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Merry
September 30th, 2011, 09:26 PM
Could #OccupyWallStreet be the start of a much-needed we're-not-gonna-take-this-anymore proletariat (and everyone else, really) movement? I hope the momentum doesn't wane.



Why We're Joining #OccupyWallStreet

by Jon Kest, Executive Director of New York Communities for Change

It has been amazing watching #OccupyWallStreet grow over the past two weeks. As someone who has been involved in the social justice movement in New York for more than 30 years, it's a rare occasion that I get to watch a movement like this develop from the outside.

Over the past several years, while the big banks have destroyed our economy and working people have fought to make do with less and less, the richest 1 percent of Americans continue to take of more of the pie.

That's why I'm excited to announce that New York Communities for Change and many of our allies in community organizing and labor will be showing our support for #OccupyWallStreet next week.
No place is more symbolic of that gross inequity than Wall Street and there is no better symbol for what all of us are working to achieve than seeing Zuccotti Park full of people who are ready to say that the American people are not going to take it anymore.

The levels of inequity in this county, and in New York especially are out of hand -- and no one knows that more than the working families that make up the members of New York Communities for Change.

We've seen our mayor and our governor slash our social safety net in the name of austerity while turning their noses up at new sources of revenue such as renewing the millionaire's Tax and seeking claw backs for improperly used public subsidies. Even when elected officials like New York Attorney General Eric Schneiderman take a stand against the big banks, corporations and the politicians in their pockets do everything they can do derail his efforts.

That's why NYCC members joined thousands of New Yorkers on May 12 to demand that Wall Street banks pay their fair share and it's why we'll be back on Wednesday Oct. 5 to continue our stand against the big banks and show our support to the protesters who have been on Wall Street for days.

Wednesday's solidarity march will be a precursor to a week of actions planned by many of the groups that participated in the May 12 coalition. The action will draw attention to the levels of inequity that exists in New York and demand that the wealthiest New Yorkers don't receive a tax break when the millionaire's tax expires at the end of this year. We hope that the energy, spirit and voices that are present in Liberty Plaza will be with us as we demand the governor renews the millionaire's tax.

When the big banks tanked our economy they took away millions of people's shot at achievingthe American Dream. It's about time all these people come together and hold Wall Street accountable for what they've done to our futures and the future of this country. Whether you're a union worker whose rights have been under attack, or a parent whose watched the funding for your child's school go into the pocket of a Wall Street CEO, or one of the millions of people, young and old, who are looking for work with no avail, on Wednesday we will stand together to demand justice.

And hopefully it will be the first day of many.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/jon-kest/occupy-wall-street-_b_989544.html

Merry
September 30th, 2011, 09:30 PM
...but taxing the rich is not the solution, unfortunately.


Occupy Wall Street Protest Spreads To San Francisco

by Robin Wilkey, Carly Schwartz

http://i.huffpost.com/gen/364137/thumbs/r-OCCUPY-WALL-STREET-SAN-FRANCISCO-large570.jpg

SAN FRANCISCO -- "Why is life a bitch? Cause we don't tax the rich!"

Such was the chant of the nearly 200 San Franciscans who surrounded the Bank of America building in the center of the Financial District Thursday afternoon to rally against bank bailouts and the country's uneven tax structure. The rally was a west coast offshoot of the "Occupy Wall Street" protests (http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2011/09/21/occupy-wall-street-protest_n_974693.html) that have continued in New York City for nearly two weeks.

The initially-peaceful crowd included families, children, dogs and bands playing drums, saxophones and banjos. Mayoral candidate and city Supervisor John Avalos opened the march with a speech that attacked big banks.

"Have you ever felt like you've been had?" he asked the crowd. "That's why this building right here is a symbol of the incredible greed and wealth that has accumulated into fewer and fewer hands."

"And how do they stay wealthy?" he added. "They took our tax dollars. They got bailed out." Avalos then urged crowd members to take their money out of national banks and invest it in smaller, community banks that care about local concerns.

The demonstrators then marched down Montgomery Street to Charles Schwab, surrounding the building and baffling employees inside. Protestors beat drums, sang songs and chanted, "Charles Schwab, give us our money back" and "Who bailed the banks out? We bailed the banks out."

The swarm finished out the day by marching to a Chase Bank branch on Market Street, where tensions began to peak. Six demonstrators -- including one who said she was losing her home to the bank -- walked into the branch and staged a sit-in in the lobby. After refusing to leave the branch, the six were arrested and then eventually released. Outside, protesters screamed, "Shame on Chase," waving signs in the air.

Occupy Wall Street officially began in a park in downtown Manhattan on Sept. 17, and the protesters there have yet to show any signs of leaving. Participants have voiced concerns over everything from environmental issues to Troy Davis' execution, but the main themes have centered on economic concerns.

"Several hand-lettered placards express outrage that banks and bankers weren't punished more severely in the wake of the financial crisis," The Huffington Post's Alexander Eichler reported Wednesday.

San Francisco's chapter had been operating less publicly until Thursday's event, but according to its official website, activists have been holding general assembly meetings each evening in Justin Herman Plaza every day since New York's protests began. They've planned several events through October, including poetry workshops, movie nights and guest speakers.
Similar groups have also popped up across the rest of the country.

The Occupy Wall Streeters have yet to present a formal list of demands or conditions that must be met, and New York City police have already arrested at least 80 individuals there. One officer faced backlash over the weekend after video surfaced of him using pepper spray to quell a group of young women.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2011/09/30/occupy-wall-street-san-francisco_n_988180.html?ir=New York (http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2011/09/30/occupy-wall-street-san-francisco_n_988180.html?ir=New%20York)

Merry
September 30th, 2011, 09:32 PM
NYC Transit Union Joins Occupy Wall Street

by Matt Sledge

New York City labor unions are preparing to back the unwieldy grassroots band occupying a park in Lower Manhattan, in a move that could mark a significant shift in the tenor of the anti-corporate Occupy Wall Street protests and send thousands more people into the streets.

The Transit Workers Union Local 100's executive committee, which oversees the organization of subway and bus workers, voted unanimously Wednesday night to support the protesters. The union claims 38,000 members. A union-backed organizing coalition, which orchestrated a large May 12 march on Wall Street before the protests, is planning a rally on Oct. 5 in explicit support.

And SEIU 32BJ, which represents doormen, security guards and maintenance workers, is using its Oct. 12 rally to express solidarity with the Zuccotti Park protesters.

"The call went out over a month ago, before actually the occupancy of Wall Street took place," said 32BJ spokesman Kwame Patterson. Now, he added, "we're all coming under one cause, even though we have our different initiatives."

The protests found their genesis not in any of the established New York social action groups but with a call put out by a Canadian magazine. While other major unions beyond the TWU have yet to officially endorse Occupy Wall Street, more backing could come as early as this week. Both the New York Metro Area Postal Union and SEIU 1199 are considering such moves.

Jackie DiSalvo, an Occupy Wall Street organizer, says a series of public actions aimed at expressing support for labor -- from disrupting a Sotheby's auction on Sept. 22 to attending a postal workers' rally on Tuesday -- have convinced unions that the two groups' struggles are one.

"Labor is up against the wall and they're begging us to help them," said DiSalvo, a retired professor at Baruch College in her late 60s who has emerged as a driving force in the effort to link up labor and the protests. DiSalvo is herself a member of the Professional Staff Congress, which represents teachers at the City University of New York.

Recent anti-labor actions like Scott Walker's in Wisconsin "really shocked the unions and moved them into militant action," DiSalvo said, and the inflammatory video of a NYPD deputy inspector pepper-spraying several protesters on Saturday also generated union sympathy.

"There's a lot of good feeling. They've made a lot of friends," said Chuck Zlatkin of the postal union.

When a band of about 100 protesters showed up at a postal workers' rally featuring Rep. Jerrold Nadler (D-N.Y.) on Tuesday, complete with purple hair and big drums, "they went a long way towards touching people and making connections," Zlatkin observed.

If unions move to support the protests in a major way, that could mean thousands more people marching in Lower Manhattan. Thus far the protesters have not managed to come near the 10,000 or so who attended the unrelated May 12 march on Wall Street. The Strong Economy for All Coalition, which receives support from the United Federation of Teachers, the Working Families Party, plus SEIU 32BJ and 1199, previously helped put together that demonstration. Now they will be rallying for the grassroots group.

"Their fight is our fight," director Michael Kink said. "They've chosen the right targets. We also want to see a society where folks other than the top 1 percent have a chance to say how things go."

Asked if the union support could dilute the message of the Occupy Wall Street protesters -- which has itself been dismissed as incoherent -- organizer DiSalvo said the rag tag group's stance would remain unchanged.

"Occupy Wall Street will not negotiate watering down its own message," she said, union support or not.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2011/09/29/nyc-transit-union-joins-o_n_987156.html

Merry
September 30th, 2011, 09:35 PM
Legitimate concerns, but not sufficient justification to halt the protest IMO.



Bloomberg Criticizes Occupy Wall Street Protest, Suggests Their Days May Be Numbered

By Michael Howard Saul, Wall Street Journal

New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg raised the specter of shutting down a two-week long demonstration on Wall Street, telling protesters who are speaking out against greed and corruption that the banks deserve support.

Asked directly on his weekly radio show Friday whether he will allow the protesters to stay indefinitely, Bloomberg replied, “We’ll see.”

“People have the right to protest, but we also have to make sure that people who don’t want to protest can go down the streets unmolested,” said Bloomberg, a 69-year-old billionaire who earned his personal fortune selling financial information to the business community.

“We have to make sure that while you have a right to say what you want to say, people who want to say something very different have a right to say that as well. That’s what’s great about this country,” Bloomberg added. “The right to protest is part of our culture. It’s also true that there are other societal concerns.”

The Bloomberg administration’s handling of the protest has come under intense criticism. In recent days, the New York Police Department opened an internal investigation into allegations that a supervising officer inappropriately pepper-sprayed a group of people participating this past weekend in the “Occupy Wall Street” demonstration.

In his remarks Friday, Bloomberg suggested that the protesters are terribly misguided in terms of their policy perspective.

“The protesters are protesting against people who make $40 or $50,000 a year and are struggling to make ends meet,” he said. “That’s the bottom line. Those are the people that work on Wall Street and in the finance sector.”

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2011/09/30/bloomberg-criticizes-occu_n_989424.html

lofter1
September 30th, 2011, 10:12 PM
Bloomberg speaks out both sides of his mouth. The little mayor went on to say (http://blogs.wsj.com/metropolis/2011/09/30/will-bloomberg-end-protesters-stay-on-wall-street/?mod=WSJBlog):

“We need the banks. If the banks don’t go out and make loans, we will not come out of our economic problems. We will not have jobs.”

The mayor acknowledged that the banks played a role in the economic downturn, but he insisted, “We always tend to blame the wrong people.”


Uh, sorry, but NO. The banks didn't just play a role. They were the lead actors and have to accept a good deal of the blame for where we now find ourselves. Also to blame are the supporting characters, the supposed financial wizards like Bloomberg and his buddies, who never stepped up to say, Whoa!" as we were marching towards meltdown.

Mike: Who is stopping the banks from making loans now with all that bail-out money they're sitting on? And who is forcing the banks to charge us all for the most minimal of transactions (check your mailbox for new notices with the latest surprise from those who hold your money)? And how much profit did those banks make in the past year?

So, STFU. Mike, I'm talking to you.

lofter1
September 30th, 2011, 10:19 PM
“People have the right to protest, but we also have to make sure that people who don’t want to protest can go down the streets unmolested,” said Bloomberg, a 69-year-old billionaire ...


Again: STFU.

Bloomie's worried that folks on their way to work are going to be molested? By what? Words?

Mike: Whose guys with badges were going after folks with pepper spray last weekend?

So when you talk about folks being able to go around town "unmolested" you just might want to STFU.

Merry
September 30th, 2011, 10:34 PM
^ Well said, Lofter.

What I meant by "legitimate concerns" was really the potential for the protest to adversely affect everyday people just going about their business, and also if celebrities (possibly Radiohead, as rumored?) get involved, the kind of crowd (in numbers) that this could attract.

Yeah, "unmolested" was an unfortunate choice of word, too.

ZippyTheChimp
October 1st, 2011, 12:33 PM
Could #OccupyWallStreet be the start of a much-needed we're-not-gonna-take-this-anymore proletariat (and everyone else, really) movement? I hope the momentum doesn't wane.I've watched it unfold in the neighborhood.

Saw it the first day while walking up Rector St to Trinity Pl. A small group had converged at 1 Wall St, and began chanting. Seemed like another common one-time rally. A few days later, there was a much larger crowd at Zuccotti Plaza. Sometimes I can hear them from my apartment, several blocks away.

BTW: From all I've seen, the protest is non-violent and non-threatening.

mariab
October 1st, 2011, 08:16 PM
I hope momentum across the country grows, but stay organized, & keep it non-political. You're not going to get any sympathy blocking traffic. When you keep people from getting to work, home, family, etc., you've lost most of them. Also, keep the celebrities out of it. They're just a distraction & a draw for people who show up simply to see whoever the bigwig is.

lofter1
October 1st, 2011, 10:26 PM
Brooklyn Bridge Occupied (https://occupywallst.org/article/brooklyn-bridge-occupied/)

Posted Oct. 1, 2011, 4:56 p.m. EST
by OccupyWallSt

https://occupywallst.org/ (https://occupywallst.org/users/OccupyWallSt/)

Police have kettled the march on the Brooklyn Bridge and have begun arresting protesters. At least 20 arrested so far.

Follow the action (http://www.livestream.com/globalrevolution)

UPDATE: 5:15PM - Brooklyn Bridge has been shut down by police

UPDATE: 5:55PM - At least 50 arrested.

UPDATE: 8:17PM - NYTimes reporting hundreds arrested - including a reporter - police appear to have deliberately misled protesters. (http://cityroom.blogs.nytimes.com/2011/10/01/police-arresting-protesters-on-brooklyn-bridge/)

UPDATE: 8:40PM - Around 400 peaceful protesters arrested.

Please call:


1st Precinct: +1 (212) 334-0611
77th Precinct: +1 (718) 735-0611
NYPD Switchboard: +1 (646) 610-5000
NYPD Central Booking: +1 (212) 374-3921
NYPD Internal Affairs: +1 (212) 741-8401
Mayor Bloomberg: +1 (212) NEW-YORK or +1 (212) 374-3921

lofter1
October 1st, 2011, 10:37 PM
500 arrested at Occupy Wall Street protest as
demonstrators and NYPD shut down Brooklyn Bridge

NY DAILY NEWS (http://www.nydailynews.com/ny_local/2011/10/01/2011-10-01_dozens_arrested_at_occupy_wall_street_protest_b rooklyn_bridge_shut_down_.html)
BY JOHN DOYLE (http://www.nydailynews.com/authors/John Doyle) AND RICH SCHAPIRO (http://www.nydailynews.com/authors/Rich Schapiro)
DAILY NEWS STAFF WRITERS

Thousands of (http://www.nydailynews.com/ny_local/2011/10/01/2011-10-01_dozens_arrested_at_occupy_wall_street_protest_b rooklyn_bridge_shut_down_.html#ixzz1ZaUUlE7N)Occup y Wall Street (http://www.nydailynews.com/topics/Occupy+Wall+Street) protesters swarmed the Brooklyn Bridge (http://www.nydailynews.com/topics/Brooklyn+Bridge) Saturday, shutting down car lanes and setting up yet another tense showdown with the NYPD (http://www.nydailynews.com/topics/New+York+City+Police+Department).

Roughly 500 people were arrested after standing in the roadway, blocking the Brooklyn (http://www.nydailynews.com/topics/Brooklyn+(New+York+City))-bound lanes. Traffic in the opposite direction was slowed -- but still running after the 4 p.m. standoff.

An army of cops swooped in after the demonstrators took over the bridge's pedestrian walkway and flooded onto the car lanes heading to Brooklyn. The showdown halted traffic on the bridge for nearly three hours.

While some of the protesters claimed cops set a trap for them, NYPD spokesman Paul Browne (http://www.nydailynews.com/topics/Paul+Browne) insisted the arrests came after the demonstrators were warned multiple times to stay off the roadway.

"Some complied and took the walkway without being arrested," Browne said. "Others proceeded on the Brooklyn-bound vehicular roadway. The latter were arrested."

The march started from Zuccotti Park, the homebase for the two-week old protest against corporate excess.

When demonstrators reached the base of the span, a bottleneck formed and many started marching up the pedestrian walkway.

Others walked straight onto the roadway, and several climbed down from the walkway moments later to join them.

"We were supposed to go up the pedestrian roadway," said Robert Cammiso (http://www.nydailynews.com/topics/Robert+Cammiso), a 48-year-old student from Brooklyn.

"There was a huge funnel, a bottleneck, and we couldn't fit. People jumped from the walkway onto the roadway. We thought the roadway was open to us."

After allowing some of the protesters to cross, officers trapped some 400 on the bridge using orange nets and vehicles - and started slapping cuffs on them.

Police called in NYPD and MTA (http://www.nydailynews.com/topics/Metropolitan+Transportation+Authority) buses to haul away the handcuffed demonstrators.

Some of the protestors managed to elude arrest by climbing from the roadway to the pedestrian walkway.

"[The cops] were respectful," Cammiso said. "They were as good as they can be. They were doing their job."

Not everyone agreed with that assessment. Etan Ben-Ami (http://www.nydailynews.com/topics/Etan+Ben-Ami), 54, said it seemed the NYPD laid a trap for the protesters.

"It seemed as if they deliberately moved back to allow people onto the roadway," said Ben-Ami, a psychotherapist from Brooklyn.

By 5 p.m., protesters clogged both the walkway and Brooklyn-bound car lanes. Just after 6 p.m., some of the protesters moved to the Manhattan Bridge (http://www.nydailynews.com/topics/Manhattan+Bridge).

At one point, about another 100 protesters marched from Zuccotti Park and gathered outside City Hall with 200 others who had scampered off the bridge. The mass of protesters faced down a wall of cops blocking the bridge, chanting, "Whose streets? Our streets" and "Let them go."

The arrests marked the second Saturday in a row protesters landed in cuffs.

Last week, cops arrested more than 80 people near Union Square (http://www.nydailynews.com/topics/Union+Square). During that roundup, Deputy Inspector Anthony Bologna (http://www.nydailynews.com/topics/Anthony+Bologna) doused a handful of women with pepper spray - spawning a video clip that helped embolden the movement.

NYPD Internal Affairs and the Civilian Complaint Review Board (http://www.nydailynews.com/topics/New+York+City+Civilian+Complaint+Review+Board) are probing the incident.

lofter1
October 1st, 2011, 10:46 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a1tCYAEDl6g


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BsJYocr0mHE


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WRYJqFPVcXA

lofter1
October 1st, 2011, 10:49 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LF3qoc2vAyA

Merry
October 2nd, 2011, 01:25 AM
^ Yeah, well...don't we know it.


700 Protesters Arrested on Brooklyn Bridge, Wall Street Elite Still Free: Something’s Rotten in NYC

By DJ Pangburn

Today, NYPD reported 700 Occupy Wall Street protesters were arrested (http://www.suntimes.com/7986771-417/more-than-700-arrested-in-occupy-wall-street-march-on-brooklyn-bridge.html) on the Brooklyn Bridge. The reason? Blocked traffic. Wall Street bankers and investors, on the other hand, have brought the world to the brink of financial catastrophe and none but Bernie Madoff are in prison.

Today, Occupy Wall Street (http://www.deathandtaxesmag.com/147030/occupy-wall-street-solidarity-grows-in-san-francisco/) protesters marched across the Brooklyn Bridge. Many protesters observed the order to stay on the sidewalk; those who disobeyed and walked into traffic lanes—700 protesters (http://www.foxnews.com/us/2011/10/01/500-arrested-after-wall-street-protest-on-nys-brooklyn-bridge/?test=latestnews), according to the NYPD—ended up arrested and carted off in buses.

This is not an apology.

It is understood that blocking traffic is a major inconvenience for many people, and it is acknowledged that there is the possibility that emergency vehicles must be able to pass, and that pedestrians freely walking in lanes present a hazard to not only themselves but to drivers crossing the bridge; but none can deny that the NYPD is on these protesters like stink on shit.

Why doesn’t New York City take half of the resources currently being arrayed against Occupy Wall Street in the form of the NYPD and investigate, arrest, try and imprison the folks who have brought this nation, indeed, the world to the brink of economic collapse?

The city—with the NYPD as proxy—works with such Gestapo-like efficiency in shadowing every movement of the protest that it is quite apparent now that they could do the same with Wall Street bankers and investors, but refuse to do so.

Millions of people lost jobs because of Wall Street greed—was that not an inconvenience to those millions of people, and the hundreds of millions more which it effected adversely in our supremely interwove economy? Millions have lost their homes and entire retirement funds have been evaporated because of corporate greed—was that not an inconvenience?
Three years now and there is still no justice.

The real threat to society is not thousands of protesters crossing a bridge, but the men in business suits who walk amongst us.

And the City of New York and its police force could care less.

http://www.deathandtaxesmag.com/147382/700-protesters-arrested-on-brooklyn-bridge-wall-street-elite-still-free-somethings-rotten-in-nyc/

Merry
October 2nd, 2011, 01:51 AM
Reliving the 1960s isn't the way to go, but, god, I sure hope this doesn't die.



See article for video
(http://www.nytimes.com/2011/10/01/nyregion/wall-street-occupiers-protesting-till-whenever.html?_r=1)
Wall Street Occupiers, Protesting Till Whenever

By N. R. KLEINFIELD and CARA BUCKLEY

http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2011/09/30/nyregion/video-wallstreet-voices/video-wallstreet-voices-articleLarge.jpg

A man named Hero was here. So was Germ. There was the waitress from the dim sum restaurant in Evanston, Ill. And the liquor store worker. The Google consultant. The circus performer. The Brooklyn nanny.

The hodgepodge Lower Manhattan encampment known as Occupy Wall Street has no appointed leaders, no expiration date for its rabble-rousing stay and still-evolving goals and demands. Yet its two weeks of noisy occupation has lured a sturdily faithful and fervent constituency willing to express discontentment with what they feel is an inequitable financial system until, well, whenever.

They arrived by design and desire. Or by sheer serendipity.

Like Jillian Aydelott, 19, and Ben Mason, 20. They are a couple, both having taken an indefinite leave from school in Boston to travel across the country, very much on the cheap. Stopping in Providence, R.I., five days ago to sleep at a homeless shelter, they encountered a man who called himself Germ and said he was an activist. He was coming to the protest. They figured why not. They have yet to leave.

Ms. Aydelott’s feeling was: “Nothing is happening. People on Wall Street have all the power.”

The stalwarts seem to range from a relatively modest 100 to 300 people, though the ranks swelled to more than 2,000 on Friday as the protest began to attract mainstream attention from those disaffected with the weak economy and to enlist support from well-known liberals.

The actress Susan Sarandon stopped by, as did the Princeton professor Cornel West and former Gov. David A. Paterson of New York. A widely reported episode last Saturday, when four protesters were pepper-sprayed by a police commander, elevated the visibility of the demonstrators.

On Friday night, many marched to Police Headquarters to criticize what they described as the improper tactics that the police had used against their movement. (The police commissioner, Raymond W. Kelly, has defended the actions by the police, though he has said they will be reviewed.)

Nicholas Coniaris, 35, came to the makeshift village in Zuccotti Park near Wall Street on Friday and will be gone soon. He is from San Diego, a counselor who works with homeless veterans, and was squeezing in protesting while awaiting a wedding he was attending on Saturday. A friend from Japan, a fellow wedding guest, was here as well.

Having brought a tuxedo for the wedding, Mr. Coniaris decided to get extra mileage out of it. He wore it while he stationed himself in the center of the park clutching a coffee cup that said “God Bless,” and a sign that said, in part, “Support the Rich.”

“Just a little something,” he said mockingly to passers-by. “Half a billion dollars. I’m not asking for a trillion.”

After a couple of hours, his cup contained $1.15.

It all began when a Canadian advocacy magazine, Adbusters, posted a call for action on its blog in July. A New York group naming itself the General Assembly, inspired by recent meetings in Madrid, began to hold organizing meetings in Tompkins Square and other public places, leading to a Sept. 17 march near Wall Street. Shooed away from Wall Street, the protesters wound up in Zuccotti Park, which is bounded by Broadway and Liberty Street and has become their base.

Most of the demonstrators are in their teens or 20s, but plenty are older. Many are students. Many are jobless. A few are well-worn anarchists. Others have put their normal lives on pause to try out protesting and see how it feels.

Not all of them can articulate exactly why they are here or what they want. Yet there is a conviction rippling through them that however the global economy works, it does not work for them.

“I’m angry because I don’t have millions of dollars to give to my representative, so my voice is invalidated,” said Amanda Clarke, 21, a student at the New School. “And the fact that I’m graduating with tens of thousands of dollars in loans and there’s no job market.”

Their politics zigzag wildly. An unemployed schoolteacher calls herself a fierce independent, while an employed teacher is a conservative. An anarchist photographer wants libertarianism to be reclaimed by the left.

“This is not about left versus right,” said the photographer, Christopher Walsh, 25, from Bushwick, Brooklyn. “It’s about hierarchy versus autonomy.”

A finance worker walked around with a dollar bill duct-taped over his mouth and carrying a pizza box, on which he had written, “I could lose my job 4 having a voice.” Nikita Nikitovich, 44, a New York Pilates teacher, was working as one of the protest’s media contacts. A 38-year-old bicycle messenger with a head shaved except for a long braid arrived early Friday by bus from New Orleans, and had been waiting for a protest to erupt since Hurricane Katrina. “That’s when we were shown the big picture,” she said.

For all the bedraggled look of the mattress-and-sleeping-bag-strewn camp, it has a structure and routine. A food station occupies the center of the park, where donated meals are disbursed, especially pizza and Popeyes chicken. Sympathizers from other states have been calling local shops and pizza parlors and, using their credit cards, ordering food to be delivered to the park.

There are information stations, a recycling center, a media center where a gasoline generator powers computers. At the east end sits the library, labeled cardboard boxes brimming with donated books: nonfiction, fiction, poetry, legal. There is a lost and found.

A medical station was outfitted with bins holding a broad array of remedies: cough drops, Maalox Maximum Strength, Clorox wipes, bee pollen granules. The main issues have been blisters, including some from handcuffs, and abrasions.

There are also a few therapists. Some out-of-work protesters are depressed. They need someone’s ear.

Elsewhere is a sanitation station, with designated sanitation workers who sweep the park. The park is without toilets, a problem that many of the protesters address by visiting a nearby McDonald’s.

The encampment even has a post-office box, established at a U.P.S. store, and has been receiving a steady flow of supportive letters and packages. Someone from Texas sent a bunch of red bandanas, now draped on the necks of demonstrators. Others have sent camera batteries, granola bars and toothbrushes.

Two General Assembly meetings are held each day to conduct organizational business and work on objectives. “We meet every day to decide what our demands are,” said Hero Vincent, 21, an artist and singer from Charlotte, N.C., who has been here from the beginning.

Not allowed to use amplified sound, the protesters have devised their own means of communication. Each speaker says a sentence, and then everyone else repeats it, so it ripples outward.

Decisions must be by consensus. Hand signals convey responses. For instance, holding your palms upward and wiggling your fingers means approval, while holding them downward means disapproval. Level hands mean uncertainty.

People are divided into committees, including town planning, child care, direct action and a de-escalation group charged with keeping things orderly. There have been a few arguments.
When will all this end?

One protester thought when the temperature fell below 50. Others were less sure.

Sid Gurung, 22, a student at the New School who enlisted because he said he was “extremely disappointed and angry that I have no future,” would agree to no timetable. “Our task is important,” he said. “We could be here for months. Our opponents are giants.”

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/10/01/nyregion/wall-street-occupiers-protesting-till-whenever.html?_r=1

ZippyTheChimp
October 2nd, 2011, 08:46 AM
Why doesn’t New York City take half of the resources currently being arrayed against Occupy Wall Street in the form of the NYPD and investigate, arrest, try and imprison the folks who have brought this nation, indeed, the world to the brink of economic collapse?

The city—with the NYPD as proxy—works with such Gestapo-like efficiency in shadowing every movement of the protest that it is quite apparent now that they could do the same with Wall Street bankers and investors, but refuse to do so.A nice thought, but the city and police are really powerless to do anything; there have to be policy changes. That's why I think this needs to become more of a national protest.

And they should welcome the attention they're getting from the mayor and the police. Protests die when they are ignored. As long as no one gets hurt, accept the arrests; it's part of it.

lofter1
October 2nd, 2011, 04:09 PM
The thanks we get for bailing out the financial mafia ...

Citibank Ripping Off Consumers with Staggering $15 Monthly Debit Card "Extortion" Fee

Marketwatch (http://www.marketwatch.com/story/citibank-ripping-off-consumers-with-staggering-15-monthly-debit-card-extortion-fee-says-consejo-2011-09-30)

"Instead of controlling their greed, Citibank is ripping off consumers with a staggering $15 monthly debit card fee," declared K.B. Forbes, Executive Director of the Consejo de Latinos Unidos. "Citibank has placed a loaded gun on the temple of Citibank consumers demanding they maintain a $6,000 balance or pay $180 a year in extortion fees. In this economy, how many working-class families have $6,000 to cough up to the goons at Citibank?"

Citibank slaps customers with $15 monthly fee for checking

Los Angeles Times (http://latimesblogs.latimes.com/money_co/2011/09/citibank-slaps-customers-with-15-monthly-fee-for-checking.html)
September 30, 2011


Another day, another new bank fee.As the uproar swelled over Bank of America Corp.'s planned $5 monthly charge for debit cards (http://latimesblogs.latimes.com/money_co/2011/09/bank-of-america-plans-5-monthly-fee-for-debit-card-purchases.html?track=icymi), megabank rival Citigroup Inc. was telling checking accounts holders that it would sock them with a $15 a month fee unless they maintain a balance above $6,000.

Customers such as Cheryl Holt of Burbank were complaining to The Times about the letters they received this week from Citibank, Citigroup’s retail arm. Holt said she opened the envelope and was confronted by what she called an "absurd salutation."

