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Kris
June 12th, 2003, 08:41 AM
June 12, 2003

New Park on Hudson Fills Gap in Greenery

By PATRICK HEALY

Malissa Liburdi remembers when the east bank of the Hudson River was a nest of rotting railways and a haven for drug dealers and addicts. The riverfront was unsettling in the daylight and unsafe at night, said Ms. Liburdi, 40, who has lived on the Upper West Side for 15 years.

But yesterday, Ms. Liburdi ambled along a newly opened section of Riverside Park South, her nephew and brown-and-white spotted dog in tow. As joggers and bikers zipped along the river, Ms. Liburdi said she was pleased to see the industrial riverfront evolving into parkland.

"We're very excited about this new park opening," Ms. Liburdi said. "The trees and the water and the grass — it's kind of a balance of nature."

Donald J. Trump gave a three-acre swath of land between 65th and 69th Streets to the city yesterday. It was another step in Mr. Trump's planned $3 billion development, which will add 16 apartment buildings and 29 acres of public park to the east shore of the Hudson River between 59th and 72nd Streets.

"When all the phases are complete, there'll be nothing to touch it," Mr. Trump said.

Riverside Park South will "close the gap" between Riverside Park on the north side and Hudson River Park on the south, said Henry J. Stern, the former Parks Department commissioner.

Lying in the shadow of the West Side Highway, the newest parcel of park features marsh grasses and boardwalks that curl like ribbons. Thomas Balsley, architect for the Riverside South project, said the park is designed to evoke memories of railroads, which once loaded and unloaded freight cars at piers that are now toppled hunks of burnt metal.

The $62 million Riverside Park South project is just one example of a citywide attempt to convert miles of waterfront to green space. The city is reviving the waterfront and marina at Flushing Meadows-Corona Park in Queens, parks on the Harlem and Bronx Rivers and a five-mile walkway on the northern shore of Staten Island.

"This is taking the decrepit industrial waterfront and returning it to a natural state," said Michael Bradley, executive director of the Riverside South Planning Corporation. "People are rediscovering the waterfront."

And at Riverside South, the city is paying nothing, said Parks Commissioner Adrian Benepe. As part of a 1992 deal that allowed the Riverside complex, Mr. Trump and his partners agreed to pay to renovate and maintain the park.

The new segment cost $8.5 million to renovate. Maintenance and security at all of Riverside South currently costs about $1 million per year, which is paid by Mr. Trump and his partners.

Parks department officials said construction on the third phase of the park will begin this September and be completed by 2004.


Copyright 2003 The New York Times Company

billyblancoNYC
June 12th, 2003, 10:40 AM
Love him or hate him, he seems to get stuff done.

TLOZ Link5
June 12th, 2003, 07:17 PM
No doubts there, Billy.

RandySavage
May 30th, 2005, 09:02 PM
The expansive Phase III (last of the Thomas Balsley designed waterfront segments) of Riverside Park South looks like it will open to the public any day now.

billyblancoNYC
May 31st, 2005, 10:04 AM
The expansive Phase III (last of the Thomas Balsley designed waterfront segments) of Riverside Park South looks like it will open to the public any day now.

Nice, this is a great park. So, when do you think the entire Hudson will be "parked-up?"

pianoman11686
May 31st, 2005, 09:08 PM
I think it'll definitely be done by the end of the decade. There's still an expansive section between the northern fringe of Battery Park City and up to about the Perry West Towers that's still almost completely asphalt. I know they'll do a good job though, because the area where the park starts is great. Also, don't forget about the whole "strip of green around the island" idea. We need more parkland along the East River too.

cyppok
February 17th, 2006, 07:02 PM
http://www.riverside-south.org/

"Riverside South is a $3 billion real estate and public use development on the 52-acre site of the former New York Central Railroad yards on the Upper West Side of Manhattan. The final Riverside South project will include 5,700 new apartments and condominiums at both market and affordable rates and a 27-acre public waterfront park along the Hudson River financed with private funds. The Riverside South Planning Corporation exists to implement details of the master plan, including enforcing building design controls, overseeing park construction, and lobbying for the relocation of the elevated Miller Highway, the noisy, obstructive and potentially dangerous structure that cuts through the entirety of the new waterfront park."

I guess its going to be about 4300 rentals and 1400 condos...

(all I want are the rentals all of em with my name on each building) :)

lofter1
September 10th, 2006, 11:51 PM
The pier at Riverside South Park:

http://www.tbany.com/rsspaerial.jpg

http://www.tbany.com/

ZippyTheChimp
November 7th, 2006, 06:49 AM
Construction underway on Phase IV of the park, the last segment from 59th to 63rd Sts, linking Riverside Park to Hudson River Park.

The Alco S-1 switcher, donated by the NY Cross Harbor RR, sits behind the fence.

http://img98.imageshack.us/img98/2957/rivparksouth01cdc2.th.jpg (http://img98.imageshack.us/my.php?image=rivparksouth01cdc2.jpg) http://img148.imageshack.us/img148/741/rivparksouth02cjk2.th.jpg (http://img148.imageshack.us/my.php?image=rivparksouth02cjk2.jpg)

lofter1
November 7th, 2006, 10:02 AM
The Alco S-1 switcher, donated by the NY Cross Harbor RR, sits behind the fence. [/URL]

Some info / pics regarding that train, (mis-) posted in the Riverside South Development thread [URL="http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showpost.php?p=124596&postcount=101"]Here (http://img148.imageshack.us/my.php?image=rivparksouth02cjk2.jpg) and Here (http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showpost.php?p=124600&postcount=102)

NYatKNIGHT
November 7th, 2006, 10:48 AM
This segment will make such a huge difference to the Hudson greenway connectivity when those fences finally come down, it's a long walk around. Plus it looks to be one of the more interesting sections - that switcher being among many cool new things to check out.

lofter1
July 4th, 2007, 02:27 PM
The newest section of the park from 59th Street north is coming together ...

The central "plaza" area (with the locomotive at right) ...

http://i130.photobucket.com/albums/p242/Lofter1/Hudson%20River%20Park/RPS_02g.jpg

http://i130.photobucket.com/albums/p242/Lofter1/Hudson%20River%20Park/RPS_02f.jpg

The shoreline is being rebuilt and re-inforced, readied for new plantings ...

http://i130.photobucket.com/albums/p242/Lofter1/Hudson%20River%20Park/RPS_02c.jpg

A new bridged walkway connects the bulkheads ...

http://i130.photobucket.com/albums/p242/Lofter1/Hudson%20River%20Park/RPS_02a.jpg

http://i130.photobucket.com/albums/p242/Lofter1/Hudson%20River%20Park/RPS_02b.jpg

http://i130.photobucket.com/albums/p242/Lofter1/Hudson%20River%20Park/RPS_02e.jpg

ablarc
July 4th, 2007, 04:00 PM
^ Elevated highway is ghastly.

Monoxide Park.

NewYorkDoc
July 4th, 2007, 05:01 PM
^ Elevated highway is ghastly.

Monoxide Park.

That's exactly my thoughts looking at the pictures.

lofter1
July 4th, 2007, 10:35 PM
Cough up a couple hundred million ^^^ and we can do something about it ...

When you're in the park below the highway and looking out towards the Hudson the roadway behind you is nearly completely unnoticeable. Very calm and quiet down there.

ablarc
July 4th, 2007, 10:55 PM
^ Silent, invisible and odorless, the CO oozes down to greet you.

ZippyTheChimp
July 4th, 2007, 11:16 PM
Carbon monoxide is lighter than air.

lofter1
July 4th, 2007, 11:43 PM
The stinky part comes up from the water :(

Low tide can be quite the olfactory experience ...

brianac
July 5th, 2007, 04:20 AM
It's not too bad.

jersey_guy
July 5th, 2007, 03:52 PM
Everything looks green when you're looking through a Heineken bottle.

MidtownGuy
July 5th, 2007, 05:38 PM
If the highway has to be there, unburied, too bad it couldn't be made to look more attractive, like the older structure above.

MidtownGuy
July 5th, 2007, 05:43 PM
I have family in town this weekend. I would love to show them Hudson River Park and Riverside Park South. It's just so linear that the older family members would never be able to walk very much of it. I wonder if we could get a couple of pedicabs to take us along it.

