his wife, Michelle, first walked with former President George W. Bush and his wife, Laura, to the North Memorial Pool. All four touched the names etched in bronze and silently bowed their heads. They then turned to dispense greetings and hugs to family members of those who died.

This also was not a day for partisanship or rancor.
Bush gave Obama a quick nod of solidarity after the president's reading. It was the first time the two presidents had seen each other since their Rose Garden appearance after the Haiti earthquake in January 2010.
The presidents and their wives stood behind bulletproof glass during the ceremony, an indication of the tight security surrounding the day's events. In Washington, Obama's chief counterterrorism adviser convened a meeting in the Situation Room to review security precautions for the weekend.

Obama's stop in Shanksville drew spontaneous applause and chants of "USA" from those at the memorial site, where each of the 40 marble slabs is inscribed with the name of someone who died in the crash. Obama and his wife lingered at the site to pose for photos with visitors, greet children and share some quiet laughs.
"Thanks for getting bin Laden," one man called out.

The Obamas then walked to the boulder that marks
the actual crash site and stood quietly together in a field of wildflowers for a time.
"I think it's just important that the president shows his support for the families that lost loved ones," said Jaleel Dyson, an 18-year-old from Washington who attends college in the area and came to pay tribute to the dead.
At the Pentagon, the Obamas took their time mingling with memorial visitors and family members of those who died, some of them wearing ribbons and T-shirts bearing the names and photos of their loved ones. For all the solemnity of the occasion, there were smiles and laughter in the crowd as well.

Obama, who was a state senator from Illinois when the hijackers struck in 2001, has called on Americans this weekend to remember and serve, and to come together toward a joint future.
"Ten years later, I'd say America came through this thing in a way that was consistent with our character," he told NBC News. "We've made mistakes. Some things haven't happened as quickly as they needed to. But overall, we took the fight to al-Qaida, we preserved our values, we preserved our character."

Obama's only other planned public remarks Sunday were to come at a memorial concert in Washington in the evening.
His goals were to acknowledge how the country has changed, such as an increased vigilance against terrorism, and the things that have stayed the same, the values of freedom and liberty that bind the country together.

In the broadcast interview, Obama recalled going home after the attacks and rocking his baby daughter, Sasha. "Our first reaction was, and continues to be, just heartbreak for the families involved. The other thing that we all remember is how America came together."


Copyright 2011 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Daquan13
September 11th, 2011, 06:49 PM
I think that I'm getting a little bit better at this now, guys.

I just edit out and delete unwanted material that appears at the bottom after copying and pasting!

Makes the post look much neater, cleaner and give it a more sleeker look! Without all that unwanted garbage.

And I just add the title of the story in the Title box, since I have a hard time getting that on the copy & paste.

lofter1
September 11th, 2011, 07:31 PM
If a post looks like that ^ then it can be helpful to immediately use the "Edit Post" feature to get things in order.

Just sayin'

Daquan13
September 11th, 2011, 07:35 PM
Among travelers on Sept. 11, unease and confidence



Email Story (http://xfinity.comcast.net/articles/news-national/20110911/US.Sept.11.Up.in.the.Air/) Print (http://xfinity.comcast.net/articles/news-national/20110911/US.Sept.11.Up.in.the.Air/print/)

By ERIC TUCKER, AP
1 hour ago
Loading... Share (http://www.plaxo.com/events?share_link=%2Farticles%2Fnews-national%2F20110911%2FUS.Sept.11.Up.in.the.Air%2F% 3Fcid%3Dplaxoshare%26src%3Dcomcast_net_share_butto n) No Thanks (http://xfinity.comcast.net/articles/news-national/20110911/US.Sept.11.Up.in.the.Air/#) Must Read?Thank YouYes 0 (http://wirednewyork.com/forum/#)
SANTA ANA, Calif. — Some travelers were plainly jittery about flying Sunday. Others weren't worried, confident that security would be tight on the 10th anniversary of Sept. 11. And some figured, well, whatever happens, happens.

In Los Angeles, Kim Pinney, who operates a daycare center in Virginia, booked the latest flight home possible from a friend's wedding in the belief that that would minimize her chances of falling victim to a terrorist attack.

"If something was going to happen, it would happen during the day and then it would be over," she said in a telephone interview Saturday. Since her flight was at 11 p.m. Sunday, she added, "Technically, I'm flying for an hour on 9/11 because it will be 9/12" for most of the flight.