"Customers like you have told us that what they want from their banks are simple options and great rewards," the giant New York bank said. "We heard you and are writing to let you know that we are making some changes to your EZ Checking Package.

"The demand for $15 a month -- $180 a year -- for a checking account sent Holt out Friday morning on a quest for free checking, an endangered service as big banks, awash in deposits, raise fees and cut costs to keep their profits up despite the sluggish economy.

"I’m on my way out the door right now," Holt wrote in an email to The Times, "off to start a new account at my nearest credit union.

"Should have done it years ago!"Citi representatives didn’t immediately return a call for comment.

lofter1
October 2nd, 2011, 04:13 PM
How much would you make by depositing $6K into one of Citibank's "pay nothing" low low low interest accounts?

It's cheaper to pay the fee than to loan them your money. They offer little to no return on the forced investment.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Hjqy2lJ5yoU

lofter1
October 2nd, 2011, 04:56 PM
Reverend Billy's Freak Storm: Revolujah! at Wall Street


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0TZ_Qi0ehe8

Wall Street Mocks Protesters By Drinking Champagne 2011


http://www.youtube.com/watch?NR=1&v=2PiXDTK_CBY

HoveringCheesecake
October 2nd, 2011, 11:25 PM
^Slime.

I know Wells Fargo is "testing" some new fees. If those become permanent, I will be moving to a local credit union as well. As a student I don't keep that much money in my account, and I can't afford to use what little money I do have left every month on their stupid fees.

Dr.T
October 3rd, 2011, 01:54 AM
^^^ The street fight continues around the world ...
Social Movement 15-M arrives to New York City from Madrid...
Now, Zuccotti park is the old Puerta del Sol square in Madrid...
Occupy Wall Street <=> Movimiento 15-M & indignados
Good Lucky !

Merry
October 3rd, 2011, 07:12 AM
Wall Street Protests: Commissioner Kelly Outdoes Himself

Posted by John Cassidy

When I suggested the other day that Police Commissioner Ray Kelly was a closet supporter of Occupy Wall Street, I was being somewhat ironic. Little did I know Kelly would go this far to publicize the protesters’ cause.

In arresting some seven hundred marchers on the Brooklyn Bridge on Saturday afternoon, the N.Y.P.D. managed to turn the protest into the top story on the BBC World News site. That’s right. The arrests topped the friendly fire killings in Yemen, renewed fighting in Libya and Syria, and speculation over whether Chris Christie will enter the presidential race—all for a peaceful demo involving perhaps two thousand people.

It isn’t clear whether the police deliberately allowed the demonstrators onto the bridge or whether they temporarily lost control of the crowd. But interviews with the protesters (http://cityroom.blogs.nytimes.com/2011/10/01/police-arresting-protesters-on-brooklyn-bridge/?hp) suggest that many of them thought they had been given permission to use the roadway, indicating that they weren’t willfully breaking the law. Whatever happened to begin with, the N.Y.P.D. brass clearly seized the opportunity to show who's boss.

So why are the police behaving in this way, evoking comparisons to the civil-rights era? One theory is that the protest, which is now spreading to other cities, is creating genuine alarm inside the financial and political establishment. “The over-reaction clearly shows that the authorities feel quite vulnerable,” Carne Ross, a former British diplomat and expert on direct democracy, who has been speaking regularly to some of the protesters at their Zuccotti Park encampment, told me. “If this was an animal rights protest, the police wouldn’t be reacting in this way. They know there are very strong feelings among ordinary people about Wall Street and the bailouts: the rage and hatred is intense.” Ross may be right. But even now, the protest remains far too small to be called a mass movement. And thus far it has had a negligible impact on the day-to-day business of Wall Street. As the protesters debate the meaning of anarchy and community banking, the employees of Goldman Sachs, Morgan Stanley, and JP Morgan Chase are carrying on as normal. If Jamie Dimon and Lloyd Blankfein are quaking in their Church’s wingtips, they are keeping it to themselves.

The other theory is that Kelly and his boss Bloomberg are blundering around, not sure what to do. During the past decade or so, City Hall and the N.Y.P.D. have adopted an increasingly hard line approach to street protests, which has gone hand-in-hand with the growing militarization of the police department in response to 9/11. Does the N.Y.P.D. really need helicopters armed with machine guns capable of shooting down small planes? BearCat armored personnel carriers? Intelligence operatives in the Middle East? Kelly thinks it does, and Bloomberg has given free rein to his imperial ambitions.

On Saturday, the N.Y.P.D. appeared to be reprising the tactics it used during the 2004 Republican Convention, when it arrested more than eighteen hundred people, many without much cause. (Subsequently, the vast majority of the cases were dropped.) Back then, Kelly and Bloomberg cited the threat of terrorism as justification for their street-sweeping strategy. Civil-rights activists complained, but the city authorities, beyond getting caught up in some long-running lawsuits, didn’t suffer any negative consequences.

Today, the Mayor and the Commissioner are confronted with a more pointed and media-savvy protest movement that refuses to play by their rules of engagement, which involve seeking permits, picking up litter, and standing on the sidewalks. Watching the actions of the N.Y.P.D. and listening to the dismissive comments of the Mayor (http://www.foxbusiness.com/industries/2011/09/30/bloomberg-criticizes-wall-street-protesters/), you get the feeling that he and Kelly would like to go into Zuccotti Park, crack a few heads, and clear away the whole thing.

Will they try and do it? I suspect that first they’ll try a less incendiary strategy, such as encouraging Brookfield Properties, the owner of the park, to go to court and seek an eviction order from a judge. But we shall see.


http://www.newyorker.com/online/blogs/johncassidy/2011/10/wall-street-protests-commissioner-kelly-outdoes-himself.html#ixzz1ZiSPqygY

Ninjahedge
October 3rd, 2011, 08:39 AM
Bank fees = BS.

I love it when banks and CC companies list all the "benefits" they give you by owning the card.

OK, fine. How do you get the $$ to PAY for these "benefits"?

The only benefit I want is to be able to put my cash somewhere where I can easily access it.

All we are getting these days are really cheap toasters.

nick-taylor
October 3rd, 2011, 08:42 AM
Bloomberg speaks out both sides of his mouth. The little mayor went on to say (http://blogs.wsj.com/metropolis/2011/09/30/will-bloomberg-end-protesters-stay-on-wall-street/?mod=WSJBlog):

“We need the banks. If the banks don’t go out and make loans, we will not come out of our economic problems. We will not have jobs.”

The mayor acknowledged that the banks played a role in the economic downturn, but he insisted, “We always tend to blame the wrong people.”


Uh, sorry, but NO. The banks didn't just play a role. They were the lead actors and have to accept a good deal of the blame for where we now find ourselves. Also to blame are the supporting characters, the supposed financial wizards like Bloomberg and his buddies, who never stepped up to say, Whoa!" as we were marching towards meltdown.

Mike: Who is stopping the banks from making loans now with all that bail-out money they're sitting on? And who is forcing the banks to charge us all for the most minimal of transactions (check your mailbox for new notices with the latest surprise from those who hold your money)? And how much profit did those banks make in the past year?

So, STFU. Mike, I'm talking to you.Banks failed to retain sufficient capital for a rainy day, they provided loans to sub-prime people or questionable business entities, they priced the credit too cheaply, education and knowledge of simple banking was overlooked, while internal controls on risk were lax and negligent.

The markets were caught up in the frenzy of what was thought to be non-stop economic growth. Shareholders demanded higher returns and entry into risky environments (e.g. buy-to-let in the UK or sub-prime lending in the US), while speculative products that provided no true economic benefit became the rage. Rating agencies didn't understand what they were rating, whilst accountants and lawyers just crossed the t's and dotted the i's. Companies (large and small) undertook risky or debt fuelled acquisitions, and were subsequently rewarded by inflated share prices. Companies that failed to spend their money or take on debt were viewed as short-termist and weak.

Yet the present global economic environment goes far beyond the banks and financial services sector.

Politicians and civil servants over the last twenty years played a part in relaxing, fudging or misunderstanding regulation, subsequently a blur developed between business and government (e.g. Government Sachs). Governments across the globe also saw no reason to reign in the banks when their coffers were overflowing with tax revenues. Politicians eager to get votes, boost economic activity, lower unemployment and increase homeownership encouraged people to obtain credit, while at the same time taking down barriers that previously restricted it (e.g. Clinton & Bush).

The media also went with the trend; failing to unanimously speak out about the splurge on credit, or criticise debt-fuelled businesses. TV channels provided countless programmes on moving up the property ladder or buying holiday/retirement homes. Spain for instance was building at one moment in time more homes than Germany, the UK and France combined, and is presently stuck with 1.5mn+ homes that it may never be able to sell.

Many academics, commentators and economists too were slow to pick up on the signs of a bubble or provide any significant warning signs.

Finally - the remaining roles in this blockbuster go to the general public. Tens of millions around the world gorged on cheap credit to finance their new large house or provide a car for every member of the family. Graduates avoided the old destinations in industry for the high-flying world of finance. Many became dependent on their credit card or overdraft facility to keep up appearances with friends, family and neighbours. Others lacked any savings whatsoever for a rainy day, or failed to diversify their investments and savings and got greedy (e.g. the example of Iceland's Icesave in the UK and Netherlands).

Generally common sense went out the window across the globe and the blame lies with a lot of people from numerous walks of life.


Banks aren't lending too anyone for a couple of reasons:
- Credit criteria has gone to the opposite end of the spectrum; there is no reasonable balance of risk.
- Regulators are seeking ever higher capital requirements; something that should have been enforced well over ten years ago when the environment was more accommodating.
- Banks are being weighed down by politically driven activities; e.g. the fudged takeover of HBOS by Lloyds.
- The interbank market is fubar; there is no trust in lending between banks due to exposure, hence the recent concerns over France's large financial entities.
- Politicians around the world have failed to put to rest speculation and worries over markets; whether it is the Americans playing Russian roulette with default, or Germany and the EU failing to resolve the problem in Greece. Subsequently banks are bracing themselves for potentially gigantic eye-watering losses.

lofter1
October 3rd, 2011, 09:50 AM
All of that ^ touches on why Mike in particular (who fits all the bills when discussing Politicians, Media-guys, Financial wizards and those who use their position to influence & direct the Unwashed and Indebted Masses) should STFU.

eddhead
October 3rd, 2011, 09:59 AM
Bank fees = BS.

I love it when banks and CC companies list all the "benefits" they give you by owning the card.

OK, fine. How do you get the $$ to PAY for these "benefits"?

The only benefit I want is to be able to put my cash somewhere where I can easily access it.

All we are getting these days are really cheap toasters.

The problem is that banks no longer need your deposits. With Fed discount rates close to zero, the Fed is practically giving free loans to banks to use for loans, mortgages etc.. Why should they give a damn about your deposits when they can capitalize income generatng assets at little or no cost?

lofter1
October 3rd, 2011, 10:00 AM
... They know there are very strong feelings among ordinary people about Wall Street and the bailouts: the rage and hatred is intense.” Ross may be right. But even now, the protest remains far too small to be called a mass movement.


This Wednesday at 4:30 PM they might see something bigger, when folks from all around gather at City Hall and then move on to Wall Street:

COMMUNITY/LABOR MARCH TO WALL ST. (https://www.facebook.com/event.php?eid=282473051782707)

lofter1
October 3rd, 2011, 10:07 AM
One idea to get the USA back on track:

It's Time to GET MONEY OUT of politics

http://www.getmoneyout.com/

Bailouts. War. Unemployment. Our government is bought, and we’re angry.

Now, we’re turning our anger into positive action. By signing this petition, you are joining our campaign to get money out of politics. Our politicians won’t do this. But we will. We will become an unrelenting, organized wave advocating a Constitutional amendment to get money out of politics.

As the petition grows, the wave grows. Email, Facebook, Tweet -- GET MONEY OUT. We are using The Dylan Ratigan Show on MSNBC, and our ability to influence other media outlets as a platform to force this issue to the center of the 2012 elections. Join us.

From our former Washington Lobbyist, Jimmy Williams, here is a DRAFT of our Constitutional Amendment for public debate this fall:


"No person, corporation or business entity of any type, domestic or foreign, shall be allowed to contribute money, directly or indirectly, to any candidate for Federal office or to contribute money on behalf of or opposed to any type of campaign for Federal office. Notwithstanding any other provision of law, campaign contributions to candidates for Federal office shall not constitute speech of any kind as guaranteed by the U.S. Constitution or any amendment to the U.S. Constitution. Congress shall set forth a federal holiday for the purposes of voting for candidates for Federal office."

Ninjahedge
October 3rd, 2011, 10:39 AM
Good luck on that one.

Once a politician is bought, he is hard to set "free" again. And our idiotic electorate will, no matter how strongly they voice their opinion, only vote for who they know and who looks best on TV.

Mike C
October 3rd, 2011, 04:30 PM
How much would you make by depositing $6K into one of Citibank's "pay nothing" low low low interest accounts?

It's cheaper to pay the fee than to loan them your money. They offer little to no return on the forced investment.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Hjqy2lJ5yoU

lofter1, my name is Mike and I work for Citi. I respect all of you points of view, but want to make sure you have all of the facts about some of the changes Citi announced to banking packages given that there has been much chatter on the social web. There is a banking package where, beginning in November, customers will have to maintain $6,000 in balances. However, you can combine Checking, Savings, CDs, and Money Market accounts to get to a total of $6,000. As long as you maintain $6,000 as an average monthly balance, the monthly service fee is completely waived. For customer who can't maintain $6,000 on average, monthly, or don't want to, we have a Basic Banking Package that will begin charging a $10 monthly fee in Nov (currently $8). With this package, as long as you either maintain $1,500 combined in checking/saving OR make at least one direct deposit and online bill pay, the $10 monthly fee is completely waived.
Other banks will likely be adding monthly debit card fees. We have committed not to do this. In terms of some other account fees like the ones I described above, we tried to implement them in a way to continue to make it easy for customers to have them waived. That's why we think our options are better for customers than what some other banks are doing. We're trying to be flexible.

Again, I respect your views, and just want to make sure you are in touch with all of the facts.

Best wishes,

Mike C, Citi

Ninjahedge
October 3rd, 2011, 05:17 PM
Gee, my credit union requires a $25 minimum deposit.

I guess paying $10 a month for someone to hold my money so long as I keep it above $1500 is a deal!

:p

HoveringCheesecake
October 3rd, 2011, 09:12 PM
Wowee what a deal!

eddhead
October 4th, 2011, 09:28 AM
lofter1, my name is Mike and I work for Citi. I respect all of you points of view, but want to make sure you have all of the facts about some of the changes Citi announced to banking packages given that there has been much chatter on the social web. There is a banking package where, beginning in November, customers will have to maintain $6,000 in balances. However, you can combine Checking, Savings, CDs, and Money Market accounts to get to a total of $6,000. As long as you maintain $6,000 as an average monthly balance, the monthly service fee is completely waived. For customer who can't maintain $6,000 on average, monthly, or don't want to, we have a Basic Banking Package that will begin charging a $10 monthly fee in Nov (currently $8). With this package, as long as you either maintain $1,500 combined in checking/saving OR make at least one direct deposit and online bill pay, the $10 monthly fee is completely waived.
Other banks will likely be adding monthly debit card fees. We have committed not to do this. In terms of some other account fees like the ones I described above, we tried to implement them in a way to continue to make it easy for customers to have them waived. That's why we think our options are better for customers than what some other banks are doing. We're trying to be flexible.

Again, I respect your views, and just want to make sure you are in touch with all of the facts.

Best wishes,

Mike C, Citi


... and that's a good deal?

Ninjahedge
October 4th, 2011, 09:38 AM
It's just not as bad as the press is making it.

It still SUCKS.

ZippyTheChimp
October 4th, 2011, 10:28 AM
... and that's a good deal?It is if you work for Citi. :)

HoveringCheesecake
October 4th, 2011, 11:10 AM
To Mr. Citi: You'd be amazed how many people cannot keep $6000, or hell, even $1500 in their bank accounts at all times. More people are living from paycheck to paycheck, and now you want to levy more fees against them? :facepalm:

Ninjahedge
October 4th, 2011, 02:28 PM
Back OT....

It is amazing. On this one tech site people are yelling the typical "get a job hippie!" instead of focusing on the actual message. They seem to think that a degree and "working hard" will solve everything. They are painfully ignorant of the working classes slowly slipping standard of living.

The sheeple on the right focus on the sheeple on the left and neither take it to the shepherd.

lofter1
October 4th, 2011, 07:29 PM
I'll go talk to Mike C [ itibank ] and let y'all know what he says :cool:

Meanwhile, down at Zuccotti Park ...

Exclusive: Occupy Wall Street Activist Slams Fox News Producer
In Un-Aired Interview


NEW YORK OBSERVER (http://www.observer.com/2011/10/exclusive-occupy-wall-street-activist-slams-fox-news-anchor-in-un-aired-interview-video/)
By Drew Grant (http://www.observer.com/author/dgrant/)
October 3, 2011

Even if Geraldo Rivera (http://www.observer.com/2011/10/geraldo-rivera-and-fox-news-come-down-to-occupy-wall-street/) was at the Zuccotti Park yesterday (http://www.observer.com/2011/10/geraldo-rivera-and-fox-news-come-down-to-occupy-wall-street/), Fox News has generally been a tad dismissive of the Occupy Wall Street movement. Foxnews.com (http://www.foxnews.com/) (as of this writing) has no coverage of this national event on their front page stories. (Hard to imagine for a network that was so gung-ho about the Tea Party!) Red Eye‘s Bill Schulz went out to try to “prank” the protesters (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s1KKLa6N68E). Bill O’Reilly sent a producer minion out with the same mission (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RDuHqntfqUI): to belittle OWS’s cause by cutting up interviews to make people sound stupid.

Well, here is an interview that Fox News filmed, but doesn’t want you to see. The segment was shot on Wednesday for Greta van Susteren‘s show, (though it looks like the same producerfrom this O’Reilly segment (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gK2DRoHevLo) questioning Michael Moore‘s anti-capitalist agenda) though the decision was made to leave it on the cutting room floor. The reason should be obvious pretty quickly.

[video=youtube;IroRe9hALf8]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IroRe9hALf8

The speaker giving Fox News the buisness is Jesse LaGreca, a vocal member of the Occupy Wall Street protests. This video comes courtesy of Kyle Christopher from OccupyWallSt.org (http://occupywallst.org/)‘s media team.

Now, no news organization is under obligation to air every interview they’ve filmed, especially when it makes them look bad. But you’d think that a “Fair and Balanced” network (that tells an interviewee that they are here to give them fair coverage to get any message they’d like to get out) would try to include at least a couple of opposing viewpoints to Mr. Shulz’s smarmy jokes or O’Reilly’s “infiltration” of the camp.

The ball is in your court, Fox.

TRANSCRIPT of the VID (http://www.observer.com/2011/10/exclusive-occupy-wall-street-activist-slams-fox-news-anchor-in-un-aired-interview-video/)

ZippyTheChimp
October 4th, 2011, 07:41 PM
That was good.

MidtownGuy
October 5th, 2011, 10:11 AM
An email I received:

Dear Readers,

What follows is the first official, collective statement of the protesters in Zuccotti Park:
As we gather together in solidarity to express a feeling of mass injustice, we must not lose sight of what brought us together. We write so that all people who feel wronged by the corporate forces of the world can know that we are your allies.
As one people, united, we acknowledge the reality: that the future of the human race requires the cooperation of its members; that our system must protect our rights, and upon corruption of that system, it is up to the individuals to protect their own rights, and those of their neighbors; that a democratic government derives its just power from the people, but corporations do not seek consent to extract wealth from the people and the Earth; and that no true democracy is attainable when the process is determined by economic power. We come to you at a time when corporations, which place profit over people, self-interest over justice, and oppression over equality, run our governments. We have peaceably assembled here, as is our right, to let these facts be known.


They have taken our houses through an illegal foreclosure process, despite not having the original mortgage.
They have taken bailouts from taxpayers with impunity, and continue to give Executives exorbitant bonuses.
They have perpetuated inequality and discrimination in the workplace based on age, the color of one's skin, sex, gender identity and sexual orientation.
They have poisoned the food supply through negligence, and undermined the farming system through monopolization.
They have profited off of the torture, confinement, and cruel treatment of countless animals, and actively hide these practices.
They have continuously sought to strip employees of the right to negotiate for better pay and safer working conditions.
They have held students hostage with tens of thousands of dollars of debt on education, which is itself a human right.
They have consistently outsourced labor and used that outsourcing as leverage to cut workers’ healthcare and pay.
They have influenced the courts to achieve the same rights as people, with none of the culpability or responsibility.
They have spent millions of dollars on legal teams that look for ways to get them out of contracts in regards to health insurance.
They have sold our privacy as a commodity.
They have used the military and police force to prevent freedom of the press.
They have deliberately declined to recall faulty products endangering lives in pursuit of profit.
They determine economic policy, despite the catastrophic failures their policies have produced and continue to produce.
They have donated large sums of money to politicians, who are responsible for regulating them.
They continue to block alternate forms of energy to keep us dependent on oil.
They continue to block generic forms of medicine that could save people’s lives or provide relief in order to protect investments that have already turned a substantial profit.
They have purposely covered up oil spills, accidents, faulty bookkeeping, and inactive ingredients in pursuit of profit.
They purposefully keep people misinformed and fearful through their control of the media.
They have accepted private contracts to murder prisoners even when presented with serious doubts about their guilt.
They have perpetuated colonialism at home and abroad.
They have participated in the torture and murder of innocent civilians overseas.
They continue to create weapons of mass destruction in order to receive government ontracts.*

To the people of the world, We, the New York City General Assembly occupying Wall Street in Liberty Square, urge you to assert your power.
Exercise your right to peaceably assemble; occupy public space; create a process to address the problems we face, and generate solutions accessible to everyone.
To all communities that take action and form groups in the spirit of direct democracy, we offer support, documentation, and all of the resources at our disposal.
Join us and make your voices heard!

Ninjahedge
October 5th, 2011, 10:59 AM
They have profited off of the torture, confinement, and cruel treatment of countless animals, and actively hide these practices.
Too many eggs in one basket.

"They" is making it too vague and easily refutable by individual entities. Combining PETA concerns with Wall Street/Financial sector grievances is not sart and just provides ammunition for counter arguments.

It would be hard to blame BoA for chicken farms......

scumonkey
October 5th, 2011, 04:54 PM
Just got back from zpark - what a scene!
Will post pics after I catch my breath...5-O out in FORCE!

scumonkey
October 5th, 2011, 06:36 PM
wall street all blocked off...
http://i211.photobucket.com/albums/bb276/scumonkey/more/IMGP0633.jpg

scumonkey
October 5th, 2011, 06:37 PM
cops everywhere
http://i211.photobucket.com/albums/bb276/scumonkey/more/IMGP0644.jpg

scumonkey
October 5th, 2011, 06:39 PM
news casters out in force
(Tamron Hall from msnbc)
http://i211.photobucket.com/albums/bb276/scumonkey/more/IMGP0515_tonemapped.jpg

scumonkey
October 5th, 2011, 06:39 PM
http://i211.photobucket.com/albums/bb276/scumonkey/more/IMGP0484_tonemappedwebbed.jpg

scumonkey
October 5th, 2011, 06:40 PM
http://i211.photobucket.com/albums/bb276/scumonkey/more/IMGP0489_tonemapped.jpg

scumonkey
October 5th, 2011, 06:41 PM
http://i211.photobucket.com/albums/bb276/scumonkey/more/IMGP0500_tonemapped.jpg

scumonkey
October 5th, 2011, 06:41 PM
http://i211.photobucket.com/albums/bb276/scumonkey/more/IMGP0510_tonemapped.jpg

scumonkey
October 5th, 2011, 06:42 PM
http://i211.photobucket.com/albums/bb276/scumonkey/more/IMGP0486_tonemapped.jpg

scumonkey
October 5th, 2011, 06:42 PM
http://i211.photobucket.com/albums/bb276/scumonkey/more/IMGP0485_tonemapped.jpg

scumonkey
October 5th, 2011, 06:44 PM
unions start arriving to join in...
http://i211.photobucket.com/albums/bb276/scumonkey/more/IMGP0688_tonemapped.jpg

scumonkey
October 5th, 2011, 06:44 PM
march is on!
http://i211.photobucket.com/albums/bb276/scumonkey/more/IMGP0698_tonemappedwebbed.jpg

scumonkey
October 5th, 2011, 06:48 PM
http://i211.photobucket.com/albums/bb276/scumonkey/more/IMGP0521.jpg

scumonkey
October 5th, 2011, 07:48 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=21ozC18BuJQ

scumonkey
October 5th, 2011, 08:37 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=igIf49ya7Do

MidtownGuy
October 5th, 2011, 09:00 PM
Good stuff, scumonkey. I was also down there for a few hours today. It felt good.

ZippyTheChimp
October 6th, 2011, 09:44 AM
October 6, 2011, 8:32 AM ET


‘Occupy Wall Street’ and the Constitution

http://si.wsj.net/public/resources/images/NY-BF750_OCCUPY_G_20111005192954.jpg
Thousands rallied at Foley Square in Lower Manhattan on Wednesday.

By Nathan Koppel

For constitutional enthusiasts, the “Occupy Wall Street” movement offers a fascinating, dynamic test case of the First Amendment.

“Occupy” protesters have assembled nationwide to complain about corporate greed and malfeasance in many alleged hues. Here’s a WSJ report about a march yesterday in lower Manhattan that attracted thousands.

At issue, legally speaking, in city after city is the extent to which police can step in to try to contain or break up protests.

The First Amendment provides for the “right of the people peaceably to assemble.” The critical term here is “peaceable”; protesters can gather and air grievances, but they can’t unduly disrupt the peace.

The problem, of course, is figuring out whether a mass protest has, in fact, become sufficiently disruptive to justify police crashing the party. Making matters tricky, officers often have to make split-second decisions, amid the din and chaos of a mass demonstration, about whether to arrests protesters.

At least one court will have the opportunity to interpret the First Amendment in a dispute involving an Occupy Wall Street demonstration. On Tuesday, a group of Occupy protesters filed suit in Manhattan federal court, claiming the New York Police Department improperly arrested about 700 people who were marching last week across the Brooklyn Bridge.

“The march from Wall Street was a spirited action, moving its message through New York into Brooklyn to communicate with and join with working people on the other side of the bridge.” the plaintiffs allege in their complaint (http://www.justiceonline.org/commentary/brooklyn-bridge-2011-class-action-filing.html). “The NYPD conducted a mass false arrest and extinguished the demonstration activity in an attempt to stop and prohibit further growing democratic and political collective action.”

Referencing the Arab Spring, the suit further alleges: “As seen in the movements for social change in the Middle East and Europe, all movements for social justice, jobs, and democracy need room to breathe and grow and it is imperative that there be a halt to law enforcement actions used to shut down mass assembly.”

The plaintiffs are represented by the Partnership for Civil Justice Fund (http://www.justiceonline.org/about.html), a New York legal organization that specializes in free-speech cases.

The Law Blog has sought comment from the New York City legal department. New York police have said that the protesters were warned not to block the roadway on the Brooklyn Bridge, according to this Bloomberg article about the suit.

Interestingly, in some cities protesters appear to be working closely with police to ensure both sides stay within the bounds of the First Amendment.

Yesterday, Philadelphia’s mayor and police commissioner met for about an hour with “Occupy Philadelphia” protesters, in advance of their planned march this morning in the city, the Philadelphia Daily News reports (http://www.philly.com/philly/news/pennsylvania/131201029.html). Protesters pledged not to block city streets, and Philadelphia police pledged to lay relatively low during the demonstration, according to the Daily News.

“They have promised us their intent is to come here and exercise their First Amendment rights. We support that,” Richard Negron, Philadelphia’s managing director, said yesterday a press conference, the Daily News reports. “This is Philadelphia, the cradle of democracy, and that’s what it’s all about.”

In Austin, where thousands of “occupiers” are planning to gather today at City Hall, protesters have been working with local police on the logistics of the demonstration, Austin’s KXAN reports (http://www.kxan.com/dpp/news/local/thousand-could-occupy-austin-thursday).

“The bottom line is the police department will be there to protect your rights as Americans,” Austin Police Chief Art Acevedo told KXAN. “Making sure the people are safe and making sure the people’s First Amendment right to free speech is being protected.”

We heartily welcome all First Amendment jocks to weigh in on this topic. To get the conversational ball rolling, here is a list from the Illinois First Amendment Center (http://www.illinoisfirstamendmentcenter.com/research_CourtCases_RightToPeaceableAssem.php) of some landmark cases interpreting constitutional assembly rights.

Copyright 2008 Dow Jones & Company, Inc.



To see comments: http://blogs.wsj.com/law/2011/10/06/occupy-wall-street-and-the-constitution/

ZippyTheChimp
October 6th, 2011, 10:01 AM
The Endgame of Occupy Wall Street Is Critical Mass

John Wellington Ennis
Posted: 10/6/11 09:37 AM ET

What is surprisingly unique about the Occupy Wall Street demonstration, and supporting actions across the country, is the broad immediate support without an immediately stated objective. With so little coverage and a yet unspecified goal, major unions lent their support, supportive occupations cropped up nationwide, and the numbers in Liberty Park are growing despite NYPD crackdowns.

Unlike anti-war marches, Tea Party gatherings, or other well-worn modes of protest, the notion of an in-person response to Wall Street's unchecked looting of the economy apparently did not need much explaining. That is because many Americans have been living with painful awareness that their hardships in recent years are related in a myriad of ways to reckless trading, predatory loans, and manifold illegal banking practices, all perpetrated by the same executives still receiving multi-million dollar bonuses whose guilt is trumped by the notion that their companies are Too Big To Fail.

None of these many abuses by financial institutions collectively referred to as Wall Street are new information. It's not like people just flooded the streets upon hearing that Bank of America is trying to tack on another surcharge, just after laying off over 30,000 employees, just after widespread manipulation of their loan business was deemed not criminal, by their own accord. (No, that move by B of A was just easy pickings for Democrats trying to remember their purpose.)