NYatKNIGHT
July 5th, 2007, 06:08 PM
Not sure if you want to bike it, but you can rent bicycles at Pier 84.

antinimby
July 5th, 2007, 08:01 PM
I wonder if we could get a couple of pedicabs to take us along it.Well, you know those are just a little harder to find now that the City Council HAS DECIDED TO PUT A LIMIT (http://www.nytimes.com/2007/07/04/nyregion/04mbrfs-pedicabs.html) ON THEM!

brianac
November 20th, 2007, 04:08 AM
November 19, 2007, 3:50 pm

Pier D Stands Out in the West Side’s Industrial Past

By David W. Dunlap (http://cityroom.blogs.nytimes.com/author/ddunlap/)

http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2007/11/19/nyregion/19pier.span_cityroom.jpg
A new pier in the Riverside Park South project offers a vantage of the ruined Pier D. (Photo: David W. Dunlap/The New York Times)
It isn’t your conventional luxury amenity.

A large rendering in a glossy new brochure from the Extell Development Company (http://www.extelldev.com/) promises prospective residents of its Avery and Rushmore apartment houses on the Upper West Side that they will enjoy commanding views of a rusting, twisted, melted ruin that has been jutting skeletally out of the Hudson River since it burned down 36 years ago.

The growing appreciation of Manhattan’s industrial past has yielded few monuments as unlikely or as poetic (if you catch it on a misty morning or under a piercing sunset) as the ruined Pier D, which once served the New York Central Railroad’s sprawling 60th Street Yard, now the site of Riverside Park South (http://www.nycgovparks.org/sub_your_park/vt_riverside_park/vt_rs_12_riverside_park_south.html) and the Riverside South residential development, from 59th to 72nd Streets.

Pier D, at the foot of 64th Street, was built of wood in the 1880s, then rebuilt with a steel frame after a fire in 1922. According to a historical plaque placed there by the Department of Parks and Recreation, it was used by longshoremen to unload bulk cargo, much of it grain, milk and vegetables.

The pier was abandoned by June 1971 when it and two others were consumed in a spectacular blaze. Smoke was so thick that it forced the closing of the elevated West Side Highway nearby.

After years of inaction, Pier D — also called the “Frank Gehry Pier,” after its almost organically random angles — and the nearby “Spaghetti Pier,” a tangled mess of steel from the 1971 fire, were finally to be removed in 2003 as part of the Riverside Park South project. (Pier I, at the foot of West 70th Street, reopened in 2001 as a pedestrian promenade and fishing spot.)

Adrian Benepe, the parks commissioner, who had favored the preservation of Pier D, said he was alerted one day that a crane had begun dismantling the pier, severing its connection to the landside bulkhead. He raced to the site. “I basically gave them a field order to stop,” he recalled.

“The combination of the accidental artwork and preserving a piece of our industrial heritage was compelling,” Mr. Benepe said.

Because approved plans for the site had called for the removal of Pier D, however, he said its preservation had to be negotiated. The parks department agreed to undertake a new study of the effect of structural coverings along the river on fish habitats below. In the 1980s, a project to build a highway called Westway through 200 acres of landfill in the Hudson was upended when it was determined that it could pose a threat to striped bass.

Westway was never a popular idea. But Mr. Benepe said that keeping Pier D was. “People are really interested in their history,” he said. “It’s very important to remember that we once got our food in Manhattan because trains were able to pull up into the middle of Manhattan.”

It will be especially worth recalling when the Fresh Direct trucks begin pulling up at the Avery and the Rushmore.

http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2007/11/19/nyregion/19rendering.cityroom.jpg
A rendering of the Riverside South residential project showing the remains of Pier D in the lower right corner. (Rendering: Extell Development Company)



Copyright 2007 The New York Times Company.

zarzapan
January 13th, 2008, 09:31 PM
Took a walk down here recently and have to say it's a great space. The plantings and the meandering paths make it feel surprisingly peaceful.

brianac
February 21st, 2008, 04:49 AM
For Perhaps $490 a Month, a Home on the Hudson River

http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2008/02/19/nyregion/19boatbasin2_600.jpg Gabriele Stabile for The New York Times
Leslie Day feeding sea gulls from her 43-foot cruiser at the 79th Street Boat Basin. Dr. Day,
a naturalist and author who teaches at an elementary school, has lived at the boat basin for 32 years.

By ANTHONY RAMIREZ (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/reference/timestopics/people/r/anthony_ramirez/index.html?inline=nyt-per)
Published: February 19, 2008

Leslie Day flirted, dated, married, raised a family and found her life’s work in Manhattan — or rather, just off its shore.

http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2008/02/19/nyregion/19boatbasin03_650.jpg
Ed Bacon, the resident of longest standing at the 79th Street Boat Basin, and Regina Jordan with their pet,
Ollie, at home on their ketch. Mr. Bacon is a former I.B.M. executive; Ms. Jordan is a chef.
“At first, in the 1970s, the boat basin was a divorcés’ heaven,” Mr. Bacon said. “All of these guys were
divorced and all they would wind up with is the boat. It became a real party place.”

Born on the Upper West Side, she moved to a 34-foot houseboat at the 79th Street Boat Basin when she was 30, single and a masseuse. She found her future husband, a biologist, on the 43-foot houseboat next door. After they were wed, they traded up to a 57-foot houseboat, and they raised a son.

Now, as empty-nesters, the couple live on a 43-foot cruiser.

Dr. Day, 62, who is now an elementary school teacher, recently wrote “Field Guide to the Natural World of New York City.” When Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/reference/timestopics/people/b/michael_r_bloomberg/index.html?inline=nyt-per) honored her book last fall in a ceremony at Gracie Mansion, he reached the part of his script that noted where she lived and ad-libbed a reaction she had heard many times. “Do you really?” he said. “That’s amazing. Thirty-two years and it never sunk or anything like that?”

Since 1937, when Franklin Delano Roosevelt (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/reference/timestopics/people/r/franklin_delano_roosevelt/index.html?inline=nyt-per) was president, the 79th Street Boat Basin has been an object of fascination off the island of Manhattan, part fishing village, part Monte Carlo and all floating opera all of the time.

The boat basin floats on five main docks on the banks of the Hudson River.

For decades, there have been as many as 100 pleasure craft, some pristine, others slovenly — schooners, houseboats, yachts and trawlers — tethered just off the Riverside Park promenade, three blocks from Broadway and Zabar’s.

Critics have called the residents squatters on public property, in a high-end trailer park; even the city government, which owns the docks, has not always been comfortable with the arrangement.

But the boaters call themselves a community with rights like any other. Residents have ranged from millionaires to those between jobs. All seem to embrace self-expression. One man liked wearing a Superman sweatshirt as he bounced on a trampoline on the dock.

“Over the years,” said Ed Bacon, 67, a yacht broker and the resident of longest standing at more than 37 years, “we’ve had starving artists, Wall Street financiers, rock promoters, computer programmers, United Nations (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/reference/timestopics/organizations/u/united_nations/index.html?inline=nyt-org) employees and,” pausing to laugh, “Dick DeBartolo.” He is a senior writer at Mad magazine, who maintains a boat as an office.

Mr. Bacon, a former I.B.M. executive, would not have it any other way. Living among people like himself, he said, would be like “reading from only one page of a book.”

Celebrities have visited, too. Aristotle Onassis once anchored his yacht there. Malcolm Forbes (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/reference/timestopics/people/f/malcolm_forbes/index.html?inline=nyt-per), Frank Sinatra (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/reference/timestopics/people/s/frank_sinatra/index.html?inline=nyt-per) and Mario Puzo (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/reference/timestopics/people/p/mario_puzo/index.html?inline=nyt-per), whose boat was named Godfather, used the basin.

But the living, despite appearances, is not always easy. When a ferry rumbles past, throwing up a huge wake, the residences buck and weave like horses.

Low tide, meaningless on land, sends the docks downward by five feet or more.

In the cold months, pets fall into chilly water. People slip on icy piers. In an especially frigid winter, a miniature Antarctica can freeze around the basin. In 2005, ice floes caused more than $400,000 damage to the river pilings and other dock infrastructure, according to the city’s Department of Parks and Recreation.

Miraculously, there have been no major fires. But bloated corpses have bumped up boat side, spoiling someone’s morning coffee. Once, a distraught man in a tuxedo leapt into the river, but residents saved him.

What the boat basin has not had for a while is newcomers, though that is beginning to change.

Keith Kerman, the chief of operations for the Parks Department, said the agency stopped issuing permits for year-round dockage in 1994 in an effort to gradually reduce the population of full-timers, who once occupied nearly all of the 116 permanent slips. The city wanted more public access, and more revenue: Short-term rentals bring in more money. Now, the number of full-timers has fallen to 43.