Authorities and travelers were clearly on edge:
_ Two fighter planes escorted a New York-bound American Airlines jet after three passengers locked themselves in a bathroom during the flight from Los Angeles, officials said. A law enforcement official said the incident was not believed to be terrorism-related. The plane landed safely at Kennedy Airport.

_ A man was detained at the Kansas City, Mo., airport and a terminal shut down after authorities found suspicious items in his carry-on bag. Authorities said the items tested negative for explosive materials, but they gave no further details on what they found.

_ A rental truck parked at a curb at the Dallas-Fort Worth Airport caused a brief scare. Authorities became alarmed when the driver said, "I got a couple of guns," but he turned out to be a member of the crew of the Discovery Channel program "Sons of Guns" — a reality show about a custom gun shop — and he was waiting for a co-worker, FBI official Kevin Gentry said.
Reminders of the day's significance were palpable in airports across the U.S. and beyond.

At Boston's Logan Airport, where the jetliners that brought down the World Trade Center took off, ticket agents, baggage screeners and other workers paused at 8:46 a.m. for a moment of silence to mark the time the first plane struck the twin towers.

At the Tampa, Fla., airport, an honor guard of law enforcement officers carried flags while a bagpiper and a bugler played.
Matt Yates, an accountant traveling from John Wayne Airport in Southern California to Atlanta and Florida for business, wore an American flag shirt that he dons on patriotic occasions.

And Genevieve Mercier, a nurse who passed the time with a French novel about a plane crash, arrived at John Wayne 3 1/2 hours early for her flight home to suburban Montreal in anticipation of heavy security.
In many ways, there were signs of Sept. 11 all around, even if passengers didn't immediately realize it.

Travelers in line at the checkpoints had to take out their driver's licenses — one of the many security measures introduced after the terror attacks. And at John Wayne, someone left behind a belt at the X-ray machine, and an announcement came over the public address system asking the owner to claim it.

In Los Angeles, Mindy Garrett of Arizona was flying with her husband and their two children to San Diego to visit SeaWorld and the zoo.
"I knew it was Sept. 11, but CNN said the threats were on the ground not in the air. And LAX is a big airport," she said.
"It just worked out to be the best date for us. I mean, if someone's going to blow me up...," husband Thomas added with a shrug.
Some travelers flew with an air of defiance and a determination to appear unfazed by the threat of terrorism.

"I spoke to many business people who would wince when they heard I was traveling on 9/11, but I don't want to do that," said Patrick Bienvenue, a native of Canada who dressed in red pants and a blue-and-white checked shirt to show his affection for the United States, his home for the past three decades. The Rockport, Maine, real estate executive was flying out of Boston and headed to Miami.
John Hollenbeck, 49, of Canyon Lake, Calif., was scheduled to fly for business exactly 10 years ago, but his flight was canceled by the attacks. He was flying again Sunday, leaving out of John Wayne.

"I have no concerns over terrorism. Not that I have no concerns over terrorism — I have no concern that security's inadequate," he said.
It's hard to know exactly how many people were traveling Sunday because airlines don't release information on how many passengers travel on a given day, and none offered any information on Sept. 11 traffic trends when asked by The Associated Press.
But George Hobica, founder of Airfarewatchdog.com, said major U.S. airlines have traditionally run one-day-only sales on the anniversary of the attacks, indicating they expect fewer passengers to fly. Those sales haven't been offered this year, perhaps because Sunday is typically the busiest day of the week to fly, he said.

At Logan, the number of passengers appeared to be lower than usual for a Sunday morning, said American Airlines customer service representative Kettly Dehoux.

"Today is slow and calm," she said. "I think today some people stayed home and didn't want to travel."
Pam O'Hara, a nurse specializing in pediatric oncology whose husband is a retired New York firefighter who responded to the attacks on the World Trade Center, was returning to Hazlet, N.J., with her daughter, daughter-in-law and granddaughter from a nursing conference in Anaheim, Calif.

She said she was apprehensive enough about flying on the anniversary that she avoided any flights from the Los Angeles airport and Kennedy Airport, figuring that they would be more desirable targets for terrorists. She was flying out of John Wayne.
"I would have preferred probably to fly tomorrow," O'Hara said, but she said her husband, who never talks about the carnage he witnessed, assured her that extra security would probably keep her safe.
Christine Abrams, who was flying to San Francisco from Boston, said she had largely avoided Sept. 11 news coverage because she knew she would be flying on the anniversary.