It's not like Americans did not wait while the federal government negotiated good-faith interest-free loans to keep huge banks and firms afloat, at the price to taxpayers, many of whom were struggling to stay afloat themselves under variable interest or inflated mortgages foisted upon them by said financial giants. It's not like financial regulations weren't proposed to Congress, with larger reforms left by the wayside, and in the final decision by the Federal Reserve on the Durbin Amendment of the Dodd-Frank Finanical Act, credit card companies somehow get to charge more for debit swipes than they had even hoped. Bank lobbyists paid off, in more than one sense.

And, it's not like President Obama hasn't trotted out some fine rhetoric of late, angling the ongoing Republican obstructionism to fuel his re-election campaign as it gears up. Yes, it's math, not class warfare. But, if this were a metaphor of head to head competition between classes -- namely, the top 1% Super Rich that owns 40% of the wealth versus the 99% rest of Americans -- then Obama would be like a goalie, constantly swarmed by the offensive John Boehner, Mitch McConnell, Eric Cantor, Darrell Issa, bank lobbyists, and Goldman Sachs alumni in his own ranks. The Super Rich Team will continue to score point after point on Obama, because despite his considerable skill set, it's like he's playing at the company picnic, and really, you just don't make your bosses look bad when they underwrite your existence.

Obama is looking for $1 billion to fund his re-election campaign. That may seem extraordinary, but after the disastrous Supreme Court decision Citizens United vs. FEC, it is a given that there will be even more spent against him in anonymous corporate money. Karl Rove's American Crossroads and Crossroads GPS have announced plans to raise and spend record amounts, over $300 million in outside ads running across the country in the 2012 races.

Obama is not going to get one billion dollars from $5 donations, no matter how many email blasts. Obama and his team have been currying favor like a schoolboy with Wall Street throughout this administration because they are waiting for the pay-off in their campaign coffers. The slap on the wrist following the financial meltdown was more drying their hands like a bathroom attendant so they can get back to work making important deals without consequence.

While the financial meltdown and ensuing bailouts came before Obama, the lack of reform or accountability does not win him any gratitude from either side, it only serves as precedent that selling bundled crap mortgages to old people goes unpunished. In fact, it is richly rewarded. Obama's deference and endless capital to the banking industry has long made it clear where his priorities are. His jobs plan is well-intentioned, but probably a drop in the bucket and a few years late. For all the bitter clamor over health care reform, it's quite likely that it will be deemed impermissible by the Supreme Court. Clarence Thomas can't wait to sit silently through the arguments before he punts our healthcare system back to the wolves that employ his wife, Ginni.

As the crowds grow, this will become Obama's next oil spill. How long will he let Occupy Wall Street go on before addressing it as more than just a policy point to support his agenda? Many loyalists will defend the intentions and constraints on Obama, but this much is painfully clear: The President must act now. Because if he does not get in front of this parade, it's about to surpass him.

If Obama really does aspire to be like President Lincoln, then he must recognize that his country is rent apart and it requires a true leader to keep our union from collapsing under debt and looted public services.

Because when people show up at the gates of their oppressor, the response is not: "What do you want? Can you bullet-point it for me?" You know what this is about. Our country has been decimated over the past three years, with continual revelations of financial impropriety, concerted fraud, and executive compensation the amount of a small nation's GDP. This might be the one protest where, if asked why you were there, you could reply, "Are you ****ing kidding me?" and that would actually be understood.

To dispel media misconceptions, here's what Occupy Wall Street is not: it's not another Tea Party, a corporate PAC-backed stab at populism consisting of right wing extremists. It's not just young people in attendance, even though younger generations have more to lose anyway, and many are already crippled with student debt and no job possibilities. (Admittedly, younger people are better suited to sleep in inconvenient places and be fine with that. The kids call this "crashing," which should not be interpreted as a roughhousing sort of thing.)

Occupy Wall Street is not anti-capitalism. We don't live in capitalism. Capitalism is supposed to be merit based and left to the market -- consumers -- to decide where innovation and service is found. What has been foisted on us again and again is not a fair and open market. Massive companies spend huge sums to avoid paying taxes altogether. They then spend money to back politicians that will be friendly to them, in terms of regulations and tax breaks or pressure on rivals. This is a system of massive corporate welfare, where the biggest corporations pay the least to the country that allows them to prosper, while they spend their excess money in hopes of making more money through lower taxes, government jobs, or loosened environmental restrictions. Election cycles ensure ongoing opportunities for candidates to be wooed with money or threatened with ads. The more they spend on the race, the more indebted candidates become to their backers. Those that become elected repay their backers with loose oversight, no-bid contracts, and even accept their donors' legislation pre-written. We don't live in capitalism -- that's favoritism.

And most importantly, Occupy Wall Street is not one political party or part of a spectrum. This grassroots movement is fundamentally removed from both parties, because both parties accept vast fortunes from Wall Street to not rain on their parade. The reason abuses have thrived is because of the cost of running for office. Most people's political persuasion or identity is based on their own sense of what's just and fair. The nuance of foreign policy or civil liberties is lost when people are losing their homes due to manipulative mortgages from banks that have faced no discipline or reform and have been given federal money to loan to people which they still sit on.

Yet, it will take a political solution to retake our country from the Gollum of Wall Street. There's no way any of these banks or brokers will willingly accept reform measures, even after taking trillions of taxpayer money following their own colossal ****-ups. Wall Street execs thrive on extracting more and more profit per sale, and get off on boardroom backstabbing. Do you expect them to respond to people of all types camped outside their offices politely? The only thing they care about is if the market goes down.

Real financial overhaul will only happen if we reclaim our elections. We need real campaign reform, and we need to elect the people who will enact it. We do that through running and winning in primaries, where the party's pick usually prevails with the most money. We innovate low budget campaign strategies to support candidates not backed by Political Action Committees, fronts for corporate money. We do it through becoming the media and covering these candidates where we live and across the country. And it starts in the streets. Where else is there but the streets?

America was born in the streets. Our first president was sworn in on the steps of Wall Street, where Congress convened for years. The framer's dream of escaping monarchy is being eclipsed by the wealthiest 1% and their insatiable assault on anything the government provides to the public.

How can we not occupy Wall Street? Wall Street occupies US.

Follow John Wellington Ennis on Twitter: www.twitter.com/johnennis

Ninjahedge
October 6th, 2011, 10:53 AM
I guess the key is defining "the peace"

lofter1
October 6th, 2011, 12:22 PM
Terrific words from John Wellington Ennis.

I wonder if OWS folks have examined Gandhi and effective action for Civil Disobedience?

ZippyTheChimp
October 6th, 2011, 12:39 PM
They only have to go back to Martin Luther King Jr, who was greatly influenced by Gandhi while in college.

Ninjahedge
October 6th, 2011, 01:37 PM
Here today... Gandhi tomorrow.

In all seriousness though... This is a losing battle unless people come out. That tech site keeps rattling off the same mantra "work harder" "lazy beatniks!", "AMERICAN WAY!!!" against anyone that voices their support of this.

And the media, bought by Corporate America and living off the bottom line, is more interested in showing the strange and extreme than the main body of the protest.

Lastly, elections? Candidates need to buy the public. We have not ELECTED someone in a long time, we have simply chosen the candidate we thought was closer to what we want. We bought shoes in an ice cream shoppe.

Unless some reform, ironically passed by those it would effect the most, prohibiting the gross expenditure of funds by ANY party in support or against a candidate is enacted, we will get superPACs that treat corporations as individuals and allow them to buy their (wo)man.

The key here is to find the trigger that will get the sheeple to stop bleating the same engineered catchphrases designed to garner blind support against "them" and realize that the version of the "dream" they have been supporting has nothing in it that will provide them, their children and their children's children any more a chance of riding the litter that they are now carrying as they have of winning the lottery they still continue to play almost religiously.

This whole thing is such a convolution of irony and contradiction it is sickening. The freedom of choice we fought for allowed the idiots of the land to choose the next generation of masters. The very freedom they shout for they surrendered under the guise of "no new taxes" or "terrorism" and still believe, after many have lost their jobs, that somehow it is someone else's fault.

The fault lies in our own laps, and until we ALL can see it and CHANGE it, we will continue to fight amongst ourselves as the puppet masters continue to play the game to try to get the better of their "equals".

eddhead
October 6th, 2011, 03:00 PM
Look, I am completely emphetic to their frustrations, and support their message. But to my mind, the big problem is that they have not stated an objective. Why are they out there, what are they hoping to accomplish? I think they need to clearly articulate the end game here, i.e. what are they asking for and what are they trying to achieve.

MidtownGuy
October 6th, 2011, 03:19 PM
I wish it could be as simple as declaring one specific goal. The umbrella is wide because the shit-storm that people are feeling is very wide...but with roots as interconnected as the boards of directors at many of the largest corporations. For now, at this nascent stage of the movement, they are trying to get people together... to figure out what moves should be made. The "Tea Party" has a lot of different concerns and goals from stopping abortion to taxes to repressing gays. If they can do it without being criticized for casting a wide net, I don't see why we have to poke holes in this counter-movement.

One thing is certain, it's a hell of a lot better than all of the progressives sitting separately in their living rooms playing gameboy or bitching to nobody but their inner circle, while the country goes down the toilet and the idiotic Tea Party gets all of the attention and talking points.

Ninjahedge
October 6th, 2011, 03:47 PM
But the tea party people are all "Americans" and these guys are all "Loosers without jobs wasting time".

See the difference?

Imagine if one showed up with an M16! I am sure Rush Limbaugh would hurry to the wielders defense just like he did for the one at the tea Party rally... what was that BTW.....

lofter1
October 6th, 2011, 04:12 PM
... to my mind, the big problem is that they have not stated an objective. Why are they out there, what are they hoping to accomplish? I think they need to clearly articulate the end game ...

You're maybe listening to too many talking heads who keep trying to frame this to fit their news bites. As Mr. Ennis states HERE (http://wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?t=25156&p=378167&viewfull=1#post378167):

The Endgame of Occupy Wall Street Is Critical Mass

... Real financial overhaul will only happen if we reclaim our elections. We need real campaign reform, and we need to elect the people who will enact it. We do that through running and winning in primaries, where the party's pick usually prevails with the most money. We innovate low budget campaign strategies to support candidates not backed by Political Action Committees, fronts for corporate money. We do it through becoming the media and covering these candidates where we live and across the country. And it starts in the streets. Where else is there but the streets?

America was born in the streets. Our first president was sworn in on the steps of Wall Street, where Congress convened for years. The framer's dream of escaping monarchy is being eclipsed by the wealthiest 1% and their insatiable assault on anything the government provides to the public.

How can we not occupy Wall Street? Wall Street occupies US.


Meanwhile, some of those in charge see the big train coming up the Street (but aren't necessarily sure if they want to get on board, get out of the way or pull the brakes on it) ...

Obama, Cuomo Weigh In On Occupy Wall Street

Politicker NY (http://www.politickerny.com/2011/10/06/obama-cuomo-weigh-in-on-occupy-wall-street/)
By David Freedlander (http://www.politickerny.com/author/dfreedlander/)
October 6, 2011 3:34pm

If further proof is needed that the Occupy Wall Street protests have captured the public’s mind, both President Barack Obama and Gov. Andrew Cuomo were asked about them today during unrelated news conferences in Washington D.C. and in Albany.

And both tried to align themselves with the goals of the protests, if not the specifics of the action.

“I think it expresses the frustrations that the American people feel,” Mr. Obama said at a news conference to promote the American Jobs Act. “That we had the biggest financial crisis since the Great Depression, huge collateral damage all throughout the country, all across Main Street, and yet you’re still seeing some of the same folks who acted irresponsibly trying to fight efforts to crack down on abusive practices that got us into this problem in the first place.”

Mr. Obama also touted his administration’s own efforts to save the financial system during the crash of 2008, and said that he has pushed for more regulation of the financial system, only to have Republicans block it.
“You’ve got Republican presidential candidates whose main economic policy proposals is, we’ll get rid of the financial reforms that are designed to prevent the abuses that got us into this mess in the first place,” he said. “That does not make sense to the American people. They are frustrated by it. And they will continue to be frustrated by it until they get a sense that everybody is playing by the same set of rules, and that you’re rewarded for responsibility and doing the right thing as opposed to gaining the system.”

Mr. Obama also said that he understood the protesters calls for there to be more prosecutions of the financial systems bad actors, but said that many of those responsible for the crash were actually following the law.

Up in Albany, Gov. Cuomo, who has resisted calls to impose higher taxes on upper income earner, talked up his own record as attorney general.

“No one has been more aggressive on Wall Street than I have. I was attorney general for four years and I was very aggressive in the cases we brought, the actions we brought, and the theories that we pursued up and down Wall Street,” he said. “At the same time, it is a major economic engine for this state. All told, 20-25 percent of the state’s income comes from Wall Street There has to be a balance from the state perspective. We want fairness, we want justice, certainly and to the extent there were bad acts we want them punished.”

Full Obama remarks HERE (http://www.politickerny.com/2011/10/06/obama-cuomo-weigh-in-on-occupy-wall-street/)

eddhead
October 6th, 2011, 04:20 PM
OK... but they are still not telling me what they want in any real concrete terms, or what they hope to accompish. Like I said, i am empathetic to the message, but I don't really understand their goals.

ZippyTheChimp
October 6th, 2011, 04:25 PM
They want politicians to take notice of them, to worry about their impact, to listen to them.

That's when you develop specific goals.

eddhead
October 6th, 2011, 04:36 PM
Well, they are starting to get some traction and that is probably a good thing. At the very least, we have a potential counterweight to the teaparty movement. But at some point they are going to have to sythesize the message and create an agenda. Hopefully you're right and they'll get to that stage.

Ninjahedge
October 6th, 2011, 04:40 PM
The problem is deeper than that zip.

As seen from sites that make fun of it, there are many different incongruent threads in this protest.

You get pictures on websites of people complaining about Wall Street, fine, but then right next to it you get another of someone with pink hair holding a sign that is asking for something with one particular situation or issue.

It is not that they are not valid, but it is too easy to voice opposition to the opposition if it is not seen a little more coherently (as with the Tea Party in the beginning... they lost power, or are losing power, as people are discovering that not everyone was talking about the same thing).

ZippyTheChimp
October 6th, 2011, 05:08 PM
The problem is deeper than that zip.Now is not the time to solve problems. The idea now is to tap into the dissatisfaction of the American people.

It's not just about Wall St and financial institutions. It's also about oil companies and defense contractors.

It's not about Republican government or Democratic government.

It's not even about rich and poor.

It's about how how present government doesn't work. Politicians don't listen to what people - any people - want, except when it's time to vote. And institutional money controls their access to voters. So who do you think controls the government?

Once you get past all of the bullshit "cultural" issues that separate people, the dysfunctional government's impact on real quality of life (it's the economy, stupid) is a common thread.

Right now, critical mass.

BBMW
October 6th, 2011, 05:13 PM
So we'll have a large critical mass of malcontents flailing around but not presenting any viable solutions? Sounds useful to me :rolleyes:

Ninjahedge
October 6th, 2011, 05:32 PM
Zip ^ case in point.

Unfortunately blanket statements of intolerance and ignorance like this abound.

ZippyTheChimp
October 6th, 2011, 05:37 PM
I don't think the idea is to attract people like BBMW. He thinks everything is fine, except a few social adjustments. Like get rid of everyone except "law abiding citizens."

We've gotten a glimpse of the society he wants.

@BBMW: Do you have kids; do you want a better life for them?

lofter1
October 6th, 2011, 06:06 PM
How this can be read and not seen as a goal is beyond me (unless one thinks that the current impasse will be solved by sitting at home, instead of getting out + getting involved to bring about change):



Real financial overhaul will only happen if we reclaim our elections. We need real campaign reform, and we need to elect the people who will enact it. We do that through running and winning in primaries, where the party's pick usually prevails with the most money.



It's not going to happen overnight.

eddhead
October 6th, 2011, 07:04 PM
I am on their side, believe me but that is NOT a goal, it is a call to action for some unknown party; a request that someone else develop the agenda. What specific reforms are they seeking? Where will the leaders come from and what are they asking for? What types of reform?

End the war is an objective. Take the money out of politics is an objective. Remove special interests and lobby groups access to legislators is an objective. They need an agenda. Still this is a great start.

lofter1
October 6th, 2011, 11:11 PM
It's not a goal to elect properly representative politicians? It's not a goal to get campaign reform where corporations aren't allowed to spend hundreds of millions of dollars to get their cronies elected?

Maybe they're not voicing the goals you want, but those are goals which = objectives.

eddhead
October 7th, 2011, 09:33 AM
It is more of a call to action. Aspiring to elect representative politicians is not a demand of people in power or government. It is an appeal to the masses not consistent with a protest movement which typically targets groups in power or Govt, people who are in a position to influence policy. And it is not very tangible.

End the war is a tangible objective and a demand placed on Government. Elect properly representative politicians? Who exactly are you asking that of and how is protesting in Wall Street going to accomplish that?

ZippyTheChimp
October 7th, 2011, 10:07 AM
It is more of a call to action.That's exactly what it is.


It is an appeal to the masses not consistent with a protest movement which typically targets groups in power or Govt, people who are in a position to influence policy. And it is not very tangible.The protest movements of the past went nowhere until they reached critical-mass, and that doesn't necessarily mean a body count of the protesting group. It didn't matter how many black people marched for civil rights in the 1950s; no one was going to listen to their demands. Things changed when white people became uncomfortable with what was on TV news. Before that, they were just a bunch of malcontent colored folk.

Before Lyndon Johnson "lost Walter Cronkite", they were just draft-dodging hippies. No one listened to them.

So who is going to listen to people camped out in public squares? What's the "or else" for their demands?

eddhead
October 7th, 2011, 10:34 AM
exactly. equally to the point, who are they making their demands to, and what are the expected outcomes? Hopefully, they'll get there.

MidtownGuy
October 7th, 2011, 11:46 AM
Camping out in public squares gets you media attention, which is what can eventually get you everything else.

There's nothing visual, no element of public spectacle, about some internet group like "Move On" asking for online donations or meeting in members' living rooms. You have to put bodies out there.

Think of how the Tea Party started...all those rubes wearing hats with tea bags hanging down, and the most outrageous signs. What did they want? Lots of things. And the media couldn't resist them. It's a VISUAL thing. A bunch of frustrated Americans carrying flags, laptops, signs, and food donations, just steps from the nation's financial nerve center, looks like a good place to start. Just like with the Tea Party, first you have to make the whole nation aware that you even exist...media attention makes other sympathetic people see a movement, join in, and get involved everywhere...on many different levels. They feel there IS something to join into. That's what eventually creates a juggernaut that has to be acknowledged.

Think of a bee hive with different bees working on different cells. Taking care of the hive is the overall objective, but there are lots of elements to that.

Or, let's just all sit back and criticize a multifaceted entity for not being single celled?

BBMW
October 7th, 2011, 12:05 PM
Do I have kids? No. I wouldn't want them is this environment.

And no i don't think everything is fine. I just think different things are wrong then you do.

As far as the Occupy Wall Street crowd, they think someone can wave a magic wand and fix everything, and wonder way no one had done it already. Wall Street's not the problem (or at least one of tthe major ones.) The fact is that large parts of the American population is economically obsolete and unnecessary, and we're losing in a global competition that isn't going to go away. And all the huffing and puffing in Liberty Plaza is not going to change that.


I don't think the idea is to attract people like BBMW. He thinks everything is fine, except a few social adjustments. Like get rid of everyone except "law abiding citizens."

We've gotten a glimpse of the society he wants.

@BBMW: Do you have kids; do you want a better life for them?

ZippyTheChimp
October 7th, 2011, 12:13 PM
Do I have kids? No. I wouldn't want them is this environment.Do you mean this environment?
The fact is that large parts of the American population is economically obsolete and unnecessary,Would you want kids if we "eliminate" this problem?

Just make sure your kids aren't the ones eliminated.

lofter1
October 7th, 2011, 12:16 PM
Jon Stewart: How Is Occupy Wall Street Not Like The Tea Party?

Huffington Post (http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2011/10/06/jon-stewart-compares-occupy-wall-street-tea-party_n_997825.html)

Previously, Jon Stewart only touched on one incident (http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2011/09/30/jon-stewart-spoofs-anthony-bologna-occupy-wall-street-cop-chris-meloni_n_988634.html) at the downtown Manhattan protests known as Occupy Wall Street (OWS), but on Wednesday night's "Daily Show," he spent nine minutes comparing the 2011 protests with 2009's birth of the Tea Party, and the media's disparate reactions ....

VIDEO (http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2011/10/06/jon-stewart-compares-occupy-wall-street-tea-party_n_997825.html)

Fabrizio
October 7th, 2011, 12:19 PM
I don't think the idea is to attract people like BBMW. He thinks everything is fine, except a few social adjustments. Like get rid of everyone except "law abiding citizens."

We've gotten a glimpse of the society he wants.

^ totally inappropriate.

Why resort to personal attacks? Why bring things down to such a petty, infantile level? Why explain to us what BBMW thinks?

Make the "issue" the discussion ... and not the poster.

I disagree with BBMW.

But I am interested in hearing his viewpoint. He certainly has as much right to post here as any one else.... and I have not heard him here get personal.

lofter1
October 7th, 2011, 12:26 PM
Exclusive: Occupy Wall Street Activist Slams Fox News Producer
In Un-Aired Interview [video]

... The speaker giving Fox News the buisness is Jesse LaGreca, a vocal member of the Occupy Wall Street protests.


Twitter Feed for Jesse LaGreca (http://twitter.com/#!/jesselagreca)

His profile image:

14195

Fabrizio
October 7th, 2011, 12:28 PM
BBMW wrote: "the fact is that large parts of the American population is economically obsolete and unnecessary,"

I agree. It's the sad truth.

But isn't it then the governments job to provide training and incourage the private sector to train? Isn't it more the reason to invest in schools?

lofter1
October 7th, 2011, 12:32 PM
Calling out BBMW on ideas he has posted is not a personal attack. It's an idea / mindset attack.

No one at WNY is censoring his ideas, just pushing back on what he espouses.

Now if you want to propose a WNY rule where no reference can ever be made to any poster by name in any reply, citing only the idea or position posted, then be my guest.




Why resort to personal attacks? Why bring things down to such a petty, infantile level? Why explain to us what BBMW thinks?

Make the "issue" the discussion ... and not the poster.

I disagree with BBMW.

But I am interested in hearing his viewpoint. He certainly has as much right to post here as any one else.... and I have not heard him here get personal.

Fabrizio
October 7th, 2011, 12:36 PM
"He thinks everything is fine, except a few social adjustments. Like get rid of everyone except "law abiding citizens."
We've gotten a glimpse of the society he wants."

^ Sorry Lofter, totally inapproproiate. The cute 3rd person business is not good.

We don't need posters explaining to us what another really thinks.

Calling out another poster on his ideas is cool.... but doing it this way is not.

Imagine if someone did to you: Lofter thinks... Lofter believes... We've seen what Lofter wants... oh c'mon.... not cool.

BBMW
October 7th, 2011, 12:36 PM
Do you mean this environment?


Do you think things are going to get economically or socially better? It might get economically better for those on the right side of the paradigm shifts, but that's not going to be the majority. As it gets economically worse for the masses (as it is now), life is going to get rougher in a number of areas.




Would you want kids if we "eliminate" this problem?

Just make sure your kids aren't the ones eliminated.

I don't know who you're eliminating? And are you suggesting what I've said is factually incorrect? Is someone just going to pull a rabbit out of their hat and come up with mass numbers of economically sustainable jobs for the workers being displaced?

Ninjahedge
October 7th, 2011, 12:45 PM
Loft, give Fab some space.

I mean, where else is he going to go now that Amanda is on US soil?

He needs SOMEONE to champion... or oppose.

So BBMW is allowed to come in and throw blanket statements around rather casually with no real backing or even merit, but any criticism of that or call for him to actually APPLY his suggestions to his own life (as a measure of merit and veracity against what seems to be a disconnected sphere of relation) is seen as some sort of gross transgression in the eyes of a professional.......[insert role here].

BBMW
October 7th, 2011, 12:46 PM
It's a lot of steps beyond that. A lot of what are good jobs now have, to coin a phrase, human leverage. For instance, if you can come up with ways to use the internet to make money, you're pretty well set. But in doing so, you're very likely looking at eliminating many local jobs. Think in terms of Amazon.com (and the other e-tailers), and how many local retailing jobs they've displaced. Look at manufacturing. It's much more automated than it used to be. It was the vast numbers of assembly line jobs (many that got unionized and became quite lucrative) that generated much of what came to be known as the middle class. Now those jobs have either been automated or offshored. We still manufacture a lot of stuff here (For the moment, I still think more than China, IIRC) we just use a fraction of the number of workers to do it. Where work is unskilled/semi-skilled labor intesive (think textiles/apparell) we just can't compete on price.

So you might be able to educate/train a some into these leveraged jobs (which themselves may get obsoleted), but in a country of 300+ million you can't do that with enough people to reverse the displacement side of the leverage.


BBMW wrote: "the fact is that large parts of the American population is economically obsolete and unnecessary,"

I agree. It's the sad truth.

But isn't it then the governments job to provide training and incourage the private sector to train? Isn't it more the reason to invest in schools?

Fabrizio
October 7th, 2011, 12:49 PM
Well... Lofter... there you go. I rest my case...

---

Post 93: It will mean thinking creatively to find solutions... in many ways Germany might be a good example to follow. Ideas are out there.

BBMW
October 7th, 2011, 12:55 PM
I've thought about Germany. But the Germans are a different people, and there are a lot less of them. It would take a lot of attitude readjustment, and I'm not so sure it would scale up.

lofter1
October 7th, 2011, 01:19 PM
Imagine if someone did to you: Lofter thinks... Lofter believes... We've seen what Lofter wants... oh c'mon.... not cool.

It's been done. I push back.

lofter1
October 7th, 2011, 01:29 PM
OK, let's take it as a "fact" that this statement is indeed a truthful fact:


"the fact is that large parts of the American population is economically obsolete and unnecessary"



I reject the idea that folks are "unnecessary" as that looks at citizens as only economic components. We should have a broader view of the value of our citizens. But if that's where we're at then this sorry "fact" shows that our Great Experiment has failed, and we've basically turned into a corporate entity that looks at what to cut and dispose of.

No solution to this "fact" is offered. What do the believers suggest we do with our "unnecessary" folks?

BBMW
October 7th, 2011, 01:46 PM
OK, let's take it as a "fact" that this statement is indeed a truthful fact:

"the fact is that large parts of the American population is economically obsolete and unnecessary"



I reject the idea that folks are "unnecessary" as that looks at citizens as only economic components.


First I said economically unnecessary. You're broadening my statement.

And if we're talking about jobs, then we're looking at this from the standpoint of economics. If you're saying that a situation can't exist where the economy needs the labor of all those willing to sell it, I'm sorry, but you're wrong.

Also, this isn't only our problem. Europe is hitting this also. Both us and them been trying for decades to plaster over this with both fiscal and monetary policy. Those attempts have now hit the wall. Do you think Greenspan didn't see this coming twenty years ago, and try keep things propped up with the credit/housing bubble. But when you get away from artificial stimulation and gov't make-work jobs (funded by deficit spending), yes, a good chunk of the population is just not needed by the economy. The proof is in the long term unemployment.



We should have a broader view of the value of our citizens. But if that's where we're at then this sorry "fact" shows that our Great Experiment has failed, and we've basically turned into a corporate entity that looks at what to cut and dispose of.

No solution to this "fact" is offered. What do the believers suggest we do with our "unnecessary" folks?

The economy is the engine that fuels the rest of society. Whatever else we want to achieve has to be paid for by the economy. A lot of people, you, and I would guess a lot of the Occupy Wall Street crowd think it's the other way around. That society and/or the gov't can dictate what will happen in the economy. It's been tried, it doesn't work.

lofter1
October 7th, 2011, 01:57 PM
OK, you view a society only from what seems to be an Economy is God viewpoint. How's that working out??

Let's see what Mayor Mike is thinking ...

(Could he be planning something before he heads off to another weekend getaway in Bermuda (http://nymag.com/daily/intel/2010/04/bloomberg.html)???)

Bloomberg On OWS: They're 'Trying To Destroy The Jobs Of Working People'

TPM LiveWire (http://livewire.talkingpointsmemo.com/updates/995)

New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg during his weekly radio address took some shots at the growing anti-Wall Street protests in lower Manhattan and around the country.

“The protests that are trying to destroy the jobs of working people in this city aren’t productive,” Bloomberg said, according (http://blogs.villagevoice.com/runninscared/2011/10/mayor_bloomberg_30.php) to the Village Voice.

More from the VILLAGE VOICE (http://blogs.villagevoice.com/runninscared/2011/10/mayor_bloomberg_30.php):

"The protests that are trying to destroy the jobs of working people in this city aren't productive," Bloomberg said in his weekly radio appearance with John Gambling. Taking a swipe at "some of the labor unions participating," Bloomberg added that "their salaries come from - are paid by - some of the people they're trying to vilify."

That resembled a refrain protesters have frequently aimed at the police: "my taxes pay your salary."

... Asked directly if the city had an end game for the protests or would let them continue indefinitely, Bloomberg, who a week ago suggested that the clock was running (http://blogs.villagevoice.com/runninscared/2011/09/mayor_bloomberg_28.php), avoided a direct answer today:

"We are trying to deal with this in a way that doesn't make the problem grow and protects everybody's rights ... we're trying to let this -- not 'play out,' that isn't quite the right word, but let them express themselves."

***


Hmmm: "... deal with this in a way that doesn't make the problem grow ..."

Mike seems to view the "problem" as the protest, rather than the nefarious deeds of money guys & politicians that landed us in the current situation.

Mike, have you tried using one of these (http://2.bp.blogspot.com/_kulnm8Gjhh8/TUuDddAbcEI/AAAAAAAAWaU/0HDgWdG26Ao/s1600/bloomberg-new-yorker-cover.jpg) lately?