After years of clashes with the remaining residents, the two sides reached a compromise: The department would issue a small number of new annual permits, infusing new blood into the community.

A permit to dock a boat is one of the last real estate bargains in Manhattan, costing a fraction of even a tiny Upper West Side apartment rental. It costs $108 a foot for the summer season; $88 a foot for the other six months.

Thus, a typical 30-foot boat would cost $5,880 in annual dock fees, or $490 a month.

Planned by Robert Moses (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/reference/timestopics/people/m/robert_moses/index.html?inline=nyt-per) when he was the city parks commissioner, the boat basin was built in 1937 to offer summer dockage to the public.

By the 1960s, however, boaters began to live there year-round and the number of so-called transient boaters, those who stayed for days or weeks, fell.

By the 1970s, there were problems. Outside managers stopped maintaining the docks, and residents filed lawsuits.

In 1989 the city resumed management of the basin.

One of the fiercest critics of the boat basin has been the Riverside Park Fund, a private group that raises money for the park. In 1991, Peter M. Wright, then its chairman, said, “The people in the boat basin are squatters on public land.”

http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2008/02/19/nyregion/19boatbasin02_190.jpg Joyce Dopkeen/The New York Times
Ollie, a toy poodle, asleep in a berth of the 54-foot,
two-mast ketch where Ed Bacon, a resident of the
boat basin since 1970, lives with his wife, Regina Jordan.

(http://javascript<b></b>:pop_me_up2('http://www.nytimes.com/imagepages/2008/02/19/nyregion/19boat_CA1.ready.html', '19boat_CA1_ready', 'width=720,height=600,scrollbars=yes,toolbars=no,r esizable=yes'))
http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2008/02/19/nyregion/19boatbasin_190.jpg (http://javascript<b></b>:pop_me_up2('http://www.nytimes.com/imagepages/2008/02/19/nyregion/19boat_CA1.ready.html', '19boat_CA1_ready', 'width=720,height=600,scrollbars=yes,toolbars=no,r esizable=yes'))Gabriele Stabile for The New York Times
The naturalist Leslie Day on her cruiser.
Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg wondered if she had ever lived on a boat that sank.

Now, James T. Dowell, the fund’s president, said, “The conditions are immeasurably improved.” He added, “The fund has been pleased that the balance has shifted toward seasonal and day people, so it’s a much more public amenity.”

There is a full-time dockmaster. The Parks Department provides, free of charge, a boat pump-out system that connects directly to the boats of full-timers and visitors. (Dumping raw sewage into the river is illegal.) Paper and other garbage can be discarded in a nearby container. A fresh-water line system is also free, but electricity, telephone, television and Internet access are paid for by boaters.

Mr. Bacon, who began living at the boat basin during the Lindsay administration, and his second wife, Regina Jordan, live with a 2-year-old toy poodle, Ollie, on a two-mast cutter-rig ketch that is 54 feet long. It is Mr. Bacon’s third and largest boat.

Mr. Bacon remembers his first winter, in 1970, as especially tough. It was hard to get electricity to boats, he recalls, and there were frequent power failures. To get fresh water, boaters ran garden hoses underwater and to their boats. Mr. Bacon remembers hauling six or seven buckets of water from the dock faucet just to take a shower.

“You learned to cooperate very quickly,” he recalled. Camaraderie and cocktails were strong.

“At first, in the 1970s, the boat basin was a divorcés’ heaven,” he said. “All of these guys were divorced and all they would wind up with is the boat. It became a real party place.”

With the increase in part-timers, revenues from dock fees have risen sixfold, to $241,000 last year from $40,000 in 2001. (There is a waiting list of 450 names for part-time slots, from May to October.)

Last month, an audit by the city comptroller found “fiscal irregularities” that raised “serious concerns about the possibility of fraud.” The comptroller, William C. Thompson Jr. (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/reference/timestopics/people/t/william_c_jr_thompson/index.html?inline=nyt-per), recommended a much tighter system of monitoring operations, including the collection, recording and reporting of gross receipts.
The parks commissioner, Adrian Benepe (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/reference/timestopics/people/b/adrian_benepe/index.html?inline=nyt-per), said that the department had already strengthened fiscal controls and that there was no evidence of misappropriation of funds.

Last year, when the Parks Department began issuing new annual permits, the first two boaters began moving in.

Sim Cass, 51, a baker and a former sailor in the British merchant navy, is one of them.

He said that he fell in love with the boat basin at first sight, in 1983. “You can see the horizon and the sun and the arc of the moon,” he said, “and yet you are decidedly in Manhattan.”

Mr. Cass, who now lives in an apartment in the East Village, first applied for a year-round permit seven years ago and was finally issued one last October.

He plans to move in this summer and live on his 37-foot trawler, which is already docked there.

“I’d love to live there now,” he said, noting that he is waiting for his daughter to leave for college. “Wintertime is spectacular!”

Like other new full-timers, Mr. Cass must ensure his boat is seaworthy. By May of next year, the 19 full-time boats that the Parks Department considers unseaworthy must be fully operational, in case of an emergency evacuation.
Gene Greenspun, now 89, lived on his boat for 32 years until 2002, when an early-morning wake from a passing boat smashed his craft against the pier. He escaped but his boat sank.

A widower who now lives in an East Side apartment, Mr. Greenspun said the other day that he was miserable, as he put it, “on land.”

But Mr. Greenspun, a developer of a manufacturing process for children’s dolls, could not move back. “It was like a child dying,” he said. “You don’t hang around the place where the child died.”

For Mr. Greenspun and others who have left, Mr. Bacon, the yacht broker, is planning a reunion June 12 at the boat basin. So far, he has contacted more than 100 alumni, out of several hundred.

“We’ll have a lot to talk about,” Mr. Bacon said.

Copyright 2008 The New York Times Company.

lofter1
February 22nd, 2008, 04:38 PM
Dreaming of Summer at Riverside Park South

CURBED (http://curbed.com/archives/2008/02/22/dreaming_of_summer_at_riverside_park_south.php)
February 22, 2008
by Pete

http://curbed.com/uploads/2008_01_RPS1.JPG

There's nothing like a nasty day in February to get a New Yorker wishing for
some sun and fun. And that's just what the landscape design crew from
Thomas Balsley Associates (http://www.tbany.com/) have got in mind for Phase IV of Riverside Park
South running north from 59th Street along the Hudson River. They're
bringing us some grassy play areas for the little ones and, for kids of all ages,
a restored 1940's Alco S-1 switcher locomotive. Not to mention plenty of
spots to get away from it all, whether gazing up at clouds, looking out across
the rusty old piers (http://figure-ground.com/travel/image.php?piers) or checking out the look-alike row of residentials (http://curbed.com/archives/2008/01/17/extells_riverside_south_will_rule_the_west_side.ph p) rising in
the east. All in all, not a bad place for playin' hooky.

http://curbed.com/uploads/2008_01_RPS2.JPG
A walkway over the water runs south through the Phase IV section.

http://curbed.com/uploads/2008_01_RPS7.JPG
Trees and a berm to buffer the sounds of the elevated highway.

http://curbed.com/uploads/2008_01_RPS4.JPG
Old Pier B, the perfect perch for pier watchers.

http://curbed.com/uploads/2008_01_RPS5.JPG
Some big kids playing train.

http://curbed.com/uploads/2008_01_RPS6.JPG
Covered seating right at water's edge.

http://curbed.com/uploads/2008_01_RPS8.JPG
A well manicured yard for all the new locals.

http://curbed.com/uploads/2008_01_RPS9.JPG
Looking west to the neighbors over in Jersey.

· Waterfront Parks & Development (http://www.tbany.com/) [Thomas Balsley Associates website]
· The Collapsed Piers of Riverside Park South (http://figure-ground.com/travel/image.php?piers) [figure-ground.com]
· Extell's Riverside South Will Rule the West Side (http://curbed.com/archives/2008/01/17/extells_riverside_south_will_rule_the_west_side.ph p) [Curbed]

RandySavage
April 19th, 2008, 12:04 PM
The expansive phase IV (photos above) looks complete: All grass, plantings and benches are in, all paving seems complete... there's still a chain link fence up, but looks like it could open very soon. The park itself looks very good.

