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Edward
July 20th, 2003, 11:16 PM
I would like to create a list of top 10 things to do for New York visitors, and I would like to have everyone’s input. Please make your recommendations, then at some point we will vote to decide on the final selections. Here are my choices:

Central Park (http://wirednewyork.com/parks/central_park/). In summer time, rent a boat at Loeb Boathouse and row yourself around the Lake; in winter, skate at Wollman Rink and enjoy the New York skyline.

Brooklyn Bridge (http://wirednewyork.com/bridges/brooklyn_bridge/). Walk across the Brooklyn Bridge, have an ice cream at the Brooklyn Ice Cream Factory at Fulton Ferry Landing – perhaps the best place to take pictures of downtown skyscrapers.

Staten Island Ferry (http://wirednewyork.com/waterfront/ferries/si_ferry.htm)
The free ride to Staten Island and back takes an hour. Wonderful views of the island of Manhattan.

TLOZ Link5
July 20th, 2003, 11:39 PM
My faves:

Chinatown: *A walk along Canal Street by day will blow their minds with the bustling crush of people. *Little Italy is a few blocks away, and the winding streets yield new surprises at every turn. *It's one of my favorite places to hang out with friends: with bubble tea cafés, ethnic cookware emporiums, sweets shops and import stores, among others, it's not just dim sum and knockoff bags anymore!

Times Square: *Natch. *New York's laboratory for unprecedented urban revitalization. *Dazzling lights, a consortium of restaurants ranging from Middle American chain eateries to high-end bistros and trattoriae, Madame Toussaud's, honky-tonk atmosphere, digital-era architecture. *The 21st century embodies the spirit of the '50s-era heart of the Theater District.

Grand Central Terminal: *The jewel in the city's diadem; New York's last vestige of the romantic age of rail travel. *Stepping into the Main Concourse still takes my breath away, even after years of using Metro-North to go to Westchester over the weekends. *The 1998 restoration was worth every penny spent: a European-style gourmet market, high-end retail boutiques, a wonderfully diverse assortment of restaurants and vendors. *Unlike Penn Station across town, Grand Central is not just a point of departure and arrival for commuters: it's a destination that only gets better with age.

amigo32
July 21st, 2003, 03:54 AM
Main sites are very good! *What would any of our members suggest for off the beaten path locations?

ZippyTheChimp
July 21st, 2003, 11:58 AM
I'll add a couple from the outer boroughs.

The Bronx:
Take the Metro North at Grand Central Terminal, 20 minutes to Botanical Garden station - step out right at the main gate to the New York Botanical Garden (http://www.nybg.org/). 250 spectacular acres. Grounds admission is $6, and free on Wednesdays. Bring a camera. Have lunch at the Garden Cafe.

In Brooklyn:
Smaller in scale at 52 acres, but also impressive is the
Brooklyn Botanic Garden (http://www.bbg.org/). Subway: Q to Prospect Park Station, or the 2/3 to Eastern Parkway. Admission $5, free on Tuesdays. Lunch at the Terrace Cafe.
The Brooklyn Museum of Art is right next door.

TLOZ Link5
July 21st, 2003, 12:21 PM
There are also many world-class venues that perform at the Brooklyn Academy of Music.

phxmania2001
July 21st, 2003, 02:35 PM
The Village. Check out some of the cool, funky shops on St. Mark's Place, or go to one of the great cafes on MacDougal Street, or just sit and relax in Washington Square Park.

Fabb
July 21st, 2003, 04:15 PM
Quote: from phxmania2001 on 1:35 pm on July 21, 2003
The Village.

Good idea.
Don't forget the angle of Bedford and Grove.

I'd recommend 245, East 73rd street, too.

Kris
July 21st, 2003, 07:25 PM
For residential art deco the Grand Concourse and its surroundings can't be beat.

muscle1313
July 21st, 2003, 07:47 PM
Coney Island - Catch a Cyclones game, have a Nathans hot dog, visit the aquarium, *ride the Cyclone, walk the boardwalk, relax on the beach, see a seaside concert. Playground of the World

(Edited by muscle1313 at 6:50 pm on July 21, 2003)

Just Rich
July 22nd, 2003, 12:42 AM
Empire State Building Observatory

Even though most everyone has seen pictures from here many times, photos don't do the experience justice.

Everything seems so close and laid out right at your feet.
There's also the sounds of the city all mixed together combined with the ever present breeze at that height.

Can't be beat

The above is the opinion of a non-NYer

dbhstockton
July 22nd, 2003, 03:46 AM
For the family: Coney Island Aquarium or the Bronx Zoo. *The Bronx Zoo is one of the best in the world and is one of my favorite places in NYC. *I'll never be too old to enjoy myself there. *

I agree w/Edward about the Staten Island Ferry. *You can't beat a free scenic cruise.

I've always been a big fan of the Cloisters, and it's something the average tourist might miss. *It's a great museum in a great setting with a great view of the Pallisades.

The average tourist might also miss an opportunity to walk along the Battery Park City waterfront. *Say what you will about the bland architecture of the appartment blocks; overall it's a wonderful urban space.

Federal Hall is worth a peek.

Best Greasy Spoon in the Times Square Area:
The Edison Cafe (off the lobby of the Hotel Edison), 47th st.
http://query.nytimes.com/gst/nytoday/rst.html?st=rst&rid=1002207986173

dtolman
October 19th, 2004, 05:49 PM
-American Museum of Natural History - One of the greatest science museums in the entire world. Must see for anyone who is interested in non-western cultures, animals, dinosaurs, geology, astronomy, or ancient human history/anthropology

-Metropolitan Museum of Art - One of the greatest art museums in the entire world. Must see for anyone interested in art or history.

BrooklynRider
October 19th, 2004, 06:19 PM
1. Walk across the Brooklyn Bridge.
2. Visit Times Square / See a Broadway Show.
3. Ride the Staten Island Ferry.
4. Visit at least one art museum: MoMA, MMA, Guggenheim, Whitney
5. Visit Central Park.
7. Go to a Yankee game
8. Go to the top of the Empire State Building
9. Visit Chinatown / Little Italy / Greenwich Village
10. Visit World Trade Center Site

Seasonal
Visit Coney Island - Summer
Walk Fifth Ave from Bergdorf Goodman to Lord & Taylor - Christmas
See the MMA Christmas Tree - Christmas
Go to Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade
Go to Gay Pride Parade & Dance on Pier
New Year's Eve in Times Square
Watch NY Marathon
Any ticker tape parade
Monday movies in Bryant Park or Movie in Hudson River Park

BigMac
October 20th, 2004, 02:45 PM
Statue of Liberty: The exclamation mark in the sentence that is New York City. An enduring symbol of America and an amazing work of art.

jiw40
October 20th, 2004, 09:19 PM
Bowling Green.Ride the bull.

Edward
October 23rd, 2004, 01:00 AM
Try a cuisine you never had before, for example: Thai, Ethiopian, Afghan, Belgian

AmeriKenArtist
November 13th, 2004, 08:20 PM
Take the Lexington Avenue Local downtown and stay on the train, beyond the last stop. A real treat!

NewYorkYankee
November 16th, 2004, 06:05 PM
what happens if you do stay on a train after it comes to the last stop and the conductor says get off?

TLOZ Link5
November 16th, 2004, 07:04 PM
what happens if you do stay on a train after it comes to the last stop and the conductor says get off?

Then you have no choice but to obey him, unfortunately. Downtown 6 trains loop around toward the uptown track when they pull out of Brooklyn Bridge/City Hall station; they pass through the Old City Hall station in the process. Considering the architectural merit of the old station, it's quite sad that this isn't allowed.

hilldweller
December 10th, 2004, 12:18 AM
Main sites are very good! *What would any of our members suggest for off the beaten path locations?

Get off the Staten Island Ferry and explore the island!

Staten Island Tourism map:
http://www.statenislandusa.com/html/cultural_map.html

Explore the historic St. George neighborhood surrounding the ferry:
http://www.preserve.org/stgeorge/stgeorge.htm

St. George walking tour map (pdf file):
http://www.statenislandarts.org/images/walking%20tour%20map.pdf

During the summer catch the Staten Island Yankees playing in the ballpark right next to the ferry:
http://www.siyanks.com/

Check out Snug Harbor Cultural Center:
http://www.snug-harbor.org/

And the Chinese Scholar's Garden at Snug Harbor:
http://www.sibg.org/cg.html

There's also the Tibetan Museum:
http://www.tibetanmuseum.com/

The Greenbelt, Gateway National Recreation Area, and Clay Pit Ponds State Park:
http://www.statenislandusa.com/html/hike_nature.html

Greenbelt brochure (pdf file):
http://nycgovparks.org/sub_your_park/vt_the_greenbelt/images/greenbelt_brochure.pdf

Greenbelt trail map (pdf file):
http://nycgovparks.org/sub_your_park/vt_the_greenbelt/images/trailmap.pdf

The new nature center in the Greenbelt:
http://www.sigreenbelt.org/Naturecenter/ncenter.htm

Historic Richmond Town:
http://www.historicrichmondtown.org/

The Boardwalk and beaches:
http://www.statenislandusa.com/html/beaches.html

Anong other little known "off the beaten path locations" on Staten Island!

NoyokA
December 10th, 2004, 09:57 AM
Go to 34th street and 12th Avenue. There's a parking lot, enter and head to your left and you'll find a way on the highline.

Daniel Kuzminski
December 10th, 2004, 02:56 PM
Take a shopping tour

AmeriKenArtist
December 10th, 2004, 11:40 PM
In addition to all these very fine suggestions, sneak off to the Corner Bistro in the West Village for my favorite burger in NYC!

metroleisures
December 14th, 2004, 01:55 AM
It may not be the best or exactly the top thing to do but it certainly is among the top 10. Besides according to Snapple, NYC has more french restaurants than France. We have such a large variety of cuisines, just come and try everything, except things that are personally stomach-turning.

Metroleisures

Metroleisures - The Best of New York (http://metroleisures.blogspot.com)

Clarknt67
December 28th, 2004, 05:10 PM
Mom just left after a week's visit, so I've done alot of these!

Took us a long to to get to the Empire State Building Observatory, which is a must-see IMHO. Everytime I have guests they want to do it, and I go gladly.

Tiffany's Fifth Avenue: Hiding out from a downpour, Mom & I spent 45 minutes examing the beautiful jewelry. It's like an upclose museum visit. Breaktaking if you really take a moment to look at it all.

Staten Island Ferry: Great Views--AND FREE!!!

Ellis Island: Don't do only half the trip, the Statue of Liberty isn't even half as interesting as the immigration museum. Just at a time when I couldn't be more disgusted with my country, a trip to Ellis Island reminds you, warts and all, we're a great, great country.

Museum of Modern Art: just went.Wow!