ZippyTheChimp
October 7th, 2011, 02:03 PM
Calling out BBMW on ideas he has posted is not a personal attack. It's an idea / mindset attack.Thanks for sparing me the need to explain it myself.

Posters who parachute into a discussion that has been ongoing over many threads for a long time, while they have been consumed by one thread for years, have a tunnel-vision viewpoint.

This isn't about what BBMW thinks; it's about what he has posted. And he knows what I have posted.

But I know what this is about. Somebody is still smarting over being wrong about a certain verdict, and isn't sure how to get back at me. So, irony of ironies, he posts about me, a twist on the Italian Whine. (Yeah, that was about you Fabby).

BBMW
October 7th, 2011, 02:10 PM
Actually, I'm looking at it from only an economic standpoint. You're dragging the rest of society into it.

As far as Bloomberg's interview, from a narrowly NYC standpoint, he's correct. Wall St. sucks a lot of money from around the world into NYC, and that money drive much of what goes on here. If somehow these demonstrators managed to destroy that money machine (which I consider unlikely, but...), NYC would not be far away from a Detroit type situation.


OK, you view a society only from what seems to be an Economy is God viewpoint. How's that working out??

Let's see what Mayor Mike is thinking ...

<snip, don't need to quote the entire article>

ZippyTheChimp
October 7th, 2011, 02:21 PM
Do you think things are going to get economically or socially better?The problem with your views is that they're black & white. On just about everything.


And are you suggesting what I've said is factually incorrect?See?

So "Wall St is not the (major) problem" means we give them a pass? Your reaction to the protest was a :rolleyes:.

Whatever the economic solutions turn out to be, nothing significant is going to happen to change things as long as Wall St (not the actual Wall St, corporate money) is controlling politics.

If you disagree, make sense out of the last three years. What have we gotten for the bailout money?

Fabrizio
October 7th, 2011, 02:46 PM
BBMW wrote:

"A lot of people, you, and I would guess a lot of the Occupy Wall Street crowd think it's the other way around. That society and/or the gov't can dictate what will happen in the economy. It's been tried, it doesn't work."

^ The economies of China, India, Germany have no government intervention and direction?

BBMW
October 7th, 2011, 03:31 PM
At one time in China, the enitre economy government directed. We saw how well that worked. They've since greatly freed up their economy, and, well, we've also seen how well that worked.

Also, every wonder why India never became a manufacturing power? It's because pretty much since it's independence from England, they've heavily protected their domestic manufacturers. This retarded their development.

The Germans do play some games, but they're mostly free market. They also have the skill and national brand recognition to drive their exports. And they're now having problems propping up the rest of Europe (talk about gov't intervention.)

ZippyTheChimp
October 7th, 2011, 03:44 PM
Actually, I'm looking at it from only an economic standpoint. You're dragging the rest of society into it.


At one time in China, the enitre economy government directed. We saw how well that worked. They've since greatly freed up their economy, and, well, we've also seen how well that worked.But it is a social issue borne out of, not only economics, but the way government makes economic policy. And the continual growth of wealth disparity is socially dangerous.

China is a poor example. A large part of it's population doesn't participate at all. And they have social and political issues that the people in modern democracies would never stand for.
The US trying to be China is no longer the US.

BBMW
October 7th, 2011, 03:58 PM
^
I never said the US should try to be China. But we do have to compete with them.

This is part of the problem. How long can we stay on to of the hill when there are bigger (in population), hungrier competitors looking to to knock us off

Ninjahedge
October 7th, 2011, 04:00 PM
The key here is simple.

You have a wart, you cut it off, not the entire appendage it is attached to.

Saying "OMGSOCIALISMWTF??!?!?!" and comparing our efforts to China is a straw man. An extreme exaggeration and comparison to an incongruous example of a hybrid totalitarian communist/socialist regime that would not float, even if it was "wanted", here.

But then applying that to ANY socialistic measure, such as Social Security or Universal Health Care, is unfair.

You see what happens when companies are allowed to write all the rules. You have coal miners dying in their 40's of black lung, factory workers dying in fires because the owners chain the doors. THAT WAS the "American Way" not too long ago.

We somehow seem to forget the F'ups in American History (smallpox anyone?) whenever we talk about our "Heratage" and seem to think that we could never do anything wrong today.

Guess what Dorothy, those ain't emerald glasses, that's a green bag over your head.

Fabrizio
October 7th, 2011, 04:15 PM
^
I never said the US should try to be China. But we do have to compete with them.

You bet we do.

No, the US should not try to be China... no one is saying that.... but as per my earlier post, our governments must invest in people, training and preparing them for new technologies and industries. I wrote:

"But isn't it then the governments job to provide training and incourage the private sector to train? Isn't it more the reason to invest in schools?"

Nicholas Kristof wrote a great series of articles about China for the NYTimes.... covering human rights and repression issues ... but also pointing out what we are up against:

"Cynics sometimes suggest that China’s rise as a world power is largely a matter of government manipulation of currency rates and trade rules, and there’s no doubt that there’s plenty of rigging or cheating going on in every sphere. But China has also done an extraordinarily good job of investing in its people and in spreading opportunity across the country. "

"There’s a lesson for us as well. China’s national commitment to education, opportunity...(...)...those are qualities that we in the West might emulate as well. "

And:

"Americans think of China’s strategic challenge in terms of, say, the new Chinese stealth fighter aircraft. But the real challenge is the rise of China’s education system and the passion for learning that underlies it. We’re not going to become Confucians, but we can elevate education on our list of priorities without relinquishing creativity and independent thought."

I agree with you that if we are talking about the economy: "large parts of the American population is economically obsolete and unnecessary"

Our Governments must invest in those people: training, education. Government matters.

ZippyTheChimp
October 7th, 2011, 04:16 PM
I never said the US should try to be China. But we do have to compete with them.So to compete with them, what do we become - a capitalistic caricature of a Soviet society, with a privileged ruling class and everyone else struggling day to day, and a corrupt government that props it up?

This country generates a lot of GDP, but look where most of it winds up.

Merry
October 7th, 2011, 09:14 PM
Keeping it peaceful and respectful adds to the credibility of this protest and the potential for garnering further support, so let's hope it stays that way.


A Look Inside Zuccotti Park's Makeshift Village

By Ben Fractenberg

DOWNTOWN — Protesters who have been occupying Zuccotti Park since Sept. 17 have created their own impromptu village, complete with everything from a library to a chiropractor and a barber.

Occupy Wall Street receives mail at the plaza, located near the World Trade Center, has a generator set up to serve a 24-7 "media center" and organizes teams to clean up the space on a regular basis.

At the kitchen station, protesters have set up a filtration system that cleans dishwater by filtering it through soil and gravel. The effluent is then used to water plants in the park.

Food, such as canned goods, are donated, and hot meals, such as pasta, rice and beans, are cooked at supporters' homes, where protesters can also shower.

There are status boards with the weather, the schedule for the day and coverage of the protests in the media, as well as a running count of cities that are occupied and the number of arrests that have been made.

And there is even a comfort station where protesters can get clothes and hand-warmers.

"The way that it works is that it's a leaderless movement. Everybody has to step up and the take the initiative and do things," said a protester who would only give her first name, Bre. "Everything that's being done is somebody's brainchild that they're really passionate about."

Needs for each of the stations are discussed at daily coordination meetings that are held in the mornings, and all of the goods and services are donated.

Even though the group, which is protesting Wall Street greed, has been careful to keep the space clean and orderly, they are still violating several rules that were posted in the plaza by owner Brookfield Properties.

The rules at the park — which is privately owned but operates as a public space that must be open 24 hours a day — include a ban on sleeping bags, tarps or sleeping on benches.

Brookfield can ask the protesters to leave, at which point police could get involved, but they have not done so yet.

Space could also start to become an issue, as the protests have grown substantially in just a few weeks.

On Wednesday some of the city's largest unions lent their support in organizing a rally and march that drew thousands of people.

A protester last week said the plaza was now housing about 200 people and that it would be difficult to sustain a much larger crowd.

Winter is also fast approaching. A committee is working on preparing for the inclement weather by getting people to donate coats and sleeping bags, but protesters have not discussed how they would handle extreme weather like a blizzard.

While the movement initially depended on the energy of young people in organizing the space, a more diverse crowd of people are being attracted to the plaza.

"You are beginning to see middle aged, middle class in addition to some of the younger students," said Miriam Siegman, 70, who lives in the city and has been traveling down to Zuccotti Park during the day.

"For me that's a very good sign, because it means that people who generally don't come out and who don't protest and make their voices heard are beginning to understand that this is a legitimate thing to do."

http://www.dnainfo.com/20111006/downtown/zuccotti-park-protesters-form-impromptu-village#ixzz1a9Fr8nwG

MidtownGuy
October 8th, 2011, 02:10 AM
Mike seems to view the "problem" as the protest, rather than the nefarious deeds of money guys & politicians that landed us in the current situation.


Of course, he's one of them. Bought his clearance for a lousy third term, bought the election with an obscene amount of money that he poured into it (and which nobody could ever match), and he looks out only for the ultra rich SOB's with whom he closely identifies. I have grown to hate him. He's a malignant tumor on this city and I can't wait to see him out of office.

lofter1
October 8th, 2011, 12:37 PM
Right now more than a few hundred skateboarders are zooming down Broadway, hooting and hollering, apparently zipping from Washington Square Park (where a march has been cancelled) on their way down to Zuccotti Park.

An NYPD cruiser, lights and sirens alive, just ripped past, through the crowd, heading south.

lofter1
October 8th, 2011, 12:44 PM
#ows Second General Assembly Of Manhattan Meets At 3PM In Washington Square Park - Anti-Flag To Play Set In Solidarity at Liberty Square
(http://occupywallst.org/article/second-general-assembly-antiflag/)
Posted Oct. 8, 2011, 1:30 a.m. EST
by OccupyWallSt (http://occupywallst.org/users/OccupyWallSt/)

#ows is growing. We will be in a thousand cities in this country by the end of the month - hundreds of cities in other countries. We will see General Assemblies on six continents.

Liberty Square has grown exponentially over the last three weeks. It is time to form a second General Assembly in Manhattan. We expect more to follow.

On October eighth at three in the afternoon a General Assembly will convene in Washington Square Park. At the same time Anti-Flag will play an acoustic set in Liberty Square in solidarity with our movement's expansion.

We are growing. Block by block – city by city. We will see change in this country, in this world. It will happen sooner than you can imagine.

***

lofter1
October 8th, 2011, 12:44 PM
Up-date from SoHo: 20 minutes later and the mass of skateboarders down Broadway continues. I've never seen such a big conglomeration of long-boarders in my life.

lofter1
October 8th, 2011, 12:52 PM
Dear friends,

I am writing to invite you to a remarkable moment. Protest artists from all over the city - and the world - have converged onto #LibertyPlaza. You've seen their vast collage of signs, tshirts, video projections and more. Now it's time to take them to Wall Street:

On Saturday, Oct. 8, for 6 hours only, Wall Street will be occupied with art. Not profiteering or credit default swaps. Not disenfranchising The 99% to prop up an unaccountable elite that peddles in influence over our schools, neighborhoods and public spaces. Just art. #OccupyArt.

The site of this magnificent exhibit couldn't be more symbolic: the historic JP Morgan House, gutted and left for years to decay as our financial system collapsed. Inside 23 Wall Street, steps from the world's largest stock exchange, another exchange is happening. A peaceful, non-destructive exchange of creative ideas.

Please come join us from 3-9pm at 23 Wall St. as we, the occupiers of Wall Street, exhibit #NoComment: a pop-up art show inspired by the #OccupyWallStreet movement.

Sincerely,
Justin Wedes
An Organizer, NYC General Assemby

www.nocommentartshow.com (http://www.nocommentartshow.com)

***

OPEN CALL FOR ARTISTS (http://www.nocommentartshow.com/call-for-art/)

“NO COMMENT,” Loft in the Red Zone

SUBMISSIONS DUE: Thursday, October 6th, Noon.

Loft in the Red Zone present a pop-up art show, entitled “No Comment,”
inspired by the #Occupy Wall Street movement at Liberty Plaza.

We will be showcasing multimedia art by activists and artists of New York.
The show concerns the current paradigm shift of human expression and the
emerging social condition.

The show will be held at the historic JP Morgan Building, at 23 Wall Street,
across from the New York Stock Exchange and Federal Hall, Saturday, October
8th, 2011 from 6-9 pm. On Sunday, removable walls with graffiti art will be
walked out of the front door of the gallery, at corner of Wall Street and
Broad.

Silent Auction will be held on Saturday evening.

lofter1
October 8th, 2011, 12:58 PM
Recent words (http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2011/10/07/peter-king-occupy-wall-street_n_1000318.html?ref=mostpopular) from a local US Congressman, Peter T. King (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peter_T._King), of NY 3rd District and Chairman of the Homeland Security Committee ...

14197

I guess he wishes we were still slogging through the rice paddies of Viet Nam.

lofter1
October 8th, 2011, 02:55 PM
Boarders down Broadway ...

http://yfrog.com/z/nwzeuiuj

MidtownGuy
October 8th, 2011, 02:57 PM
Up-date from SoHo: 20 minutes later and the mass of skateboarders down Broadway continues. I've never seen such a big conglomeration of long-boarders in my life.

Awesome!! There was another rally just south of Times Square yesterday.

lofter1
October 8th, 2011, 03:20 PM
Good to see Young Americans making some noise. And, unlike what some seem to be wishing for, there's really been little to no destructive activity.

Labeling this gathering of citizens as "Anarchists" "60s do-overs" and "Anti-American" is both bone headed and irresponsible.

I wonder what those who now make such claims would have called those guys in Boston back in 1770?

lofter1
October 8th, 2011, 03:25 PM
Meanwhile, Way Up West ...

Open Thread – Occupy Anchorage on Saturday!

MUDFLATS (http://www.themudflats.net/2011/10/06/open-thread-occupy-anchorage-on-saturday/)
October 6, 2011

This Saturday from 3-7:30 pm, join the Occupy Anchorage rally in Town Square Park next to the Anchorage Center for the Performing Arts.

Step out in solidarity with the protesters of Occupy Wall Street!

Come early to join in the organization of action committees. Stay to enjoy a peaceful protest to make the voices of the other 99% of Americans heard for equality, financial justice, and democracy.

Please bring your signs, food to share, musical instruments, ideas, costumes, puppets, friends and purpose to join us for an afternoon of street theatre and consciousness raising.

Stay tuned, as it may also be the beginning of the occupation for those brave enough to do so.

See the Facebook Event page HERE. (https://www.facebook.com/event.php?eid=268651369824278)

lofter1
October 8th, 2011, 03:58 PM
Down in DC ...

shabooty (http://twitter.com/#!/shabooty) Shabooty Bieber

#OccupyDC (http://twitter.com/#!/search?q=%23OccupyDC)

Protesters Pepper Sprayed at Air & Space Museum After Dropping 3 Story Banner: “NO DRONES STOP THE AFGHAN WAR”

http://j.mp/pCnkSC


(http://j.mp/pCnkSC)***

http://occupydc.org/

lofter1
October 8th, 2011, 04:28 PM
Heading out soon ...

Folks now gathering at Washington Square Park:

Massive turnout. Massive. WashingtonSqPark NYC. #OccupyWallStreet (http://twitpic.com/search#q=%23OccupyWallStreet&type=mixed&page=1) Growing so fast, NYPD overwhelmed

http://twitpic.com/6x7mzf

lofter1
October 8th, 2011, 08:45 PM
Earlier today, when the skater brigade was heading down Broadway ...

http://i130.photobucket.com/albums/p242/Lofter1/OccupyWallStreet/111008_OccupyWallStreet_101.jpg

http://i130.photobucket.com/albums/p242/Lofter1/OccupyWallStreet/111008_OccupyWallStreet_102.jpg

Later, over at Washington Square Park. These guys had come up from Maryland to join the skate action.

They said it was the biggest they'd ever been involved in, with over 1,500 boarders zipping around town.

http://i130.photobucket.com/albums/p242/Lofter1/OccupyWallStreet/111008_OccupyWallStreet_103.jpg


Around WSP late today, where it was declared:

"This is not a Demonstation. This is a CONVERSATION!!"

http://i130.photobucket.com/albums/p242/Lofter1/OccupyWallStreet/111008_OccupyWallStreet_104.jpg

http://i130.photobucket.com/albums/p242/Lofter1/OccupyWallStreet/111008_OccupyWallStreet_105.jpg

http://i130.photobucket.com/albums/p242/Lofter1/OccupyWallStreet/111008_OccupyWallStreet_106.jpg

http://i130.photobucket.com/albums/p242/Lofter1/OccupyWallStreet/111008_OccupyWallStreet_107.jpg

http://i130.photobucket.com/albums/p242/Lofter1/OccupyWallStreet/111008_OccupyWallStreet_108.jpg

http://i130.photobucket.com/albums/p242/Lofter1/OccupyWallStreet/111008_OccupyWallStreet_109.jpg

http://i130.photobucket.com/albums/p242/Lofter1/OccupyWallStreet/111008_OccupyWallStreet_110.jpg

*

lofter1
October 8th, 2011, 08:49 PM
It was really kind of amazing. All around WSP people actually engaging in a discussion of ideas ...

http://i130.photobucket.com/albums/p242/Lofter1/OccupyWallStreet/111008_OccupyWallStreet_21.jpg

http://i130.photobucket.com/albums/p242/Lofter1/OccupyWallStreet/111008_OccupyWallStreet_22.jpg

http://i130.photobucket.com/albums/p242/Lofter1/OccupyWallStreet/111008_OccupyWallStreet_23.jpg

http://i130.photobucket.com/albums/p242/Lofter1/OccupyWallStreet/111008_OccupyWallStreet_24.jpg

http://i130.photobucket.com/albums/p242/Lofter1/OccupyWallStreet/111008_OccupyWallStreet_25.jpg

http://i130.photobucket.com/albums/p242/Lofter1/OccupyWallStreet/111008_OccupyWallStreet_26.jpg

http://i130.photobucket.com/albums/p242/Lofter1/OccupyWallStreet/111008_OccupyWallStreet_27.jpg

http://i130.photobucket.com/albums/p242/Lofter1/OccupyWallStreet/111008_OccupyWallStreet_28.jpg

http://i130.photobucket.com/albums/p242/Lofter1/OccupyWallStreet/111008_OccupyWallStreet_29.jpg

*

lofter1
October 8th, 2011, 08:52 PM
There were all sorts of folks there ...

http://i130.photobucket.com/albums/p242/Lofter1/OccupyWallStreet/111008_OccupyWallStreet_31.jpg

http://i130.photobucket.com/albums/p242/Lofter1/OccupyWallStreet/111008_OccupyWallStreet_32.jpg

http://i130.photobucket.com/albums/p242/Lofter1/OccupyWallStreet/111008_OccupyWallStreet_33.jpg

http://i130.photobucket.com/albums/p242/Lofter1/OccupyWallStreet/111008_OccupyWallStreet_34.jpg

http://i130.photobucket.com/albums/p242/Lofter1/OccupyWallStreet/111008_OccupyWallStreet_35.jpg

http://i130.photobucket.com/albums/p242/Lofter1/OccupyWallStreet/111008_OccupyWallStreet_36.jpg

http://i130.photobucket.com/albums/p242/Lofter1/OccupyWallStreet/111008_OccupyWallStreet_37.jpg

http://i130.photobucket.com/albums/p242/Lofter1/OccupyWallStreet/111008_OccupyWallStreet_38.jpg

The ideas are formulating into something bigger. This won't be dying off anytime soon.

Welcome to Our American Autumn. Which always leads to Spring.

Merry
October 8th, 2011, 09:20 PM
Wow, far out man, things haven't been this exciting since all those groovy happenings in the '60s...only (kinda) kidding :cool:.

This is amazing and so uplifting. I think we're all way overdue for a peaceful, well-organised, ideas-driven, ordinary people's revolution. Take note, pollies of the world.

This commenter on the pic Loft posted (http://twitpic.com/6x7mzf) has it right:


Bosbey (http://twitpic.com/photos/Bosbey) about an hour ago
People get ready there's a train a coming, you don't need no ticket, you just get on board. Keep Marchin

Thanks for all the pics and commentary, Loft :). Keep with the movement.

Merry
October 8th, 2011, 09:34 PM
Occupy Wall Street and the limits of spontaneous street protest

by Eric Augenbraun

The anger I get, but the movement needs a coherent message and broader connections if it wants to win political change

Those who, like me, expected the Occupy Wall Street protest to fizzle out, or be actively stomped out, after just a few days, have been surprised to see that after nearly two weeks, it is still going strong. Recent confrontations with the police – especially the 'pepper spray' incidents – have emboldened protesters and stimulated the kind of media attention many supporters complained was lacking in the demonstration's early days.

It is hard to disagree with Doug Henwood and others that insofar as any political ideology can be discerned from the protest, it would be the flavor du jour of American anti-corporate populism. But, in the absence of anything else, that's been enough to draw leftwing luminaries from Michael Moore, to Roseanne Barr, to Cornel West.

Sure, the fact that people are angered enough by the largely unpenalised greed and venality of major financial institutions to camp out in Zuccotti Park indefinitely is certainly a welcome development. But the protest leaves unanswered a number of questions about just what kind of effort it would take to create a more just society. The statement of purpose for the demonstration reads:



"The beauty of this new formula, and what makes this novel tactic exciting, is its pragmatic simplicity. [W]e talk to each other in various physical gatherings and virtual people's assemblies … we zero in on what our one demand will be, a demand that awakens the imagination and, if achieved, would propel us toward the radical democracy of the future …"


On a screen, this message has a sort of melodic appeal; in practice, its shortcomings are thrown into relief. Josh Sternberg of Mediaite.com, who visited the protest on Wednesday, noted:



"As of now, it's a haphazard process, as there's no leadership, no message. Nothing but a group of a few hundred people – and of that group, I saw about 10 to 15 actually take charge of something – trying to figure out what they're doing."


In addition to underscoring the folly of the current fascination with the "leaderless" protest, this illustrates the more general problem with the impulse on the American left to be "doing something" – without necessarily much idea of what that should be. We may be looking at what Liza Featherstone, Doug Henwood and Christian Parenti aptly termed "activistism" in their 2002 essay, "Action Will Be Taken":



"This brave new ideology combines the political illiteracy of hyper-mediated American culture with all the moral zeal of a 19th-century temperance crusade. In this worldview, all roads lead to more activism and more activists. And the one who acts is righteous.

"The activistists seem to borrow their philosophy from the factory boss in a Heinrich Böll short story who greets his employees each morning with the exhortation 'Let's have some action.' To which the workers obediently reply: 'Action will be taken!'"


Where, to their credit, the Wall Street occupiers differ from the "activistists" described by Featherstone et al is in their attempt to think of change in much broader, systemic terms – as muddled as their demands may be. But what they have in common with "activistism" is a misunderstanding of the relationship of the movement to the demonstration.

The parallels being drawn by protesters and some of the media between Occupy Wall Street and the Tahrir Square uprising in Egypt that began early this year are revealing. As Patrick Glennon writes for In These Times:



"The activists behind Occupy Wall Street hope to emulate the success of Tahrir Square, which was an integral force in the dethroning of former Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak last February. In Cairo's case, the occupied square became the most compelling symbol of the country's spontaneous rebellion against its autocratic leader."


But just what is the parallel here? It seems more stylistic and rhetorical than anything else. After all, we now know the uprising in Egypt to have been anything but spontaneous. "Spontaneous" is a label frequently applied by the media to describe insurgencies that to them appear to have come out of nowhere. In fact, the circulation among Egyptian protestors of a 26-page leaflet providing a blueprint for action suggests a great deal of foresight and preparation by organisers. As Robert Dreyfuss of the Nation wrote:



"Contrary to some media reports, which have portrayed the upsurge in Egypt as a leaderless rebellion, a fairly well-organised movement is emerging to take charge, comprising students, labor activists, lawyers, a network of intellectuals, Egypt's Islamists, a handful of political parties and miscellaneous advocates for 'change'."


Which brings us to my central point: what is the purpose of protest? As history shows, protests can certainly be effective in winning concessions from those in power, but only to the extent that they are representative of broader movements. When it is effective, protest itself is little more than the public expression of a major social mobilisation already organised.

In all probability, Occupy Wall Street will achieve no measurable political change; the best-case scenario for participants is that they will leave Wall Street with wind in their sails. The scope has already widened as plans emerge for similar protests in cities like Boston and Los Angeles. These protests, though, will continue to draw from a relatively narrow pool of self-selecting participants. And without any clear definition of goals or constituency, without organisation of a leadership structure or an attempt to form coalitions with established movements, they are likely to skew towards a voluntaristic politics of "witness-bearing". The endorsement that protesters received Thursday from the New York Transit Workers Union is a major step in the right direction, but without more support and links like this, they risk remaining isolated from the broad class-based movement that is needed to alter the shape of the American political and economic terrain – a movement that can unite the 99% against the 1%, to use their supporters' formulation.

The advent of "hashtag activism" has been greeted with breathless claims about the birth of a new form of technology-based social movement. While such technologies can be extremely useful tools, they do not represent alternatives to the exhausting, age-old work of meeting people where they are, hearing their concerns, reaching common ground, building trust and convincing them that it is in their interests to act politically to change their circumstances. There are no shortcuts here; or to put it another way, it's not the protests that matter, but what happens in the time in between.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/commentisfree/cifamerica/2011/sep/29/occupy-wall-street-protest

Merry
October 8th, 2011, 09:43 PM
Occupy Wall Street Protests Spread Across the Country With No Unified Message

By OLIVIA KATRANDJIAN

As the Occupy Wall Street (http://occupywallst.org/) movement enters its fourth week of protests in lower Manhattan and spreads within New York and to several other major U.S. cities, its message is becoming a bouillabaisse of views representing the many groups that have signed on.

Their causes include such diverse issues as global warming, gas prices and corporate greed -- though most seem to be fueled by the common thread of anger at the wealthy and powerful at the expense of the middle class and less fortunate.

The Occupy Wall Street website says organizers took their inspiration in part from the so-called Arab Spring demonstrations that have tried to bring democracy across the Arab world.

"We will be in a thousand cities in this country by the end of the month - hundreds of cities in other countries. We will see General Assemblies on six continents," read a post on the movement's website (http://occupywallst.org/) today.

But with the protests spreading to so many cities, a unified message has failed to come across, leaving many wondering what exactly people are protesting about.

"There is no one, unified message for the protesters, but that doesn't mean these protests are not real," said Jake Horowitz, the co-founder of PolicyMic (http://www.policymic.com/), a news site focused on millennial politics. "From students protesting against tuition hikes to union leaders speaking out against the death of the middle class, people are angry and disillusioned with the economy and political process. They feel that a small few are racking up huge profits while the vast majority of Americans are suffering.

"More importantly," he added, "they feel that Washington is only representing the select few. These protests do not have a clear end-goal or aim in mind, but they represent a chance for people to vent their frustrations and commiserate, to finally raise their collective voices and get Washington to listen. While there is no one person or policy that is the target of these protests, this is not a fringe movement of hippies and radicals," Horowitz added.

Protests at Freedom Plaza in Washington, D.C. kicked off Thursday. A video on the Occupy D.C. website showed some protesters dressed up as wealthy investment bankers riding the subway, holding champagne glasses and toasting to the "1 percent" -- the wealthiest Americans.

Others chose to mark the 10th anniversary of the start of the U.S. war in Afghanistan at a church near Dupont Circle.

The Stop the Machine movement also joined the protest, although Occupy D.C. made clear on its website that the two groups are not affiliated.

In Georgia, several hundred people have joined the Occupy Wall Street movement, setting up their own demonstrations in Georgia with group names like the "99 Percenters" and Occupy Atlanta.
"The 99 percent of Americans who basically fall into the middle class or the lower class who are suffering from unemployment ... are suffering from corporate America basically gouging the middle class," protester Alethia Hyman said.

U.S. Rep. John Lewis, D-Ga., showed up at rally in Atlanta, hoping to lend a word of his support, but the crowd voted against hearing him speak.

Lewis shared what he had wanted to say with ABC: "I stand with you. I support you, what you're doing to humanize American corporations, humanize the American government and look out for those who have been left out and left behind."

In Los Angeles, protesters have been camping outside city hall for over a week.

Earlier this week, about 40 protesters from ReFund California, a coalition of advocacy groups and union members, barged past security guards into a California Bankers Association meeting at the Balboa Bay Club in Newport Beach, chanting, "Make banks pay!" the Los Angeles Times reported (http://www.latimes.com/business/la-fi-occupy-la-20111004,0,5287534.story?track=icymi).

Occupy Wall Street Heads to Union Square in Manhattan

In New York, the Occupy Wall Street protesters, who have been joined by unions, 200 orthodox Jews, the Naked Cowboy and a Sarah Palin impersonator, are marching into Union Square today in attempt to find more space.

"Obviously, we've outgrown our current space; we've met our capacity," organizer Matt Vrvilo, 20, of Portland, Ore., told the New York Daily News. "It's critical to find more space. ... We have to migrate some of our people to another location." But in city parks like Union Square, mandatory curfews are applicable. So if the protesters try to stay overnight, they will be breaking the law."

Added a post on the movement's website (http://occupywallst.org/) today: "We are growing. Block by block -- city by city. We will see change in this country, in this world. It will happen sooner than you can imagine."

The post announced the group will form a second general assembly in Washington Square Park today at 3 p.m. It is unclear how the group plans to be in two places at once.
Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg described the protests as "trying to destroy the jobs of working people in this city" on his weekly radio program.

"Their salaries come from the taxes paid by the people they're trying to vilify," he said, referring to the public-sector unions that have joined the protests.

http://abcnews.go.com/US/occupy-wall-street-protests-spread-country-clear-unified/story?id=14696466&singlePage=true

Merry
October 8th, 2011, 09:49 PM
For Mayor, ‘Occupy Wall Street’ Evokes Protests From Vietnam Era (http://www.nytimes.com/2011/10/08/nyregion/for-bloomberg-occupy-wall-street-evokes-vietnam-era-protests.html)


Joyce Purnick, a former reporter at The New York Times and the author of a biography of Mr. Bloomberg, said she recalled asking him if he had participated in any antiwar protests, and he said no. “He said, ‘You just didn’t do that at that time,’ ” Ms. Purnick said.