MidtownGuy
April 21st, 2008, 02:11 PM
Thanks, that's good news, I'll have to rollerblade up there and check it out.:)

Optimus Prime
April 23rd, 2008, 06:00 PM
They were still installing some of the pavers today but it does look very close to finished. Would have snapped some pics but I was running. It looks really great, I love the newness of the park space played off the old pier and the train engine and the highway overhead.

RandySavage
April 23rd, 2008, 06:28 PM
Oftentimes, even when parks like this are finished, they delay the opening for a long time in order to let the plantings set. North Point Park in Boston/Cambridge was essentially completed two years ago and I don't even know if they've opened it yet.

The Benniest
April 28th, 2008, 09:16 PM
MidtownGuy has posted some wonderful pictures of Riverside Park South in his Springtime In The Big Apple (http://wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?t=9331) thread HERE (http://wirednewyork.com/forum/showpost.php?p=227380&postcount=57).

-ben

ZippyTheChimp
May 31st, 2008, 08:05 AM
Entrance near pier 99 (W 59th St). Almost ready to open.

http://img61.imageshack.us/img61/1311/rivparksouth03cot5.th.jpg (http://img61.imageshack.us/my.php?image=rivparksouth03cot5.jpg) http://img61.imageshack.us/img61/1365/rivparksouth04cpw7.th.jpg (http://img61.imageshack.us/my.php?image=rivparksouth04cpw7.jpg)

Remnants of one of the railroad piers
http://img48.imageshack.us/img48/5959/rivparksouth05cuw9.th.jpg (http://img48.imageshack.us/my.php?image=rivparksouth05cuw9.jpg)

In the background, the worker is standing on the tunnel replacement for the Miller Highway.
http://img48.imageshack.us/img48/3018/rivparksouth06cuw5.th.jpg (http://img48.imageshack.us/my.php?image=rivparksouth06cuw5.jpg)

Shell will be constructed, and covered with fill to form a slope for the park.
http://img138.imageshack.us/img138/3276/rivparksouth07cmq2.th.jpg (http://img138.imageshack.us/my.php?image=rivparksouth07cmq2.jpg)

Completed northbound tunnel section on the right.
http://img79.imageshack.us/img79/161/rivparksouth08cfd1.th.jpg (http://img79.imageshack.us/my.php?image=rivparksouth08cfd1.jpg)

ablarc
May 31st, 2008, 08:59 AM
...the tunnel replacement for the Miller Highway ... Shell will be constructed, and covered with fill ...
... and likely never put to use as envisioned.

Will we even need multi-lane highways at mid-Century? Might make a good train tunnel...

ZippyTheChimp
May 31st, 2008, 10:11 AM
Hard to envision transportation 50 years out, but we hope it will be more enlightened than present conditions.

But it's clear now that elevated highways are no longer viable within cites. Even with maintenance, their lifespan is about 40 years, while tunnels are much more durable (BQE vs BBT). And they're difficult to replace.

As long as there's a Henry Hudson Parkway spilling onto 12th Ave, a connection will be needed.

ablarc
May 31st, 2008, 12:18 PM
Point I was getting at was that we could use that highway tunnel TODAY for sure (could demolish the elevated structure), and in the future: maybe not so much (you need an infallible crystal ball to be sure). In any case it seems a tad quixotic to go to the expense of building a tunnel for HALF a highway that may or may not materialize in the future.

Phase II of many a project fails to materialize. To spend money today in anticipation of its certainty tomorrow requires either faith or folly.

ZippyTheChimp
May 31st, 2008, 12:54 PM
The segment that's being built now won't run up to W 72nd St, where the transition to the existing road will be made. Another connection needs to be made at W 57th onto 12th Ave. Expensive work around existing traffic.

The segment is relatively easy to construct. And if it wasn't built, the volume of the tunnel would have to be filled with earth to create the slope down from the streets to the shore.

The present highway does the job, and while it's bad for the towers, it's not so bad for the park. The park has a wind-swept post-industrial feel to it, and the highway compliments it. From a practical standpoint, its height allows sunlight to penetrate underneath, and it serves as a canopy for basketball courts.

Nesting pigeons are another problem, but they've installed netting under portions of the highway.

I don't think Lucie Dove would approve.

MidtownGuy
May 31st, 2008, 01:16 PM
This old elevated green structure (Old Miller Highway) is attractive...I don't know much about it and maybe this is a stupid question, but could it be put to a creative use, I mean something up there on top?
http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3183/2442579298_67f0c373fc.jpg

Moebius
June 19th, 2008, 05:19 PM
Point I was getting at was that we could use that highway tunnel TODAY for sure (could demolish the elevated structure), and in the future: maybe not so much (you need an infallible crystal ball to be sure). In any case it seems a tad quixotic to go to the expense of building a tunnel for HALF a highway that may or may not materialize in the future.

Phase II of many a project fails to materialize. To spend money today in anticipation of its certainty tomorrow requires either faith or folly.

As I understand it, one of the big questions that has to be answered is whether to have Extell finish building the park now, knowing full well that if and when the money for the rest of the tunnel materializes, it will have to be ripped up with no money to redo it - or wait for the money for the other half of the tunnel to materialize from who knows where and finish the park afterwards.

NYatKNIGHT
July 21st, 2008, 12:24 AM
This park looks completely finished, even the dark mesh has been removed from the perimeter fence. Maybe the VIP's that are doing their photo-op at the Tribeca section of HRP this week will keep their ribbon-cutting scissors handy and open this segment while they're at it.

The Benniest
July 21st, 2008, 10:20 AM
I can't wait to see this park. I got a great view of it from a boat cruise I went on, but am still anticipating actually going over to it.

I was planning on it today, but rain is in NYC's forecast. :confused:

NYatKNIGHT
July 21st, 2008, 10:51 AM
^Not until Wednesday, from what I've seen.

The Benniest
July 21st, 2008, 01:41 PM
Oh...well, good.

I never made it to the park today but will tomorrow, since you say that there is no rain until Wednesday.

I can't seem to let go of downtown. :rolleyes:

RandySavage
August 3rd, 2008, 05:20 PM
The new section is not open yet.

NYatKNIGHT
August 4th, 2008, 12:05 PM
The new section is not open yet.^and it's really pissing me off. Summer's waning, open it already!

lofter1
August 4th, 2008, 12:31 PM
I can understand keeping the newly-planted grassy aras off limits, but don't understand the reasoning for not opening access to the paths & esplanade :mad:

NYatKNIGHT
August 4th, 2008, 03:28 PM
Especially since peds are shareing the bike lane (right, scumonkey?). It's been planted since spring, I really think it was the unfinished river access they've been dragging their feet on, but that's no excuse to keep the public off of every path. Only the geese are living it up. They also need to remove the huge amount of litter from the skyway area - on top of the rock "islands" in particular.

scumonkey
August 4th, 2008, 03:36 PM
^ you said it! ;)

NYatKNIGHT
August 17th, 2008, 10:52 PM
I ran through it today, it is open. There is no barrier to the river, and there are steps down to the waters edge. Interesting seating throughout plus a grassy hillside. Very nice to finally enjoy this park segment.

RandySavage
August 17th, 2008, 10:56 PM
Thanks for the heads up.

NYatKNIGHT
August 19th, 2008, 02:36 PM
August 19, 2008, 10:07 am

Another Phase of Riverside Park South Opens

By Sewell Chan (http://cityroom.blogs.nytimes.com/author/schan/)

http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2008/08/18/nyregion/19riversidetrain-533.jpg

A 60-year-old, 95-ton locomotive engine, known as No. 25, is at the centerpiece of the latest phase of Riverside Park South to be completed. (Photos: New York City Department of Parks and Recreation)

At a noontime ceremony on Tuesday, city officials will formally mark the completion of the fourth of seven projected phases in the construction of Riverside Park South, a core element in the continuous West Side greenway that has been constructed along the Hudson River over the past decade.

The park will eventually have 27.5 acres. Phase I, from 68th to 72nd Streets, opened in 2001; Phase II, from 65th to 70th Streets, opened in 2003; and Phase III, from 62nd to 65th Streets, opened in 2006. (Some of the phases overlap.)

The completion of Phase IV (59th to 63rd Streets) connects Riverside Park South (http://www.nycgovparks.org/sub_your_park/vt_riverside_park/vt_rs_12_riverside_park_south.html)to Hudson River Park (http://www.hudsonriverpark.org/index.asp), to the south, and also extends the waterfront greenway along the west side of Manhattan from Battery Park to 83rd Street, according to the city’s Department of Parks and Recreation, which said that 220 acres of waterfront parkland have been created under the Bloomberg administration.