Go to an outrageous nightclub or a drag queen restaurant (like Lips or Lucky Chengs). See the side of culture that can never (be it gay, s&m, Limelightesque-club kids) that never gets a foothold in most of the world.

John et Aurèl
January 4th, 2005, 07:19 PM
Hello we're french and we want friends in NY, for talking.

billyblancoNYC
January 4th, 2005, 11:38 PM
Hello we're french and we want friends in NY, for talking.

Ok, talk about what? NY or life in general?

RandySavage
February 11th, 2005, 11:40 AM
Five Recommendations:


5. Corner Bistro: Cheap beer and the best burgers and fries on the planet.

4. Broadway: New York boasts the best and most elaborate (and expensive) theater productions in the world. If you’re a visitor, make a point to catch one.

3. Craning at Skyscrapers: One of the best places to experience the majesty of New York’s skyscrapers is the plaza outside One Chase Manhattan just off of Wall Street. In that location you will be bounded on three sides by some of the tallest buildings in the city (AIG, 40 Broad, 1 Chase). It makes you feel like an ant… but in a good way.

2. American Museum of Natural History: The biggest and best natural history museum in the world. Amazing.

1. Cycling Central Park at Dusk: Everyone should bike the Central Park loop. It's good exercise and you really begin to appreciate how beautiful and big the Park (and the City) is. While everyone is familiar with the central and southern zones of the Park, few tourists get up to the northern zone. It offers a lot of hidden surprises. Dusk after a warm day is the best time to bike the loop. It is very crowded at all other times, but once the sun goes down, the loop empties. There is something indescribable about speeding around the park at night with the dark masses of the trees and the bright masses of skyscrapers behind them. In the summer, if you bike at night, you can often listen to concert going on while you pedal.

sunman
February 18th, 2005, 12:31 PM
I'm surprised nobody suggested Brooklyn Heights.

My suggestions from that area:

Brooklyn Heights (Photos (http://www.nycfoto.com/showPage.php?albumID=26)): Promenade (Photos (http://www.nycfoto.com/showPage.php?albumID=285)), Montague Street; or just stroll the streets (Spring and Autumn)

Fulton Ferry: Landing Platform (Photos (http://www.nycfoto.com/showPage.php?albumID=870) Views (http://www.nycfoto.com/showPage.php?albumID=871)) and new park (Photos (http://www.nycfoto.com/showPage.php?albumID=872))

DUMBO & Vinegar Hill (Photos (http://www.nycfoto.com/showPage.php?albumID=374)) -- if you search for unbeaten place to visit, go here

Carrol Gardens (Photos (http://www.nycfoto.com/showPage.php?albumID=522&start=0)) are a short walk away and could be an interesting place to visit as well. Although I'm not sure if this place would get on the top 10 list...

cryptobionic
April 16th, 2005, 02:02 PM
this tourist's fave:

1) staten island ferry - great views no matter what the weather and as stated: it's free! how can you resist? good mix of tourists and huddled masses. buy a cup of crappy coffee on these old boats to complete that nostalgic new york feel.

2) brooklyn bridge - more great views and everyone does it! there's always a freindly vibe here, maybe because tourists are forever asking to have their photos taken. one of the few places in the city where you can safely walk at a slow pace, as long as you stay off the bike lane. you have been warned.

3) sightseeing buses - yes, i recommend a ride on those cheesy double decker buses. expensive, but if you're an archictecture buff, it's well worth it. get on the open-air second deck. there's absolutely no other way to see new york like this. mad traffic below, buildings towering above. you almost can reach out and touch the passing skyline, all while comfortably sitting on one's arse. awesome.

4) ground zero - no no no, not to lament the tragic past, but just to experience the great temporary 16 acre space left behind, walled in by a good collection of massive early and mid 20th century buildings which are finally receiving sunlight since...well, you know.

5) times square - of course! roam it anytime, but weekend nights are awesome, when it busts at the seams with visitors from far away as the other side of the world and from close as the city limits. i swear, sometimes it seems you can lift your tired feet up and body surf broadway. warning: there's so many lights, sounds and people to watch, you might succumb to sensory overload. need a bench to catch your breath? too bad.

6) financial district - i recommend it late late night, the area is totally deserted, the only signs of life are security cameras. you can actually hear your whispers and footsteps echo off the massive buildings crowding the narrow empty streets. great stuff.
7) grand central station - rush hour. the halls and connecting corridors are the ultimate urban experience during this time. it's more harrowing than any roller coaster. if you hail from anywhere that moves at a slower pace than NY, please stay close to the walls, otherwise you'll be trampled to death. next time i decide to brave this, i'm taking a xanax.

8) brooklyn botanical gardens - if you are staying in NY for a week or more, try this destination on a weekday for your mid-vacation urban break. the zen-like peacefulness will recharge your batteries in no time. also a great place to steal seeds for living souveniers. if it's cold out, head to the toasty palm house. sweet.

9) chinatown/little italy/village/soho - it's all good. you should schedule at least a half a day for each of these unique neighborhoods to soak in the atmoshere and all the adorable stereotypes. and of course the food. yum.

10) sunday morning manhattan - by far, these have been my most memorable experiences. if you can force your tired touristy body to roam the streets shorty before sunrise to wait and watch the first yellow rays of light pierce the grid of the deserted streets, creating sharp architectual shadows, it may haunt you for a long time. it's best on a cold, clear morning, when the only animation is the warm air steaming from the city's orfices. if you time it right, you'll be one of those rare souls who discovers that, yes indeed, sometimes the city does sleep.

ofekslayer
April 20th, 2005, 04:45 AM
I would really like to recommend a great book which a friend of mine bought me for my last birthday. It's called City Walks New York: 50 Adventures on Foot
by Christina Henry De Tessan (http://www.fetchbook.info/search_Christina_Henry_De_Tessan/searchBy_Author.html), and I found it to be very useful when I visited New York last year. One can find it on: http://www.fetchbook.info/city_walk_to_newyork.html (http://www.fetchbook.info/city_walk_to_newyork.html).
I believe the best way to see New York is on foot, so have a look, and I hope you will all be inspired, just as I was.

altyfc
April 22nd, 2005, 08:47 AM
Run the NYC Marathon.

That has to be one of the top 10 things to do... :)

Aaron

NewYorkYankee
April 22nd, 2005, 02:54 PM
Thats something I want to do. :)

MagnumPI
April 22nd, 2005, 06:54 PM
Thats one of my dreams, run the NYC marathon.

Anyone knows the time difference between the winner and the last one?

I dont want to set a new record.:)

ofekslayer
May 1st, 2005, 10:05 AM
I can walk around 5th avenue again and again, and if I'm finished with that, I can always go down to the village. I always find these cute little stores, and cute coffee shops, I can walk there all day.

When I really want to relax - there are two places:

1. Rockefeller Center - there's nothing more relaxing than watching people skate.

It's great.

2. Bryant park behind the public library - gorgeous place, benches, trees, grass. What else do you need? (And in the middle of the city as well...)

Clarknt67
June 30th, 2005, 06:49 PM
take a tour of Governors Island. I was down in Battery Park and watched all the tourists lined up for hours to see the Statue of Liberty. 20 minutes later we were on Governors Island enjoying the beautiful, historic landscape. i thought, jeez, those tourists are wasting a lot of time, while GI is empty.

details on getting there (only on Saturdays in the Summer) are in another thread on this site.

mata
July 1st, 2005, 12:36 PM
Audubon Ecotourists Harbor Heron Islands TourSaturday, July 30th
7 pm
North & South Brother Islands, LI Sound

Dinner at the Bridge Cafe in South Street Seaport
5 pm

Members Only

New York City, the Audubon, and egrets have a common history going back more than a hundred years. At the end of the Nineteenth Century, a New York City resident, George Bird Grinnell, started the first Audubon. He brought together like-minded people who hoped to stop the slaughter of egrets, which were being killed by the hundreds of thousands so that their plumes could be shipped to New York and used to decorate hats.

Fortunately, egrets and herons are now prospering in the harbor, and New York Water Taxi's partnership with NYC Audubon will allow you to see them up close with the guidance of professional naturalists.

www.nywatertaxi.com (http://www.nywatertaxi.com/)

Departs from South Street Seaport, Pier 17
Cost: $20; seniors/child. $10
info: nybirdclub@yahoo.com
www.manhattanbirdclub.com (http://www.manhattanbirdclub.com)
http://www.manhattanbirdclub.com/images/dove.jpg

Toonami
July 6th, 2005, 10:30 PM
I'm a latino who wants to move to Manhattan form London, Ontario. What's a good latino neighborhood that's fairly safe and not too far uptown? At first i wanted to live in Spanish Harlem but I realized that it's dangeirous there and too far uptown, I'm thinking anywhere below midtown or a little above midtown?... As long as its latino

Schadenfrau
July 7th, 2005, 12:24 PM
If you're looking to live somewhere below 96th Street in Manhattan, you're not going to have much luck finding a Latino enclave. You might want to expand your horizons.

Also, this would get more of a response if it was posted on the "Moving to New York" thread over on the New York City for New Yorkers board.

peyi123
July 7th, 2005, 04:11 PM
Spanish Harlem is not that dangerous anymore. Limit yourself to 116th and you're fine.

Since the last post is right in saying you won't fine specifically Latino neighborhoods south of 96th, you are better off going into queens, which has great neighborhoods like sunnyside and jackson heights with big latino populations and lower crime rates than upper manhattan.

shocka
July 7th, 2005, 04:32 PM
Heres some of the things i take tourists to..

1) Empire State Building
2) Broadway Play
3) Walk Around Time Square (2 n 3 usually are a day)
4) Village for the great quick eats
5) Avas penthouse, lounge with a great view of NYC
6) One of the many musems
7) A trip through the Subway, thats always an experience, hey i do it every day and it never gets old


As for the latino moving to NY, no need to move to a Latino community there are alot of Latinos around NYC and you will find em any where, going into a community i feel limits yourself too much. Hey a big part about NYC is its diversity

Toonami
July 8th, 2005, 07:08 PM
hmm why did i write that in this thread? i meant to put this in the "moving to new york" thread

BrooklynRider
August 28th, 2005, 01:21 PM
I did a cuple of NYC Tourist things over the last 2 weekends:

1) Hamilton Grange - Alexander Hamilton's home in Harlem. Great park Ranger there who spoke passionately about the vision for moving the house to St. Nicholas Park, The legislation was passed. Now, they only need the $11M to relocate and restore the home.

2) Grant's Tomb - Normally a kind of somber and slightly boring visit, but I decided to engage the Park Ranger, who was incredibly interesting and provided great detail about Grant, the Structure and Grant's life in NYC and his funeral. Apparently, April 27, there are huge festivies every year with a 21 gun salute and miltary honor guard on Grant's birthday.