"But a lot of my friends said, `Oh, it's probably the safest day to travel,' and I think so, too," said Abrams, a preschool teacher and musician who lives on the Massachusetts island of Martha's Vineyard.

In London, some passengers flying to New York said they weren't concerned.
"You can get knocked down by a bus or a car any day. If it is meant to be, it is meant to be, but my daughter won't be happy about it," said Alan Jefford, of Wales.


___
Associated Press writers Samantha Bomkamp in New York, Denise Lavoie in Boston, Jessica Gresko in Washington, Marjorie Miller in Los Angeles, and Paul Cheung in London contributed to this report.


Copyright 2011 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Daquan13
September 11th, 2011, 07:39 PM
If a post looks like that ^ then it can be helpful to immediately use the "Edit Post" feature to get things in order.

Just sayin'



Thanx for your advice, Lofter. I appreciate it.

I tried to fix it, but it just wouldn't work, so I deleted that one because it kept on coming out crappy. Too much space, as you saw.

A revised version of the story appears below.

Daquan13
September 11th, 2011, 11:31 PM
Military jets safely escort NYC, Detroit flights




[h=3]By TOM HAYS, DAVID N. GOODMAN and JAMES ANDERSON, AP
44 minutes ago.


NEW YORK — Fighter jets escorted two flights — one to New York City, another to Detroit — after passengers' use of the bathrooms aroused suspicions Sunday, the 10th anniversary of the Sept. 11 attacks.

On a Los Angeles-to-New York American Airlines flight, three passengers made repeated trips to the bathroom, officials said. The three were cleared after the plane landed safely at New York's Kennedy Airport.

Earlier, on a Denver-to-Detroit Frontier Airlines flight, the crew reported that two people were spending "an extraordinarily long time" in a bathroom, Frontier spokesman Peter Kowalchuck said. Police detained three passengers at Detroit's Metropolitan Airport after the plane landed without incident. They were released after questioning.

In both instances, the FBI said the jets shadowed the planes "out of an abundance of caution."
New York, in particular, has been in a heightened state of security after federal officials received a credible but uncorroborated tip of a car bomb plot on the 9/11 anniversary in either New York or Washington.

American Airlines spokesman Tim Smith said the plane's captain never declared a security threat and never asked for law enforcement help. A "security concern" was brought to the airline's attention, the crew used "normal procedures" to assess the circumstances and the plane landed as planned, Smith said.
"In our eyes, it's a big nothing," Smith added.

The North American Aerospace Defense Command scrambled two F-16 jets to shadow American Airlines Flight 34 until it landed safely at 4:10 p.m., the Transportation Security Administration said in a statement.

On the flight, the three passengers made repeated trips to the bathroom and some thought they were using hand signals to communicate, a law enforcement official said. The official was not authorized to speak publicly and spoke to The Associated Press on condition of anonymity. Two of the men were Israeli and one was Russian, the official said, adding that they were cleared and sent on their way.

FBI spokesman J. Peter Donald said in a statement that the jets were sent to escort the flight "out of an abundance of caution." The FBI interviewed passengers and found "no nexus to terrorism," he said.
A similar scenario played out on Frontier Flight 623.

NORAD spokesman John Cornelio said NORAD sent two F-16 jets to shadow the plane until it landed safely. The craft, with 116 passengers on board, landed without incident at 3:30 p.m. EDT, Kowalchuck said.
The Airbus 318 taxied to a pad away from the terminal, he said. The three escorted off the plane in handcuffs included two men and a woman, passenger Ilona Hajdar of Charlotte, Mich., told The Associated Press.

Authorities cleared the aircraft at 5:15 p.m. EDT after it was searched, the TSA said.
Flight 623 originated in San Diego before stopping at Denver International Airport on its way to Detroit.
In Denver, the FBI said that NORAD scrambled F-16 fighter jets to shadow the plane "out of an abundance of caution." The plane was searched and nothing was found, the FBI said.

American Airlines passenger Steven Ciobo said nothing seemed amiss on the flight until he saw police lights on the runway after the plane landed. He looked out the window while still in flight and didn't notice anything.
When the plane landed, he said, the airline workers told them to remain seated and that the authorities would meet the plane. Everyone was quiet as air marshals got on board and headed for the back of the plane.