Riverside Park South is being built with private money — a concession to the community by the developers who have erected large, luxury high-rises over what used to be a train depot.

The fourth phase of the park cost $10 million and was financed by the Extell Development Company (http://www.extelldev.com/) and designed by Thomas Balsley Associates (http://www.tbany.com/), landscape architects. The design company said in a statement:
This new space, together with future phases of a skateboard park, ball fields, dog runs and game courts will become the park’s southern activity node. Sunbathers and picnickers are a short walk to larger lawns with promontories that offer a pastoral river setting. With kayak and canoe launchings, visitors seeking a moment of quiet will find custom seating, shade structures and a naturalized shore of rip-rap grasses and riverside “get-downs.”
Throughout its length, Riverside Park South laces together these nodes of activity with open expanses of walkways edged with native grasses, poetic vistas and references to the area’s industrial railroad history. The result is a park experience reflective of rich diversity of New York City and its culture of recreation.
http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2008/08/18/nyregion/19riversideseats-190.jpg
New seats, walkways and landscaping have been installed.

In addition to new walkways and landscaping, the park’s most distinctive feature, officials said, is a train locomotive, parked on a plaza at 62nd Street, that evokes the former train yard. The locomotive, known as No. 25, is a 60-year-old, 95-ton engine that was most recently used on the Brooklyn waterfront. It was built in 1946 and is identical to engines (http://www.nytimes.com/2006/08/11/nyregion/11engine.html) that moved freight cars along the West Side from the 1940s to the 1980s.

Phases V and VI are still being designed; construction is to start next year.
Other city waterfront park projects, either under construction or recently completed, include Riverwalks, from 135th to 145th Streets and from 83rd to 91st Streets, along the Hudson, and the West Harlem Piers, from St. Clair Place (at West 129th Street, intersected by 125th Street) to 135th Street.

Copyright 2008 (http://www.nytimes.com/ref/membercenter/help/copyright.html) The New York Times Company (http://www.nytco.com/)

http://cityroom.blogs.nytimes.com/2008/08/19/another-phase-of-riverside-park-south-opens/

stache
August 20th, 2008, 08:10 PM
It's very nice. Now you can walk along the Hudson from there all the way down to BPC. :)

ZippyTheChimp
August 20th, 2008, 11:18 PM
http://img366.imageshack.us/img366/5377/rivpkso01pt0.th.jpg (http://img366.imageshack.us/my.php?image=rivpkso01pt0.jpg) http://img366.imageshack.us/img366/2571/rivpkso02kw1.th.jpg (http://img366.imageshack.us/my.php?image=rivpkso02kw1.jpg) http://img368.imageshack.us/img368/2600/rivpkso03ii4.th.jpg (http://img368.imageshack.us/my.php?image=rivpkso03ii4.jpg) http://img368.imageshack.us/img368/4715/rivpkso04pp0.th.jpg (http://img368.imageshack.us/my.php?image=rivpkso04pp0.jpg) http://img241.imageshack.us/img241/2978/rivpkso05hn6.th.jpg (http://img241.imageshack.us/my.php?image=rivpkso05hn6.jpg)


There's an overlook at the top
of the hill
http://img520.imageshack.us/img520/6788/rivpkso06in1.th.jpg (http://img520.imageshack.us/my.php?image=rivpkso06in1.jpg)

With a good view of the garbage trucks
entering the transfer station.
http://img368.imageshack.us/img368/7307/rivpkso07cv4.th.jpg (http://img368.imageshack.us/my.php?image=rivpkso07cv4.jpg)


http://img368.imageshack.us/img368/9541/rivpkso08uo6.th.jpg (http://img368.imageshack.us/my.php?image=rivpkso08uo6.jpg) http://img378.imageshack.us/img378/6334/rivpkso09gw9.th.jpg (http://img378.imageshack.us/my.php?image=rivpkso09gw9.jpg) http://img376.imageshack.us/img376/7046/rivpkso10jd7.th.jpg (http://img376.imageshack.us/my.php?image=rivpkso10jd7.jpg) http://img376.imageshack.us/img376/8173/rivpkso11vg0.th.jpg (http://img376.imageshack.us/my.php?image=rivpkso11vg0.jpg)


http://img156.imageshack.us/img156/9228/rivpkso12vd0.th.jpg (http://img156.imageshack.us/my.php?image=rivpkso12vd0.jpg) http://img156.imageshack.us/img156/8639/rivpkso13pq5.th.jpg (http://img156.imageshack.us/my.php?image=rivpkso13pq5.jpg)


http://img508.imageshack.us/img508/2941/rivpkso14nm7.th.jpg (http://img508.imageshack.us/my.php?image=rivpkso14nm7.jpg) http://img508.imageshack.us/img508/3237/rivpkso15wr4.th.jpg (http://img508.imageshack.us/my.php?image=rivpkso15wr4.jpg) http://img299.imageshack.us/img299/9982/rivpkso16nw4.th.jpg (http://img299.imageshack.us/my.php?image=rivpkso16nw4.jpg)


At the ruins of Pier D, a transition to
a less formal landscape.
http://img299.imageshack.us/img299/4835/rivpkso17pj9.th.jpg (http://img299.imageshack.us/my.php?image=rivpkso17pj9.jpg) http://img299.imageshack.us/img299/3958/rivpkso18ar7.th.jpg (http://img299.imageshack.us/my.php?image=rivpkso18ar7.jpg) http://img45.imageshack.us/img45/2930/rivpkso19ia1.th.jpg (http://img45.imageshack.us/my.php?image=rivpkso19ia1.jpg) http://img45.imageshack.us/img45/2050/rivpkso20wd3.th.jpg (http://img45.imageshack.us/my.php?image=rivpkso20wd3.jpg)



http://img45.imageshack.us/img45/91/rivpkso21vp3.th.jpg (http://img45.imageshack.us/my.php?image=rivpkso21vp3.jpg)

lofter1
August 21st, 2008, 12:19 AM
The open access down to the river's edge is a terrific feature ... but methinks if folks want to enjoy that aspect of the park then they had better visit soon, as a park "ranger" was telling me today that it seems some sort of barricade will be going up both at the top of the steps and where the grasses have been planted between the unbarricaded path and the rocks -- apparently bureaucratic types are worried that someone will fall and get hurt.

The Benniest
August 21st, 2008, 01:19 AM
Great pictures Zippy. :) Thanks.

I love the "street furniture" they have in this area. :cool:

lofter1
August 21st, 2008, 11:54 PM
The weather has been perfect for a visit to our newest parkland ...

http://i130.photobucket.com/albums/p242/Lofter1/Hudson%20River%20Park/RPS_11u.jpg

Some folks seem to have set up office on the lounges set into the grass ...

http://i130.photobucket.com/albums/p242/Lofter1/Hudson%20River%20Park/RPS_121.jpg

http://i130.photobucket.com/albums/p242/Lofter1/Hudson%20River%20Park/RPS_123.jpg

http://i130.photobucket.com/albums/p242/Lofter1/Hudson%20River%20Park/RPS_124.jpg

From the reiver's edge the George Washington Bridge can be clearly seen ...

http://i130.photobucket.com/albums/p242/Lofter1/Hudson%20River%20Park/RPS_129.jpg

http://i130.photobucket.com/albums/p242/Lofter1/Hudson%20River%20Park/RPS_1214.jpg

There's a ramp to launch your vessel ...

http://i130.photobucket.com/albums/p242/Lofter1/Hudson%20River%20Park/RPS_1217.jpg

http://i130.photobucket.com/albums/p242/Lofter1/Hudson%20River%20Park/RPS_11v.jpg

rps4

smuncky
August 24th, 2008, 01:37 PM
Some of the street furniture looks great. Especially the benches with the overhanging canopy. Looks like a great place overall.

krulltime
August 24th, 2008, 01:48 PM
Yeah I am enjoying this (finally) new addition of the park. And my dog does too of course. ;) No more dark bridge tunnel experience.

scumonkey
August 24th, 2008, 08:43 PM
http://i211.photobucket.com/albums/bb276/scumonkey/parkset.jpg

http://i211.photobucket.com/albums/bb276/scumonkey/parked-1.jpg

http://i211.photobucket.com/albums/bb276/scumonkey/salsa.jpg

http://i211.photobucket.com/albums/bb276/scumonkey/theScene.jpg

http://i211.photobucket.com/albums/bb276/scumonkey/upFront.jpg

ablarc
August 24th, 2008, 10:00 PM
Needs more trees.