She said she was not surprised that he now took a dim view of the Occupy Wall Street protesters.

“He believes in getting things done, and he doesn’t think this is the way things get done,” she said. “He’s an action guy.” :confused: :rolleyes:

lofter1
October 8th, 2011, 11:21 PM
Pretty narrow thinker, our mayor is. Guys like that probably think we would have beat the commies in Nam, if not for the folks back home who spoke out against the death & deceit, and foiled our wrong-headed foreign misadventure.

Merry
October 9th, 2011, 01:55 AM
Occupy Wall Street: Mark Rudd, Former Radical Leader, Reacts To Protests

by Simon McCormack

http://i.huffpost.com/gen/370968/thumbs/r-OCCUPY-WALL-STREET-large570.jpg

Mark Rudd was once a leader of an organization that advocated for the violent overthrow of the American government.

He is also the ex-husband of this reporter's mom.

In 1968, he led the occupation (http://alibi.com/feature/27940/The-Weatherman-and-Me.html) of five buildings on Columbia's campus to protest the university's funding of the Vietnam War. In many ways, he became the face of student organizing and mass protests. He traveled the country speaking at various schools and had his picture featured in the New York Times and Newsweek.

Rudd's formerly peaceful activism with the Students for a Democratic Society was abandoned in 1969 when he joined the Weathermen, a group of young white men and women who believed that any means necessary, including violence, was required to bring capitalism down.

His endorsement of violence is something Rudd now greatly regrets, as he mentions repeatedly in his book Underground: My Life with SDS and the Weathermen. He's careful to assert that his extreme approach was adopted during a time of severe racism and repression and in the midst of the unjust Vietnam War. Still, he acknowledges that promoting violence was counterproductive.

"To act as if we could build a true revolutionary, anti-imperialist movement at a time when what we really should have been doing was uniting as many people as possible to end the war was a terrible mistake," Mark told the Weekly Alibi in 2009. (http://alibi.com/feature/27940/The-Weatherman-and-Me.html) "It's like taking a victory and turning it into defeat."

The now retired math teacher spoke with The Huffington Post about his take on the current protests that have sprung up across the country and the challenges the Occupy Wall Street movement faces. The interview has been condensed and edited.

What was your first reaction when you heard about Occupy Wall Street?

It's thrilling to see young people taking action on social, political and moral issues. I've been waiting a long time for this. This is well timed in terms of the economic and political crisis that the country is experiencing. It's a great response.

What do you think of the charge that protesters lack concrete demands?

The whole slogan of the protest is that one percent of the country owns and controls the entire government. That implies all sorts of demands. That's a pseudo-liberal phony criticism. Liberals in general, I use that word in the historic sense, the way we used it 40 years ago, as apposed to radicals, but Liberals are scared by upheaval. A radical analysis goes down to the root of the problem. The root is the terrible imbalance in this country.

What do you see as the biggest challenges Occupy Wall Street faces?

Maybe my biggest fear is that there might not be an evolution of the movement towards politics. That was part of the problem with the New Left. It never coalesced around politicos. That's not a criticism of Occupy Wall Street. But there has to be some eventual movement toward strategy and power and the only possible movement toward politics is a transformation of the Democratic party. Or you could form a third party, but those never work. It's gonna have to mean supporting progressive Democrats everywhere.

What do you see as the key differences between the Weathermen and Occupy Wall Street?

They're involved with real down-to-earth issues. Tax the rich, give the people power. We had a fantasy of revolution. Secondly, we were committed to a crazy notion of violent revolution. We are the 99 percent is a brilliant slogan. It's a metaphor. They are much smarter than we were. They understand the power of non-violence.

Were you surprised at how the movement has progressed and how many other demonstrations have sprouted up?

In a way I'm not, because I know there are thousands of people who were waiting to take action. It's gotta grow to a mass thing and it will, hopefully.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2011/10/07/occupy-wall-street-mark-rudd_n_1000771.html?ncid=edlinkusaolp00000003

Merry
October 9th, 2011, 01:58 AM
Occupy Wall Street: The Most Important Thing in the World Now

by Naomi Klein

I was honored to be invited to speak at Occupy Wall Street on Thursday night. Since amplification is (disgracefully) banned, and everything I say will have to be repeated by hundreds of people so others can hear (a k a “the human microphone”), what I actually say at Liberty Plaza will have to be very short. With that in mind, here is the longer, uncut version of the speech.

I love you.

And I didn’t just say that so that hundreds of you would shout “I love you” back, though that is obviously a bonus feature of the human microphone. Say unto others what you would have them say unto you, only way louder.

Yesterday, one of the speakers at the labor rally said: “We found each other.” That sentiment captures the beauty of what is being created here. A wide-open space (as well as an idea so big it can’t be contained by any space) for all the people who want a better world to find each other. We are so grateful.

If there is one thing I know, it is that the 1 percent loves a crisis. When people are panicked and desperate and no one seems to know what to do, that is the ideal time to push through their wish list of pro-corporate policies: privatizing education and social security, slashing public services, getting rid of the last constraints on corporate power. Amidst the economic crisis, this is happening the world over.

And there is only one thing that can block this tactic, and fortunately, it’s a very big thing: the 99 percent. And that 99 percent is taking to the streets from Madison to Madrid to say “No. We will not pay for your crisis.”

That slogan began in Italy in 2008. It ricocheted to Greece and France and Ireland and finally it has made its way to the square mile where the crisis began.

“Why are they protesting?” ask the baffled pundits on TV. Meanwhile, the rest of the world asks: “What took you so long?” “We’ve been wondering when you were going to show up.” And most of all: “Welcome.”

Many people have drawn parallels between Occupy Wall Street and the so-called anti-globalization protests that came to world attention in Seattle in 1999. That was the last time a global, youth-led, decentralized movement took direct aim at corporate power. And I am proud to have been part of what we called “the movement of movements.”

But there are important differences too. For instance, we chose summits as our targets: the World Trade Organization, the International Monetary Fund, the G8. Summits are transient by their nature, they only last a week. That made us transient too. We’d appear, grab world headlines, then disappear. And in the frenzy of hyper patriotism and militarism that followed the 9/11 attacks, it was easy to sweep us away completely, at least in North America.

Occupy Wall Street, on the other hand, has chosen a fixed target. And you have put no end date on your presence here. This is wise. Only when you stay put can you grow roots. This is crucial. It is a fact of the information age that too many movements spring up like beautiful flowers but quickly die off. It’s because they don’t have roots. And they don’t have long term plans for how they are going to sustain themselves. So when storms come, they get washed away.

Being horizontal and deeply democratic is wonderful. But these principles are compatible with the hard work of building structures and institutions that are sturdy enough to weather the storms ahead. I have great faith that this will happen.

Something else this movement is doing right: You have committed yourselves to non-violence. You have refused to give the media the images of broken windows and street fights it craves so desperately. And that tremendous discipline has meant that, again and again, the story has been the disgraceful and unprovoked police brutality. Which we saw more of just last night. Meanwhile, support for this movement grows and grows. More wisdom.

But the biggest difference a decade makes is that in 1999, we were taking on capitalism at the peak of a frenzied economic boom. Unemployment was low, stock portfolios were bulging. The media was drunk on easy money. Back then it was all about start-ups, not shutdowns.

We pointed out that the deregulation behind the frenzy came at a price. It was damaging to labor standards. It was damaging to environmental standards. Corporations were becoming more powerful than governments and that was damaging to our democracies. But to be honest with you, while the good times rolled, taking on an economic system based on greed was a tough sell, at least in rich countries.

Ten years later, it seems as if there aren’t any more rich countries. Just a whole lot of rich people. People who got rich looting the public wealth and exhausting natural resources around the world.

The point is, today everyone can see that the system is deeply unjust and careening out of control. Unfettered greed has trashed the global economy. And it is trashing the natural world as well. We are overfishing our oceans, polluting our water with fracking and deepwater drilling, turning to the dirtiest forms of energy on the planet, like the Alberta tar sands. And the atmosphere cannot absorb the amount of carbon we are putting into it, creating dangerous warming. The new normal is serial disasters: economic and ecological.

These are the facts on the ground. They are so blatant, so obvious, that it is a lot easier to connect with the public than it was in 1999, and to build the movement quickly.

We all know, or at least sense, that the world is upside down: we act as if there is no end to what is actually finite—fossil fuels and the atmospheric space to absorb their emissions. And we act as if there are strict and immovable limits to what is actually bountiful—the financial resources to build the kind of society we need.

The task of our time is to turn this around: to challenge this false scarcity. To insist that we can afford to build a decent, inclusive society—while at the same time, respect the real limits to what the earth can take.

What climate change means is that we have to do this on a deadline. This time our movement cannot get distracted, divided, burned out or swept away by events. This time we have to succeed. And I’m not talking about regulating the banks and increasing taxes on the rich, though that’s important.

I am talking about changing the underlying values that govern our society. That is hard to fit into a single media-friendly demand, and it’s also hard to figure out how to do it. But it is no less urgent for being difficult.

That is what I see happening in this square. In the way you are feeding each other, keeping each other warm, sharing information freely and proving health care, meditation classes and empowerment training. My favorite sign here says, “I care about you.” In a culture that trains people to avoid each other’s gaze, to say, “Let them die,” that is a deeply radical statement.

A few final thoughts. In this great struggle, here are some things that don’t matter.

§ What we wear.

§ Whether we shake our fists or make peace signs.

§ Whether we can fit our dreams for a better world into a media soundbite.

And here are a few things that do matter.

§ Our courage.

§ Our moral compass.

§ How we treat each other.

We have picked a fight with the most powerful economic and political forces on the planet. That’s frightening. And as this movement grows from strength to strength, it will get more frightening. Always be aware that there will be a temptation to shift to smaller targets—like, say, the person sitting next to you at this meeting. After all, that is a battle that’s easier to win.

Don’t give in to the temptation. I’m not saying don’t call each other on shit. But this time, let’s treat each other as if we plan to work side by side in struggle for many, many years to come.

Because the task before will demand nothing less.

Let’s treat this beautiful movement as if it is most important thing in the world. Because it is. It really is.

https://www.commondreams.org/view/2011/10/07-0#.TpD-qIwa7E5.twitter

Merry
October 9th, 2011, 04:43 AM
Humanity is OK. It's society that sucks. I agree with this sentiment, though.

http://owni.eu/files/2011/10/occupywallstreetguywithsign.jpg

Occupy Wall Street – How to Occupy an Abstraction (http://govinthelab.com/occupy-wall-street-%E2%80%93-how-to-occupy-an-abstraction/)

lofter1
October 9th, 2011, 10:05 AM
WORD of the DAY:

OLIGOPOLY (http://stats.oecd.org/glossary/detail.asp?ID=3270)

lofter1
October 9th, 2011, 10:18 AM
From this linked article: Occupy Wall Street – How to Occupy an Abstraction (http://govinthelab.com/occupy-wall-street-–-how-to-occupy-an-abstraction/)

A refusal to make demands

How can you occupy an abstraction? Perhaps only with another abstraction. Occupy Wall Street took over a more or less public park nestled in the downtown landscape of tower blocks, not too far from the old World Trade Center site, and set up camp. It is an occupation which, almost uniquely, does not have demands. It has at its core a suggestion: what if people came together and found a way to structure a conversation which might come up with a better way to run the world? Could they do any worse than the way it is run by the combined efforts of Wall Street as rentier class and Wall Street as computerized vectors trading intangible assets?

hbcat
October 9th, 2011, 11:31 AM
Boarders down Broadway ...

http://yfrog.com/z/nwzeuiuj

A vid of same --


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0x7O9aZwepA

lofter1
October 9th, 2011, 12:20 PM
Looks like the get-together was communicated via SHERED (http://sheredmag.com/2011/10/broadway-bomb-2011/):

BROADWAY BOMB (http://bwaybomb.tumblr.com/)

WHEN: Saturday, October 8th @ NOON.
Riverside Park and 116th St – Manhattan.
WHAT: Push Race on Broadway Ave. in Manhattan through traffic

POST RACE BARBECUE
WHEN: Saturday, October 8th @ 2pm
WHERE: East River Park, Manhattan

AFTER PARTY – YOU DESERVE IT!
WHEN: – Saturday, Oct 8th @ 7pm
WHERE: Lucky Jacks 126 Allen Street (next to the Longboard Loft NYC) – Manhattan.

20 min. VID at SHERED (http://sheredmag.com/2011/10/broadway-bomb-2011/) and VIMEO (http://vimeo.com/21405702) on the history of the Broadway Bomb

http://thisispushculture.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/09/bomb-218x300.jpg

hbcat
October 9th, 2011, 09:52 PM
October 9, 2011, 11:33 AM
Artists Occupy Wall Street for a 24-Hour Show
http://cityroom.blogs.nytimes.com/2011/10/09/artists-occupy-wall-street-for-a-24-hour-show/
By COLIN MOYNIHAN (http://cityroom.blogs.nytimes.com/author/colin-moynihan/)

http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2011/10/10/nyregion/9exhibit1-cityroom/9exhibit1-cityroom-blog480.jpg
Robert Stolarik for The New York TimesPeople mill about the exhibit named “No Comment,” a show with a wide variety of politically themed art at the former building of JP Morgan & Co.

http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2011/10/10/nyregion/9exhibit2-cityroom/9exhibit2-cityroom-articleInline.jpg
Robert Stolarik for The New York TimesOne of the works shown during “No Comment,” a politically themed art show located across from the New York Stock Exchange.
http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2011/10/10/nyregion/9exhibit3-cityroom/9exhibit3-cityroom-articleInline.jpg
Robert Stolarik for The New York TimesTwo unidentified men hang a piece during the “No Comment” art exhibit in the former JP Morgan & Co. headquarters.

For weeks, a growing collection of protesters have tried to get their grievances heard on Wall Street — even if the police have prevented them from establishing a physical presence on the fabled street.
On Saturday night, the Occupy Wall Street movement managed to gain a temporary foothold on Wall Street, courtesy of an art show partly inspired by the group’s protests.

The show was held inside a landmark building built in 1914 as the headquarters of J.P. Morgan, across from the New York Stock Exchange; it has been empty for about five years.

The show, called No Comment, was scheduled to be up for only 24 hours, from Saturday evening until Sunday evening. It combined art that addressed a wide variety of political themes with pieces that were derived directly from the recent protests.

The organizers included Marika Maiorova, who arranged to use the former bank building in September for a show reflecting on the events of Sept. 11, 2001; and Anna Harrah, one of those who had been participating in three weeks of protests, aimed at criticizing inequities in the financial system.

The idea for the show came, Ms. Maiorova said, when her September show was disrupted to some degree by the maze of metal barricades set up by the police to help control marches by protesters.

She joined with Ms. Harrah, who had joined Occupy Wall Street’s art and culture committee. The two put out a call for submissions and ended up with dozens of pieces of work, including paintings, illustrations, photographs and video installations.

Items inspired by the protests included a collection of cardboard signs created by demonstrators, a large spray-painted banner reading “Occupy Wall Street,” and a plate that had been at the protesters’ stronghold at Zuccotti Park, which carried the message, “If you need money take some,” and also held a handful of dollar bills.

One of the artists who assisted in putting the show together, Lee Wells, contributed an installation consisting of two tents and American flags. It was a commentary, he said, on the fact that the police had decreed that the protesters sleeping in Zuccotti Park could not erect tents.

Ms. Maiorova said that some of the pieces of art could be sold at a silent auction, with most of the proceeds going to the artists but some being donated to Occupy Wall Street, or to her own organization, Loft in the Red Zone, which had rented the raw, cavernous space inside the Morgan building.

As crowds strolled through the show on Saturday night, three men with badges walked past barricades set up outside, entered the show and looked around. Soon, the streets outside were filled with police vehicles and uniformed officers.

Inside the gallery, Ms. Harrah gazed at the crowd and reflected on the irony of the show’s setting.
“As soon as I saw this place, I said let’s make something happen here,”
she said. “It seems only right to occupy this space.”

hbcat
October 9th, 2011, 10:59 PM
Let your life be a counter-friction to stop the machine. What I have to do is to see, at any rate, that I do not lend myself to the wrong which I condemn.
As for adopting the ways of the State has provided for remedying the evil, I know not of such ways. They take too much time, and a man's life will be gone.I have other affairs to attend to. I came into this world, not chiefly to make this a good place to live in, but to live in it, be it good or bad.



-- Henry David Thoreau, Resistance to Civil Government (1849)



14206

Source: Nate Silver, NYTimes
http://fivethirtyeight.blogs.nytimes.com/

lofter1
October 9th, 2011, 11:36 PM
As crowds strolled through the show on Saturday night, three men with badges walked past barricades set up outside, entered the show and looked around. Soon, the streets outside were filled with police vehicles and uniformed officers.

It's really disconcerting that the NYPD and NYC officials view each and every act of those involved in OWS as a threat that needs to be monitored.

(too bad they failed to do the same with the guys who ripped us all off a few years back -- surely one or more of them broke the law, no?)

Today I heard a drum beat outside my window. There were about eight guys walking up Broadway, on the sidewalk, beating a drum, chanting "We are the 99%" and were trailed by four NYPD officers. As far as I know, even under NYC's most onerous laws, groups of under 20 people can gather and walk together without the need of a parade permit. I never see NYPD trailing a tour group walking en masse through SoHo. Or following a group of NYU students being shown the neighborhood.

lofter1
October 10th, 2011, 12:48 AM
Ben & Jerry's takes a stand ...

To those who Occupy: We stand with you. (http://www.benjerry.com/activism/occupy-movement/)

http://www.eteignezvotreordinateur.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/10/Ben-Jerrys-apporte-son-soutien-au-mouvement-de-contestation-Occupy-Wall-Street.jpg
We, the Ben & Jerry’s Board of Directors, compelled by our personal convictions and our Company’s mission and values, wish to express our deepest admiration to all of you who have initiated the non-violent Occupy Wall Street Movement and to those around the country who have joined in solidarity. The issues raised are of fundamental importance to all of us. These include:

The inequity that exists between classes in our country is simply immoral.
We are in an unemployment crisis. Almost 14 million people are unemployed. Nearly 20% of African American men are unemployed. Over 25% of our nation’s youth are unemployed.
Many workers who have jobs have to work 2 or 3 of them just to scrape by.
Higher education is almost impossible to obtain without going deeply in debt.
Corporations are permitted to spend unlimited resources to influence elections while stockpiling a trillion dollars rather than hiring people.
We know the media will either ignore you or frame the issue as to who may be getting pepper sprayed rather than addressing the despair and hardships borne by so many, or accurately conveying what this movement is about. All this goes on while corporate profits continue to soar and millionaires whine about paying a bit more in taxes. And we have not even mentioned the environment.

We know that words are relatively easy but we wanted to act quickly to demonstrate our support. As a board and as a company we have actively been involved with these issues for years but your efforts have put them out front in a way we have not been able to do. We have provided support to citizens’ efforts to rein in corporate money in politics, we pay a livable wage to our employees, we directly support family farms and we are working to source fairly traded ingredients for all our products. But we realize that Occupy Wall Street is calling for systemic change. We support this call to action and are honored to join you in this call to take back our nation and democracy.

— Ben & Jerry’s Board of Directors

lofter1
October 10th, 2011, 01:51 AM
Geraldo Rivera & his Faux News Team Get Drummed Out of Zuccotti Park Sunday October 9 ...


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XWtGg-La1nc

lofter1
October 10th, 2011, 02:24 AM
Down at OccupyDC a right wing media guy (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_American_Spectator) starts some trouble to make a story ...

American Spectator Editor Admits to Being Agent Provocateur at D.C. Museum

FIREDOGLAKE (http://my.firedoglake.com/cgrapski/2011/10/09/american-standard-editor-admits-to-being-agent-provacateur-at-d-c-museum/)
October 9, 2011

The following photograph taken by opednews.com (http://www.opednews.com/articles/Reporter-and-Occupy-Wash-D-by-Rob-Kall-111008-611.html) shows a confrontation in the lobby of the National Air and Space Museum between two individuals and an officer shortly before video shows officers with the Museum’s security forces rush outside indiscriminately pepper-spraying numerous individuals.

http://crayfisher.files.wordpress.com/2011/10/howley-possible.jpg

It appears that one of the two in the confrontation with the security officer is Patrick Howley, Assistant Editor (http://spectator.org/people/patrick-howley/all) of The American Spectator. [See the following photograph in which Howley's Facebook Profile Photo is side-by-side with the person pictured at the Air and Space Museum]

http://i55.tinypic.com/2w3vxuh.jpg

Immediately after the incident began hitting the newswires Howley published a “Breaking News” story with The American Spectator online (http://spectator.org/archives/2011/10/08/standoff-in-dc) in which he reveals that he had consciously infiltrated the group on Friday with the intent to discredit the movement. He states that “as far as anyone knew I was part of this cause — a cause that I had infiltrated the day before in order to mock and undermine in the pages of The American Spectator — and I wasn’t giving up before I had my story.”

[NOTE: The Link to Howley's story at the American Spectator now says: "You have tried to access a URL that no longer exists or was entered incorrectly!"]

According to Howley’s story he joined the group in its march toward the Air and Space Museum but the protesters on the march were unwilling to be confrontational. He states “they lack the nerve to confront authority. From estimates within the protest, only ten people were pepper-sprayed, and as far as I could tell I was the only one who got inside.”

He claims that upon arrival at the Museum the group of approximately one hundred protesters split into two factions with the smaller of the two “rushing the doors,” the majority “staying behind.” Howley then admits in his piece that he snuck past the guard at the first entrance in order to “infiltrate” the building and then confronted another guard. He then “sprinted toward the door” at which time he was first hit with pepper-spray.

As he describes his next actions “I forced myself into the doors and sprinted blindly across the floor of the Air and Space Museum, drawing the attention of hundreds of stunned khaki-clad tourists (some of whom began snapping off disposable-camera portraits of me).”

FULL STORY (http://my.firedoglake.com/cgrapski/2011/10/09/american-standard-editor-admits-to-being-agent-provacateur-at-d-c-museum/)

hbcat
October 10th, 2011, 10:22 AM
It's really disconcerting that the NYPD and NYC officials view each and every act of those involved in OWS as a threat that needs to be monitored.

(too bad they failed to do the same with the guys who ripped us all off a few years back -- surely one or more of them broke the law, no?)

Today I heard a drum beat outside my window. There were about eight guys walking up Broadway, on the sidewalk, beating a drum, chanting "We are the 99%" and were trailed by four NYPD officers. As far as I know, even under NYC's most onerous laws, groups of under 20 people can gather and walk together without the need of a parade permit. I never see NYPD trailing a tour group walking en masse through SoHo. Or following a group of NYU students being shown the neighborhood.

But this is actually a good thing. Police harassment is unpleasant, but look at that graph posted in the NYTimes. The arrests and abusive use of mace have put raised the profile of these demonstrations. As long as no one is seriously harmed, the policing is to be welcomed.

hbcat
October 10th, 2011, 10:27 AM
Geraldo Rivera & his Faux News Team Get Drummed Out of Zuccotti Park Sunday October 9 ...


Brilliant. It took me a while to hear "Fox News lies!" I thought they were chanting, uh ... something else... but equally relevant.

'Nah, nah, nah, nah, hey, hey, hey -- good bye!'

lofter1
October 10th, 2011, 10:34 AM
Yep, the alternative understanding of the Zuccotti chant was the first thing that popped into my mind, too.

mariab
October 10th, 2011, 05:03 PM
For those of you who have talked to the leaders: Have you heard anything about possibly getting an organized, well spoken contingent together to speak before congress to redress their grievances?

ZippyTheChimp
October 10th, 2011, 06:20 PM
Dylan Ratigan from MSNBC (and CNBC before that) was at Zuccotti Plaza last weekend.

If you missed it, he delivered a classic rant on TV a few months ago:


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gIcqb9hHQ3E&feature=player_embedded#!

He's now involved in the drafting of a Constitutional Amendment on political campaign financing. Two draft versions:


No person, corporation or business entity of any type, domestic or foreign, shall be allowed to contribute money, directly or indirectly, to any candidate for Federal office or to contribute money on behalf of or opposed to any type of campaign for Federal office. Notwithstanding any other provision of law, campaign contributions to candidates for Federal office shall not constitute speech of any kind as guaranteed by the U.S. Constitution or any amendment to the U. S. Constitution. Congress shall set forth a federal holiday for the purposes of voting for candidates for Federal office


No non-citizen shall contribute money, directly or indirectly, to any candidate for Federal office. United States citizens shall be free to contribute no more than the equivalent of $100 to any federal candidate during any election cycle. Notwithstanding the limits construed to be part of the First Amendment, Congress shall have the power to limit, but not ban, independent political expenditures, so long as such limits are content and viewpoint neutral. Congress shall set forth a federal holiday for the purposes of voting for candidates for Federal office

You can add your name to the petition at


Get Money Out (http://www.getmoneyout.com/)

lofter1
October 10th, 2011, 07:54 PM
The second option, limiting a contribution to $100 per person per candidate, is the more viable of the two drafts.

lofter1
October 10th, 2011, 08:36 PM
Who Do the White Shirt Police Report to at Occupy Wall Street Protests?

Financial Giants Put New York City Cops On Their Payroll

COUNTERPUNCH (http://www.counterpunch.org/2011/10/10/financial-giants-put-new-york-city-cops-on-their-payroll/)
by PAM MARTENS
OCTOBER 10, 2011

Videos are springing up across the internet showing uniformed members of the New York Police Department in white shirts (as opposed to the typical NYPD blue uniforms) pepper spraying and brutalizing peaceful, nonthreatening protestors attempting to take part in the Occupy Wall Street marches. Corporate media are reporting that these white shirts are police supervisors as opposed to rank and file. Recently discovered documents suggest something else may be at work.

If you’re a Wall Street behemoth, there are endless opportunities to privatize profits and socialize losses beyond collecting trillions of dollars in bailouts from taxpayers. One of the ingenious methods that has remained below the public’s radar was started by the Rudy Giuliani administration in New York City in 1998. It’s called the Paid Detail Unit and it allows the New York Stock Exchange and Wall Street corporations, including those repeatedly charged with crimes, to order up a flank of New York’s finest with the ease of dialing the deli for a pastrami on rye.

The corporations pay an average of $37 an hour (no medical, no pension benefit, no overtime pay) for a member of the NYPD, with gun, handcuffs and the ability to arrest. The officer is indemnified by the taxpayer, not the corporation.

New York City gets a 10 percent administrative fee on top of the $37 per hour paid to the police. The City’s 2011 budget called for $1,184,000 in Paid Detail fees, meaning private corporations were paying wages of $11.8 million to police participating in the Paid Detail Unit. The program has more than doubled in revenue to the city since 2002.

The taxpayer has paid for the training of the rent-a-cop, his uniform and gun, and will pick up the legal tab for lawsuits stemming from the police personnel following illegal instructions from its corporate master. Lawsuits have already sprung up from the program.
When the program was first rolled out, one insightful member of the NYPD posted the following on a forum: “… regarding the officer working for, and being paid by, some of the richest people and organizations in the City, if not the world, enforcing the mandates of the private employer, and in effect, allowing the officer to become the Praetorian Guard of the elite of the City. And now corruption is no longer a problem. Who are they kidding?”

Just this year, the Department of Justice revealed serious problems with the Paid Detail unit of the New Orleans Police Department. Now corruption probes are snowballing at NOPD, revealing cash payments to police in the Paid Detail and members of the department setting up limited liability corporations to run upwards of $250,000 in Paid Detail work billed to the city.

When the infamously mismanaged Wall Street firm, Lehman Brothers, collapsed on September 15, 2008, its bankruptcy filings in 2009 showed it owed money to 21 members of the NYPD’s Paid Detail Unit. (A phone call and email request to the NYPD for information on which Wall Street firms participate in the program were not responded to. The police unions appear to have only scant information about the program.)

Other Wall Street firms that are known to have used the Paid Detail include Goldman Sachs, the World Financial Center complex which houses financial firms, and the New York Stock Exchange.

The New York Stock Exchange is the building in front of which the Occupy Wall Street protesters have unsuccessfully tried to protest, being herded behind metal barricades, clubbed with night sticks, kicked in the face and carted off to jail rather than permit the last plantation in America to be defiled with citizen chants and posters. (A sample of those politically inconvenient posters and chants: “The corrupt are afraid of us; the honest support us; the heroic join us”; “Tell me what democracy looks like, this is what democracy looks like”; “I’ll believe a corporation is a person when Texas executes one.” The last sign refers to the 2010 U.S. Supreme Court decision, Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission, giving corporations First Amendment personhood, which allows them to spend unlimited amounts of money in elections.)

On September 8, 2004, Robert Britz, then President and Co-Chief Operating Officer of the New York Stock Exchange, testified as follows to the U.S. House Committee on Financial Services:


“…we have implemented new hiring standards requiring former law enforcement or military backgrounds for the security staff…We have established a 24-hour NYPD Paid Detail monitoring the perimeter of the data centers…We have implemented traffic control and vehicle screening at the checkpoints. We have installed fixed protective planters and movable vehicle barriers.”


Military backgrounds; paid NYPD 24-7; checkpoints; vehicle barriers? It might be insightful to recall that the New York Stock Exchange originally traded stocks with a handshake under a Buttonwood tree in the open air on Wall Street.

In his testimony, the NYSE executive Britz states that “we” did this or that while describing functions that clearly belong to the City of New York. The New York Stock Exchange at that time had not yet gone public and was owned by those who had purchased seats on the exchange – primarily, the largest firms on Wall Street. Did the NYSE simply give itself police powers to barricade streets and set up checkpoints with rented cops? How about clubbing protesters on the sidewalk?