"To be honest, I think it's reassuring that there was such a great response from the authorities," Ciobo said. "If there are people that are stupid enough to do those things on today of all days you wonder what's going on through their heads. But the fact that there were so many authorities there ... and that it all went so smoothly, I think they did a good job.
The jets intercepted the flight about 100 miles west of New York and shadowed it until it landed, Cornelio said. He also described the measure as precautionary.

American Airlines is a subsidiary of AMR Corp. Frontier is a subsidiary of Republic Airways Holdings Inc.
___(equals).

Goodman reported from Detroit, Anderson from Denver. Associated Press writers Colleen Long and David B. Caruso and AP Television Reporter Bonny Ghosh reported from New York, Jeff Karoub from Detroit and P. Solomon Banda from Denver.

From Associated Press.

Ninjahedge
September 12th, 2011, 10:57 AM
Dr. T, I have never said to forget, but here's the catch. We have a tendency to over exaggerate the remembrance to the point where it no longer fits the event. There are some that say that there can never be something that would truly represent the horror of that day, and that is right. But remembering is not reliving.

You do not re-open a wound every year on its anniversary just to let everyone know how much it hurt the first time.

The key is to remember, not relive.

eddhead
September 12th, 2011, 11:17 AM
I agree with Stache. Unless you were downtown, the event really was really not a big deal in the city. As to the media coverage, I really did not find it THAT intrusive up until the day of the event itself. And even than, it was really more TV than media hype.

@ Fab - I agree with your comments on Paul Simons singing "Sound of Silence" . I thought he did a great job.

ZippyTheChimp
September 12th, 2011, 11:42 AM
Thanx for your advice, Lofter. I appreciate it.

I tried to fix it, but it just wouldn't work, so I deleted that one because it kept on coming out crappy. Too much space, as you saw.

A revised version of the story appears below.Use the PREVIEW POST button to see how your post will look. Make any necessary changes and then SUBMIT REPLY. On some web pages, there is a PRINTER FRIENDLY button which displays the text without all the extra banners and graphics. Sometimes it's easier to copy & past from that.

It looks like your formatting is removing paragraph breaks, which makes the text hard to read.

eddhead
September 12th, 2011, 12:37 PM
^ The removal of paragraph breaks and the inclusion of 'code' (eg: [h=3]) appears to be a browser issue. The same thing happens to me when I am in IE7, but not when I am in Safari. Changing it in preview doesn't always work.

Best thing to do is to paste it as is, than go into edit mode and add the paragraph breaks back in. You may or may not be able to delete the code marks. Sometimes I cannot even re-edit roght away, the page won't take me there, or I get an error msg ... something about a missing token. But if you try 2-3 times or exit and reenter the page, you can ususally do it.

eddhead
September 12th, 2011, 12:41 PM
... Like just now for instance. I tried to edit my last post, but when I click 'Edit Post', nothing happens.

lofter1
September 12th, 2011, 12:44 PM
And that long slog of a process to make stuff readable is a Pain!

lofter1
September 12th, 2011, 12:48 PM
Unless you were downtown, the event really was really not a big deal in the city.


Walking home last night after midnight I came upon a blockade with flares at Canal & Broadway, where NYPD was checking all trucks heading downtown.




... Paul Simons singing "Sound of Silence" . I thought he did a great job.

I kept thinking: "Where's Art?"

eddhead
September 12th, 2011, 01:43 PM
You are right about the check points; we came across one at Lincoln center Saturday night. It didn't bother me much, but than again, I was not in a car. There is also one on 42nd street near Time Square

(and btw, this time the edit function worked fine)

My understanding is that the checkpoints were less due to 9/11 cermonies and more a result of the unconfirmed terrorist threat. In fact, they are still there today and will remain over the next few days.

Ninjahedge
September 12th, 2011, 04:46 PM
The truck checks are an inconvenience, but a necessary one. Unlike the uniformed soldiers marching around Penn Station, checking for goodies (or baddies) in box trucks might prove much more effective.

Daquan13
September 12th, 2011, 08:43 PM
Use the PREVIEW POST button to see how your post will look. Make any necessary changes and then SUBMIT REPLY. On some web pages, there is a PRINTER FRIENDLY button which displays the text without all the extra banners and graphics. Sometimes it's easier to copy & past from that.

It looks like your formatting is removing paragraph breaks, which makes the text hard to read.




Ok, thanx.