SlavMan1
November 6th, 2008, 05:29 PM
Extell needs to finish the park and do it soon. The area between the waterfront park (that has been completed and is gorgeous) and Riverside Blvd is one giant construction pit. I know that Extell has many more buildings to build at the southern end of Riverside South, but finishing the park--at least in front of the Avery and Rushmore--should be a priority. That was the promise made to the residents of those buildings who spent a lot of money to live there.

lofter1
November 6th, 2008, 05:51 PM
Promises, promises :cool: . Did you get the Extell promise in writing?

If you take a look at the space between Riverside Park South and the buildings to the north of Avery / Rushmore you'll see that there is a large swath of steep land that has neither been improved as parkland or built upon -- and the same fate will probably befall the land directly in front of the Avery / Rushmore for quite some time to come.

No one will properly develop or plant that land on the outside hope that it will be dug up to de-construct and bury the elevated Hiway -- but that won't happen for at least a generation or two.

SlavMan1
November 9th, 2008, 10:04 AM
Not every promise needs be "in writing" to be enforceable. Look at the ad for the Rushmore in today's Sunday NYT: "nestled between two parks." Extell is expressly marketing the Rushmore and Avery on the promise of a park being built between Riverside Blvd and the Hudson. Also, the tunnels for the below-grade portion of the highway are already being built under Riverside Blvd. The tunnels form the decking for Riverside Blvd. I heard (from a reliable source) 2010 as the date for the completion of the park, but that remains to seen with the City's budget crisis because the project involves the NYC Dept of Parks.

ckucic
June 23rd, 2009, 09:57 AM
A couple buldozers came over yesterday and razed and leveled the fill between 65th and 67th street by Riverside Boulevard. Anyone know whats going on? Are they starting the next phase?

GintGotham
July 19th, 2009, 11:43 PM
I asked people around what is being done. Nobody who lives around there knows. Most of the people I spoke to were unaware that even a tunnel had already been built from the Avery to the southern portal (almost 900 feet long).

I spoke to a representative of the landscapers on Thursday. He said they were sodding the berm. "You'll like it," he said.

I asked about the construction for the southbound tunnel. He responded that the tunnel is a long way in the future.

They're also building a dog run along the retaining wall at the south end of the berm. One of the residents said that it should be finished before the end of July.

It just seemed strange that they ripped up that beautiful park (that nobody could enter) in order to build...another park.

ZippyTheChimp
September 7th, 2010, 10:52 PM
No End to Miller Time at Riverside South?


Extell tunnels onward in long-waited bid to bury West Side highway,
but project may still take decades



http://www.archpaper.com/uploads/image/Riverside_Aerial.jpg
Construction is underway for a tunnel under Riverside South (center right) to replace
the Miller Highway with an extension of Riverside Park.
Courtesy Thomas Balsley Associates


In recent years, New Yorkers have seen parkland burgeon along the Hudson River, nowhere more expansively than at Riverside Park South, where boardwalks, overlooks, and marsh grasses wind along the water’s edge. But the beauty of this new landscape between 59th and 72nd streets is blighted by an elevated stretch of the West Side Highway that spews noise, fumes, and debris onto the park below.

Unbeknownst to passing rollerbladers, Extell Development, which is completing the new park as part of its Riverside South complex, has quietly been building a whopping chunk of infrastructure to bury this noxious stretch of road: a $60 million tunnel shell between 61st and 65th streets. It is one of the first pieces of a decades-old plan to sink the elevated structure, known as the Miller Highway, and extend the park from Riverside South’s dozen-odd new towers to the river in a monumental, 3/4-mile-long public space.

The removal of the highway, which would be topped with park from roughly 61st to 70th streets, has been a dream of planners and community advocates since the project’s 1991 masterplan, led by Skidmore, Owings & Merrill and based on a plan by Paul Willen and Daniel Gutman, with landscape design by Thomas Balsley Associates. That plan, devised for the Trump Organization, the original developer of the 77-acre Penn Central railyards site, calls for the highway to be buried below Riverside Boulevard, a new access road that runs west of the towers.

Balsley's rendering of the park with the highway still intact. (http://www.archpaper.com/uploads/Riverside_Before.jpg)

At the time of the project’s 1992 approval, it was understood that the highway relocation would ultimately require public transportation funds. But there was a catch: In order to secure certificates of occupancy for the first towers at the north end of the site, the developer had to deliver the waterfront park as called for in the masterplan. So instead of waiting around for public funds—and a public process that could drag on for years—Trump began building Riverside Boulevard and the new park.

Enter Extell, which acquired the remaining undeveloped land from 65th to 59th streets in 2005. To continue building its new towers, Extell needed to build the first section of tunnel—hence its $60 million investment. The developer is also working on an upland section of park stretching north from 65th street to be built atop a southbound portion of tunnel. Final plans for that segment are being completed by Thomas Balsley, who has designed all of the 26-acre waterfront park in a series of complicated maneuvers around the hulking Miller Highway.

“It’s a chess game,” explained Balsley of the design. “The point is not to build anything that would get ripped out later. So we had to design the upland park and design the waterfront park, knowing what would happen between those two things when we take the highway out of the equation. It was crystal-ball design work.”

The park after a stretch of the highway from roughly 61st Street to 70th Street has been buried and covered over with stepped parkland. (http://www.archpaper.com/uploads/Riverside_After.jpg)

A prime impediment was the 35-foot elevation change from Riverside Boulevard to the river, at the base of which the highway now runs. Balsley’s solution is to split the park into three distinct spatial experiences. On the upland section, a narrow ribbon of landscape overlooks the water. The riverfront segment is more adventurous, with naturalized riparian edges, lush plantings, and a variety of overlooks and coves. Connecting the two is a big, sloping lawn with wooded edges in the tradition of Riverside Park, creating a transition between the community-scaled upland and the more civic-scaled waterfront.

Completion of that middle segment, however, remains contingent on the Miller’s re-routing. Though an environmental impact statement for the highway relocation was finished in 2002 by the state Department of Transportation, and the move was subsequently authorized by the Federal Highway Administration, the Miller teardown still awaits engineering and design work, not to mention the estimated $400 million needed for the relocation, a sum certain to require federal assistance.

It also remains to be seen how Extell’s plans for the southern portion of the site between 59th and 61st streets, where it has proposed a cluster of towers designed by Christian de Portzamparc, might affect the highway’s fate. The project is currently undergoing public review and recently drew opposition from Borough President Scott Stringer.


http://www.archpaper.com/uploads/Riverside_Relax.jpg
Visitors recline at one of the park's pavilions designed by Balsley.


According to Daniel Gutman, the Miller’s predicament can be traced to the 1991 agreement between the city, state, developer, and civic groups, which called for the highway to be relocated concurrently with development of the new park. But it never stipulated who would fund the new highway, and the state Department of Transportation takes the position that the road has at least another 30 years of life left in it. “There’s no way this highway is going to get moved in the near future unless some other source of funds is found, and so far none is available,” Gutman told *AN.

“I don’t know if it will ever happen,” said Cheryl Huber, deputy director of New Yorkers for Parks, a member organization of the Riverside South Planning Corporation. “It seems like one of these debates that will possibly go on forever.”

Jeff Byles

Copyright © 2003-2010 | The Architect's Newspaper, LLC.

londonlawyer
September 9th, 2010, 09:13 PM
The elevated highway must go. My friend used to live in Riverside South, and when one walks on the street adjacent to the highway, it is clear that it is a complete POS.

This area has the potential to be magnificent park land for all to enjoy, but it currently sucks wang.

lofter1
September 9th, 2010, 10:32 PM
Start passing the collection plate.

BPC
September 12th, 2010, 07:33 PM
That stretch never really bothered me. It's an urban area and the highway provides a decent cover for basketball courts and such. They really did a nice job with that stretch of park. If any part of the West Side Highway were buried or rerouted, I would prefer the section further north, around the Cloisters and Van Courtland Park. That is already a fantastic park, but it could be phenomenal if it adjoined the River.

antinimby
September 12th, 2010, 10:28 PM
I know this sounds crazy but one day in the very, very, very distant future when automotive traffic on the Miller Hwy is moved underground, couldn't they then convert the existing elevated structure to train/rail use?