3) Theodore Roosevelt's Birthplace - A fathful reconstruction of the home TR was born and grew up in. The house is a fine museum of mid-19th century high class living. But, the best part of it was the museum and memorabilia rooms. A very interesting and satisfying surprise.

4) Lower East Side Tenement Museum - I took two tours
a) Getting By - in which a group of visitors (pretending to be new immigrants) go into an apartment and speak with an immigrant living there to learn about what to expect and what they should do. It was a little tenuous at first, but, as our group got into it, it was an excellent learning experience. It was very interesting to be in one of the tenement apartments as a "house guest" as opposed to a museum tour vistor. The "actress/tour guide" was dead-on perfect.
b) Piecing it together - This was an overview of the garment industry at the time of the creation of sweathshops. It covered a little more of the history of the tenement building and toured more apartments.

The combination of the two tour made is a really wonderful and even moving event. (I'm not sure any one tour could capture all of the info). Whereas Ellis Island talks about immigration in the shaping of the country and tells the story of coming emigrating, the Tenement Museum hits the visitor with the living conditions, challenges, prejudices, and squalor made famile faced. It was a wonderful view of NYC 1865 - 1930 and covered the period we all know from "Gangs o New York" in an even more sobering light.

Reserve in advance for Tenement Museum. I went on a Saturday and tours were selling out.

Gregory Tenenbaum
September 22nd, 2005, 11:38 AM
Some great bookshops here - especially a great selection of Badminton tomes,

and the Coffee Shop at Union Square Park.

JE PARLAY
September 22nd, 2005, 12:03 PM
defanitely visit QUO
one of the most remarkable designed venue in New York City

quonyc.com (http://quonyc.com)

tdp
October 28th, 2005, 11:44 AM
Definately the "Top of the Rock" (Rockefeller Plaza observation deck)

I was very (very) lucky to be given a private tour last Wednesday (26th Oct) and would recommend it to anyone.

The views are simply stunning.
It scores over the Empire State Building for three reasons;
1: The incredible, unobstructed, view of the wonderful ESB itself.
2: The view north across Central Park (obstructed from the ESB by Rockefeller Plaza!)
3: It's Midtown position - in amongst all of those other wonderful buildings.

It opens to the public on Tuesday 1st November.
www.topoftherocknyc.com (http://www.topoftherocknyc.com)

redhot00
October 28th, 2005, 12:46 PM
Take a tour of Yankee Stadium if the Yankees are not in town, or if it isn't baseball season.

The Bronx Zoo

The Central Park Zoo

Pete's Tavern for a step back in time to Olde New York, than a walk around the gates of Gramercy Park

Prospect Park in Brooklyn, than a stroll among the brownstones of Park Slope.

Take a walk around the least visited area of Central Park, the northern fringes around the Harlem Meer

The Museum of the City of New York

Like another poster said, The American Museum of Natural History, than partake in one of the many great restaurants the Upper West Side has to offer

I could go on and on but I'll stop here:)

sbj
October 29th, 2005, 11:23 AM
Definately the "Top of the Rock" (Rockefeller Plaza observation deck)

I was very (very) lucky to be given a private tour last Wednesday (26th Oct) and would recommend it to anyone.

The views are simply stunning.
It scores over the Empire State Building for three reasons;
1: The incredible, unobstructed, view of the wonderful ESB itself.
2: The view north across Central Park (obstructed from the ESB by Rockefeller Plaza!)
3: It's Midtown position - in amongst all of those other wonderful buildings.

It opens to the public on Tuesday 1st November.
www.topoftherocknyc.com (http://www.topoftherocknyc.com)


I totally agree. They handed out free preview public tickets yesterday and again I feel very fortunate to be one of the first few up. The views are everything you can imagine and more.

Would like to add two more reasons to the list.
4: Top floor view unobstructed by fences/barriers - just a low wall. This enhances the viewing itself and gives you a sense of freedom that you never experience in the ESB.

5: Pre-booked time slots, so that you can get away from two hour queues (ESB take note).

Very definitely a New York "must do".

deezee
January 6th, 2006, 12:55 AM
not mentioned yet..the cloisters..you won't even believe you're in the 21st century (or 18th either for that matter) no less in new york city. worth it for the unicorn tapestries and the general ambience. a great one day get-a-way you don't have to leave the city to experience. as duke ellington would say "take the A train"....

if you're a modern art lover don't forget MOMA and the guggenheim (worth it for the building alone if you don't love the artwork).

can't recommend the museum of natural history too much, especially if you have kids. worth it for the blue whale alone as far as i'm concerned. it was the only touristy thing we did as kids that we didn't wait to be dragged to by visiting out-of-towners.

Freebird
January 6th, 2006, 09:57 AM
I could just write so much here but I guess Ill limit it to a few things....

Tour of Yankee Stadium is really good (especially if your an English Yankee fan in love with Mr Jeter.....)

Ice skating in Central Park on a very cold October morning...infact the very first day they open...infact to be one of the very first people on the ice within opening...shame I cant skate and looked like Bambi...but it was so happy I actually cried!

Top of the Empire State Building at sunset. More tears.

First time I saw the Guggenheim, all alone in NYC, having studied that building from books so far away. Yes...er...more tears....

Walking around Times square at night with some really great tunes in your Ipod Nano, stopping only to watch some street dancers spinning on their heads and doing somersaults.

Oh and of course, breakfast at the Cheyenne Diner......

Emma06
January 8th, 2006, 10:39 AM
Any theme parks around the New York area?

lofter1
January 8th, 2006, 08:04 PM
not too far: http://www.sixflags.com/parks/greatadventure/index.asp

kitchie
March 7th, 2006, 02:35 AM
Check out the Central Park and Manhattan bridge. You can have the greatest view right there...

antinimby
March 7th, 2006, 02:58 PM
Tour of Yankee Stadium is really good (especially if your an English Yankee fan in love with Mr Jeter.....)Do most Brits know how the game of baseball is played? Do they show baseball over there?

tdp
March 7th, 2006, 03:06 PM
No - Baseball is not big over here, it gets minimal (if any) coverage.
I assume it can be found on satellite?

Football (sorry, Soccer!), cricket and rugby are our main interests.

A small number of your National soccer team play in the English leagues - we look forward to seeing the U.S.A. in Germany (world cup 2006 - June/July).

Cricket and Rugby will never really get a foothold in the U.S. will they? - against Baseball & Football.

MrSpice
March 7th, 2006, 03:09 PM
Do most Brits know how the game of baseball is played? Do they show baseball over there?

Baseball is the most boring sport ever (4+ hours of spitting and throwing the ball at the same guy)

I am so glad Brits get that :)

antinimby
March 7th, 2006, 04:26 PM
You are obviously not familiar with baseball. The game usually lasts 2 and a half or 3 hours. The pitcher throws the ball at different batters. It's not boring if you learn more about the game, particularly if you get attached to a player or a team (like Freebird seems to have with Jeter).


A small number of your National soccer team play in the English leagues - we look forward to seeing the U.S.A. in Germany (world cup 2006 - June/July).
Cricket and Rugby will never really get a foothold in the U.S. will they? - against Baseball & Football.It's interesting why that's the case. Just like Europeans haven't picked up on baseball, the same can be said for Americans' apathy toward cricket and rugby. Soccer is beginning to become popular here esp. amongst the younger kids.

Emma06
March 15th, 2006, 11:10 AM
If I was to visit around the September / October time...what is the weather like at that time of year?
What could anyone recommend I do when in NY at that time of year?

Schadenfrau
March 15th, 2006, 12:35 PM
That's the best time to visit, in my opinion. The weather is generally cool, clear, and dry. The leaves will probably be turning, so you'll want to walk through Central Park.

Emma06
March 16th, 2006, 09:23 AM
Cool! Thanks! I was hoping it wasn't going to be too warm or too cold at that time of year. I've been to New York once in December and it was FREEZING!

GermanNewYorkFan
March 20th, 2006, 03:56 AM
omg , you have so many beautiful ideas , what one in NY should look at. if i visit next or over next year NY , i need very many time and many vacation.:D then i could see only a little part form NY. i become then definite again-comes and i again a little parts looka at. thank you for the ideas !;)

GoBUSH
March 28th, 2006, 09:16 AM
I just ate at Morimoto Restaurant and it was really great.
When you are done eating, make sure and see the
lavatories. They are something else.

ArchiveNYC
April 1st, 2006, 08:16 PM
Heres some of the things i take tourists to..

1) Empire State Building
2) Broadway Play
3) Walk Around Time Square (2 n 3 usually are a day)
4) Village for the great quick eats
5) Avas penthouse, lounge with a great view of NYC
6) One of the many musems
7) A trip through the Subway, thats always an experience, hey i do it every day and it never gets old


As for the latino moving to NY, no need to move to a Latino community there are alot of Latinos around NYC and you will find em any where, going into a community i feel limits yourself too much. Hey a big part about NYC is its diversity


Where is Avas Penthouse located? Is there a fee? I've never heard of this.

lofter1
April 2nd, 2006, 12:35 AM
Where is Avas Penthouse located? Is there a fee? I've never heard of this.

DREAM_Hotel (http://www.dreamny.com/) ...

http://www.dreamny.com/images/dream24.jpg

http://www.dreamny.com/images/dream25.jpg

http://www.dreamny.com/images/dream26.jpg

210 West 55th St.
(Between Broadway & 7th Ave.)



Guests of Dream Hotel New York will enjoy ... a Penthouse lounge named after movie star Ava Gardner. The Ava Lounge is an electic mix of 1950s retro and French Riviera, with a seasonal terrace that offers stunning panoramic views of New York City.

TREPYE
April 17th, 2006, 02:09 AM
1. The observatory on the top of the Empire State Building: Watching the lit up skyscrapers at night literally gives you butterflies in your stomach.

2. Crossing the Brooklyn Bridge: a 365 degree unobstructed view of Manhattan, Brooklyn, Queens Staten Island, Statue of Liberty and Governors Island in the misdt of the graceful cables that hold up this majestic bridge. Truly a view to be hold!!

3. Times Square: You'll feel like an electron in a beam of light.

4. Central Park: A reminder of what this landscape looked like before the stroke of civilization. Also the way the bedrock protrudes out of the grass plains reminds us of the foundations that this great city is built on.

5. Rockefeller Center: Looking up at its majestic tower (GE tower) from the rink gives you a sense of what larger than life really is.

6. The Metropolitan Museum of Art on Central Park East: An ultra pure conglomerate of history and culture all under one roof.

7. The Statue of Liberty: Visiting Americas beacon of freedom is a must for anyone who believes in the American way of life

8. Weehawken, NJ promenade(western side) or Kosciusko Bridge on the Brooklyn/Queens border (easter side) views of Manhattan: From downtown to midtown to uptown the way the skyscrapers silhouette gives a visual definition of the word skyline.