Just six months before NYSE executive Britz’ testimony to a congressional committee, his organization was being sued in the Supreme Court of New York County for illegally taking over public streets with no authority to do so. This action had crippled the business of a parking garage, Wall Street Garage Parking Corp., the plaintiff in the case. Judge Walter Tolub said in his opinion that


“…a private entity, the New York Stock Exchange, has assumed responsibility for the patrol and maintenance of truck blockades located at seven intersections surrounding the NYSE…no formal authority appears to have been given to the NYSE to maintain these blockades and/or conduct security searches at these checkpoints…the closure of these intersections by the NYSE is tantamount to a public nuisance…The NYSE has yet to provide this court with any evidence of an agreement giving them the authority to maintain the security perimeter and/or conduct the searches that their private security force conducts daily. As such, the NYSE’s actions are unlawful and may be enjoined as they violate plaintiff’s civil rights as a private citizen.”


The case was appealed, the ruling overturned, and sent back to the same Judge who had no choice but to dismiss the case on the appellate ruling that the plaintiff had suffered no greater harm than the community at large. Does everyone in lower Manhattan own a parking garage that is losing its customer base because the roads are blocked to the garage?

Some believe that Wall Street is given special privileges and protection because New York City’s Mayor Michael Bloomberg owes his $18.1 billion in wealth (yes, he’s that 1 percent the 99 percent are protesting) to Wall Street. The Mayor was previously a trader for Salomon Brothers, the investment bank made famous for attempting to rig the U.S. Treasury market in two-year notes.

The Mayor’s business empire which bears his name, includes the awesome Bloomberg terminal, a computer that houses enormous pricing data for stocks and bonds, research, news, charting functions and much more. There are currently an estimated 290,000 of these terminals on Wall Street trading floors around the globe, generating approximately $1500 in rental fees per terminal per month. That’s a cool $435 million a month or $5.2 billion a year, the cash cow of the Bloomberg businesses.

The Bloomberg businesses are run independently from the Mayor but he certainly knows that his terminal is a core component of his wealth. Nonetheless, the Mayor is not Wall Street’s patsy. Bloomberg Publishing is frequently in the forefront of exposing fraud on Wall Street such as the 2001 tome “The Pied Pipers of Wall Street” by Benjamin Mark Cole, which exposed the practice of releasing fraudulent stock research to the public. Bloomberg News was responsible for court action that forced the Federal Reserve to release the details of what it did with trillions of dollars in taxpayer bailouts to Wall Street firms, hedge funds and foreign banks.

Police Commissioner Ray Kelly may also have a soft spot for Wall Street. He was formerly Senior Managing Director of Global Corporate Security at Bear, Stearns & Co. Inc., the Wall Street firm that collapsed into the arms of JPMorgan in March of 2008.

There has also been a bizarre revolving door between the Wall Street millionaires and the NYPD at times. One of the most puzzling career moves was made by Stephen L. Hammerman. He left a hefty compensation package as Vice Chairman of Merrill Lynch & Co. in 2002 to work as Deputy Commissioner of Legal Matters for the NYPD from 2002 to 2004. That move had everyone on Wall Street scratching their head at the time. Merrill collapsed into the arms of Bank of America on September 15, 2008, the same date that Lehman went under.

Wall Street is not the only sector renting cops in Manhattan. Department stores, parks, commercial banks and landmarks like Rockefeller Center, Jacob Javits Center and St. Patrick’s Cathedral have also participated in the Paid Detail Unit, according to insiders. But Wall Street is the only sector that runs a private justice system where its crimes are herded off to secret arbitration tribunals, has sucked on the public teat to the tune of trillions of dollars, escaped prosecution for the financial collapse, and can put an armed municipal force on the sidewalk to intimidate public protestors seeking a realignment of their democracy.

We may be learning a lot more in the future about the tactics Wall Street and the NYPD have deployed against the Occupy Wall Street protestors. The highly regarded Partnership for Civil Justice Fund has filed a class action lawsuit over the approximately 700 arrests made on the Brooklyn Bridge on October 1. The formal complaint and related information is available at the organization’s web site, www.JusticeOnLine.org (http://www.JusticeOnLine.org/).

The organization was founded by Carl Messineo and Mara Verheyden-Hilliard. The Washington Post has called them “the constitutional sheriffs for a new protest generation.”

The suit names Mayor Bloomberg, Police Commissioner Kelly, the City of New York, 30 unnamed members of the NYPD, and, provocatively, 10 unnamed law enforcement officers not employed by the NYPD.

The lawsuit lays out dwhat has been curtailing the constitutional rights of protestors for a very long time in New York City.


“As seen in the movements for social change in the Middle East and Europe, all movements for social justice, jobs, and democracy need room to breathe and grow and it is imperative that there be a halt to law enforcement actions used to shut down mass assembly and free expression of the people seeking to redress grievances…

“After escorting and leading a group of demonstrators and others well out onto the Brooklyn Bridge roadway, the NYPD suddenly and without warning curtailed further forward movement, blocked the ability of persons to leave the Bridge from the rear, and arrested hundreds of protestors in the absence of probable cause. This was a form of entrapment, both illegal and physical.

“That the trap and detain mass arrest was a command-level-driven intentional and calculated police operation is evidenced by the fact that the law enforcement officials who led the demonstration across the bridge were command officials, known as ‘white shirts.’ ”


In April 2001, I was arrested and incarcerated by the NYPD while peacefully handing out flyers on a public sidewalk outside of the Citigroup shareholders meeting – flyers that warned of growing corruption inside the company. (The unlawful merger of Travelers Group and Citibank created Citigroup and resulted in the repeal of the Glass-Steagall Act, the depression era investor protection legislation that barred depositor banks from merging with high-risk Wall Street firms. Many of us from social justice groups in New York City had protested against the repeal but were out maneuvered by Wall Street’s political pawns in Washington.)

Out of a group of about two dozen protestors from the National Organization for Women in New York City, Rain Forest Action Network, and Inner City Press, I was the only person arrested. There was no civil disobedience occurring. Rain Forest Action Network was handing out fortune cookies with prescient warnings about Citigroup and urging pedestrians to cut up their Citibank credit cards. The rest of us were peacefully handing out flyers.

Chained to a metal bar inside the police precinct, I was grilled on any crimes I might know about. I responded that the only crimes I knew about were listed on the flyer and apparently, in New York City, one gets arrested for disclosing crimes by Wall Street firms.
A mysterious, mature, white shirted inspector who ordered my arrest on the sidewalk, and refused to give his first name, disappeared from the police report when it was filed, blaming the arrest instead on a young police officer. Citigroup is only alive today because the Federal government inserted a feeding tube into Citigroup and infused over $2 trillion in loans, direct investment and guarantees as the company veered toward collapse.

The NYPD at the time of my arrest was run by Bernard Kerik – the man President George W. Bush later sent to Iraq to be the interim Interior Minister and train Iraqi police. The President subsequently nominated Kerik to head the Department of Homeland Security for the entire nation. The nation was spared of that eventuality only because of an illegal nanny popping up. Today, Kerik is serving a four year sentence in Federal prison for a variety of criminal acts.

The New York Civil Liberties Union filed a Federal lawsuit on my behalf (Martens v. Giuliani) and we learned that the NYPD had arbitrarily established a policy to arrest and hold for 72 hours any person protesting in a group of 20 or more. The case was settled for a modest monetary award and the repeal by the NYPD of this unconstitutional and despicable practice.

Pam Martens worked on Wall Street for 21 years. She spent the last decade of her career advocating against Wall Street’s private justice system, which keeps its crimes shielded from public courtrooms. She has been writing on public interest issues for CounterPunch since retiring in 2006. She has no security position, long or short, in any company mentioned in this article.

lofter1
October 10th, 2011, 09:36 PM
Here’s Video of James O’Keefe Scheming at Occupy Wall Street

GAWKER (http://gawker.com/5848408/heres-video-of-james-okeefe-scheming-at-occupy-wall-street)

The rumors (http://gawker.com/5848327/james-okeefe-reportedly-creeping-around-occupy-wall-street) were true: Doltish conservative stuntman James O'Keefe was hanging out at Occupy Wall Street today. No doubt he was dreaming up another hilarious sex imprisonment fantasy prank (http://gawker.com/5651120/james-okeefe-tried-to-trap-hot-blonde-reporter-in-palace-of-pleasure) that proves liberals suck. We've got video ...

O'Keefe, who made his name taking down ACORN with a deceptively-edited video "sting," (http://gawker.com/5508190/okeefe-and-breitbart-acorn-videos-severely-edited) isn't the first conservative to attempt to infiltrate the Occupy Wall Street movement. Conservative journalist Patrick Howley marched with protesters in Washington D.C., then bragged in the American Spectator (http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/ezra-klein/post/conservative-journalist-says-he-infiltrated-escalated-dc-museum-protest/2011/10/09/gIQAIKxCYL_blog.html) about illegally escalating the protest by charging into the National Air and Space Museum and getting pepper-sprayed.

O'KEEFE VID is HERE (http://gawker.com/5848408/heres-video-of-james-okeefe-scheming-at-occupy-wall-street)

lofter1
October 10th, 2011, 09:43 PM
Down at OccupyDC a right wing media guy (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_American_Spectator) starts some trouble to make a story ...

American Spectator Editor Admits to Being Agent Provocateur at D.C. Museum

FIREDOGLAKE (http://my.firedoglake.com/cgrapski/2011/10/09/american-standard-editor-admits-to-being-agent-provacateur-at-d-c-museum/)
October 9, 2011

... photograph taken by opednews.com (http://www.opednews.com/articles/Reporter-and-Occupy-Wash-D-by-Rob-Kall-111008-611.html) shows a confrontation in the lobby of the National Air and Space Museum between two individuals and an officer shortly before video shows officers with the Museum’s security forces rush outside indiscriminately pepper-spraying numerous individuals.

It appears that one of the two in the confrontation with the security officer is Patrick Howley, Assistant Editor (http://spectator.org/people/patrick-howley/all) of The American Spectator.

Immediately after the incident began hitting the newswires Howley published a “Breaking News” story with The American Spectator online (http://spectator.org/archives/2011/10/08/standoff-in-dc) in which he reveals that he had consciously infiltrated the group on Friday with the intent to discredit the movement. He states that “as far as anyone knew I was part of this cause — a cause that I had infiltrated the day before in order to mock and undermine in the pages of The American Spectator — and I wasn’t giving up before I had my story.”

[NOTE: The Link to Howley's story at the American Spectator now says: "You have tried to access a URL that no longer exists or was entered incorrectly!"]


Some smart webster cached Howley's story (https://docs.google.com/document/d/1pzvJbtN4UfNaRnpjO08sjfJkTZGMZHtgP2kKDs-Ry_8/edit?hl=en_US&pli=1) before The American Spectator took it down ...

Standoff in D.C.

By PATRICK HOWLEY
10.8.11 @ 6:24PM

Anti-capitalist protests engulf the nation's capital -- and one American Spectator reporter gets pepper-sprayed.

WASHINGTON -- The fastest-running protesters charged up the steps of Washington's National Air and Space Museum Saturday afternoon to infiltrate the building and hang banners on the "shameful" exhibits promoting American imperialism. As the white-uniformed security guards hurried to physically block the entrances, only a select few -- myself, for journalistic purposes, included -- kept charging forward ...

ZippyTheChimp
October 10th, 2011, 10:51 PM
Outrageous.

lofter1
October 11th, 2011, 02:02 AM
Following a huge march today in Boston, the Boston PD & MA State Police are now starting to clear the "second" Occupy Boston encampment, located between Congress Street and Pearl Street on the Rose Kennedy Greenway.

Live reports state that the Dewey Square camp is secure and no action is taking place there.

From Maiden Patch (http://malden.patch.com/articles/boston-pd-to-protestors-leave-by-midnight): "Activists participating in the 'Occupy Boston' protests downtown have been issued an ultimatum by Mayor Tom Menino: return to your original occupation in Dewey Square, or face eviction by the police ... the Boston Police Department said on its official Twitter account that the Greenway Conservancy recently invested over $150,000 in new plantings on that second, new camp site, and asked Occupy Boston activists to return to their original site (http://twitter.com/#!/Boston_Police/status/123548762126819328). Boston Police also said that the original site "has not been renovated yet (http://twitter.com/#!/Boston_Police/status/123552883349258240) which is why protestors were given permission to be there."

More info at DAILY KOS (http://www.dailykos.com/story/2011/10/10/1025026/-BREAKING-LIVE:-Police-Mobilizing-for-Mass-Arrests-Camp-Evictions-at-OccupyBoston-|-LiveStream-?via=sidebar).

Live Stream: http://www.livestream.com/occupyboston/
(http://www.livestream.com/occupyboston/)
Live Stream with audio report: http://www.livestream.com/globalrevolution

Screen Grab of Atlantic & Congress, October 11 @ 1:45 AM ...

14240

2:00 AM ...

14241.

HoveringCheesecake
October 11th, 2011, 02:13 AM
I just watched the entire mess in Boston on several of the feeds.

lofter1
October 11th, 2011, 02:18 AM
Looks like a similar action is about to take place in Seattle (http://occupyseattle.org/blog/2011-10-10/police-ordering-us-de-camp-westlake-trying-move-us-city-hall):

Police Ordering Us to De-Camp at Westlake, Trying To Move Us to City Hall

Too many folks for the little parks to contain.

OccupySeattle Twitter Feed (http://twitter.com/#!/occupyseattle)

lofter1
October 11th, 2011, 02:22 AM
All this going on and not one of the 24-hour news channels has any info about it. They're all re-running the talking head shows from earlier tonight, and their annoying zipper headlines make no mention of these actions.

HoveringCheesecake
October 11th, 2011, 02:24 AM
Now that Boston did it, it's only a matter of time before every city tries the same thing.

And I wonder how many American flags are ending up in those garbage trucks that drove in immediately after they took everyone out of the park?

lofter1
October 11th, 2011, 02:27 AM
Early this morning in Boston:


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Iu63e7QD_5k

scumonkey
October 11th, 2011, 02:38 AM
Because of the immanent crises looming caused by this Shockingly outrageous display in Boston, I hope our friend Daquan is alright?!

lofter1
October 11th, 2011, 02:40 AM
Late yesterday from the Boston PD (http://www.bpdnews.com/2011/10/10/note-to-occupy_boston-the-boston-police-department-respects-your-right-to-protest-peacefully-we-ask-for-your-ongoing-cooperation/):

Note to @Occupy_Boston: The Boston Police Department respects your right to protest peacefully. We ask for your ongoing cooperation.

Posted by MediaRelations (http://www.bpdnews.com/author/mediarelations/) on October 10, 2011

The Boston Police Department has continued to respect your right to peacefully protest. The BPD is also obligated to maintain public order and safety. We ask for your ongoing cooperation.

What the BPD expects from Occupy Boston Participants:

• Respect police instructions and, if asked to leave an area, please do so peacefully, taking your belongings with you.
• Don’t engage in negative behavior, such as fighting, throwing objects, or destroying property.
• If you are noticed by the BPD that you are unlawfully assembling, or trespassing, you will not be allowed to remain in the area. Please immediately leave the area with your belongings, or you will be subject to arrest.

What Occupy Boston Participants can expect from the BPD:

• BPD will arrest those knowingly in violation of the law if necessary.
• Police will employ the use of video-cameras in areas surrounding the Rose Kennedy Greenway. The video will be used to capture the images of individuals who are engaging in disorder. Those images will then be used to lodge criminal complaints in a follow-up investigation conducted by Boston Police detectives.
• Officers will conduct themselves in a professional, respectful and proportional manner.

Ninjahedge
October 11th, 2011, 11:47 AM
The law always has loopholes. Both ways, unfortunately.

So although we have the right to gather and protest, we do not have the right to do so, on public ground or otherwise, if some of these stipulations are not adhered to.

So as soon as they find refuse on the ground, everyone can be ticketed for littering, etc etc.....

lofter1
October 11th, 2011, 01:39 PM
It appears that the BPD actions early this morning in Boston went way beyond ticketing folks for littering ...



#OWS Stands In Solidarity With 100 Arrested At Occupy Boston (http://occupywallst.org/article/ows-solidarity-100-arrested-occupy-boston/)

Posted Oct. 11, 2011, 11:52 a.m. EST
by OccupyWallSt
(http://occupywallst.org/users/OccupyWallSt/)
Occupy Wall Street would like to express our support and solidarity with both the people of Boston and the 100+ arrested at Occupy Boston last night. We commend them for their bravery in standing their ground at great personal cost to assert the right of the people to peaceful assembly in public spaces.

http://occupyboston.com/2011/10/11/boston-police-brutally-assault-occupy-boston/
(http://occupyboston.com/2011/10/11/boston-police-brutally-assault-occupy-boston/)
We condemn the Boston Police Department for their brutality in ordering their officers to descend upon the Occupy Boston tent city in full riot gear to assault, mass arrest, and destroy the possessions of these peaceful women and men. We condemn them for ordering this attack in the middle of the night. These people were not simply protesters holding a rally, it was their home, it was their community and it was violated in the worst possible way by the brutal actions of the BPD. Furthermore:

The Boston Police Department made no distinction between protesters, medics, or legal observers, arresting legal observer Urszula Masny-Latos, who serves as the Executive Director for the National Lawyers Guild, as well as four medics attempting to care for the injured. [emphasis mine]


These actions go beyond unconscionable, they're unthinkable. If this was war, the BPD could be found guilty of war crimes:

Chapter IV, Article 25 of the Geneva Convention states that "Members of the armed forces specially trained for employment, should the need arise, as hospital orderlies, nurses or auxiliary stretcher-bearers, in the search for or the collection, transport or treatment of the wounded and sick shall likewise be respected and protected if they are carrying out these duties at the time when they come into contact with the enemy or fall into his hands.


Every day the actions of the BPD, NYPD, etc. continue to remind us that the police no longer fight to "protect and serve" the American people, but rather the wealth and power of the 1%. With each passing day, as the violence of the state continues to escalate, the myth of American "democracy" becomes further shattered.

THIS IS WHAT A POLICE STATE LOOKS LIKE

And we are what democracy looks like. We do not fear your power and we will continue to fight for a better world. We will never stop growing and each day we'll continue to expand, block by block and city by city. We call upon others to join us, to take a stand against these ever encroaching threats to our liberty. We commend the brave actions of our sisters and brothers in Boston and condemn the BPD leadership. We call upon the rank-and-file police officers of this country to disobey such orders and remember that they protect and serve the people. You are one of us, the 99% and we're too big to fail.

lofter1
October 11th, 2011, 01:54 PM
This claim is a bit over the top:

These people were not simply protesters holding a rally, it was their home ...


​Such statements don't necessarily serve the purpose.

Not sure they had a legal right to set up a permanent camp in the Kennedy Greenway. But if that's the position of OccupyBoston, then they need to train their folks to let themselves be arrested in the most non-confrontational manner possible, and then sort out the legalities later on. Not so easy to do if being aggressively taken by an officer of the law, but physically resisting at the time of the arrest will do no good.

Ninjahedge
October 11th, 2011, 02:06 PM
They had the right to be there, but not the right to sleep there.....

The technicalities I was alluding to were not littering, but such things as blocking emergency access and egress, exceeding occupancy regulations (and causing a potential life safety hazard because of it) and so on.

I can understand that we all thing we have the right to protest, but when that protest starts to be an outright impedance to daily workings.... then the line gets very blurry.

lofter1
October 11th, 2011, 02:33 PM
Charts: Who Are the 1 Percent?

MOTHER JONES (http://motherjones.com/mojo/2011/10/one-percent-income-inequality-OWS?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+Motherjones%2Fmojoblog+(Mothe rJones.com+|+MoJoBlog)&utm_content=Google+Reader)

One of the informative visual images ...

WHAT THEY OWN:

14246

A commenter notes that another one of the charts shows:


... from 1980 to 2008, the bottom 90% have not seen any increase in their earnings (flat at $31k) while the top 1% have their earnings triple in the same time period. Interestingly, the top 1% have seen less of a decline in this very deep recession than they did after 9/11. Assuming the numbers are correct, the chart makes perfect sense.

lofter1
October 11th, 2011, 03:16 PM
Your tax payer dollars protecting the David Koch mansion on the UES from marauding hordes and unwashed masses (http://twitpic.com/6yvjgw)

lofter1
October 11th, 2011, 03:38 PM
Good instructions, apparently posted by supporters of OWS:

peaceful resistance guide lines (https://docs.google.com/document/d/1EOlAYihdQBTE06lxfKeGdBMVkMsXbazvKiGSBzFhdtg/edit?hl=en_US)

lofter1
October 11th, 2011, 10:59 PM
I was down at Zuccotti this evening around rush hour, and it was very lively. I think they've found the next-best alternative to the WTC Performing Arts Center. It's happening now at the park, and at far lower cost than what is planned for the Gehry site.

Just one block away you're hardly aware of the massive crowds at Liberty & Broadway. And walking down Carlisle Street there was hardly a soul to be seen. So much for folks saying that OWS is making it nearly impossible to do the commute. If anyone wants to avoid the crush it's fairly simple to do.

I traveled by way of the newly-opened Cortland Street station, which is clean as a whistle and the under-rail passageway beneath Broadway gives yet another option for avoiding crowds up at street level.

After I left I found that a camper had tagged my knapsack with a nice little stick-on message:


AMPLIFY LOVE,
DISSIPATE HATE

ZippyTheChimp
October 11th, 2011, 11:18 PM
I try to stop by once a day, just to see how they're holding up.

Was there today from about 2:30 to 3PM. The place was jumping.

hbcat
October 12th, 2011, 01:42 AM
Nice series of 46 photos from the past couple of weeks at The Christian Science Monitor, for those of us unable to be there in person --

"Wall Street Protests"
http://www.csmonitor.com/CSM-Photo-Galleries/In-Pictures/Wall-Street-protests

lofter1
October 12th, 2011, 02:10 AM
http://media.columbiatribune.com/img/photos/2011/10/07/DarkowSatBizEdit-1000_10-08_t600.jpg?4326734cdb8e39baa3579048ef63ad7b451e76 76

lofter1
October 12th, 2011, 02:17 AM
Click here to see more than 100 logos (http://www.jenx67.com/p/pre-occupied-with-wall-street.html).from Occupy Wall Street protests from around the globe

http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-xE6gRnDyibo/ToR6eOy6eGI/AAAAAAAAGJk/j_RI6t7mNBY/s1600/occupy+together.jpg

lofter1
October 12th, 2011, 02:23 AM
.


http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-fU2rYeAB3JA/TpDe50DSoII/AAAAAAAAGXM/dWfynww8ftY/s1600/occupy+boone.jpg.
.
.

lofter1
October 12th, 2011, 03:29 AM
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Occupy the London Stock Exchange - 15th October 2011

Dress nice. Be nice.

Peace.
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=92GggSG9Lpg

Merry
October 12th, 2011, 07:26 AM
Occupy Wall Street May Be Too Big to Fail

by Edward Murray

It's not just Occupy Wall Street anymore.

According to occupytogether.org (http://www.occupytogether.org/), there are Occupy events currently running or planned for the month of October in over 1400 cities across the globe, and in approximately 400 cities in 48 states across America. This is proof that Occupy Wall Street is growing, not only in its numbers, but in its ability to spread its message to as many Americans as possible in an attempt to end the financial manipulation of our government by those who bastardize the freedoms and ideals of the United States of America.

Seattle mayor Mike McGinn became one of the first political figures to not only address the Occupy Seattle protest, but also to publicly sympathize with their right to protest, as well as the actual cause at hand.

From McGinn's official statement (http://mayormcginn.seattle.gov/mayor%E2%80%99s-statement-on-westlake-park-protest/):


I support the efforts of the protesters at Westlake Park to address this country's economic situation. In my budget speech last week, I stated: "We are facing unprecedented inequality in this country. It is always true that bad times are harder on the poor. But we have not seen income inequality this great since 1928, the year before the Great Depression started. The top 1 percent control 34 percent of the nation's wealth. The top 10 percent control 2/3rds of the nation's wealth. It is an unprecedented grab by the most powerful to get a bigger share of a shrinking pie."

I also support the right to protest, and I support the right to protest at Westlake Park. Individuals and groups are welcome to continue exercising free speech rights.


Even with McGinn making good on his threat to arrest protestors, this was an important (if not lukewarm and possibly inadvertent) expression of solidarity for citizens expressing their desire to live in a country that is legislated through voter wishes rather than corporate influence.


If only NYC Mayor Mike Bloomberg, Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel, LA Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa, Oklahoma City Mayor Mick Cornett, Youngstown Mayor Charles Sammarone, Birmingham Mayor William A. Bell, Sr., Miami Mayor Tomás Regalado, Santa Fe Mayor David Coss, or Lansing, Michigan Mayor Virg Bernero would follow suit with similar statements, our national consciousness could embrace this perspective that Americans from all walks of life can support. It is the broad appeal of this mindset that is rippling across the nation and transforming Occupy Wall Street from a protest into a movement.

When people hear the word 'protest,' many of them have an involuntary, defensive reaction. Those with a social conscience may often feel guilty when they are not involved in a protest that espouses principles they actually agree with. In an attempt to ease their visceral guilt, they often conjure up images of a protest as a disorganized pack of drum circles, hacky sacks and incense. They imagine every protest to be a recreation of the worst parts of their undergrad experience. But this reluctance to effect societal change and engage in a dialogue to alter the course of our nation is shifting for many people all across the country. (I am legally obligated to inform you that this statement in no way constitutes a guarantee that you won't find a drum circle at Occupy Wall Street.)

People who support the movement "in spirit" are ditching their preemptive judgments of Occupy Wall Street as a loose mass of disoriented refugees simply filling time between Burning Man gatherings. They are discovering that the protestors are actually intelligent, articulate and employed individuals who fear living in an economy that puts their families one lay-off, medical diagnosis or bank error away from being out on the streets. Many people are seeing a social movement equipped with a proliferation of smartphones, tablets, web cameras, and an impressive, organic media network.

Citizens are realizing that the protestors in 1,430 cities across the world, and in approximately 400 cities in 48 states across the United States are actually paralegals, bus drivers, baristas, retail clerks, production assistants, cab drivers, actors, dancers, associate producers, waiters, bartenders, plumbers, stage managers, butchers, bakers, candlestick makers... friends, neighbors, mothers and daughters, fathers and sons.

In short, people are internalizing the truth that they share more with this group, the 99 percent, than they have ever shared with another group of protestors. Now, people are standing up and actively making their presence known as opposed to sitting on their hands and waiting for the movement to give them a reason to watch from the sidelines.

For those who support the movement, but don't see themselves as the protesting "type," they can repost information through social networks, donate blankets to those on the front lines, or simply bring up the movement in a conversation as a means of opening up a dialogue on the viability of transforming America from a corpocracy to a democracy driven of, by, and for the people. All of these things do matter. (You could also check out the videos of police officers beating protestors and pepper spraying reporters and see where you want to go from there.)

The more support this movement garners, the more transparent and impotent things like snarky Facebook updates, ignorant rhetoric from vapid, network reporters and casual dismissals from state or federal officials become. With support, this movement is very capable of transforming specific fundamental tenets of our society; because anything is possible with enough support. Just the existence of 2 Broke Girls is enough to make me certain that a cure for cancer must be just around the corner.

This movement is about a disappearing middle class. This movement is about millions of lost jobs at the wave of a hand. This movement is about a bloated financial system that is desperately in need of substantial reform. Make no mistake, when the world's largest unsustainable financial system finally bursts, it's taking everyone down with it. It's taking every bank account, every 401(k), every lease, every mortgage, every smartphone; all of it. This is, in no uncertain terms, a fight for a stable, financial reality. And in 21st century America, this means a fight for survival.

It's no secret that Americans are angry and losing faith in the two major political parties at a record clip, and elected officials should consider themselves on probation right now. Nearly every American citizen was negatively affected by the Crash of 2008. People are still feeling the swift and severe effects of that collapse, but they are now also feeling a taste for their own power as active, empowered citizens. Once they realize the full potential of this democratic power, they will not support those officials who do not accurately represent the wishes of the communities that put them into offices. Those elected officials who stand up now and vocalize their support for the most broadly appealing public movement since the American Revolution will be remembered fondly by the voters.

Certainly all voters don't agree on the specifics of their anger; some people blame Bush, some blame Obama, some people blame the House, some blame the Senate. However, nearly everyone blames a hysterically-inflated market run by reckless financial firms who knew that the taxpayer would get screwed twofold in the end with another government-sanctioned bailout.

Don't let a simple-minded media distort the message. Business in this country needs to be allowed to do business. However, an unchecked collusion of profitlust between our business and our elected officials will continue to engender legislation that will only widen the wealth disparity in a country where the top 1 percent currently takes home 40 percent of all income; a level not seen since 1929. Does that year ring a bell? This isn't a call to dismantle our business infrastructure, but a call to separate business from our government and to accept the fact that deregulation does not lead to self-regulation. It never has, and it never will. Have you ever wiped beef jerky stains off a married man's cheek after his wife has been out of town for a few days?... Yeah.

As every day passes, more and more people are realizing that elected officials aren't put into office by magic, coincidence, foregone conclusion or even by well-edited commercials. Our citizenry is beginning to truly understand the unbridled power it wields in selecting the legislators of the United States of America. The Occupy Movement could become what we were all told Wall Street was; only this time, the people won't have to take the government's word for it. This time, it will be the people who decide whether or not they themselves are "too big to fail."

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/edward-murray/occupy-wall-street-may-be_b_998947.html?ir=New%20York

Ninjahedge
October 12th, 2011, 09:13 AM
You guys need to start posting on other sites less "receptive" to this.

I get a lot of good information here, but the problem is, a large number of people out there are like BBMW in their position on this. They think that there are a bunch of Liberal Arts majors out in NYC "whining" about the job market when they could just as easily 'move to Kentucky to get a job at Arby's'.

Just be warned, any posting on these sites will probably earn you a photoshoped image of a tatooed "hipster" with an overlayed message akin to the witicisims viewed on "icanhazcheezburger.com".

odiug
October 12th, 2011, 01:18 PM
Yes ... it is a little like bringing owls to Athens.
http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/bring_owls_to_Athens

But i think, there is a point to it!
The first duty seems to me, to inform yourself what is going on in the world of finances!
It has become an esoteric business, hiding it's BS behind Acronyms and a detached language, nobody outside of the financial district is meant to understand!