Voilà! Now you've got a new subway/light rail/El line going up the Westside Manhattan where there is now no subway service and it wouldn't cost as much to build as a new subway line is from scratch.

(God, I'm brilliant. Too bad I don't use it for my own financial benefit.) http://wirednewyork.com/forum/images/icons/icon9.gif

lofter1
September 12th, 2010, 11:34 PM
Sure, if you want an elevated train that runs 10 blocks.

212
September 13th, 2010, 01:30 AM
This area is shaping up nicely.

I agree with antinimby that it could use more transit. I'd favor a Far West Side busway down West End/Eleventh from 70th Street through Midtown to Chelsea, and down West Street through the Financial District to the Battery.

lofter1
January 18th, 2011, 05:12 PM
Remnants of an Industrial Past, Now Gone

NY TIMES (http://cityroom.blogs.nytimes.com/2011/01/18/remnants-of-an-industrial-past-now-gone/?ref=nyregion)
City Room Blog
By COREY KILGANNON
January 18, 2011, 3:20 PM

http://www.schizflux.org/waysofcool/wp-content/uploads/2008/09/nyc_riverside_pier_d_2.jpg
Pier D (http://ommateum.schizflux.org/tag/nyc/page/2/) until recently.

WNY Thread: The float bridges of the New York Central Railroad (http://wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?t=2890&page=1)

Many New Yorkers are attached to their city’s gritty industrial past, especially when it is juxtaposed with newer gleaming luxury structures.

A prime example, at least until a few days ago, could be found on the Hudson riverfront near Riverside Park on the West Side, around 64th Street.

There, twisted skeletons of two piers that had long ago burned down jutted out of the river, gnarled-iron sculptures looking back from the past at gleaming Trump Place, a towering bulkhead of large luxury residential buildings on the waterfront from 59th to 72nd Streets.

For all their rough and rusty condition, the piers seemed to be elegantly melting into the water. They were lauded by passers-by, preservationists and governmental leaders.

But now they are gone, quickly removed over the long, frigid weekend by two cranes and several huge refuse bins on barges.

http://www.wirednewyork.com/images/ny_central_railroad/new_york_central_railroad_float_bridge_gantry_17fe b02.jpg
Pier C a tangled spaghetti-like mass of rusting steel

“It is not possible to stabilize or preserve Pier D in its current condition,” Vickie Karp, a parks department spokeswoman, said of the larger of the two structures. “It is being removed before it collapses into the Hudson River, causing a hazard to navigation. It is prudent to remove it now, while the funding is in place and work is ongoing in the surrounding area, before any such collapse occurs.”

Pier D, at 64th Street, was known to some as the “Frank Gehry Pier” for its resemblance to that architect’s structures. Its neighboring pier at 62nd Street, a tangled mess of steel nicknamed the “Spaghetti Pier,” was called “an amazing sight” by the landscape architect Thomas Balsley, who helped design the Riverside South project, one that included a viewing station overlooking the piers.

Adrian Benepe, the parks commissioner, had been a fan of the piers. In 2003, when cranes had begun to remove the piers, Mr. Benepe rushed to the site and ordered work stopped, and later helped negotiate an agreement to temporarily preserve them.

These monuments to the city’s industrial past were even included as bragging points in brochures of several luxury apartment buildings with Hudson views.

“They were accidental treasures,” said Roland Lewis, president of the Metropolitan Waterfront Alliance. “They were whimsical, beautiful pieces of history right in front of you. Everyone I’ve ever spoken to about it had good things to say about them.”

Regarding the timing of the demolition, he said, “If they were worried about community protest, they certainly picked an opportune time to take them down – when you’re doing something unpopular, you often try to do it fast, and at odd times.”

Pier D was built of wood in the 1880s, then rebuilt with a steel frame after a fire in 1922. It once served the New York Central Railroad’s sprawling 60th Street Yard. The pier was abandoned after a June 1971 fire.

The piers were scheduled for demolition as a part of the original plans for the Riverside Park South. On Tuesday, Ms. Karp said, “Out of appreciation for its accidental sculptural forms, the structure was left in place over the last eight years, without any remedial work.”

After Mr. Benepe halted the demolition in 2003, he helped negotiate an agreement to let parks department officials conduct a study on the effects of pier shade on the fish habitats below. At that time, he said that the state Department of Environmental Protection, and some federal agencies, favored the demolition, and that the demolition was part of a uniform land-use review procedure by the city’s Planning Department.

Mr. Benepe called the piers “as good as anything created by artists in the last few decades,” but he allowed that some officials called the piers unstable and said they were slowly collapsing into the water. He called their preservation ”a romantic notion that may not be practical.”

© 2011 The New York Times Company

Merry
January 19th, 2011, 05:21 AM
Remnant of an Industrial Past, Now Gone

By COREY KILGANNON

http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2011/01/18/nyregion/18pier1-cityroom/18pier1-cityroom-blog480.jpg
A crane dismantling the last remains of an old Hudson River pier on Monday.
A 2007 view of the pier is below.

Many New Yorkers are attached to their city’s gritty industrial past, especially when it is juxtaposed with newer gleaming luxury structures.

A prime example, at least until a few days ago, could be found on the Hudson riverfront near Riverside Park, around 64th Street.

There, the twisted skeleton of a pier that had long ago burned down jutted out of the river, a gnarled-iron sculpture looking back from the past at gleaming Trump Place, a towering bulkhead of large luxury residential buildings on the waterfront from 59th to 72nd Streets.

For all its rough and rusty condition, the pier seemed to be elegantly melting into the water. It was lauded by passers-by, preservationists and governmental leaders.
But now it is gone, quickly removed over the long, frigid weekend by two cranes and several huge refuse bins on barges.

“It is not possible to stabilize or preserve Pier D in its current condition,” Vickie Karp, a spokeswoman for the parks department, which removed the pier. “It is being removed before it collapses into the Hudson River, causing a hazard to navigation. It is prudent to remove it now, while the funding is in place and work is ongoing in the surrounding area, before any such collapse occurs.”

Pier D, at 64th Street, was known to some as the Frank Gehry Pier for its resemblance to the architect’s structures. It once stood next to another pier, at 62nd Street, a tangled mess of steel nicknamed the Spaghetti Pier. The latter pier was called “an amazing sight” by the landscape architect Thomas Balsley, who helped design the Riverside South project, which included a viewing station overlooking the piers.

Adrian Benepe, the parks commissioner, had been a fan of the piers. In 2003, when cranes had begun to remove Pier D, Mr. Benepe rushed to the site and ordered the work stopped. He later helped negotiate an agreement to temporarily preserve it.

This monument to the city’s industrial past was even included as a bragging point in brochures of several luxury apartment buildings with Hudson views.

“They were accidental treasures,” said Roland Lewis, president of the Metropolitan Waterfront Alliance. “They were whimsical, beautiful pieces of history right in front of you. Everyone I’ve ever spoken to about it had good things to say about them.”

Regarding the timing of the Pier D demolition, he said, “If they were worried about community protest, they certainly picked an opportune time to take them down — when you’re doing something unpopular, you often try to do it fast, and at odd times.”

Pier D was built of wood in the 1880s, then rebuilt with a steel frame after a fire in 1922. It once served the New York Central Railroad’s sprawling 60th Street Yard. The pier was abandoned after a June 1971 fire.

It was scheduled for demolition as a part of the original plans for Riverside Park South. Spaghetti Pier was demolished, but Pier D remained intact until last weekend. On Tuesday, Ms. Karp said, “Out of appreciation for its accidental sculptural forms, the structure was left in place over the last eight years, without any remedial work.”

After Mr. Benepe halted the demolition in 2003, he helped negotiate an agreement to let parks department officials conduct a study on the effects of pier shade on the fish habitats below. At that time, he said that the State Department of Environmental Conservation, and some federal agencies, favored the demolition, and that the demolition was part of a uniform land-use review procedure by the city’s Planning Department.

Mr. Benepe called the piers “as good as anything created by artists in the last few decades,” but he allowed that some officials called the piers unstable and said they were slowly collapsing into the water. He called their preservation “a romantic notion that may not be practical.”

State officials said on Tuesday that removal of portions of the pier above the river bottom did not need local community or public approval.