9. Battery Park: Walking among this urban waterfront gives a surprisingly tranquil experience a midst the various monuments along the way and beautiful Jersey city views.

10. Coney Island Amusement Parks: The biggest thrill of riding the cyclone is hearing the 75 year old wood creaking still holding that sucker up.


Notable Mentions:

The Village (Bleeker Street)
The Brooklyn Heights Promenade
Bryant Park
Crossing the George Washington Bridge
South Street Seaport
The Bronx Zoo
Flushing Meadow Park/Shea Stadium
Yankee Stadium
Brooklyn Bridge Park (DUMBO)
Prospect Park's Grand Army Plaza
New York Watertaxi around downtown from Fulton Street, Brooklyn.

Anarchy77
April 18th, 2006, 12:51 AM
1. the east village--very scenic

2. The strand bookstore in the east village-one of the greatest used bookstores in the country

3. Theater--off and off off broadway in particular--cheaper than broadway, but more inventive and envelope pushing

4. Go see a show at CBGB before they close it--The yankee stadium of punk rock

5. A Baseball game at either shea, yankee or keyspan

6. A stuffed pastrami or corned beef sandwich at Katz's deli, the carnegie deli, or the 2nd ave deli

7. If they get a rink, check out the Gotham Girls Roller Derby League--It's not fixed or clownish like old time roller derby. Flat track roller derby is the most exciting up and coming sport in america

8. Museums, particularly MOMA, the Metropolitan, the Guggenheim, and the Whitney

9. Comedy shows--even the greatest comedians in america will stop by the small clubs to try out new material-check out carolines and the gotham club

10. Coney Island Playland--The cyclone still rocks

gpanterov
April 18th, 2006, 01:20 AM
I visited NYC over the Thanksgiving weekend and had an awesome time! I needed help locating the off-Broadway shows and non-commercial performances. I have seen most of the broadway performances but I would like to see more unconventional shows. While I was leaving The American Girl shop on 5th Ave., with my daughter I paid $25.00 for a bike ride (2-seater pull-behind cart) and the driver was very knowledgable about New York and what shows and entertainings the City has to offer. By the way this was my daughter's favorite part of our trip. I would like to hear if anybody knows where I can find a list of all non-broadway theaters and shows/tickets. The
cart was very nice by the way. In case you ever one a ride or a tour in New York or Central Park I got the bike and carriage's website: www.panterovtour.com It's great and inexpensive. Please help - it will be much appreciated. Thanks to all!!!

I would like to create a list of top 10 things to do for New York visitors, and I would like to have everyone’s input. Please make your recommendations, then at some point we will vote to decide on the final selections. Here are my choices:

Central Park (http://www.wirednewyork.com/parks/central_park/default.htm). In summer time, rent a boat at Loeb Boathouse and row yourself around the Lake; in winter, skate at Wollman Rink and enjoy the New York skyline.

Brooklyn Bridge (http://www.wirednewyork.com/bridges/brooklyn_bridge/default.htm). Walk across the Brooklyn Bridge, have an ice cream at the Brooklyn Ice Cream Factory at Fulton Ferry Landing – perhaps the best place to take pictures of downtown skyscrapers.

Staten Island Ferry (http://www.wirednewyork.com/waterfront/ferries/default.htm)
The free ride to Staten Island and back takes an hour. Wonderful views of the island of Manhattan.

lofter1
April 18th, 2006, 02:40 AM
Sites with good info on all sorts of NYC theatre:

http://www.playbill.com/index.php

http://www.curtainup.com/index.html

http://www.theatermania.com/home/

Anarchy77
April 18th, 2006, 03:16 PM
gpanterov

Next time you visit the city, pick up copies of the village voice and the ny press--can be obtained for free from bins in the street, primarily in the east village. You'll get lots of listings and reviews for off-beat, experimental and off and off off broadway performances.

milleniumcab
May 27th, 2006, 08:06 AM
Hiiiihhhh!!! This one looks like a sales pitch to me...I can't imagine brain of anyone pulling one of those pedisasters (pedi cabs) could contain such knowledge... They mostly seem to entertain with their reckless driving skills...Can you imagine one zipping down middle of 5th Avenue with three people in the back, and traffic moving 20-25 miles an hour....I can..I've seen it!!!...I would most definitely put this one in top 10 "NOT" to do list, for sure....
I visited NYC over the Thanksgiving weekend and had an awesome time! I needed help locating the off-Broadway shows and non-commercial performances. I have seen most of the broadway performances but I would like to see more unconventional shows. While I was leaving The American Girl shop on 5th Ave., with my daughter I paid $25.00 for a bike ride (2-seater pull-behind cart) and the driver was very knowledgable about New York and what shows and entertainings the City has to offer. By the way this was my daughter's favorite part of our trip. I would like to hear if anybody knows where I can find a list of all non-broadway theaters and shows/tickets. The
cart was very nice by the way. In case you ever one a ride or a tour in New York or Central Park I got the bike and carriage's website: www.panterovtour.com (http://www.panterovtour.com) It's great and inexpensive. Please help - it will be much appreciated. Thanks to all!!!

DX2K
June 15th, 2006, 02:55 PM
Statue of Liberty: The exclamation mark in the sentence that is New York City. An enduring symbol of America and an amazing work of art.


Yeah, too bad it was a present from the French ;)

Comelade
June 15th, 2006, 03:10 PM
Yeah, too bad it was a present from the French ;)

no the problem, one takes it again when you want!! it will be better in France. :):)

CastleHillzfinest718
June 25th, 2006, 02:23 PM
Bronx: of course, he famed arthur avenue in the fordham area for great food, the bronx zoo on southern boulevard, shopping on fordham rd and co op city
Brooklyn: grimaldi's pizza on old fulton street, brooklyn ice cream factory, walk along the promenade for great views of manhattan, shopping on flatbush avenue in fort greene.
Manhattan: the empire state building, pier 17, south street sea port, chinatown, little italy, times square, central park, rockafella center (48th n 5th), roosevelt island tram
Queens: im unfamiliar with the borough but i know long island city has good views of manhattan, walking across the QB bridge, and shopping on queens blvd and the queens center mall in elmhurst

milleniumcab
June 25th, 2006, 02:29 PM
Roosevelt Island Tram is out of service, for the near future:(

LeCom
June 25th, 2006, 07:03 PM
Yeah, too bad it was a present from the French ;)
Remember that they gave it to the NYC because they made it for the opening ceremony of the Suez Canal but the Egyptians hated the statue, so the French had to dump it elsewhere.

antinimby
June 25th, 2006, 07:51 PM
Really?
I didn't know that.
Here I was thinking the French were being genuinely nice to us.

ablarc
June 25th, 2006, 08:04 PM
The French helped us big time get our freedom and independence.

milleniumcab
June 25th, 2006, 08:20 PM
^ And we returned the favor. Now we are all even... But they seem to forget that..

ablarc
June 25th, 2006, 09:03 PM
But they seem to forget that..
That's also a two way street.

CastleHillzfinest718
June 26th, 2006, 01:59 PM
Roosevelt Island Tram is out of service, for the near future:(

Yeah I'm not goin on the tram anytime soon after that power outage. Imagine being stuk that far up above the East River. I actually went on a day or two before it happened, in the same car! I got lucky.

piglet
September 24th, 2006, 03:29 PM
Thanks for the great ideas! Can I ask a couple of very stupid questions? ;)

Is it possible to walk from Brooklyn Heights Promenade to Brooklyn Bridge Park?? (is this Empire-Fulton ferry state park? just with a different name?)

It looks walkable on my map, but you can never be too certain ;)

also how easy is it to get onto the bridge (to walk across) from either the park or the promenade?

ablarc
January 25th, 2007, 09:22 AM
how easy is it to get onto the bridge (to walk across) from either the park or the promenade?
http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?t=3082&page=2. Post #26.

.

iam_j4yn3
March 3rd, 2007, 12:00 AM
thanks very much for all the cool ideas
sorry if i didnt see it and its here but is the bronx zoo open all year?
thanks

Schadenfrau
March 3rd, 2007, 12:44 AM
It is. They've got a website with the hours they're open listed, as well.

Apple Blossom
May 23rd, 2007, 08:53 PM
So I've just recently found out that my mother is taking me to New York for my graduation present. :D I've never been to the east coast (besides Florida, but I don't think that counts). I'm going to see Les Miserables and Phantom of the Opera, plus, you know, the Empire State Building, the Statue of Liberty, Ground Zero etc. etc. but I was wondering about things to do in New York beyond your basic tourist things. I'm probably going to be getting some classic New York pizza, for example. And I've seen in the movies lots of hot dog vendors (are there even hotdog vendors?) and if there are, I want one. :p

So I've just recen

RandySavage
May 24th, 2007, 04:24 PM
Hot dog vendors shouldn't be hard to find in Manhattan (particularly in Midtown), although they're not as ubiquitous as they once were.

If you read through this entire thread, starting with the first post, you'll find lots of suggestions of things to do, both touristy and non-touristy.

I would definitely recommend setting aside some time to walk around and explore Central Park and Greenwich Village. You should also consider walking the Brooklyn Bridge. New York is also home to the world's best museums (American Museum of Natural History, the Met, the MoMa, Guggenheim, etc.) if that interests you.

Have a great time.

Alonzo-ny
May 24th, 2007, 05:22 PM
Remember that they gave it to the NYC because they made it for the opening ceremony of the Suez Canal but the Egyptians hated the statue, so the French had to dump it elsewhere.

Not true, august bartholdi PROPOSED it there but it didnt take, then it was proposed as a gift to the US and was then built.

ablarc
May 24th, 2007, 09:06 PM
I was wondering about things to do in New York beyond your basic tourist things.

If you go beyond the basic tourist things, you might get hooked on New York. ;)


I would definitely recommend setting aside some time to walk around and explore Central Park and Greenwich Village. You should also consider walking the Brooklyn Bridge. New York is also home to the world's best museums (American Museum of Natural History, the Met, the MoMa, Guggenheim, etc.) if that interests you.

All good advice, except I’d say hit the museums even if you’ve never been interested in museums before. The ones in New York are so good they might hook you on museumgoing for a lifetime.


MUSEUMS

Metropolitan Museum will absolutely blow your mind. Vast skylit Engelhart Court contains sculpture, architectural fragments, even an entire building. Art Nouveau’s particularly well-represented with stained glass by Louis Comfort Tiffany, architectural fragments by Sullivan and Wright, swooning paintings by Whistler and Sargent, St. Gaudens’ gold-plated Diana from atop the original Madison Square Garden.

The European Painting department rivals the Louvre, and they’ve recently redone the Greek and Roman sections. Don’t miss the Middle Ages, the armor and the Egyptian stuff.

If you’re not yet into art, this place might just do the trick.