I'm still tweaking this in hopes that it comes out better. I've been removing all that unwanted stuff manuallly, but I'll try what you suggest to do.

Daquan13
September 12th, 2011, 09:02 PM
You're right, Zippy!!

I did what you suggest to do. Posted an article from the New York Post website in the World Trade Center Developments forum.

At the NY Post website, I clicked on the Printer-friendly button and it took out all that unwanted crap! Doing it this way also helps eliminate any misspelled worlds over typing it manually.

Thanx again for the advise!!

Daquan13
September 15th, 2011, 12:18 AM
Yeah, they sometimes have paragraph breaks in them when they appear on a website, but when I copy and paste them, the whole story is one giant paragraph again!

And yeah, I DO often have to go back to edit and put in the paragraph breaks to them. A bit of a pain, but if doing it this way makes them easier to read, then so be it.

Merry
September 15th, 2011, 06:15 AM
Formatting is typically applied to websites using style sheets containing such things a font size, paragraph spacing, etc. When you copy something from a website, that formatting doesn't come with it.

If you're copying something, it's always best to use Go Advanced and not Post Quick Reply.

As Zippy said, sometimes you can use the print-friendly option to eliminate ads and other unwanted stuff. When using that option, if you want to include any pictures, you need to copy those separately (right click on the image and select Copy Image Location (Firefox) or equivalent). If you don't use the print-friendly option, you can just highlight the text and any photos all at once. You may get extra stuff but you can delete this when using Preview Post (see below).



Paste the text

Add any photos using the Image icon

Click on Preview Post (doing this will apply a certain amount of formatting based on the style sheet/s associated with the WNY website - see Tip in point 6.)

Remove the html tags (e.g. [h1]) and apply bold, font size etc. to the heading (BTW, the inclusion of html tags has only occurred since the last upgrade of the vBulletin software)

Delete any unwanted extra stuff
Add blank lines between paragraphs (Tip: do NOT do this BEFORE you click on Preview Post; you'll be wasting your time, because you'll most likely get double spacing!)

Click on Preview Post again if required to check the formatting

Click on Submit Reply

Hope this helps :).

Daquan13
September 15th, 2011, 11:07 AM
Yeah, on the last posted story, I DID go to Go Advanced before I posted the story.

I took the initiative to make some minor changes like breaking the story down into paragraphs and checking other things before I posted it.

Daquan13
September 15th, 2011, 06:07 PM
http://www.nypost.com/rw/SysConfig/WebPortal/nypost/images/nyp_logo_230x32.png (http://www.nypost.com/) Updated: Thu., Sep. 15, 2011, 1:27 PM http://www.nypost.com/images/icon_home.png




JetBlue pilot 'forgot' gun was in luggage at airportBy DOUG AUER

Last Updated: 1:27 PM, September 15, 2011

Posted: 1:26 PM, September 15, 2011

He mustíve had his head in the clouds.

A flighty JetBlue pilot allegedly forgot he had a firearm packed in his luggage as he tried to board a plane out of LaGuardia Airport, The Post has learned.

Captain Robert Paulson, 47, apparently didnít remember the 40-caliber H&K pistol stashed in his bag as he presented it for pre-flight screening at a security checkpoint at 10 a.m. on Sept. 8, law enforcement sources said.

An eagle-eyed Transportation Security Administration officer spied the weapon as the bag made its way through the x-ray machine in Terminal A, the sources added.

The TSA agent also found a magazine with 10 live rounds loose inside Paulsonís backpack, the sources continued.
Paulson was deadheading Ė an aviation term for hitching a free ride Ė to Chicago on Delta Airlines flight 5939, the sources said.
He allegedly admitted the gun was his and that he didnít have a license to carry in New York State.

Paulson, who lives in Ankeny, Iowa, was arrested and charged with weapons possession, said a spokesman for Queens DA Richard Brown. He was released without bail after his arraignment and is due back in court on Sept. 29.





Read more: http://www.nypost.com/p/news/local/jetblue_pilot_forgot_gun_was_in_xJ1hHHToP1p7ROZqeC v16N#ixzz1Y3r9Za8G

ZippyTheChimp
September 30th, 2011, 10:39 AM
This thread has gone way off-topic. It's about 09/11 anniversaries.

There are other threads about terrorism, such as this one (http://wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?t=3867&page=25).

Daquan13
September 30th, 2011, 12:18 PM
I moved my news post over to that thread and deleted it here.