Ms. Karp said its demolition was scheduled in conjunction with the parks department’s coming renovation of another rusted relic just up the river: the 69th Street Transfer Bridge, which is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

http://cityroom.blogs.nytimes.com/2011/01/18/remnants-of-an-industrial-past-now-gone/

NYatKNIGHT
January 19th, 2011, 10:50 AM
Wow, they're just suddenly...gone. They were definitely cool, but it's understandable why they were removed.

infoshare
January 19th, 2011, 11:21 AM
There is just no pleasing everyone: to my eye (who knows why) that assemblage of rusted, curvy, twisted steel was a thing of beauty - sorry to see it is now gone.

ZippyTheChimp
January 19th, 2011, 12:05 PM
Wow, they're just suddenly...gone. They were definitely cool,I remember the graffiti applied some time after the fire, white faded to a rusty tan; then removed when the park was built:


"Comic Times"

Ninjahedge
January 19th, 2011, 12:16 PM
Now where will Doc Oc hide while he is constructing his devices to get his revenge on Spiderman?

:worried:

Stroika
January 19th, 2011, 11:41 PM
RIP. I used to love the pier relics. I was surprised to see them carted off -- there were some plaques in the HRP describing the heap of steel in the river, and I sort of assumed that the piers were out there with an official sanction ... and thus were more or less permanent.

The HRP just got a wee bit less interesting.

scumonkey
January 20th, 2011, 01:32 AM
They didn't remove this as well did they?!:eek:
http://i211.photobucket.com/albums/bb276/scumonkey/more/derelict.jpg

NYatKNIGHT
January 20th, 2011, 11:07 AM
^Nice image. I hope that's not gone too.

lofter1
January 20th, 2011, 11:25 AM
That is the old Float Bridge #4 (http://www.oldnyc.com/hudson_piers/upper_west_side/upper_west_side_6.html) (it has its own WNY Thread (http://wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?t=2876&pagenumber=)). It remains.

At one point there were plans (http://wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?t=2876&p=223809&viewfull=1#post223809) to turn it into a ferry terminal.

scumonkey
January 20th, 2011, 11:53 AM
Thank Goddess for small miracles- I love that hulk!

Merry
September 7th, 2012, 07:04 AM
Exploring the Upper West Side's Riverside Park South

http://ny.curbed.com/uploads/01_kensinger_riverside_park_south_DSC_8411-thumb.jpg (http://ny.curbed.com/uploads/01_kensinger_riverside_park_south_DSC_8411.jpg)

[Riverside Park South is a seven phase public park that is being created through private funding. All photos by Nathan Kensinger (http://kensinger.blogspot.com/).]

Riverside Park South offers up one of the Manhattan's best opportunities to consider the city's past as an industrial hub while considering the future of its waterfront. Situated along a thin strip of shoreline stretching from 72nd street down to 59th street, this 27.5 acre park presents visitors with a series of reminders that this was once a bustling system of piers, docks and freight trains. All of that is gone now. The park is being built as a concession to the city by the private developers of Riverside South, a series of nondescript condo towers looming over this stretch of the Hudson River.

Despite being funded by private money, Riverside Park South is surprisingly creative in its design. Designed by Thomas Balsley Associates, it is being built in seven planned stages. Phase IV was completed in 2008, while Phase V is currently underway. Perhaps because of its multipart construction, the park takes a playful and diverse approach to waterfront access, incorporating piers, bridges, promenades, boardwalks, overlooks, and a boat launch. Even on a rainy evening, it is clear that the park is a popular destination for local residents. A parade of joggers runs by the ruins of the old wharves, fisherman ply the waters by industrial ruins, and couples hide underneath the new piers jutting out into the Hudson.

Like many new waterfront park's in NYC, Riverside Park South features a promenade above the water's edge.

http://ny.curbed.com/uploads/02_kensinger_riverside_park_south_DSC_8393-thumb.jpg (http://ny.curbed.com/uploads/02_kensinger_riverside_park_south_DSC_8393.jpg)

Popular with couples and joggers, the promenade pays homage to the area's industrial past. The area was once the rail yards of the Penn Central railroad company.

http://ny.curbed.com/uploads/03_kensinger_riverside_park_south_DSC_8423-thumb.jpg (http://ny.curbed.com/uploads/03_kensinger_riverside_park_south_DSC_8423.jpg)

Throughout the park, unique seating designs have been incorporated. These steel chairs look out onto a series of rotting Hudson River piers.

http://ny.curbed.com/uploads/04_kensinger_riverside_park_south_DSC_8380-thumb.jpg (http://ny.curbed.com/uploads/04_kensinger_riverside_park_south_DSC_8380.jpg)

A jogger finds space to relax along the waterfront after a long run.

http://ny.curbed.com/uploads/05_kensinger_riverside_park_south_DSC_8400-thumb.jpg (http://ny.curbed.com/uploads/05_kensinger_riverside_park_south_DSC_8400.jpg)

In the southernmost section of the park, a winding path leads through a glade of trees and down to the water.

http://ny.curbed.com/uploads/06_kensinger_riverside_park_south_DSC_8358-thumb.jpg (http://ny.curbed.com/uploads/06_kensinger_riverside_park_south_DSC_8358.jpg)

A site-specific exhibition of seven sculptures created by the The Art Students League of New York is currently installed in the park.

http://ny.curbed.com/uploads/07_kensinger_riverside_park_south_DSC_8374-thumb.jpg (http://ny.curbed.com/uploads/07_kensinger_riverside_park_south_DSC_8374.jpg)

The ruins of an old dock are prominently displayed underneath the West Side Highway.

http://ny.curbed.com/uploads/08_kensinger_riverside_park_south_DSC_8431-thumb.jpg (http://ny.curbed.com/uploads/08_kensinger_riverside_park_south_DSC_8431.jpg)

Further north in the park, a narrow boardwalk cuts through an overgrown garden.

http://ny.curbed.com/uploads/09_kensinger_riverside_park_south_DSC_8465-thumb.jpg (http://ny.curbed.com/uploads/09_kensinger_riverside_park_south_DSC_8465.jpg)

The garden is a quiet refuge from nearby car traffic, and from the park's busy bike lane.

http://ny.curbed.com/uploads/10_kensinger_riverside_park_south_DSC_8485-thumb.jpg (http://ny.curbed.com/uploads/10_kensinger_riverside_park_south_DSC_8485.jpg)

North of the garden area are the ruins of the New York Central Railroad 69th St. Transfer Bridge.

http://ny.curbed.com/uploads/11_kensinger_riverside_park_south_DSC_8516-thumb.jpg (http://ny.curbed.com/uploads/11_kensinger_riverside_park_south_DSC_8516.jpg)

The transfer bridge was placed on the national register of historic places by the US Department of Interior in 2003.

http://ny.curbed.com/uploads/12_kensinger_riverside_park_south_DSC_8541-thumb.jpg (http://ny.curbed.com/uploads/12_kensinger_riverside_park_south_DSC_8541.jpg)

A fisherman near the ruins claims to have caught an eel "as big as my leg" at this spot.

http://ny.curbed.com/uploads/13_kensinger_riverside_park_south_DSC_8535-thumb.jpg (http://ny.curbed.com/uploads/13_kensinger_riverside_park_south_DSC_8535.jpg)

The rusty relic is a last reminder of the neighborhood's past as a freight train hub.

http://ny.curbed.com/uploads/14_kensinger_riverside_park_south_DSC_8571-thumb.jpg (http://ny.curbed.com/uploads/14_kensinger_riverside_park_south_DSC_8571.jpg)

At the park's northern edge, a renovated pier offers fishermen a vista onto the Hudson River.

http://ny.curbed.com/uploads/15_kensinger_riverside_park_south_DSC_8602-thumb.jpg (http://ny.curbed.com/uploads/15_kensinger_riverside_park_south_DSC_8602.jpg)

As the skyline of the city is transformed by new glass towers, its waterfront is also being transformed. The elevated section of the West Side Highway may soon be buried underground.

http://ny.curbed.com/uploads/16_kensinger_riverside_park_south_DSC_8618-thumb.jpg (http://ny.curbed.com/uploads/16_kensinger_riverside_park_south_DSC_8618.jpg)

—Nathan Kensinger

Official website: Riverside Park South (http://www.nycgovparks.org/parks/riversideparksouth) [nycgovparks.org]
Official site: Nathan Kensinger Photography (http://kensinger.blogspot.com/) [kensinger.blogspot.com]

http://ny.curbed.com/archives/2012/09/06/exploring_the_upper_west_sides_riverside_park_sout h.php

vanshnookenraggen
September 8th, 2012, 03:53 PM
I can't tell you how many nights I've spent in that park drinking or with a girl. It's great, no one goes there!