Twentieth Century? You can’t beat the Museum of Modern Art; it has the Whitney beat except if your bag is Hopper. Christina’s World, Georgia O’Keefe, Grant Wood and of course Pollock, Kline, Rothko, Stella, Oldenburg, Lichtenstein, Chuck Close.

Museum of Natural History has dinosaurs, stuffed animals (real ones) in naturalistic scenes, your ancestors from ape-man days, gold nuggets, and diamonds the size of eggs.

MOMA, the Met and the Museum of Natural History are unlikely to escape your notice, but three of New York’s smaller museums might charm you more:

The Cloisters, in Fort Tryon Park way at the northern tip of Manhattan, is a romantic distillation of all things medieval. Rockefeller-assembled from an assortment of European monastery parts, the collection features ivory devotionals, gold and jewelry, ceramics, metalwork, reliquaries, books of hours, stained glass, pollarded pear trees, sculpture, a Tudor chamber, a chapel, razor-sharp Flemish paintings, and the world’s best series of medieval tapestries in exuberant celebration of unicorn hunting (they even have a specimen horn, if you can believe that).

This is like time travel.

Perched in regal isolation on a wooded bluff above the Hudson, the Jersey palisades and the George Washington Bridge, this peaceful place celebrates solitude and contemplation, and when the herb gardens are in full scent, it’s a feast for the nose. Sundays resonate in Gregorian tones, and once in a while there’s ancient music live.

Access is via the A-train to atmospheric and barrel-vaulted 190th Street station, the way out from which is by rock-hewn elevator shaft and tunnel. Bucolic Fort Tryon Park welcomes with specimen trees, lush vegetation and New York’s most charming outdoor eatery built of stone, the New Leaf Café, where you can have lunch or brunch before you hit the museum.

After your museum visit, leave by the driveway portal, where the Number 4 bus waits idling to waft you back to Midtown on one of New York’s most interesting routes. Take a seat facing frontwards and stay on it all the way to its terminus; you’ll be surprised where it ends. A long ride but rewarding –especially on a Sunday, when traffic’s not too heavy.

To my mind, the Frick Collection is more than a match for the lumbering Metropolitan, ten blocks uptown, for within the judicious, single-story sprawl of this tranquil city mansion you’ll find concentrated every bit as many top-drawer masterpieces as at the Met, without having to wade through crowd-filled acres of the lesser stuff.

Here you’ll find Holbein’s Thomas More, familiar portraits by Titian, rooms full of naughty paintings by Boucher and Fragonard, El Greco’s more-than-magnificent St. Jerome, two Vermeers and two Rembrandts (one a self-portrait) better than the ones in the Met’s collection, one of Ingres’ two best portraits ever, the finest furniture from Renaissance to Louis XVI, stupendous works by Bronzino, Frans Hals, Van Dyck, Velazquez, Goya, Gainsborough, Hogarth, Turner, Whistler, Manet, Degas ...all in surroundings by the distinguished architect, John Russell Pope. Not a clunker in the house, unlike the Metropolitan’s warehouse of packrattery, which is full of them.

Henry Clay Frick, Andrew Carnegie’s pit-bull partner, villain of the violent Homestead Strike, major-domo of Pinkerton’s private army of thugs and killers, possibly the richest man of his time—Henry Clay Frick had a good eye.

Another plutocrat, Solomon R. Guggenheim, funded Frank Lloyd Wright’s last major work, an architectural tour-de-force ideal for generating bustle and hype for flashy exhibits. These have tended to mobiles, motorcycles, conceptual art, one-man shows, architecture or abstract painting. A permanent collection is heavy on Kandinsky, Picasso, Braque and other mainstream modernists, and is usually exhibited in level rooms, most of which were reworked by Gwathmey.

After picking your jaw off the floor, ride one of Wright’s glitzy elevators to the top and coast down the ramps as though you were in a wheelchair. The space will follow you down.

Unlike the other two museums, Guggenheim is usually quite crowded. An architectural spectacle with a museum attached.


May is the best month to visit New York. The weather is balmy and the culture hasn’t shut down for the summer.


SOME NEIGHBORHOODS (each is worth a half-day, even if you’re on a whirlwind tour)

West Village. The nicest of the nice. (subway Sheridan Square; go into the fenced square for a surprise).

The tree-lined streets of finely-detailed 19th Century town houses are both harmonious and stylistically diverse. As this is the northernmost outpost of New York’s pre-Madison Plan organic grid, these fine-grained houses are superimposed on a street pattern reminiscent of Paris. The Avenues play the role of, well…avenues, while Hudson Street, where Jane Jacobs lived and wrote, is sort of a cross between the rue Mouffetard and Boulevard St. Germain. At its heart, don’t miss quietly beautiful, Parisian, refurbished Abingdon Square and the adjacent White Horse Tavern, where Dylan Thomas drank himself into a coma. This is now primarily a tourist destination with a solid underlayment of local regulars.

Be sure you go all the way out to the (Hudson) River to the handsome new park with its astroturf piers and look back to admire Richard Meier’s three graceful and fine-scaled glass towers: vacant stacks of celebrities. Late in the afternoon, you may see mammoth cruise ships glide by, ocean-bound.

South of here lies faux-gritty but even richer Tribeca, and to the north they pack meat --though less of it all the time. 9th Avenue and 14th Street is worth a visit.

Above even that you’ll find Chelsea, where poverty coexists unhomogenized with artists, bohemians, gays and the usual yuppies.

These days Chelsea’s western reaches resemble a vast construction site; here star architects are putting up plutocrat housing on both sides of an elevated park (yes!) where there were once railroad tracks: the High Line. When you return five years from now this work-in-progress will be probably New York’s glitziest neighborhood.

Brooklyn Heights. The next-to-nicest of the nice. (subway Clark Street or Borough Hall) Solid bourgeois houses here are more overtly Victorian than in the West Village, though a few go way back to colonial times, and some are even wood-clad. Joralemon Street is a nice neighborhood shopping street, and you’ll find mews (streets of converted stables) and a really nice mix of building types –as diverse as Washington’s Georgetown.

The glory here is the East River Promenade with its TwinTowerless Downtown skyline view with Brooklyn Bridge. This Promenade is cantilevered out over a multi-tiered highway, which is thus neutralized as an environmental liability. Brilliant.

Walk back to Manhattan on the Brooklyn Bridge and take in the view; you'll be facing in the right direction. Or take a water taxi (Fulton's Landing) if you’re tired.

Upper West Side. New York to the core and New York at its best, and it's not touristy.

Great apartment buildings are to be found on shop-lined Broadway; go in the courtyards of those that have them. Look especially for the Apthorp (west side of Broadway between 78th and 79th Streets) and the Belnord (east side of Broadway at 86th Street). An unexpected delight to stumble across (if you can find it): Pomander Walk, which runs between 94th and 95th Streets, midblock between Broadway and West End Ave. For hardcore deco: Master Apartments, Riverside Drive at 103rd Street. Round the corner, handsome Beaux-Arts rowhouses from the late 1890’s on 103rd Street. An adult George Gershwin lived in the building at #316 (1925-31), simultaneously Humphrey Bogart grew up at #245.

Broadway is bustling and vibrant, and this stretch will inevitably remind you of Paris. One block over, West End Avenue is quiet because it's residential, and it too will remind you of Paris; it's like a boulevard with the buildings scaled up to about fifteen stories. Even further over is elegant Riverside Drive and Park right on the Hudson. Check out outdoor noshing at 79th Street Boat Basin Café in the park, at the Hudson River (a little hard to find; ask.).

On Central Park West, twin towers reign, mostly deco. These are best seen from within the Park at Strawberry Fields (the John Lennon Monument) and to the north of it, from The Ramble, Central Park’s best feature.

Even further east: Central Park and the Museum of Natural History. Side streets hereabouts feature brownstones galore, especially in the Seventies between Central Park West and Amsterdam Avenue. A lovely place for a walk.

Lincoln Center is actually within walking distance on Broadway (66th Street). A little further down: be sure you take in the new Columbus Circle, its fountain, the Time Warner Center and its shops, Jazz at Lincoln Center, glitzy restaurants and slick basement supermarket/snack bar (Whole Foods)

Morningside Heights is an academic community and the West Side’s uppermost reaches before Harlem. Take the subway a few stops uptown to 116th Street (transfer to local at 96th) for Columbia University’s terrific campus; (see the rotunda and the chapel, find where they invented The Bomb, explore), St. John the Divine (not fully recovered from fire; check out the sculpture in its Peace Garden!), Riverside Church. Plenty of bookstores hereabouts.

But architecturally the very best thing in Morningside Heights is the intensely romantic Grant's Tomb, a moving experience, a poignant reminder of conjugal devotion, and perhaps New York’s noblest Beaux-Arts space, both inside (Napoleonic) and out. Note the urn near the fence and the Gaudiesque benches. There’s even a ruined belvedere with a magnificent view. Solitude and privacy will follow you here.


FUN RIDES

Roosevelt Island Tramway. Familiar to Spider Maniacs, this suspended cable-car gondola provides a heart-stopping ride across the East River beside the Queensboro Bridge, affords dynamic skyline views and actually takes you somewhere. It will take you from Second Avenue and 60th Street to Utopia. In this case that means Roosevelt (formerly Welfare) Island, a social-engineered community.

After you’ve seen the spectacular view, the incongruously-preserved woodframe farmhouse that once loomed manorially over the island’s cornfields and the vaguely Gothic madhouse chapel, you’ll be ready to hop the subway back.

Gray Line Bus. Not really transportation unless you plan your days around it, this open-top double-decker provides (in good weather) Manhattan’s most consistently entertaining mode of transport. I don’t normally recommend tourbuses, but here I’ll make a strenuous exception. Buy the two day ticket and ride all three lines all the way through, hopping off and on as you please. If you have to omit one line, let it be Brooklyn, but then you’ll miss the dynamite Manhattan Bridge crossing, perhaps the best five minutes on all the tours combined. http://www.coachusa.com/newyorksightseeing/

The high vantage point and open top give you a great perspective and facilitate photography; it's great to be able to hop on and off, and all three routes pass through interesting territory.

The tourguides’ patter ranges from witty to bland, from informative and insightful to ignorant and dumb. But hey, if you’re well-informed, you know when the facts aren't spot-on; and when the commentary's truly inspired it's like a rolling comedy club --with all that scenery.

I recommend it no matter how jaded you are. You’ll love it, but better hope the weather isn’t cold or wet.

