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Edward
March 2nd, 2003, 10:15 PM
The article below *is perhaps a year old...


Construction is to begin late this summer on the six-slip, $30 million West Midtown Ferry Terminal on Pier 79 at the foot of 39th Street, which will wrap around the imposing ventilating towers of the Lincoln Tunnel. This glass pavilion will be immediately north of the existing New York Waterway terminal at Pier 78, a jumbled grab bag of structures and slips.

About 60 percent of the cost is being met by the federal Transportation Equity Act for the 21st Century and 30 percent by the city's capital budget, with the rest from the state and New York Waterway, which will also make an average annual lease payment of $750,000 over 30 years. Three slips will be controlled by New York Waterway and three will be open to other services. Operating costs will be defrayed in part by landing fees and advertising revenues. There will be 4,100 square feet of retail space.

The architects are William Nicholas Bodouva & Associates, designers of the four-year-old Terminal 1 at Kennedy International Airport. Thomas Balsley Associates are the landscape architects; Thornton-Tomasetti Group, the structural engineers.

The terminal has been shaped by more than passenger traffic, since it straddles the Lincoln Tunnel tubes and stands in the middle of the Hudson River Park and alongside the reconstructed Route 9A.

"We tried very hard in our design to make the building as open as possible, allowing both ferry terminal users and the public to move in and out easily," said Darko Hreljanovic, the project designer. That includes plazas to the north and south, a cafe from which seating can spill outside in pleasant weather and an elevated walkway over the ferry slips so that pedestrians can trace an uninterrupted waterside path.

The main waiting room will be clad in a structural glass system for highest transparency. Curving vestibules on either side of the vent stacks are intended to signal the terminal entrance clearly and to create a kind of architectural transition between the 145-foot-high towers and the low-rise terminal and plaza, Mr. Bodouva said.


From William Nicholas Bodouva & Associates website (http://www.bodouva.com/various/)

WNB+A was selected by the New York City Economic Development Corporation from a short list of New York's top architectural firms to design the new West Midtown Intermodal Ferry Terminal on Pier 79 located at West 39th Street. This new terminal will be a municipally-owned multi-user facility, providing ferry service including short haul commuters, water taxis, and high-speed long distance services from Midtown Manhattan to points along the Hudson River. Plans call for a new state-of-the-art Terminal as well as six new boat slips. The project is planned to be part of the larger Hudson River Park development.

http://www.bodouva.com/various/westmidtown_gallery/westmidtown_gallery_images/westmidtown_1.jpg

http://www.bodouva.com/various/westmidtown_gallery/westmidtown_gallery_images/westmidtown_3.jpg


From Wired New York:

Pier 79 (http://www.wirednewyork.com/piers/pier79/default.htm) in April 2002.

http://www.wirednewyork.com/piers/pier79/images/pier79_14apr02.jpg


Construction started on the six-slip, $30 million West Midtown Intermodal Ferry Terminal at Pier 79 (http://www.wirednewyork.com/piers/pier79/default.htm) at the foot of 39th Street, which will wrap around the imposing ventilating towers of the Lincoln Tunnel. This glass pavilion will be immediately north of the existing New York Waterway terminal at Pier 78, a jumbled grab bag of structures and slips. 2 March 2003.

http://www.wirednewyork.com/piers/pier79/images/pier79_west_midtown_intermodal_ferry_terminal_2mar ch03.jpg

Kris
April 7th, 2004, 02:19 PM
http://www.aiany.org/designawards/2003/projects/jpegs/287c.jpg
http://www.aiany.org/designawards/2003/projects/jpegs/287a.jpg
http://www.aiany.org/designawards/2003/projects/jpegs/287b.jpg

http://aiany.org/designawards/2003/projects/proj7.htm

ZippyTheChimp
June 27th, 2004, 10:19 PM
June 27, 2004
Progress on pier 79 ferry terminal
http://www.pbase.com/image/30664605.jpg

http://www.pbase.com/image/30664654.jpg

NYatKNIGHT
June 28th, 2004, 10:32 AM
So far, so good. It looks like it's going to be awesome when it's done.