We all need a basic understanding of what it is those people do and what the consequences of there doing is for all of us!

As far as i understand it ... the big money is trapped!
It dosn't know where to go, so it is running from one bubble to the other trying to survive the worst of it!
Look at the debt crisis in Europe!
After the brake down of the financial markets everybody was running into "secure" financial products ... state bonds!
Now they are figuring out ... ups ... no good ... and the run again!
This time, as gold is overvalued as it is into the dollar, creating an other bubble!
There is to much paper money ... way too much!
And quite frankly, we have to get rid of it!
Why is it, that googles Enterprise Value (Oct 12, 2011) is $142.41B?
What dose google produce to justify it's market value?
And google is not even a good example, since information could be considered a real world commodity which is hard to say about swaps or derivatives or all the other financial BS the World is drowning in!

mariab
October 12th, 2011, 02:49 PM
Very well-written article Merry posted. While the movement is being acknowledged in Washington, they still don't see it as a force to be reckoned with yet.


Those elected officials who stand up now and vocalize their support for the most broadly appealing public movement since the American Revolution will be remembered fondly by the voters.

That's all well & good, but again, there has to be people within OWS who can use their newfound influence/power to go to Washington to speak to congress, & remind them that they're not going away quietly, & that they're not simply going to keep protesting in the street. As OWS spreads & gets bigger throughout the US, Washington won't be able to ignore the barbarians at the Capitol gate. I really hope OWS has plans for this.

lofter1
October 12th, 2011, 04:11 PM
The word is being spread far and wide via twitter and other social media. The kids in charge are a lot more savvy about that stuff. I'm just posting here to keep WNY up to date.

Can't wait to see what's in store for this Saturday October 15 ...

Occupy Brooklyn? Anti-greed movement coming to boro this Saturday (http://www.brooklynpaper.com/stories/34/41/all_occupybrooklyn_2011_10_14_bk.html)

‘Occupy Taipei’ set for Saturday (http://www.taipeitimes.com/News/taiwan/archives/2011/10/12/2003515547)

Occupy Wall Street Comes to Canada October 15 (http://www.gender-focus.com/2011/10/08/occupy-wall-street-comes-to-canada-october-15/)

Occupy Miami Sets October 15 Protest as Other South Florida Groups Meet

(http://www.nbcmiami.com/news/Occupy-Groups-in-South-Florida-Protested-Saturday-131416048.html)Podcast: Vancouver's "Occupy Wall Street" starts October 15

(http://broughton.ca/index.php/bob-broughtons-blog-mainmenu-26/179-occupy-vancouver-podcast)Coming October 15: #OCCUPYMILWAUKEE

(http://bloggingblue.com/2011/10/06/coming-october-15-occupymilwaukee/)OCCUPY U.S.A.

(http://www.villagevoice.com/microsites/wall-street-monopoly/)14253

Ninjahedge
October 12th, 2011, 05:03 PM
The key to remember is simple.

Look at the small steps that you can do in your own life that will put pressure, both politically AND fiscally, on the people in charge and the companies that are now holding the purse strings.

One of the best has been to localize monies. Get your cash into a credit union. Tell BoA that you do not like them charging you to use your own money when a 1 month "lender" is free. PAY YOUR CREDIT ON TIME!!!!!

The less they make, the stronger the message you send.


Oh, one more thing. VOTE. Both in primaries (if you are registered) and general elections.

lofter1
October 12th, 2011, 06:40 PM
OCTOBER 15TH (http://15october.net/)

UNITED FOR #GLOBALCHANGE

October 15th Global Day Of Action
(http://occupywallst.org/article/october-15th-global-protest-info/)
Posted Oct. 12, 2011, 3:57 p.m. EST
by OccupyWallSt
(http://occupywallst.org/users/OccupyWallSt/)
Hi, we write you from the International Commission of Sol, in Madrid (Spain). We know that you have a lot to do in the USA, as we have here in Spain, but the 15O is coming and we need you to make a milestone in history out of it. It's the great chance we expected to start a real global revolution! This is what we are doing, and could be wonderful if you join us:

Spread the webpage of the call http://15october.net/, the graphic material http://15october.net/spread-it/ and the videos http://15october.net/category/video/. And please send us your videos, banners, posters to contact.takethesquare@gmail.com so that we can compile them and put them in common. Send all of this through your mailing lists, to all your contacts, but also to all your friends.

Explain everybody that this is not just one mobilization more, that we are reinventing ourselves. Tell them how the movement is popping all over the world, from the streets of Tel-Aviv to Wall Street. Tell them that over 650 cities have already confirmed they will do an event on October 15th as you can check in http://map.15october.net/ and if they do plan to do an event invite them to add it to the map http://map.15october.net/reports/submit

Explain them that 15O is the moment to wake up all of us together. And specially tell them that it is in their hands the potential of making a success of it. It's not anymore about parties, organizations or trade unions, the call should come from all of them, from the people of the world like you.

There is a text that could be very useful to send this last message: "who are you?" http://map.15october.net/page/index/1
(http://map.15october.net/page/index/1)
It could be great to tell your friends abroad to spread it through their countries. We need one revolution in each single city of the world.

For a further explanation about the mobilization and a more specific plan, there is a document written by the international network takethesquare, between people from many countries, that you could send and post in your webpage. It comes attached with this e-mail. But you can find it also inhttp://takethesquare.net/2011/09/24/15th-october-whats-the-plan-15oct/
(http://takethesquare.net/2011/09/24/15th-october-whats-the-plan-15oct/)
In order to promote and discuss the activities for October 15th, everyone is encouraged to participate and to organize local meetings the days 8th and 9th, to fix the details and discuss the preparation of the events for the 15th. Simultaneously, there will be a chat http://webchat.freenode.net/?randomnick=1&channels=15october&prompt=1 , an audio-chat (mumble: Download inhttp://mumble.sourceforge.net/ Host:tomalaplaza.net Port:64738, see the tutorial in http://takethesquare.net/2011/10/04/mumble-setup-walkthrough/) and a collaborative document pad http://titanpad.com/15october open to everybody, so during 48 hours people from all the world will be able of talking about the ideas and activities decided in their squares with every other single person in the world! All the channels will be open for everybody...just participate!

lofter1
October 12th, 2011, 06:41 PM
http://www.galacticchannelings.com/afbeeldingen/global_change.jpg

lofter1
October 12th, 2011, 06:46 PM
http://gothamist.com/attachments/byakas/101211occupie.jpg

lofter1
October 12th, 2011, 06:56 PM
#15O (http://twitter.com/#!/search?q=%2315O)

from indignation to action


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a_8FEwTNSgk

Artist: Moby (http://www.youtube.com/artist/Moby?feature=watch_metadata)

lofter1
October 12th, 2011, 07:08 PM
http://15october.net/files/2011/09/graffiti-15O.jpg

Bob
October 12th, 2011, 09:50 PM
As a kid, when somebody said "Down with Imperialism," I thought they were talking about Imperial margarine. Maybe that's why it's so hard to find, these days.

lofter1
October 12th, 2011, 10:00 PM
From the OccupyWallStreet Agenda (http://occupywallst.org/):

Friday, October 14

4:00pm Family Sleep Over at Occupy Wall Street

Organized by Parents for Occupy Wall Street:

http://www.parentsforoccupywallst.com/

ZippyTheChimp
October 12th, 2011, 10:10 PM
Comment


Occupying Wall Street at the public-private frontier.

http://www.archpaper.com/uploads/image/occupy_wall_street_01.jpg

In future years, people will remember 2011 as the year in which physical public space reclaimed its lofty status in the public sphere thanks to the audacious actions of engaged individuals.

From Tahrir Square to Zuccotti Park, physical public space has aggressively reminded the world of its centrality in accommodating and nurturing political debate and protest.

Public spaces come in many flavors. They include city-owned streets, sidewalks, and parks. In New York and other cities, they also include a zoning-created variety known as privately owned public space. Through a technique known as incentive zoning, New York since 1961 has encouraged developers of office and residential skyscrapers to provide a now-substantial array of close to 550 plazas, arcades, and indoor spaces in return for valuable zoning concessions. The most valuable concession of all has been bonus floor area, and the City has thus granted more than 20 million square feet of extra building area for developers. Although the spaces differ in terms of the legal specifics that created them, the signature requirement is that they be usable by the public.

Zuccotti Park is one such privately owned public space, although referring to it as one in 550 understates the seismic role it is currently playing. The many actors in this unfolding drama – the activists of Occupy Wall Street using the space, space-owner Brookfield Properties, various agencies and officials of the City—including the police—as well as neighbors and other members of the public have a stake in understanding the possibilities and limitations for continued occupation. Initially at least, such greater understanding requires unearthing and characterizing the specific legal actions that created the space.


http://www.archpaper.com/uploads/occupy_wall_street_05.jpg

http://www.archpaper.com/uploads/occupy_wall_street_08.jpg

http://www.archpaper.com/uploads/occupy_wall_street_06.jpg

Zuccotti Park owes its existence to an incentive zoning transaction memorialized in a 1968 Special Permit that traded zoning concessions other than a floor area bonus in return for this public space variously referred to as a “plaza,” an “open landscaped area with trees, sitting areas and the necessary lighting,” and “what amounts to a permanent open park in the heart of one of the most densely built-up areas in the world.” The Special Permit notes, importantly, that it is “principally because of this public benefit that the Commission has viewed this application with favor.” Although the developer simultaneously secured a substantial floor area bonus for its office tower, that bonus was actually for another plaza to the north that wraps around the tower, and not for Zuccotti Park. In 2005, the City approved an application from the current owner, Brookfield, to modify the space through such improvements as “the planting of 55 honey locust trees, the addition of 1,010 linear feet of fixed seating, 16 fixed tables with fixed seats, an abstract steel sculpture and new lighting.” Brookfield also changed the name of the space from Liberty Park (how prescient) to Zuccotti Park, after the company’s United States Co-chairman John Zuccotti, a highly-respected New York City attorney and former Chair of the New York City Planning Commission.

Given its legal provenance, how should one judge the current use of Zuccotti Park by the hundreds of people constituting Occupy Wall Street? The true answer is, no one knows. Unlike most other outdoor privately owned public spaces in New York City, Zuccotti Park is a one-off, sui generis as lawyers would say. Zuccotti Park is simply what the Special Permit says it is, a “large and useful plaza” that must have amenities of seating, tables, trees, lighting and public art. The nature of permissible public use, including the legal authority of the owner to impose its own rules to govern the conduct of those within the space, is undefined. The Zoning Resolution does provide some comparative guidance with regard to four expressly defined categories of plazas, including the “plaza” (1961), “urban plaza” (1975), “residential plaza (1977), and “public plaza” (2005). Believe it or not, different rules attach to each of these categories of plaza, and their definitions reflect a relentless chronological march introducing tougher design and amenity requirements to remedy the evident inadequacies of spaces provided under existing law. The grandparent of all privately owned public spaces, the plain vanilla “plaza” introduced in the City’s 1961 Zoning Resolution, initially required owners to make the space “accessible to the public at all times,” but subsequent zoning amendments, motivated in large measure by problems associated with overnight use of spaces by homeless individuals, led the City to permit owners of the various plaza categories to apply for authorization for nighttime closings. Many owners have applied for and secured such authorizations.


http://www.archpaper.com/uploads/occupy_wall_street_07.jpg
Participating in the "Human Microphone"


No one knows for sure what the owner of Zuccotti Park would like to do with its space, although it hardly stretches the imagination to believe it may like Occupy Wall Street to, well, occupy Wall Street, and not its park. If it so desired, could the owner legally dislodge Occupy Wall Street? Could it, for example, apply for and receive an authorization from the City for a nighttime closing under existing law? The answer is a clear and unambiguous maybe. Under one reading of the law, the answer is no. Section 37-727 of the Zoning Resolution states that the “City Planning Commission may authorize the closing during certain nighttime hours of an existing or new publicly accessible open area, if the Commission finds,” among other things, that “(a) such existing publicly accessible open area has been open to the public a minimum of one year or there are significant operational or safety issues documented” and “(b) such closing is necessary for public safety within the publicly accessible open area and maintenance of the public open areas as documented by the applicant.” But because the phrase “publicly accessible open area” is a defined term in the Zoning Resolution that refers to the four articulated plaza types (plaza, urban plaza, residential plaza, public plaza), and since Zuccotti Park is none of the above, this option could be understood as unavailable to the owner or City. The spirit of the law, and an accommodating City interpretation, would suggest that owners of Zuccotti Park should enjoy the same ability to apply for an authorization of a nighttime closing as owners of similar plazas created pursuant to the existing zoning categories.

Could Brookfield impose its own rules of conduct that would limit or even prohibit Occupy Wall Street from using the space, effectively rendering the current use a trespass? To answer this question, I need only quote a passage from Privately Owned Public Space: The New York City Experience, a book I wrote more than a decade ago in collaboration with the New York City Department of City Planning and the Municipal Art Society of New York:

“The Department of City Planning has taken the position that an owner may prescribe “reasonable” rules of conduct. In determining the definition of reasonable, the Department has looked to the rules of conduct applicable in City-owned parks for general guidance. Thus, for example, the Department has considered a dog leash requirement, a ban on the consumption of alcoholic beverages, or a prohibition on sleeping in an indoor space to be reasonable. On the other hand, suggestions by owners that they be allowed to exclude “undesirable” persons on some basis other than improper conduct, or to set limits on the amount of time a member of the public may sit in or otherwise use a space, have been considered unreasonable…Other fact patterns have and will arise to help sharpen the notion of reasonableness…What about rules against listening to a radio, playing a musical instrument, or in-line skating? May an owner bar political candidates, organizational representatives, or activist individuals from seeking signatures for a petition or from handing out literature?


http://www.archpaper.com/uploads/occupy_wall_street_02.jpg

http://www.archpaper.com/uploads/occupy_wall_street_03.jpg

http://www.archpaper.com/uploads/occupy_wall_street_04.jpg

The open question remains, then, could the owner adopt a rule allowing it to oust or severely limit the activities of Occupy Wall Street? Surely any rule crudely prohibiting political activity within the space should fail the reasonableness test. And there is no need to impress the U.S. Constitution’s First Amendment Free Speech clause to support this argument, especially since the First Amendment applies only to government, not private, action. And if it did apply, by deeming Brookfield effectively, a government actor, content-neutral rules regulating the time, place, and manner of political activity would likely be constitutionally legitimate. Instead, one need only recognize that there is hardly a more time-honored use of public space than as platform for political activity. Cities are about expression of ideas, and what better way, even in this digital age, to express ideas than to gather in one place, body to body, and express them.

Ironically, it is Occupy Wall Street’s enormous success that presents the greatest legal challenge. Its footprint of occupation is, to state the obvious, dominant. Yes, people unassociated with Occupy Wall Street may (and do) pass through the space, wander about, chat with movement members, take photographs, eat a sandwich, and read a book. But this recitation glosses over the reality that Zuccotti Park has been literally taken over by one group in a way that could easily mitigate the enjoyment of the public space by other members of the public. For those seeking the quiet, passive enjoyment of what had been, they are out of luck. For other groups, political or otherwise, that may be inspired to seek a public space home of their own (think political competitors, flash mobs, organized skateboarders), they face a no vacancy sign. Brookfield’s privately owned public space has become privately owned, de facto, by Occupy Wall Street.

This should not, I hope, offend Occupy Wall Street. Its members are equally members of the public with a right to use Zuccotti Park, and they have exercised that right with civility, humanity, and conviction. But as time goes by, they should ask themselves whether, in satisfying their own needs, they are preventing multiple publics from doing the same. First in time should not become first in right, now and forever more. One potential solution would involve a scheduled reduction of their footprint over time, freeing up part of the space for other users. After all, Speakers’ Corner in London’s Hyde Park is just that, a corner of Hyde Park. Spatial pluralism may be a dilution, but it respectfully responds to the needs of many publics seeking to take advantage of Zuccotti Park.

The City, privately owned public space owners and their representatives, civic groups like the Municipal Art Society, and other interested individuals should seize the moment to commence a public conversation on how best to utilize New York’s remarkable archipelago of plazas, arcades, and indoor spaces scattered throughout downtown, midtown, and the upper east and west sides of Manhattan. As recounted in Privately Owned Public Space, far too many of these spaces have been disappointments, effectively orphaned by private and public inattention or worse. Brookfield is not an absentee parent, but conceptually Occupy Wall Street may be one of the first to recognize that an orphan is a terrible thing to waste.

That doesn’t mean, however, that political occupation is the palliative. To be fair, most of these spaces are modest, neither designed nor equipped for the robust, mass engagement represented by Occupy Wall Street’s use of Zuccotti Park. For spaces that can accommodate larger groups, it may now be time to develop citywide rules governing organizational use so that everyone gets a fair shake. Such approaches are routinely applied in a city’s public-owned realm worldwide. With the vastness of the inventory, not every space has to accommodate every type of public use. If the outcome of Occupy Wall Street’s use of Zuccotti Park results in a discussion about uses of and improvements to public space, then its members could add yet another accomplishment to their already impressive achievements.

Jerold S. Kayden

Jerold S. Kayden is the Frank Backus Williams Professor of Urban Planning and Design and Director of the Master in Urban Planning Degree Program at the Harvard University Graduate School of Design. In 2005, he founded Advocates for Privately Owned Public Space (APOPS), a not-for-profit organization.

Copyright © 2003-2011 | The Architect's Newspaper, LLC

lofter1
October 12th, 2011, 10:16 PM
Nobel Prize-Winning Former President Of Poland To Visit Occupy Wall Street

GOTHAMIST (http://gothamist.com/2011/10/12/nobel_prize-winning_former_presiden.php)

Lech Walesa, the Nobel Peace Prize-winning former president of Poland, (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lech_Wałęsa) will show his support of Occupy Wall Street by paying Zuccotti Park a visit. "How could I not respond," Walesa said, (http://www.nydailynews.com/ny_local/occupy_wall_street/2011/10/12/2011-10-12_lech_walesa_former_polish_president_to_visit_ne w_york_in_support_of_occupy_wall_.html?r=news&utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+nydnrss%2Fnews+(News)&utm_content=Google+Reader) "The thousands of people gathered near Wall Street are worried about the fate of their future, the fate of their country. This is something I understand."

[...]

"This this a worldwide problem," Walesa told a Polish newspaper. (http://www.dziennikwschodni.pl/apps/pbcs.dll/frontpage) "The Wall Street protesters have focused a magnifying glass on the problem." A spokesman for the 99 New York Campaign describes Walesa's career to the Daily News: (http://www.nydailynews.com/ny_local/occupy_wall_street/2011/10/12/2011-10-12_lech_walesa_former_polish_president_to_visit_ne w_york_in_support_of_occupy_wall_.html?r=news&utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+nydnrss%2Fnews+(News)&utm_content=Google+Reader) "He fought very, very hard for the rights of all working people." It's unclear when Walesa will make the journey, but his representative said it'd be "soon."

lofter1
October 12th, 2011, 10:34 PM
Margaret In The Middle: Downtown Councilwoman Chin
Struggles to Balance Constituent Concerns and Her Own Radical Past (http://www.politickerny.com/2011/10/11/margaret-in-the-middle-downtown-councilwoman-chin-struggles-to-balance-constituent-concerns-and-her-own-radical-past/)

PolitickerNY (http://www.politickerny.com/tags/margaret-chin/)
By David Freedlander
October 12, 2010

Last week, the city’s labor unions joined the Occupy Wall Street protests in earnest, swelling the ranks of the demonstrators from a couple of hundred to tens of thousands. Before the scene was marred by a couple of sporadic outbursts of violence, a half-dozen or so members of the City Council stopped by Zuccotti Park to raise a fist and become among the first elected officials in New York City to officially declare solidarity with the demonstration.

Margaret Chin was not among them ...

FULL ARTICLE (http://www.politickerny.com/tags/margaret-chin/)

hbcat
October 12th, 2011, 10:42 PM
‘Occupy Taipei’ set for Saturday (http://www.taipeitimes.com/News/taiwan/archives/2011/10/12/2003515547)

I'll be there.

lofter1
October 12th, 2011, 11:05 PM
This might spoil Friday's family-sponsored sleep-over ...

Bloomberg Tells Wall Street Protesters to Clear Out for Cleanup

DNA INFO (http://www.dnainfo.com/20111012/downtown/occupy-wall-streets-camp-at-zuccotti-park-be-cleaned)
October 12, 2011 9:37pm
By Julie Shapiro, DNAinfo Reporter/Producer

LOWER MANHATTAN — Mayor Bloomberg paid a surprise visit to Occupy Wall Street's Lower Manhattan encampment Wednesday night, personally telling the protesters that they will have to temporarily clear out of the deteriorating plaza so it can be cleaned on Friday.

Complaints about cleanliness at Occupy Wall Street's (http://www.dnainfo.com/tags/occupy-wall-street) base at Zuccotti Park have reached a fever pitch, even as the protesters said they were redoubling their efforts to keep the area clean.

“The mayor is a strong believer in the First Amendment and believes that the protesters have a right to continue to protest," Deputy Mayor Cas Holloway said in a statement on Wednesday, shortly after Bloomberg toured the site — his first visit.

"At the same time, the last three weeks have created unsanitary conditions and considerable wear and tear on the park."

Holloway said that Brookfield — which owns the plaza, but must keep it open to the public 24-hours-a-day under an agreement with the city, creating a complicated legal situation — will be doing the cleaning in stages.

"The protesters will be able to return to the areas that have been cleaned, provided they abide by the rules that Brookfield has established for the park,” he said ...

Brookfield wrote a letter to Police Commissioner Ray Kelly on Tuesday saying the park's conditions "have deteriorated to unsanitary and unsafe levels" withe space having no toilets and overflowing trash bins attracting rodents.

"We have received hundreds of phone calls and emails from concerned citizens and office workers in the neighborhood," the letter stated ...

The Sanitation Department said on Tuesday it had not received a single complaint through 311.

ZippyTheChimp
October 12th, 2011, 11:09 PM
The Sanitation Department said on Tuesday it had not received a single complaint through 311. :p

Ninjahedge
October 13th, 2011, 08:56 AM
Maybe people were just mis-dialing......

BBMW
October 13th, 2011, 10:08 AM
They should really close the park every night. The protesters can leave, and come back the next day if they want.

Ninjahedge
October 13th, 2011, 10:11 AM
Making a protest inconvenient is just an underhanded way to disperse it.....

So long as they are willing to observe some reasonable right-of-passage requests and some others on the books about legal assembly, they should be left to do what they need to....

BBMW
October 13th, 2011, 12:02 PM
First, it's private property. So far, Brookfield has been accomodating. The have no particular reason to be. The protesters have a right to speak. They don't have the right to force people to listen to them, and they don't have a right to appropriate property for their own use (which is what they've done.) Really, it's time to kick them out, which should have been done the first night.

Ninjahedge
October 13th, 2011, 12:06 PM
First, it is private property that was given to public use in order to get special provisions on their own building (relaxations on size and occupancy are usually the big ones).

Second, wait, you did not have a second.....

hbcat
October 13th, 2011, 12:25 PM
I think it is brilliant that to have occupied a privately owned park. Attempting to remove the protesters would only garner even greater public (domestic & worldwide) support. Let's hope someone in authority listens to BBMW.

And their lack of civic-mindedness and disrespect of park property -- just appalling...

http://www.archpaper.com/uploads/occupy_wall_street_05.jpg

Ninjahedge
October 13th, 2011, 12:41 PM
That is not a state approved sign.

They could get fined for not following building code!

ZippyTheChimp
October 13th, 2011, 12:51 PM
It's all bullshit.

There's no physical reason that these people can't be in the plaza. I commute through here every day, and it's easy to avoid. Easier than the crowds of Fargo People that have been clogging Church St for years, blocking crosswalks and subway entrances. Or the scene at Greenwich and Albany Sts, a complete mess despite dozens of cops.

So I guess there's some other reason they want them out.

eddhead
October 13th, 2011, 01:01 PM
^^ Well to that end, the arrests last week clearly backfired. Since than, media coverage of the event has intensified, and movement is gaining more and more traction especially with younger people.

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/10/13/us/occupy-wall-street-protests-a-growing-news-story.html?hp

Ninjahedge
October 13th, 2011, 01:37 PM
It's all because of "The Man" (man).

BBMW
October 13th, 2011, 02:05 PM
I think Bloomberg agrees with you. Otherwise they wouldn't still be there.


^^ Well to that end, the arrests last week clearly backfired. Since than, media coverage of the event has intensified, and movement is gaining more and more traction especially with younger people.

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/10/13/us/occupy-wall-street-protests-a-growing-news-story.html?hp

Ninjahedge
October 13th, 2011, 02:21 PM
He does not agree, he just has not made it an official declaration ("or else").

lofter1
October 13th, 2011, 07:03 PM
First, it's private property.

Do you read posts that come before? It's not that simple, as it's not purely private.

lofter1
October 13th, 2011, 10:34 PM
Tonight the folks at Zuccotti are doing some cleaning as demanded by the City. Everyone is still waiting for Bloomberg and others to clean out the crooks that nearly brought us to our knees @ 9/2008.

Tomorrow Bloomberg aims to break up OWS. Don't let him do it: Sign THE PETITION (http://www.civic.moveon.org/defend_ows/?rc=homepage) ...

Subject: Urgent: Eviction for Occupy Wall Street

Hi,

I just found out that the Occupy Wall Street protesters are being evicted from Zuccotti Park at 7am tomorrow morning.

Mayor Bloomberg is sending in the police to clear the park so it can be "cleaned" and is imposing new rules that won't allow protesters to continue to occupy the park.

These protesters have been standing up for all of us against corporate greed on Wall Street and the corporate takeover of our democracy. It's time we stand with them. Please join me in urgently signing a petition to Mayor Bloomberg to keep him from evicting the protesters. Just use the link below.

http://civic.moveon.org/defend_ows/?r_by=-19992723-Hju0Ypx&rc=defend_ows.confemail.g1

Thanks!

lofter1
October 13th, 2011, 10:54 PM
From Move On ...

Tonight I went to Occupy Wall Street to deliver the signatures of more than 240,000 people—including you—who signed our emergency petition asking Mayor Bloomberg not to evict the Occupy Wall Street protesters from Zuccotti Park tomorrow.

We held a huge press conference at the park with dozens of news outlets, and then hundreds people marched up Broadway to City Hall to deliver the petition.

When they found out Mayor Bloomberg was busy dining with the 1% a few blocks away at the ultra-luxurious Cipriani, the march continued to the doors of the restaurant.

It was a strong show of nationwide solidarity, numerous local elected officials joined our march to oppose Bloomberg's decision, and MSNBC's Lawrence O'Donnell even featured the petition tonight. As of right now, however, Bloomberg's order to clear Zuccotti Park still stands and we won't know until tomorrow morning what he's going to do.

But regardless of Mayor Bloomberg's actions, the most important thing any of us can do is to make sure this movement keeps growing by supporting a local Occupy event in our town.

Here's a great map listing of tons of Occupy events all over the country that our friends at DailyKos put together:

www.occupywallstreetevents.com
(http://www.occupywallstreetevents.com/)
As we wait to see what happens in New York tomorrow, I hope you'll find the event closest to you and go there to show your solidarity.

Thanks for all you do.

–Daniel, Tate, Peter, Elena, and the rest of the team

Ninjahedge
October 14th, 2011, 09:05 AM
Cleaning postponed indefinitely.

Bloomie visited last night (I believe).

ZippyTheChimp
October 14th, 2011, 09:35 AM
The plaza was packed this morning, along with onlookers and a lot of media. The "cleaning" was postponed indefinitely.

There seems to be some spin about exactly what happened. "Brookfield was contacted by city officials" implies that Brookfield initiated the issue about the need to clean the plaza. I find it hard to believe that Brookfield wanted to put themselves at the front of the protest. The plaza isn't dirty. There's a police barricade along Liberty St that isolates the plaza from the Brookfield building (1 Liberty Plaza) across the street.

More likely that the mayor found a way to break up the protest, and asked Brookfield to clean the plaza. With the media present for a possible confrontation, and maybe wondering if the protestors would just relocate (like City Hall Park), they may have decided that it was better to just let them stay where they are.

eddhead
October 14th, 2011, 10:49 AM
To your point, police were apparently concerned about a possible confrontation along the lines of the one that resulted in the arrests a couple of weeks back.


October 14, 2011, 7:04 am

Cleanup of Zuccotti Park Is Postponed

By COLIN MOYNIHAN (http://wirednewyork.com/author/colin-moynihan/) and CARA BUCKLEY (http://wirednewyork.com/author/cara-buckley/)Earl Wilson for The New York Times

Occupy Wall Street protesters in Zuccotti Park in Lower Manhattan receiving the news that the city had postponed the cleanup of the park.
Updated, 10:31 a.m. | The cleanup of the Lower Manhattan park that has been occupied by protesters for nearly a month was postponed Friday shortly before it was supposed to begin, averting a feared showdown between the police and demonstrators who had vowed to resist any efforts to evict them from their encampment.

But sporadic clashes between protesters and the police erupted anyway when demonstrators started marching through the winding streets of Lower Manhattan after learning that the cleanup had been called off. A number of protesters were seen being taken into custody.
Fourteen people were arrested, including protesters who knocked over a police scooter, overturned trash cans, hurled bottles and sat in the street blocking traffic, said Paul J. Browne, the head police spokesman.

The announcement on the cleanup was made by the Bloomberg administration around 6:20 a.m., about 40 minutes before workers were scheduled to enter Zuccotti Park, which has been the home base for the Occupy Wall Street (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/reference/timestopics/organizations/o/occupy_wall_street/index.html) demonstrators angered by what they see as an unfair and corrupt financial system.

“Late last night, we received notice from the owners of Zuccotti Park — Brookfield Properties (http://www.brookfieldofficeproperties.com/Default.aspx) — that they are postponing their scheduled cleaning of the park, and for the time being withdrawing their request from earlier in the week for police assistance during their cleaning operation,” Deputy Mayor Caswell F. Holloway said in a statement.

“Brookfield believes they can work out an arrangement with the protesters that will ensure the park remains clean, safe, available for public use,” Mr. Holloway said, “and that the situation is respectful of residents and businesses downtown.”

Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg, in a radio interview on Friday morning, sought to make it clear that the the decision to postpone the clean up was made by Brookfield. He said that the company made its decision after receiving a flurry of angry phone calls from elected officials.

“Yesterday, as of 8 o’clock at night, they were going ahead to do it, but, as of midnight, they called and said they wanted to postpone the cleaning operations,” Mr. Bloomberg said on his radio program on WOR-AM (710).

As news that the cleanup had been called off rippled through Zuccotti Park, cheers erupted among demonstrators who had been preparing for a possible confrontation.

“I did not come here to look for a fight,” said Steve Sachs of Highstown, N.J. “I’ve never been in a fight in my life. I’ve never been arrested. But I was ready to be arrested over this.”

But clashes between the police and protesters flared on various streets in the financial district.

At about 7:40 a.m., a man was seen being led away in handcuffs on Broadway. Moments later, a woman who said she was his girlfriend identified him as Michael Rivas.

Shortly afterward, at Maiden and Water Streets, police officers were seen taking four people into custody, placing them into a police wagon. One of those men appeared have a gash on his forehead and blood running down his face.

At one point, it appeared that as officers tried to keep the crowd on the sidewalk, a bag of garbage was hurled from the crowd and hit one officer. That prompted that officer and another to wade into the crowd and apprehend a man.

The crowds marched in roadways, accompanied or pursued by officers on foot or riding scooters.

Near the corner of Beaver and Broad Streets, officers wearing helmets leaped from scooters, tackled a man to the ground and placed him in handcuffs. At the intersection of William and Wall Streets, officers stood behind metal barricades as protesters filled the street in front of them. Some protesters waved mops and brooms that had been used earlier to clean Zuccotti Park.

Near Broadway and Exchange place, officers drove scooters into a crowd of marchers.

A police spokesman said that officers had taken some people into custody on Friday morning, but he said he could not immediately confirm the number of people taken into custody or describe the circumstances.

The abrupt decision to call off the clean up seemed to frustrate Mr. Bloomberg. He said that if Brookfield decided that it did still want to clean the park, it would place the city in a more difficult situation.

“From our point of view,” Mr. Bloomberg said on the radio, “it will be a little harder, I think, at that point in time to provide police protection, but we have the greatest Police Department in the world and we will do what is necessary.”

He also said that Brookfield had come under intense pressure on Thursday night from local officials not to try to clean the park.

“My understanding is that Brookfield got lots of calls from many elected officials threatening them and saying, ‘If you don’t stop this, we’ll make your life more difficult,’ ” Mr. Bloomberg said. “If those elected officials would spend half as much time trying to promote the city and get jobs to come here, we would go a long ways toward answering the concerns of the protesters.”

Hundreds of people had gathered overnight in Zuccotti Park in anticipation of what might happen on Friday, swelling the crowd to much larger numbers than have typically been encamped in the park, while others continued cleaning the park, which Brookfield Properties complained (https://www.documentcloud.org/documents/256243-brookfield-letter-to-kelly.html) had become filthy and a potential health threat.

Around 5 a.m., a collection of mops and brooms had stood in a plastic bin on Liberty Street. Nearby were 27 buckets of soapy water. A woman handed out white rubber gloves to more than a dozen people. They walked to the west end of the park, at Trinity Place, and announced they were going to begin a sweep, picking up and discarding objects that did not belong to anyone.

“This place is extremely important,” said Kyle Christopher, 27, a photographer from Buffalo, who had been part of the protests since their first week.

Patrick Bruner, a spokesman for Occupy Wall Street, said that on Thursday night protesters tried to deliver a petition with more than 100,000 signatures to City Hall, calling upon Mr. Bloomberg to allow the Zuccotti Park occupation to continue.

On Thursday night, the A.F.L.-C.I.O. sent a message to members asking them to show up at Zuccotti Park early Friday morning to support the protesters.

By 6 a.m., the crowd had swelled to more than a thousand. Police officers stood behind metal barricades that lined the park.
Andy Friedman, 38, of Park Slope, Brooklyn, said on Friday that he had come to the park in response to the union’s call for solidarity.
“For the past 30 years, banks in this country have been making out like bandits,” said Mr. Friedman, who works for the service employees union, S.E.I.U. “And the rest of us are going backwards.”

On Wednesday, Mr. Bloomberg announced that the park would be cleaned (http://www.nytimes.com/2011/10/13/nyregion/protesters-told-they-will-have-to-leave-zuccotti-park-temporarily.html).

In a letter to the police commissioner, Raymond W. Kelly (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/reference/timestopics/people/k/raymond_w_kelly/index.html), dated Tuesday, Brookfield’s chief executive, Richard B. Clark, wrote that conditions in the park had reached “unsafe” levels, and he reiterated his complaint that the encampment violated the law.

Overflowing garbage cans attracted rodents, he wrote, gas-fired generators posed a fire hazard, bad smells abounded, the lack of toilets made things worse and complaints were mounting from disgruntled people who live and work nearby.

“In light of this and the ongoing trespassing of the protesters,” Mr. Clark wrote, “we are again requesting the assistance of the New York City Police Department to help clear the park.”

The protesters feared that Mr. Bloomberg’s announcement that the park would be cleaned was a prelude to their being banned permanently. An appeal quickly went out on Facebook and other sites calling for brooms, mops and various cleaning supplies as well as volunteers willing to donate elbow grease. After cleaning the place themselves, the protesters planned to form a human chain around the park to try to keep police officers from entering. Supporters had been urged to go to the park at 6 a.m. Friday “to defend the occupation from eviction.”

Clashes between the police and protesters have occurred several times since protesters started their encampment in the park on Sept. 17. Scores of protesters were arrested during a march to Union Square (http://cityroom.blogs.nytimes.com/2011/09/24/80-arrested-as-financial-district-protest-moves-north/) on Sept. 24, and several women were pepper-sprayed (http://www.nytimes.com/2011/09/26/nyregion/videos-show-police-using-pepper-spray-at-protest.html) by a high-ranking police officer, in an episode that is being investigated by the Manhattan district attorney’s office.

On Oct. 1, about 700 protesters were arrested (http://cityroom.blogs.nytimes.com/2011/10/01/police-arresting-protesters-on-brooklyn-bridge/) while trying to march across the Brooklyn Bridge. And 28 people were arrested after Oct. 6 march in Lower Manhattan, which attracted thousands and drew the backing of large labor unions.

Triggered by a call to action from Adbusters, a Canadian magazine, Occupy Wall Street began as a protest against what demonstrators portray as corporate greed and income inequalities, drawing several hundred people to Lower Manhattan but barely registering a blip on the radar of mainstream news media. Participants declared themselves the part of the “99 percent” to highlight their claim that that 1 percent of Americans control much of the country’s wealth.

News of the protest steadily grew, fanned by coverage of pepper-spraying episodes, the mass arrests on the bridge and the eruption of similar protests in nationwide and around the world. Its support base widened. Celebrities visited the protesters, among them Susan Sarandon and Kanye West. Unions, politicians and academics lent their support. The protest was taken up by more and more people, angry over chronic joblessness, rising debt and what they view as a grossly imbalanced economic system.

odiug
October 14th, 2011, 11:09 AM
Yea ... they are learning that confrontation is strengthening the movement!
So they avoid it.
that is good.
To your proposed relocation to city hall park ... this park is to fragile.
Battery park with its open lawn is much better suited for this kind of event!

scumonkey
October 14th, 2011, 11:11 AM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c9D33hr4CW0&amp;feature=player_embedded

ZippyTheChimp
October 14th, 2011, 11:41 AM
To your proposed relocation to city hall park ... this park is to fragile.
Battery park with its open lawn is much better suited for this kind of event!I think you misunderstand. I'm not suggesting City Hall Park as an alternative; I was just wondering if the mayor was afraid that might happen.

Battery Park would give the city the opportunity to use the same excuses they used in Central Park to limit protests.

odiug
October 14th, 2011, 11:57 AM
Zippy ... it is a question of negotiations with the city!

Ninjahedge
October 14th, 2011, 12:14 PM
“If those elected officials would spend half as much time trying to promote the city and get jobs to come here, we would go a long ways toward answering the concerns of the protesters.”

Um, yeah.

10 minutes of their time would solve everything.

lofter1
October 14th, 2011, 12:58 PM
Bloomberg: Lawmakers ‘Threatened’ Brookfield, Clean Up Still To Come

POLITICKERNY (http://www.politickerny.com/2011/10/14/bloomberg-lawmakers-threatened-brookfield-clean-up-still-to-come/)
By David Freedlander
(http://www.politickerny.com/author/dfreedlander/)October 14, 2011

Mayor Bloomberg said today that Brookfield Properties relented on their demands to clean up Zuccotti Park after they were threatened by local lawmakers.

“My understanding is Brookfield got calls from many elected officials threatening them and saying if you don’t stop this we will make your life more difficult,” the mayor told John Gambling on his weekly radio show. “If those elected officials spend half as much time trying to promote the city and get jobs to come here we would go a long ways to answering the concerns of the protesters.”

Mr. Gambling interrupted him at this point, saying “Mr. Mayor did I hear you correctly?” and asked if in fact Brookfield received phone calls asking them to leave the protesters alone.

“I’m told they were inundated with lots of elected officials who called,” the mayor said.

Yesterday, a number of elected officials held a raucous press conference (http://www.politickerny.com/2011/10/13/lawmakers-bash-bloomberg-as-zuccotti-cleanup-looms/) on the periphery of Zuccotti Park, and many of them slammed the mayor for seeming to enable Brookfield’s efforts to clean up the park.

The mayor repeatedly insisted that the eviction and clean-up order came from Zuccotti Park–pointing out that if the protests occurred at a public park, then they would already have been evicted–and said that even though protesters were given a reprieve to negotiate, the reprieve was most likely a temporary one.

“Make no mistake: We will do what is necessary to maintain public health and safety but there is a limit to what we can do in a private park,” he said. “And if they want to take a couple of days to work something out they are welcome to do that. I have asked what happens if they cannot and the answer I got was they would want to go ahead and do exactly what they were going to do this morning.

Mr. Bloomberg also spoke of his own visit to Zuccotti Park, where he was inundated himself with handshakes, offers of food, and apparently, drugs.

“I actually took a walk through the park the night before last. Nice people. Everybody wanted to shake your hand people offered food. One guy offered something more than that.”

ZippyTheChimp
October 14th, 2011, 01:05 PM
Battery Park would give the city the opportunity to use the same excuses they used in Central Park to limit protests.


Zippy ... it is a question of negotiations with the city!


The mayor repeatedly insisted that the eviction and clean-up order came from Zuccotti Park–pointing out that if the protests occurred at a public park, then they would already have been evicted–and said that even though protesters were given a reprieve to negotiate, the reprieve was most likely a temporary one.

See what I mean?

mariab
October 14th, 2011, 01:21 PM
Why wouldn't they be able to use Central Park? Not that all of them should move up there, because then the financial district will be relieved to have them out of their hair. But as the movement spreads, they're going to need a lot more room than the parks down there can provide.

lofter1
October 14th, 2011, 01:27 PM
Huge Action set for Saturday 10/15, ending up in Times Square at 5PM. Today there are notices all along Broadway, saying "NO PARKING SATURDAY" so it seems there is an orchestrated march from Zuccotti up Broadway to Times Square.

Mass March on the CHASE Bank (https://www.google.com/calendar/render?eid=MjVpY2kzZHM2bGhlNG5hOXJtNDU5ZjVjYWMgOWE yNHNyaHE4dWdiMmw1b3ZhbW83MjNpMGdAZw&ctz=America/New_York&pli=1&sf=true&output=xml)

Sat, October 15, 11am – 1pm





Meet at Liberty Plaza (Zuccotti Park)





This Saturday at 11 AM @ Liberty Plaza

Convergence at Times Square at 5 PM

Sponsored by Occupy Wall Street Labor Committee

Move your money, Chase's money is our money!

”That's the rallying cry for the Occupy Wall Street labor activists marching on a Chase Bank branch this Saturday. The protesters plan to enter Chase en mass to close their accounts and then transfer the money to worker-owned banks and credit unions around the city.

The march advocates moving money to “a financial institution that supports the 99%.” The protesters are making this transfer of capital from corporate banks to member-based financial institutions out of a concern for the financial sector's lack of public accountability in light of the billions of dollars it received in public bailout money. The flier promoting the event calls out Chase in particular, saying that “Chase destroys what matters."

”The protesters have identified what they see as trend in irresponsible behavior on the part of the bank. Chase has laid off 14,000 employees since receiving a bailout of $94.7 billion. The bank ranks number one in American home foreclosures and is currently under investigation for fraudulent foreclosures on families in New York City. Amid all of this, last year, Chase CEO Jamie Dimon gave himself a record-setting bonus. The march is being coordinated in conjunction with other large-scale public movements.

The Chase action is one event in a larger “Day of Action Against Banks” organized by groups within Occupy Wall Street. The October 15th date was set by a larger international mobilization called “Take the Square” that has its roots in the M15 demonstrations in Madrid. As of this date, October 15th protest events have been scheduled in 869 cities in 71 countries.

The Chase march is coordinated by the Labor Outreach Working Group, a working group of the Occupy Wall Street movement, in a continuation of the outpouring of union support demonstrated by the estimated 30,000 persons in attendance at the labor/community march on October 5, 2011.

lofter1
October 14th, 2011, 01:32 PM
Why wouldn't they be able to use Central Park?


A number of reasons, including the fact that CP closes at night. Plus gatherings of 20 or more require a permit. Yes, under the law even a large picnic technically requires a permit. However, it seems they only use that regulation for controlling political situations. It wasn't enforced last December during Santacon (not that they could have done much about 5,000 Santas -- plus we were gone after a few hours).

Zuccotti is one of the few large spaces where something like this can be on-going. Proximity to Wall Street / Financial District is also important.

odiug
October 14th, 2011, 01:51 PM
Zippy
Well ... yes ... but those protest will not disappear just because you evict them from Zuccotti Park!
this is like a flash mob! It will pop up somewhere else!
So it is an advantage for the City if this is "contained" to one focus point!
And this "thread" of a flash mob movement is the bargaining chip of OWS!

lofter1
October 14th, 2011, 01:52 PM
Blocking Auction of Foreclosed Properties with SONG ...

Community Members block auctions in Brooklyn court; 9 activists arrested.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u3X89iViAlw

Date: October 13, 2011

Calling on the judicial system to institute an immediate moratorium on all foreclosures until a fair system of home loans is put into place, a group of New York City housing justice advocates disrupted the auction of several foreclosed Brooklyn properties in Civil Court on Thursday afternoon through music and song. The group, called Organizing for Occupation (O4O), was protesting what it views as a system designed to benefit financial lending institutions at the expense of homeowners and low-income communities. Although the New York judiciary instituted mandatory pre-foreclosure settlement conferences in 2009, O4O claims that these conferences do nothing to protect the rights of homeowners to remain in their homes. "No lender, be it Bank of America, Wells Fargo, Citibank or Chase, has any intention of settling by means other than a foreclosure auction or another predatory modification," says Karen Gargamelli, a housing attorney and spokesperson for O4O. "These auctions displace our neighbors and destabilize our neighborhoods. We need a stronger system for dealing with foreclosures, one that holds banks accountable for making bad loans and then speculating on them as 'securitized instruments'." And until the Legislature passes more protective laws, O4O is calling on the courts to hold all foreclosure auctions, and encouraging New Yorkers to raise their own voices in the courts to stall these auctions through concerted direct action such as Thursday's disruption.

Produced by O4O and Housingisahumanright.org

Ninjahedge
October 14th, 2011, 02:04 PM
Zuccotti is one of the few large spaces where something like this can be on-going. Proximity to Wall Street / Financial District is also important.

Are you saying things like the protest "at" the republican convention was not as effective because it was located blocks away and behind police barricades?

Odd that we can only have protests if they do not disrupt the status quo.....

lofter1
October 14th, 2011, 02:42 PM
Welcome to America 2011!

The status quo will almost always have the edge due to $ resources & force.

But social networking is definitely shifting the balance.

Ninjahedge
October 14th, 2011, 02:53 PM
Status Quo -> Stasis Quo.

lofter1
October 14th, 2011, 03:06 PM
Get on down ...

http://www.theoccupationparty.com/

14260

Ninjahedge
October 14th, 2011, 03:12 PM
S+tfs?

ZippyTheChimp
October 14th, 2011, 03:50 PM
Zippy
Well ... yes ... but those protest will not disappear just because you evict them from Zuccotti Park!
this is like a flash mob!You're underestimating the importance of Zuccott Plaza

It's near Wall St, Occupy Wall St.

It allows people and the media to go to a specific place to find out what's going on, or to conduct interviews.

Spontaneous protests can be effective, but they run the risk of alienating people by causing problems. The people in the plaza aren't trying to cause disruptions; they want to be heard. Have you been there?

Ironically given the lingering name for the area, Zuccotti Plaza has become Ground Zero for demonstrations in other cities. Anything that happens here will be known everywhere.

eddhead
October 14th, 2011, 03:55 PM
Spot on.


Ironically given the lingering name for the area, Zuccotti Plaza has become Ground Zero for demonstrations in other cities. Anything that happens here will be known everywhere.

I know, it is awesome, isn't it?

odiug
October 14th, 2011, 06:03 PM
ups duple post :eek:

odiug
October 14th, 2011, 06:03 PM
Zippy
That is exactly my point!
It is important for the movement to have such a focus point!
But it has advantages for the City to, if this gets a little more organized!
And Battery Park is perfect for that!
It has the space, the facilities and is close enough to the financial district ... and it would allow OWS to establish more permanent structures like tents ... i know ... Bloomberg is hoping for mother nature to intervene ... instead of NYPD riot police lets have winter take care of them ... so OWS has to negotiate for a better place ... and if necessary with the thread of flash mobs disrupting the city!
an other option ... and this might be a realy good one ... is to occupy the WTC hub!
It has a roof and is warm!:cool:

odiug
October 14th, 2011, 06:34 PM
@ eddhead
Yes ... actually it is good for one of Bloombergs little pets ... Tourism to NYC!:rolleyes:

ZippyTheChimp
October 14th, 2011, 07:11 PM
Interactive graph



Growth of Income (http://www.stateofworkingamerica.org/pages/interactive#/?start=1917&end=2008)

Move the sliders between the mid 1940s and the mid 1970s, and see why your parents or grandparents lived well.

Move them between 1980 and 2008, and see what happened.

**sterretje**
October 14th, 2011, 07:24 PM
"Move them between 1980 and 2008, and see what happened. " The richest 10% got 96% of the growth of the economy...

hbcat
October 14th, 2011, 07:56 PM
I played with the graph for about half an hour and my depressive mood increased by about 90%.

odiug
October 14th, 2011, 08:29 PM
Welcome to America 2011!

The status quo will almost always have the edge due to $ resources & force.

But social networking is definitely shifting the balance.

You know what i think is really awesome ... the human megaphone :cool:
I love it ... so low tech and undercuts this ridiculous ban of megaphones.
It has a very unique quality!
It makes it much more a grass root community protest than somebody speaking to the masses by megaphone ...
I really think the human megaphone is the Logo of this movement!

hbcat
October 14th, 2011, 09:09 PM
Yes, that is a brilliant idea. I'm trying to explain the human megaphone to someone and am looking for good youtube clips right now. Post here or PM me if you know of some good examples.

scumonkey
October 14th, 2011, 09:27 PM
Post here or PM me if you know of some good examples.
look at post 214 for your youtube clip
or click here for direct youtube:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c9D33hr4CW0&feature=player_embedded

odiug
October 14th, 2011, 09:35 PM
the sound is mostly horrible on you tube ... you miss the experience!

odiug
October 14th, 2011, 09:38 PM
:)
look at post 214 for your youtube clip
or click here for direct youtube:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c9D33hr4CW0&feature=player_embedded
thanks ... that is a good one

hbcat
October 14th, 2011, 10:00 PM
I'm sure! But most of the world cannot be in NY and this is inspiring.

@ scumonkey -- excellent example. The few Youtube examples I found don't convey it well.

hbcat
October 14th, 2011, 10:33 PM
This one is good too --

SLAVOJ ZIZEK AT OWS PART2
"We are not communists..."


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7UpmUly9It4&amp;feature=related

Merry
October 15th, 2011, 12:29 AM
Occupy Wall Street and the Tea Party: Compare and Contrast

One looks cooler. The other smells better. Do they agree on anything?

By Jacob Weisberg

The Tea Party movement began on Feb. 19, 2009, when Rick Santelli, the CNBC financial journalist who reports from the floor of the Chicago Mercantile Exchange, ranted against the government bailing out homeowners who couldn’t pay their mortgages. The Occupy Wall Street protest got going two and a half years later, when editors at the anti-corporate Canadian magazine Adbusters were inspired by events in the Middle East to call for a mass demonstration against the financial industry on Sept. 19, 2011.

Those origins tell you a lot about how the two movements differ. The Tea Party has remained a purely American affair, while Occupy Wall Street strikes a global posture. The Tea Party began spontaneously, when a guy on TV got mad about freeloaders. Occupy Wall Street was planned over email by experienced organizers. The Tea Party is a revolt of the haves; Occupy Wall Street a revolt of the have-nots. Yet there are points of commonality between them. Both are angry about what they see as economic unfairness—the Tea Party over deviations from free-market principle, the Occupiers over excessive adherence to it. Both are hostile toward society’s elite, though they define that elite differently. Both are frustrated with the American political system.

Let’s go a little deeper into the comparison.

Grass-roots authenticity: Critics of the Tea Party have been quick to point out the ways in which it has been driven from above. Fox News used its megaphone to hype and encourage the Tax Day protests that were the Tea Party’s first big outing. Its personalities Glenn Beck and Sarah Palin became darlings of the movement. Wealthy conservatives like the Koch Brothers bankrolled the Tea Party while Republican politicians tumbled over each other to glom on.

It’s hard to see a parallel here to Occupy Wall Street, which has no major media champion or institutional support. Reuters published a weak story today attempting to link the liberal financier George Soros to the movement though a tenuous connection between his Open Society Institute, a San Francisco non-profit, and Adbusters. But Soros says he’s never heard of Adbusters and Adbusters says it hasn’t received money from Soros. Labor leaders want in, but so far haven’t had much impact on the protests.

Message coherence: At this point, it is pretty clear what the Tea Party view of the world is: smaller government, lower taxes, less spending, and less regulation. One can’t say the same about Occupy Wall Street, which raises a wide variety of complaints: Bankers should be punished; they should be paid less; government should regulate them more aggressively; society is becoming more unequal; people are out of work; money should have no sway in politics; capitalism isn’t working; etc. But Occupy Wall Street is less than a month old, and at a similar point in its emergence, it was much harder to say what the Tea Party stood for beyond “freedom” and the Constitution. OWS leaders, such as they are, have promised that more specific demands will emerge. The problem is that many of the Occupiers’ most trenchant complaints, like excessive pay for CEOs, don’t translate readily into a political program.

Impact: The energy generated by the Tea Party helped produce the big Republican swing in the 2010 election. But the influence of the Tea Party within the GOP also led to the nomination of unelectable candidates who arguably cost Republicans the Senate. Probably the Tea Party’s greatest achievement to date is keeping House Speaker John Boehner from agreeing to a debt-ceiling deal with President Obama that would have included a modest tax increase. Overall, the movement has made the Republican Party more rigidly right-wing without producing any substantive accomplishments. Its influence may now be on the wane. The GOP seems poised to nominate a candidate the Tea Party doesn’t like. Occupy Wall Street is probably at an earlier stage of its lifecycle, but already pointed toward a similar role: energizing the liberal base and pulling the Democratic Party to the left, without making anything in particular happen.

Style: Where the Tea Party is anarchic in principle and conservative in style, Occupy Wall Street is anarchic in style and liberal in principle. Tea Party rallies are dominated by middle-class, middle-aged white men who pack up their coolers and go home at the end of the day. The Occupy Wall Street encampment, which I visited a couple of times last week, is more like a Phish concert that forgot to end. The Tea Party, remember, was launched by a guy in a suit on the floor of a financial exchange; it’s the backward-looking movement of people worried about losing their place in society. Occupy Wall Street was spawned by a poster of a ballerina perched atop Wall Street’s bronze bull. It is the image-conscious, forward-looking movement of people worried that they may never live in the kind of country they want. Occupy Wall Street looks cooler. The Tea Party smells better.

Structure and Tactics: The Tea Party has evolved toward a hierarchical decision-making structure; OWS insists on a horizontal, consensus-driven one. Both movements are nonviolent, with deviations. Tea Partiers created an ugly scene at the Capitol last year and were accused of using racial epithets and spitting at members of Congress. OWS protestors have come into conflict with the police, and been criticized for creating squalor and nuisance in Lower Manhattan. Their tactics include civil disobedience, confrontation with authority, and a willingness to get arrested—something Tea Partiers aren’t interested in doing. This has already proved effective at drawing attention and sympathy. An episode of brutality by a New York City police officer with a can of pepper spray greatly expanded the profile of protests.

There is not much that the Tea Party and the Occupy Wall Street agree about other than that they are not like each other. Because of their huge cultural and ideological differences, both groups object to the comparison. But as spontaneous, unpredictable movements reshaping the political landscape, they have more in common than meets the eye. The parallels are much stronger than either prefers to admit.

http://www.slate.com/articles/news_and_politics/the_big_idea/2011/10/occupy_wall_street_and_the_tea_party_do_they_agree _on_anything_.html

lofter1
October 15th, 2011, 01:21 AM
The conclusion of that article is totally unsubstantiated. These two groups want very different things. And they go about getting them in very different ways.

odiug
October 15th, 2011, 02:26 AM
they are similar because there source of grievance is similar, the condition of economy & government and that grievance is there source!
They both wouldn't exist without it!
But what divides them more than there aims and reasoning about the causes of this current crisis is the generational gap between them.
And i have to confess ... age wise i should be more of a tea party type ... bu i can't help myself ... they are jut to beautiful down there in Zuccotti Park:D
Or is ist on Zuccotti Park? ... well ...;)

Merry
October 15th, 2011, 02:51 AM
They both want change, which is the extent of any perceived commonality, but I'd be more than happy to keep them totally separate, precisely because of their "huge cultural and ideological differences".

Meanwhile...conflict of interest and tactical expediency all over the place :rolleyes::


Common Sense Breaks Out at City Hall

Posted by John Cassidy

The city’s last-minute decision not to evict the Occupy Wall Street hordes from Zuccotti Park, at least for now, represents a rare sensible decision by the Bloomberg administration in its reaction to the protest. If the Mayor had gone ahead and sent the N.Y.P.D. in to clear out the square, supposedly for a cleaning, the police would have had to arrest thousands of people live on television, which would have been a public-relations disaster for Bloomberg and for the city. In stepping back, Bloomberg and Ray Kelly, the police chief, have given themselves some time to seek an agreement with the demonstrators. Even if these negotiations fail, as they may well do, the city will have given the impression that it tried to act reasonably rather than simply trying to bash the protestors into submission.

Spare me the official line that Brookfield Properties, the owner of the “public private” park, had second thoughts about asking for the N.Y.P.D.’s help in cleaning it up. The mayor, whose girlfriend Diana Taylor is a director of Brookfield, is driving this van, and Kelly is in the passenger seat.

Bloomberg’s distaste for what is happening has been clear from the beginning. That’s hardly surprising. The Occupy Wall Street folk have put him in the invidious position of overseeing a protest against the industry that created his fortune and, by extension, his mayoralty. But disliking a protest is one thing. Ordering the police to break it up at dawn, with force if necessary, would have placed in jeopardy his entire political identity as a cool-headed problem solver. If he hadn’t been careful, he could easily have ended up looking like an out-of-touch billionaire trying to defend his own class-interest.

In his radio show this morning, Bloomberg was clearly trying to strike an equitable and impartial note. “The protestors, in all fairness, have been very peaceful there,” he said. But he then went on to cite the concerns of the people living in the neighborhood of Zuccotti Park, adding, “The longer this goes on, the worse it is for our economy.”

Now, the Mayor’s representatives can meet with some of the protest leaders and try to reach a compromise. Legally, it seems clear that Brookfield has the right to enforce “reasonable” rules of conduct in the park, which it can define to include not sleeping there or creating a camp. But will the protestors be willing to accept such limitations?

If the Mayor is in a tricky spot, so are the protest organizers. After a month in which they have succeeded beyond any expectations, the protesters now have to ask themselves some tricky questions. Is Occupy Wall Street a movement about occupying a piece of real estate in lower Manhattan, or is it about something broader? The answer is clearly that it is about something broader—rising inequality and a corrupted political system—but how should this campaign be prosecuted from here on out?

There isn’t an immediately obvious answer. But over the next few days, somebody is going to have to come up with one and persuade the rest of the movement to go along with it.

http://www.newyorker.com/online/blogs/johncassidy/2011/10/occupy-wall-street-cleaning.html#ixzz1apXP6tV4

lofter1
October 15th, 2011, 10:53 AM
“The longer this goes on, the worse it is for our economy.” So says Bloomberg.

If he means that the longer those in power allow the continuance of the moral corruption at the heart of our global crisis then I agree he has a point.

If he means that the demonstrations are hurting our economy then that's a whole other issue. Perhaps our mayor should reconsider the massive and mostly unnecessary use of public funds + force via the NYPD that he has decided must be spent.

Choices Must Be Made.

Meanwhile, across the pond today:

The situation is clear and the message to the point ...

14262

lofter1
October 15th, 2011, 10:58 AM
Is Occupy Wall Street a movement about occupying a piece of real estate in lower Manhattan, or is it about something broader? The answer is clearly that it is about something broader—rising inequality and a corrupted political system—but how should this campaign be prosecuted from here on out?

There isn’t an immediately obvious answer. But over the next few days, somebody is going to have to come up with one and persuade the rest of the movement to go along with it.


The answer is inside everyone's own head. Each of us must Demand that ATTENTION MUST BE PAID. Stop looking to others to formulate the thought and turn it into action.

:: Individual Responsibility :: Take A Stand ::