New York Water Taxi. Yellow and checkered, these jaunty little ferryboats provide multistop commuter service during warmer months. This is a much better deal than the Circle Line, which includes dreary hours of dull shoreline. Hudson River stops are at 44th, 23rd, 10th, World Financial Center and Battery Park; East River stops are at South Street Seaport, Fulton Ferry Landing (Brooklyn, at the foot of the bridge), Williamsburg (Brooklyn, on weekends) and 34th Street. That makes a pretty nice tour of most of Manhattan’s most interesting shoreline views, a photographer’s feast. In warm weather, the service runs often enough so you can hop off at every stop and explore, then hop back on. Get a two-day pass. http://www.nywatertaxi.com/

You can thrill yourself with The Beast, a half-hour speedboat escapade at a breakneck 45mph. The boat holds close to a hundred, features ferocious Flying Tiger graphics, roars riotously all over the harbor, and you may get a little wet. Absolutely terrific. http://www.circleline42.com/index.ihtml?page=beast

Everyone knows about the Staten Island Ferry. It’s free, and it’s good for a frank and a cheap beer. But after the skyline recedes, you’ll find it goes on way too long, and its destination holds no interest; when you get to Staten Island, the only thing you can do is return on the ferry. The Governors Island Ferry is different. The ride is mercifully short and the view from the ferry remains continuously exhilarating.

But here’s the best part: when you get to this uninhabited island, there’s a [lady] park ranger waiting to show you around. Now this lady wears boots, so you’d better be ready for a strenuous hike. If you can keep up while furiously snapping pictures, you’ll find an amazing earthwork fort built by George Washington [yes!] to cover his retreat from the Battle of Brooklyn. Later in the Eighteenth Century, this was embellished with an ominously militaristic red sandstone sculpted gateway worthy of Vauban (completely un-American). Inside the fort, handsome Greek Revival officers’ barracks make Renaissance townscape.

There’s also a battery of cannons aimed at Downtown’s skyline, a pair of chapels, a handsome row of wooden officers’ houses, and a second fort, engineered by Benjamin Franklin’s grandson. This estimable sandstone structure is round; he fondly imagined cannonballs would glance off it that way. They didn’t, so it was pressed into service during the Civil War to hold Confederate prisoners, and later it remained as the brig. The windows have bars and the court in the middle was used for exercise. Super interesting, but grim.

There’s a great view from the promenade, there’s an imposingly-scaled pile that was --prior to the Pentagon-- the country’s biggest military building, and there’s the historic Commandant’s House. Possibly built on Dutch foundations, this ancient structure hosted Gorbachev on his U.S. visit and was the site from which he announced to Reagan the steps that would lead to the Evil Empire's collapse. The French President also stayed here when he came to inaugurate the refurbished Statue of Liberty. As though this weren’t enough, the kitchen of this house, old-fashioned and cheerfully resplendent in its two-tone tile, was featured in an episode of Law and Order.


PARKS AND SQUARES

The best you don’t want to miss. They are:

The Ramble. Everyone goes to Central Park. The Castle’s a great place to view the skyline, the sunning turtles and an exquisite frog skeleton in a display case, but the best part of Central Park is The Ramble…make-believe nature improved by man, a concept familiar to anyone English. Start across from the Dakota, where Chapman shot Lennon (72nd Street at Central Park West), cross into the park, where you’ll find that event memorialized, head east, then north around the lake, cross the Bow Bridge, and then proceed aimlessly north. Try to get lost and spot some wildlife.

Union Square. New York’s liveliest, and like the others once the realm of low-lifes. Now you’ll find the Starbucks crowd shopping for organic produce on market days, Mo, We, Fr, Sa, 8-6. Newly restored Madison Square, 9 blocks up Broadway, is nice, not as lively, and flanked by some nifty architecture, including the original MetLife Building and the Flatiron. Unlike in Times Square, most folks you see here will be New Yorkers.

Washington Square. About to be rebuilt with the fountain to be moved on axis with the arch and Fifth Avenue, this is a good place for people watching and urban exploring; it’s surrounded by secret places. You can sit on a bench and enjoy a lovely picnic lunch you assembled for yourself at the stupendously well-stocked deli and salad bar at University Place, just up from Waverly Place. Here you’ll also find picturesque Washington Mews, a street of stables for the splendid Greek Revival rowhouse/mansions that line Washington Square’s northern edge. Both mansions and mews are now mostly New York University offices. Henry James, Richard Morris Hunt, John Dos Passos, Edward Hopper and various other well-heeled artists lived here in the Square’s Nineteenth Century (and subsequent) heyday, before several of the houses were swept away for a crass apartment building.

If you think Washington Mews was picturesque, wait till you see its western counterpart, McDougal Alley. Accessible only from McDougal Street, this gives new meaning to the term “gated community.” Feel free to open the gate and enter. Check out how the carriage houses have evolved in such diverse ways.

You have to be rich to live here.

Tompkins Square. The East Village edition of Washington Square is bigger, less genteel, a little remote and about equally good for watching people. Walk to it from Washington Square via 8th Street and you’ll pass a little zoo of architectural specimens called Astor Place, home of Cooper Union. You’ll know it when you spot the undulating glass apartment tower and the cube balanced jauntily on one point.

At tuition-free Cooper Union, three subjects are taught professionally: engineering, art, and between them of course, architecture.

Eighth Street changes its name to St. Mark’s Place; here you can still buy patchouli and a Che Guevara poster, remnants of the Summer of Love. Counter-culture wannabes swarm here from New Jersey on Saturdays. The people who live hereabouts fancy themselves progressive.

Bryant Park. It’s easy to think of this as New York’s best park. It’s definitely Parisian, everything is just so --especially impressive to those who know that just a decade ago this was New York’s most dangerous needle park. Come with a little lunch or buy some at the kiosk, or if you’re feeling flush eat at the grill. Any way you do it, you’re bound to hang around for an hour or more. So many people to watch, such pleasant and salubrious surroundings, so much architecture to ogle. Just right.

Grand Central Station. The big space is for people; the trains lurk in tunnels. In the basement, a great food court. Up the steps: mezzanine restaurants with bars. Up the escalators: the MetLife (Pan Am) Building (Walter Gropius, et al.). Grand Central functions like an indoor square.




Hope you have a great time, Apple Blossom. How long will your visit be?

.

manHa
May 25th, 2007, 07:11 AM
- Times Square
- Walk across the Brooklyn Bridge
- Ground Zero, Wall Street
- Staten Island Ferry
- ESB observation deck
- Rockefeller Center observation deck (Top of The Rock)
- Chinatown
- Central Park
- Fifth Avenue
- Take a cab, subway

:)

misselaineneous
May 25th, 2007, 10:04 AM
Thank you for that amazing and well-considered post Ablarc, you've picked out a few of my favourite things and given me some new ideas, especially Grovenor Island.

I'm over (from London) in August for just 2 days. Having been to NY for work and pleasure several times and knowing how hot & humid it's going to be, I'm thinking about escaping Manhattan and have had the following ideas for day trips.

Roosevelt Island: take a picnic and walk up to the lighthouse. Is it easy/clearly marked? Are there any good places to eat on the Island?

Coney Island: classic New York and a day out on the beach...

Grovenor Island (for the reasons Ablarc outlined above).

Central Park?

Any suggestions gratefully received. Am in town Fri 3rd - Sun 5th Aug.

ablarc
May 25th, 2007, 11:40 AM
Roosevelt Island: take a picnic and walk up to the lighthouse. Is it easy/clearly marked?
The whole island is visible on your tramway approach.


Are there any good places to eat on the Island?
Not a gourmet paradise, but if you're bringing your own picninc lunch, there are numerous patches of grass to plop yourself down on --or park benches.

Pick up your picnic fixings near the tramway's Manhatttan terminal at the nifty Bridgemarket, built right into the Guastavino vaults of the Queensboro Bridge approach. http://www.thefoodemporium.com/finefood/ You can't miss it, it's right next to the Conran store.


Grovenor Island
Governors Island. Call in advance to find out the ferry and tour schedule. I believe you can linger after the tour and catch a later ferry. Plenty of peace and leafy shade to enjoy --along with sea breezes, skyline views and harbor vistas (good view of Lady Liberty).

ablarc
May 25th, 2007, 11:57 AM
Any suggestions gratefully received. Am in town Fri 3rd - Sun 5th Aug.
Consider also an exotic excursion to:

HOBOKEN. I find this place absolutely amazing: yuppie central on a red-brick grid. Nice enough to be a part of Manhattan, but it’s in another state [though the PATH subway does get you there in a few minutes from Herald Square or Ground Zero (or take a ferry from Battery Park City)]. Like Manhattan, it’s built on a grid of oblong blocks.

Presently many similarities link it to Brooklyn Heights and the West Village. These include: 19th Century red-brick rowhouse infrastructure, a prosperous population, a nice mix of commerce and residences, walkability due to absence of parking lots, beautiful riverfront parks with views, resistance to [very] high-rise development, and easy subway access.

A difference is that Hoboken sank deep into a trough of slumhood; when Sinatra was born there it was rough enough for him to be ashamed of. He saw himself as an escapee from the dense, violent, gangster-ridden little city of stevedores chronicled by Elia Kazan in On the Waterfront; like New Orleans, Hoboken boosted Brando to stardom.

The vast scale of container shipping vaporized Hoboken’s dainty piers and cranes without a trace. Their replacement is Frank Sinatra Drive, a glitzy waterfront parade of elephantine lumps in postmodern style; it may remind you of some of the newer places along the Thames. After sampling Sinatra’s pleasures, be sure you get up away from it into Hoboken’s viewless residential and commercial core, which lies along handsome Washington Street (disfigured by one or two bank parking lots).

Vanished along with the cranes are the stevedores. These seem to have been replaced by an army of trust-fund kids. I can imagine the baby boomers’ reasoning as they plunk down payment on junior’s condo: “there’s a river between here and that bad ol’ city full of drugs and disease; Junior’ll be fine here, and he can visit the kulchur on weekends. After he gets married and needs a bigger place, we can either flip the condo or retire to it ourselves.”

What Junior actually does on weekends is get drunk. He does that mostly in Hoboken, which is full of dating bars, and he’s even joined by college buddies from the City.

Reminds me of Miami Beach: weekend eves feature acres of tasty tanned flesh scantily framed in designer-dud glitter (even in cool weather; you know what that's about). Saturday night, it's a mating dance. At 10 pm the PATH subway to Manhattan (ten minute ride) is packed with revelers--about evenly divided, I reckon, between Hobokenites headed for a night on the town and Manhattanites returning from their evening on the [other] town. Check out the calamari, the view, the passersby and the clientele at Quay.

Truly the sixth borough, though a miniature. Everything looks good in Hoboken. And the breezy views of Manhattan…

* * *

Will you be in New York for all of Sunday, or do you fly out that day?

Brunch is a New York institution.

Schadenfrau
May 25th, 2007, 12:06 PM
That's a pretty accurate description of Hoboken, though I'd argue about the trust-funders. Hoboken is more for junior finance-types. Williamsburg would be trust-fund central.

Misselaineneous, I'd go with Coney Island. That would be perfect around the time you're visiting. Have you ever been to Central Park? If not, you should do that, too. FYI: Central Park is smack in the middle of Manhattan and Roosevelt Island is also considered Manhattan.

misselaineneous
May 30th, 2007, 08:41 AM
Thanks for the recommendation. Yes, I've been to Central Park before, only I've never got very far in to it!