Edward
January 5th, 2005, 09:38 AM
http://www.nypost.com/business/37646.htm
By LOIS WEISS

January 5, 2005 -- MANHATTAN'S Pier 78 the home of New York Waterways' new terminal is on the block and its buyer may have to fork over a cool $10 million.

This rare, privately owned pier is on the Hudson River, opposite the Javits Convention Center at 38th Street, and near the planned sites for New York's Olympic Games bid.

There's not only enough room for your yacht, but several yachts, parking for BMWs and buses, a hotdog cart, a horsedrawn buggy and a restaurant or three.

The only thing you can't do is live on the 24,450 square-foot parcel, said Jon Epstein, who along with Cushman & Wakefield compatriots Charles Kingsley, Yoav Oelsner, and Glenn Tolchin, is in charge of selling the pier.

The space can be expanded to 49,000 square feet of "anything related to entertainment, dining or [business] that is water dependent," he said. "It's ideal for specialty users."

It also comes with all city utilities with a real-estate tax currently about $126,000 a year.

The unique property runs north-south about 65 feet and extends more than 300 feet west toward what in 1837 was going to be a Thirteenth Avenue, but sssh, don't remind anyone or we'll end up with an actually, much-needed monorail or something.

BrooklynRider
January 5th, 2005, 10:14 AM
I don't understand how something that had a 60% Federal subsidy to be built, suddenly is on the block for private development.

ZippyTheChimp
January 5th, 2005, 10:34 AM
The new ferry terminal is just to the north - pier 79 (around the Lincoln Tunnel vent tower).

Pier 78 is between the vent tower and the car tow-pier. It's a small pier owned by NY Waterway (or maybe another private owner).

Edward
January 5th, 2005, 11:37 AM
My mistake - got confused by the words "new terminal".

BrooklynRider
January 5th, 2005, 12:46 PM
It seems that the article has it wrong.

ZippyTheChimp
January 5th, 2005, 12:57 PM
Well, it was new when it was new.

Sort of like that "LAST DAY OF OPENING" sign. :)

ZippyTheChimp
March 15th, 2005, 09:19 PM
It's like watching a race - The Tortoise & the Tortoise.

At least the buildings are closed in.

Edward
July 6th, 2005, 10:34 PM
West Midtown Ferry Terminal (http://www.wirednewyork.com/piers/pier79/default.htm). The building under construction - Orion Condominiums (http://www.wirednewyork.com/real_estate/orion/default.htm). 3 July 2005.

http://www.wirednewyork.com/piers/pier79/west_midtown_ferry_terminal.jpg (http://www.wirednewyork.com/piers/pier79/default.htm)

billyblancoNYC
July 7th, 2005, 11:31 AM
West Midtown Ferry Terminal (http://www.wirednewyork.com/piers/pier79/default.htm). The building under construction - Orion Condominiums (http://www.wirednewyork.com/real_estate/orion/default.htm). 3 July 2005.




Any plans to cover those brown bohemoths in that nice new glass?

ZippyTheChimp
July 7th, 2005, 11:56 AM
I don't think so, but I like the contrast.

pianoman11686
July 7th, 2005, 06:24 PM
I think the Zebra tower is a much bigger and more offensive eyesore. I still cannot figure out what the developers were thinking.

lofter1
July 7th, 2005, 06:54 PM
I think the Zebra tower is a much bigger and more offensive eyesore. I still cannot figure out what the developers were thinking.

Luckily, if the building boom on and around West 42nd continues, that "zebra" monstrosity will soon be surrounded by bigger & taller buildings (and, if we're lucky, they'll be better looking). God willing this eyesore will soon be far less visible.

NIMBYkiller
July 26th, 2005, 09:23 PM
I really need to get over to the west side some time. I'm missing out on all the reconstruction of the ferry terminals. This looks like a great new terminal. I'm glad to see it has SIX spots for boats instead of just 4 like many others.

Edward
August 10th, 2005, 09:17 PM
West Midtown Ferry Terminal (http://www.wirednewyork.com/piers/pier79/default.htm). 6 August 2005.

http://www.wirednewyork.com/piers/pier79/ferry_terminal.jpg (http://www.wirednewyork.com/piers/pier79/default.htm)

BrooklynRider
August 10th, 2005, 11:07 PM
I really like that they incorporated the Lincoln Tunnel Vent into a bigger project. I'm looking forward to this being done and landscaped. Westside bike path and Hudson River Park are coming along nicely.

NIMBYkiller
August 21st, 2005, 08:56 PM
Nice photo. You even got the BEAST in it! SWEET!

Looks like the terminal is comming along nicely.

macreator
August 21st, 2005, 09:11 PM
Why has this thing taken so long? Anyone know?

In the timeframe this thing has taken, the Milan apartment house on second avenue was built. And that is a 30 story structure mind you.

ZippyTheChimp
October 21st, 2005, 09:05 AM
New and Flashy, Big and Glassy

By PATRICK McGEEHAN
October 21, 2005


http://www.nytimes.com/2005/10/21/nyregion/21ferry.html


New York City officials started dreaming of a classy ferry terminal on the Hudson River in Midtown sometime in 1999. Six years, $56 million and one financial crisis later, they are preparing to open it to the public on Monday.

The terminal, a two-story glass structure on a pier at the west end of 39th Street, is the latest manifestation of the prevailing view that if government agencies build the docks, the ferry operators and ferry riders will follow.
Known as the West Midtown Ferry Terminal, it will be available to any company that wants to pick up or drop off commuters there.

But for now, the operators of the New York Waterway ferry service will have it all to themselves. Their company, controlled by the family of Arthur E. Imperatore Sr., is leasing the building from the city for 10 years. It will also be running it for the city as a public terminal, like those at airports, with hopes of attracting more commuters and boat operators.

New York Waterway, which was on the verge of bankruptcy less than a year ago and had to sell half of its assets, is to pay $12,500 a month in rent. The company has also agreed to share with the city any revenue from concessions and advertising, as well as fees collected from other ferry services that want to bring boats there.

Officials of the New York City Economic Development Corporation, which built the terminal, said they expected to receive $200,000 to $300,000 from New York Waterway in the first year.

The deal will enable the company to move its commuter operations and New York offices into the terminal from the makeshift setup it has maintained a block south for almost 20 years. The new terminal has room for indoor ticket counters, a spacious waiting room and even a cafe with an angled, elevated deck that the architects called "the diving board."

The terminal, which wraps around two unsightly ventilation towers that pump air into the Lincoln Tunnel below, was designed by William Nicholas Boudova & Associates. The firm is responsible for several other transportation facilities in the city, including Terminal 1 at Kennedy International Airport.

With seven boat slips and 30,000 square feet of space inside, the terminal could handle as many as 20,000 passengers an hour, said Sandra Tomas, who oversaw the project for the city. That is far more capacity than the current contingent of commuters requires: Only about 5,000 people ride ferries to and from New York Waterway's adjacent dock each weekday.

Plans for the terminal, which date back to 1999, gained momentum after 9/11 when ferries carried tens of thousands of people fleeing Manhattan. For about a year after the terrorist attack, New York Waterway operated additional ferries from a temporary barge that was moored where the new terminal now stands.

"God forbid there's another disaster in New York, but this terminal serves an important function in an emergency," said Arthur Imperatore Jr., whose father started the ferry service in 1986.

The Federal Emergency Management Agency provided money that paid for dredging, so the terminal could handle the parking of ferries of various sizes. Of the $56 million total, $38.4 million came from federal agencies, $12.3 million from the city, $3.3 million from the state and $2 million from New York Waterway.

The ferry company made its contribution two years ago, before it ran into significant financial trouble. During that episode, the Imperatores struck a deal to sell half their boats and routes to a new enterprise controlled by William B. Wachtel, a lawyer in Manhattan.

Having survived that crisis, Mr. Imperatore smiled as he walked about in his company's new New York quarters yesterday.

The lesson for the day, Mr. Imperatore said, was, "If you live long enough, good things will happen to you."