Yes, I'm staying for the whole of Sunday, leaving that evening. Any good brunch recommendations? I'm staying at The Library Hotel at 229 Madison Avenue.

Thanks :)

Punzie
May 30th, 2007, 09:34 AM
. . . I'm staying for the whole of Sunday, leaving that evening. Any good brunch recommendations? I'm staying at The Library Hotel at 229 Madison Avenue. . .

Last month I had a delicious, (affordable) French brunch at Pergola de Artistes (http://www.tripadvisor.com/Restaurant_Review-g60763-d424497-Reviews-Pergola_Des_Artistes-New_York_City_New_York.html) in the Theatre District.

ablarc
May 31st, 2007, 08:19 AM
Pergola des Artistes seems like a hidden gem.

The_Other_White_Meat
May 31st, 2007, 03:08 PM
Bronx Zoo is a particular favorite place of mine during visits... much, much better than the overrated Central Park Zoo.

ablarc
June 3rd, 2007, 11:50 AM
Bronx Zoo is a particular favorite place of mine during visits... much, much better than the overrated Central Park Zoo.
Central Park Zoo is a leopard that changed its spots a few decades ago. It now makes no claim to be a full service zoo. "Selections from the New York Zoological Society" might be an appropriate name.

Before its reconception it was a more interesting place for the zoogoer and possibly a hell-hole for the animals. Within its compact boundaries, ten times as many as today's specimens could be found all lined up and confined in smallish barred cages. It made for intimate viewing and an encyclopedic experience; you could see all the big cats in less than a hundred yards. The experience was urban: tight, dense, spatially defined. It was an animal-inhabited version of Manhattan itself.

It was thought to be inhumane.

clubBR
July 23rd, 2007, 05:16 AM
I like to walk down W 100th St., go under the West Side Highway, sit at the riverfront called Cherry Walk, and fish.

I also like to visit the Natural Museum or the Met.

I go to the New York Public Library and do my homework (summer = outside).

Bronx Zoo and Botanical Gardens is always nice.

Have a barbecue across the river in Englewood Cliffs.

Central Park to make out while listening to someone play the guitar.

At night, I usually go bar hopping on 34th St. or St. Marks Place.

clubBR
July 23rd, 2007, 08:12 PM
Which Botanical Gardens, Bronx or Brooklyn? Also, do you go to the one in Queens?

Botanical Gardens in the Bronx. No, I have not been to the one in Queens because my life revolves around the Bronx and Manhattan.

CVLyons
September 17th, 2007, 11:29 PM
Something that I think is worth keeping in mind when traveling to NYC is the fact that Independent movies play here. For people who are traveling to the area and enjoy indie films, but don't have them playing in their own, potentially smaller hometowns, going to NYC to see an independent film is a lot of fun. One that is playing now is "Delirious" and has had very positive reviews, but there are others playing too!!:)

milleniumcab
September 30th, 2007, 01:48 AM
Take the Tram to Roosevelt Island and visit the Southpoint when famous artist,Tom Sokoloski, sets up "The Encampment"..This free public art exhibit will be showcased starting Friday, Oct 5th to Sunday, Oct 7th from 7pm to 1am nightly... You will also get a chance to enjoy Manhattan Skyline at night..;)

Let's hope the wheather holds up...

www.theencampment.net (http://www.theencampment.net)

LEGEND-K
January 22nd, 2008, 08:34 AM
is there any cool place to get some great icecream?
seems to me,the states becomes a great country because u have movies,hard rock music,cowboys and ICECREAM.

we have HAGENDAZE (or maybe sth like that) in my city,I'M LOVIN THAT!

brianac
January 22nd, 2008, 09:40 AM
Brooklyn

http://i194.photobucket.com/albums/z245/brianaclift/New%20York%20June%202007/js800_Pictures_from_small_card_0806.jpg

LEGEND-K
January 23rd, 2008, 02:35 AM
cool,ice cream factory,ah,i'll get a job there.:)

nyc_obsessed
March 2nd, 2008, 09:33 AM
I recommend Chinatown Ice Cream Factory (has very good ice cream, and very unusual flavors that you think would be gross, but are awesome)

Also CONES 272 Bleecker St. They have delicious ice cream! Yummy now I want some :)

SouthernMarie
March 11th, 2008, 06:50 AM
I love this forum, I found so many interesting things to do when I travel to (http://homepages.nyu.edu/%7Ejac614/nyny/index.html)New York. It may sound a little bit cheesy but I can't wait to get a hot dog :D because in almost every movie that takes place in New York you see them eating one.

djacana
March 15th, 2008, 12:11 PM
Ola,
We'll be in NY with a party of five from 20th till 24th March.
Are there any cool things someone would advise to do (besides visiting the 'hot spots')?
Thanks, ciao!

milleniumcab
March 15th, 2008, 01:02 PM
Ola,
We'll be in NY with a party of five from 20th till 24th March.
Are there any cool things someone would advise to do (besides visiting the 'hot spots')?
Thanks, ciao!

A recent hot spot some people still don't know about is the Top of The Rock. It is located in the Rockefeler plaza (49th -50th Streets between 5th & 6th Avenues). It offers much better view than Empire State Building and the wait is much shorter..;)

Doug
March 17th, 2008, 10:26 AM
take a tour bus .. fun http://www.citysightsny.com/ ;)

The Benniest
April 10th, 2008, 10:57 PM
1. Central Park
2. Visit Times Square!
3. See a Broadway show (or two!)
4. Walk across the Brooklyn Bridge (i have yet to do this)
5. Chinatown / Little Italy (walk down Canal St.)
6. Metropolitan Museum of Art
7. Take the NYC Subway
8. The Statue of Liberty / Ellis Island
9. World Trade Center site
10. Empire State Building Observation Center

slv1982
May 9th, 2008, 07:16 PM
Try this in the other forum I use: http://www.helium.com/smf/index.php?topic=31648.0

The Benniest
July 25th, 2008, 01:29 PM
Another thing to add to my list above:

11. Get lost downtown.

Personal experience... :cool:

KenNYC
July 25th, 2008, 02:25 PM
Point 11 is more mandatory than recommended, isn't it? :)

highlander447
July 29th, 2008, 05:51 PM
I'd also say that the ground zero workshop museum is well worth a visit

Triborough
August 4th, 2008, 03:59 PM
I recently gave the following advice on where to go to someone who was visiting from Wisconsin and didn't want to do "touristy" things.

1. The Panorama of New York (http://www.queensmuseum.org/panorama/) at the Queens Museum of Art.
http://farm1.static.flickr.com/131/385257767_e2faa0a28e.jpg (http://www.flickr.com/photos/triborough/385257767/)

2. Governors Island (http://www.govisland.com/)
http://farm2.static.flickr.com/1346/1289749896_0764d616fd.jpg (http://www.flickr.com/photos/triborough/1289749896/)

3. Gantry Plaza State Park (http://nysparks.state.ny.us/parks/info.asp?parkID=86)
http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3149/2297302070_bed02ecfdb.jpg (http://www.flickr.com/photos/triborough/2297302070/)

4. Red Hook (via the Ikea Water Taxi)
http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3059/2702106145_e2d1fb765f.jpg (http://www.flickr.com/photos/triborough/2702106145/)

5. New York City Transit Museum (http://www.mta.info/mta/museum/)
http://farm2.static.flickr.com/1326/1465302965_4efcc85776.jpg (http://www.flickr.com/photos/triborough/1465302965/)

6. Coney Island
http://farm2.static.flickr.com/1002/1228547676_167ba53f0a.jpg (http://www.flickr.com/photos/triborough/1228547676/)

7. DiFara Pizza
http://farm2.static.flickr.com/1226/1024377759_404dec3bb5.jpg (http://www.flickr.com/photos/triborough/1024377759/)

NYC MOMMA
November 19th, 2008, 11:58 AM
You can't live in NY without taking a really cool LoVer East Side Tour.
LoVer East Side is the city's hottest tour enterprise and they offer tours for all types of people. If you love FOOD, they got a food tour. If you're into ARCHITECTURE, they've got one of that too. If your great grandpa came over from Europe on a boat – you''ll find the HISTORY of the Lower East Side to be fascinating. . . And if you're looking to chill out with your kids – their KIDS tours are SUPERB!!!!!!!!

Trust me, I know, check out their site www.lovereastside.com; (http://www.lovereastside.com;))

lofter1
November 19th, 2008, 12:41 PM
Number One NYC thing to do in the Fall of 2008: Panhandle for spare change.

The Benniest
November 19th, 2008, 06:03 PM
LOL :p :p

Schadenfrau
November 20th, 2008, 06:45 PM
Number One NYC thing to do in the Fall of 2008: Panhandle for spare change.

Or just spam the hell out of internet message boards for the same thing.

Bronxbombers
November 21st, 2008, 03:04 PM
Bowling Green.Ride the bull.
1. Go to a Yankees game.
2. Go to a Knicks game.
3. Go to a Rangers game.
4. Go to Central Park.
5. Ride on a Staten Island Ferry.
6. Go to Times Square.
7. Go to Radio City Music Hall.
8. See Chinatown/Little Italy/ and Greenwich Village
9. To see the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Annex
10. To the Impire State Building and the Statue of Liberty.

lofter1
November 21st, 2008, 08:05 PM
"Impire State" ^

LOL

In times of recession everything gets downgraded :cool:

milleniumcab
November 22nd, 2008, 02:56 AM
"Impire State" ^

LOL

In times of recession everything gets downgraded :cool:
LMAO, again.....

The Benniest
November 22nd, 2008, 11:42 PM
So many of you know that I have visited and grrreeattly enjoyed NYC twice in the last year... and am planning on visiting this summer (definitely) or before. :)

My question is, after visiting twice and hitting manny of the major touristy spots, what is there to do? I know it's physically impossible to see everything in New York City but I'm talking tourist things that I can fit into a ~ 1-2 week schedule?

Thanks for any help! :)
Ben

Alonzo-ny
November 23rd, 2008, 02:26 PM
Outer boroughs a bit more, just go walk around, hit up the smaller museums.

milleniumcab
November 24th, 2008, 11:06 PM
I agree with outer boroughs suggestion, here is some ideas:


*** The Bronx Zoo is great in the summer. Go early, it is an all day affair...

*** Brooklyn Botanical Garden is another good attraction.. It is definitely better than the one in the Bronx and the Brooklyn Museum and Prospect Park are right next to it...