Copyright 2005 (http://www.nytimes.com/ref/membercenter/help/copyright.html)The New York Times Company (http://www.nytco.com/)

ZippyTheChimp
November 6th, 2005, 06:19 AM
.
http://img455.imageshack.us/img455/1795/pier79019ho.th.jpg (http://img455.imageshack.us/my.php?image=pier79019ho.jpg) http://img455.imageshack.us/img455/2817/pier79029ls.th.jpg (http://img455.imageshack.us/my.php?image=pier79029ls.jpg) http://img455.imageshack.us/img455/9343/pier79031xk.th.jpg (http://img455.imageshack.us/my.php?image=pier79031xk.jpg)
http://img455.imageshack.us/img455/8808/pier79044nl.th.jpg (http://img455.imageshack.us/my.php?image=pier79044nl.jpg) http://img455.imageshack.us/img455/2150/pier79052jb.th.jpg (http://img455.imageshack.us/my.php?image=pier79052jb.jpg) http://img455.imageshack.us/img455/407/pier79069sr.th.jpg (http://img455.imageshack.us/my.php?image=pier79069sr.jpg) http://img455.imageshack.us/img455/1424/pier79072uy.th.jpg (http://img455.imageshack.us/my.php?image=pier79072uy.jpg)

ablarc
November 6th, 2005, 07:48 AM
I think the Zebra tower is a much bigger and more offensive eyesore. I still cannot figure out what the developers were thinking.
I bet that was the architect thinking, not the developer.

infoshare
November 6th, 2005, 08:48 AM
I bet that was the architect thinking, not the developer.

You've got that right.

cheers

infoshare
November 6th, 2005, 09:21 AM
New and Flashy, Big and Glassy

New York Waterway, which was on the verge of bankruptcy less than a year ago and had to sell half of its assets, is to pay $12,500 a month in rent. The company has also agreed to share with the city any revenue from concessions and advertising, as well as fees collected from other ferry services that want to bring boats there.

Officials of the New York City Economic Development Corporation, which built the terminal, said they expected to receive $200,000 to $300,000 from New York Waterway in the first year.



This is great. And thanks to NY wired for bringing me the news, I did not know this was in the works.

What I like (in addition to the revenue) is that this is a facility that is put to use 24 hours a day/7 days a week/ 365 days per year.

Most of the park sits in a state of dormancy/vegitation for about 9 months out of the year. During warm weather months it is put to use only on weekends.
Now lets see what happens with Leonardo on pier 57.

cheers, you made my day

STT757
November 10th, 2005, 09:08 PM
I had the day off so I took a trip into the City, NJ Transit into NY Penn and I decided to take the ferry back to Hoboken Terminal to catch NJ Transit back home.

Good news:

The new Ferry Terminal is AWESOME(!), it was better than I was expecting. I've seen it under construction for a couple years now but this was the first time I got to get a real close look around, the inside is bright, modern and very well constructed. The outside has nice landscaping, there was also a NYPD cruiser parked on the side walk right in front of the doors leading into the Terminal, there was also private security walking around outside.

I wanted to bring my digital camera for some photos but Im glad I left it in my car, I don't want to be hassled by the cops on my day off.

Bad news:

The signs inside listed all the destinations and from which slip the ferry left, Hoboken North was listed as was Hoboken terminal. For whatever reason they taped over the number of the slip Hoboken terminal ferries were operating from, when I tried to buy a ticket to Hoboken terminal the agent said they are not running that route right now.

How can they not serve Hoboken terminal?.. I would think that would be one of their busiest routes because of the NJ Transit/MTA (West of the Hudson) rail hub.

Long story short I took the ferry to Newport/Colgate and hopped on the Light Rail for the trip to Hoboken Terminal.

On the ferry trip over I could see the new Port Imperial Terminal which looks to be nearing completion, also work is progressing rapidly on the new World Financial Center ferry terminal and the rebuilding of the Hoboken Terminal Lackawanna Ferry slips. Combine the Hudson Ferry terminal projects and the new Staten Island ferry terminal and it's obvious ferry service in the NYC/NJ area is undergoing a renaissance.

Derek2k3
November 12th, 2005, 01:23 AM
Beautiful pics zippy. Some shots of the interior.

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/52125527.jpg

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/52125581.jpg

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/52125529.jpg