*** You should also catch the Atmosphere of Coney Island before it disappears...

*** Take pictures from Brooklyn Promonade...

*** Eat Cheese Cake at Juniors and Pizza at Grimaldi's in Brooklyn...

Bronxbombers
November 28th, 2008, 11:59 PM
I agree with outer boroughs suggestion, here is some ideas:


*** The Bronx Zoo is great in the summer. Go early, it is an all day affair...

*** Brooklyn Botanical Garden is another good attraction.. It is definitely better than the one in the Bronx and the Brooklyn Museum and Prospect Park are right next to it...

*** You should also catch the Atmosphere of Coney Island before it disappears...

*** Take pictures from Brooklyn Promonade...

*** Eat Cheese Cake at Juniors and Pizza at Grimaldi's in Brooklyn...1. To take of New York Yankee Stadium. When the Yankees are on the road? 2.To take of Madison Square Garden. When no sporitng events,no concerts and nothing else scheduled at the time? 3. To see The Bronx Zoo. 4. To the Central Park Zoo 5.The Botanical Garden in The Bornx 6. Coney Island 7. City Hall 8. Governor Island 9. To see the Brooklyn Bridge 10. To take a tour of Citi Field. When the Mets are on the road?

MarilynfromtheHeights
February 25th, 2009, 08:57 AM
I went on this tour in November and enjoyed it a lot. Saw that it is being repeated on April 26th. A great thing to do in NYC.

http://www.alexandramosca.com/db3/00248/alexandramosca.com/_uimages/GWHF-Mosca042608FlyerCLR.jpg

brianac
March 31st, 2009, 11:11 AM
March 31, 2009, 7:30 am

I’ve Never Done That in New York

By Peter Khoury (http://wirednewyork.com/author/peter-khoury/)

http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2009/03/31/nyregion/31stay1.190.jpgThe New York Times

I am sitting at the very top of the Bernard B. Jacobs Theater in Midtown Manhattan — last row of the mezzanine, near the center. Barbara Walters, Martha Stewart, Jane Fonda and Hugh Jackman have apparently secured spots closer to the stage.

But I’m not complaining here in Seat K 111. I called Telecharge.com (http://www.telecharge.com/) just a few hours ago to purchase a seat for the opening night of “God of Carnage,’’ the Yasmina Reza play starring James Gandolfini that I happened to be reading about. (http://theater2.nytimes.com/2009/03/23/theater/reviews/23carn.html?scp=1&sq=God%20of%20Carnage&st=cse)

It sounded interesting, and the event fits with how I want to spend my “staycation (http://www.nytimes.com/2008/08/29/nyregion/29stay.html?scp=1&sq=staycation&st=cse)“: Doing things that people always think about doing in New York but never get around to doing. I had my own ideas, and fellow editors at The Times were more than helpful, bombarding me within minutes with more suggestions than I could possibly do in a week.

Broadway Opening

I’ve been to dozens of Broadway shows. Back when I edited The Metro Section (http://www.nytimes.com/2008/09/06/business/media/06times.html)’s late gossip column, Boldface Names (http://query.nytimes.com/search/sitesearch?query=boldface+names+wadler&submit.x=0&submit.y=0&submit=sub), I even hit a few after-parties. But it occurred to me as I perused the Arts & Leisure section (http://www.nytimes.com/2009/03/22/theater/22sont.html) that I’d never been to a Broadway opening. So I secured one of the last seats, and here I am, on Sunday, March 22, the first day of the first full week of spring, ensconced next to a nice couple from Short Hills, N.J., waiting for the curtain to rise.

Really, though, the experience began roughly 45 minutes earlier, when I arrived to pick up my $81.50 ticket. Photographers lined the sidewalk along West 45th Street, just to the left of the entrance, capturing the celebrities as they arrived. Ushers patiently made sure that we ticket holders didn’t get in the way as we waited to be admitted.

Once inside, I did what many mezzanine-bound audience members did. I stood by the stairs and pretended to be waiting for someone. The familiar faces? Elaine Stritch, John Lithgow, Alan Alda and… my boss! (http://www.nytimes.com/2008/07/21/business/media/21askthetimes.html?scp=4&sq=%22metro%20section%22&st=cse)

Hey, you take a staycation (http://travel.nytimes.com/2008/08/03/nyregion/nyregionspecial2/03Rstaycation.html?scp=2&sq=staycation&st=cse), you’re going to run into people you know.

(Actually, I get along fairly well with the boss, and after the show we retreated to a nearby bar.)

The play (http://www.godofcarnage.com/) is smart, and I enjoy it.

The difference between opening night and any other? There’s a better chance you’ll see a celebrity, the ushers seem a little more strict, some audience members are better dressed than usual (and some overdressed), and there’s more excitement in the air.

Mill Basin Kosher Deli, Restaurant and Art Gallery

http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2009/03/31/nyregion/31stay2.190.jpg
The author snapped this photo of his pastrami sandwich in Mill Basin, Brooklyn. (Photos by Peter Khoury/The New York Times)

An old cigarette ad (http://cityroom.blogs.nytimes.com/2009/03/30/stop-smoking-for-childrens-sake-city-urges/) once featured smokers who swore they’d walk a mile for a Camel. How about a 75-minute trip by subway and bus for hot pastrami on rye?

That’s how long it takes to get from my home on the Upper West Side to the Mill Basin Kosher Deli, Restaurant and Art Gallery (http://www.mssk6.bizland.com/) in Southeast Brooklyn, suggested by a colleague who once worked in a deli.

I begin to have my doubts just after 1 p.m. Monday after getting off the B train at the Kings Highway Station. The sunshine is brilliant, but it is cold and windy as I wait for the B100. (The red wine I had the night before is not helping matters.)

I arrive at the deli, along Avenue T, about 1:30 p.m., and refuse to be distracted by the lengthy menu.

My colleague had suggested the pastrami, and the delivery truck outside declares the deli’s product the “best pastrami in Brooklyn.’’

“I’m told I have to get the pastrami on rye,’’ I say to the waitress, opting for the $11.95 sandwich.

“The best,’’ she replies.

That said, my only other major decision is whether to get the unlimited cole slaw or unlimited macaroni that come with the meal. (Pickles are also included.)

The sandwich is tall, the meat thinly sliced, tasty and not too salty. (Good thing I have only one helping of slaw.) Mill Basin may be a changing area (http://www.nytimes.com/1991/03/17/realestate/if-you-re-thinking-of-living-in-mill-basin.html?), but this place has a timeless feel to it. Young and old customers, families.

Artwork adorns the walls, and “On the Town” plays on a screen at the front of the deli.

Dessert? No room, but I can’t resist some rugelach to go. (Delicious.)

Sure, there are fine delis much closer to home (http://cityroom.blogs.nytimes.com/2007/08/01/something-to-nosh-on-heres-the-skinny-on-jewish-delis/). And I don’t know anyone with time for a two-and-a-half-hour round-trip lunch commute. If I lived in this area, though, they might get to know me here.

Les Paul

http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2009/03/31/nyregion/31stay3.190.jpg
The original guitar hero, still playing two shows on Mondays.

“Birds do it. Bees do it. Even 93-year-old guitar players do it.’’

More than a half-century after the electric guitar pioneer Les Paul (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/reference/timestopics/people/p/les_paul/index.html?scp=2&sq=%22les%20paul%22&st=cse) had his biggest hits with Mary Ford, the jazzman (http://video.nytimes.com/video/2006/02/06/arts/1194817114388/les-paul.html?scp=1&sq=%22les%20paul%22&st=cse) is still doing it — playing guitar at the Iridium (http://iridiumjazzclub.com/), two shows on Monday nights.

Having taken a post-pastrami nap and later dined with relatives who are in town, I’m sitting at a back table in this intimate basement venue on Broadway at 51st Street. A woman in front of me sways gently as “the Wizard of Waukesha’’ and his trio take us “Over the Rainbow.’’ His right foot often tapping to the beat, Mr. Paul makes his way through many favorite standards tonight — from “The Lady is a Tramp’’ and “Blue Skies’’ to a jazzed-up “Tennessee Waltz.’’

To a non-musician like me, his playing seems strong, controlled. In his day, I imagine, he must have been amazing.

There is an easy banter among Les Paul and his trio, from his harmlessly risqué jokes (“I’ll let you play with my pacemaker,’’ he tells his comely bass player) to mentions of Louis Armstrong, Art Tatum and Jackson Heights, Queens, where Mr. Paul and Ms. Ford recorded some of their songs in a basement.

The tab, including cover and minimum purchase, is $75 before tax and tip.

By the time Mr. Paul plays “Sweet Georgia Brown’’ and prepares to sign autographs, there’s no doubt that he’s managed to take a hint from one number the group played: “Young at Heart.’’

Panorama of the City of New York

http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2009/03/31/nyregion/31stay4.190.jpg
The author’s Upper West Side neighborhood, at the panorama in Queens.

It’s Friday, March 27, and I’m bent over and leaning against the railing that surrounds the mammoth panorama created for the 1964 World’s Fair. I’m trying to locate the tiny model of the brownstone-and-brick building on the Upper West Side that houses my small co-op, and I’m having a little trouble.

To tell you the truth, my heart really isn’t in this today.

The panorama, whose last major update was in the early 1990s, includes replicas of 895,000 structures and takes up 9,335 square feet in this building at the Queens Museum of Art (http://www.queensmuseum.org/panorama/about.htm) — one used by the General Assembly during the United Nations’ early days. As a recorded presentation informs us, the panorama shows “a complex web of waterways, buildings and highways.’’ But it wisely also notes that there are things we cannot see, like the “individual lives that unfold here each day.’’

For the past three days, I have not been up to experiencing anything new in the City of New York. The death of a dear great aunt (nearly as old as Les Paul, and also remarkable) has preoccupied me. On Thursday night, I attended a friend’s retirement party (in Mill Basin, coincidentally). A pay cut announced at The Times that same day also stifled my sense of adventure, though I realize I am fortunate to still be working and living in this city. (The suggested $5 donation for admission to the museum fits my current economic outlook. And I opt against plopping down $50 to “buy’’ the model of my apartment under the museum’s new Adopt-a-Building Program (http://www.nytimes.com/2009/03/17/nyregion/17museum.html).)

Still, as the panorama goes dark and a spotlight highlights myriad marvels — from the Statue of Liberty up to Co-op City — it’s hard not to be amazed at all that is here and what it represents.

Roosevelt Island Tramway

http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2009/03/31/nyregion/31stay5.190.jpg

A young boy stares out a window and babbles in apparent amazement.

“We’re coming in for a landing,’’ the man with him says as a tram car that has taken us from Roosevelt Island back to Manhattan nears the end of its four-minute trip. Next to me, several tourists converse in Russian; one takes pictures.

It is a gloomy, wet Sunday afternoon, and the conditions are far from ideal for enjoying what, on a clear day or night, is a spectacular skyline view. Still, two swipes of a MetroCard (one each way) afford a fine perspective as the tram car reaches about 250 feet into the air during its quick jaunt over the East River.

The skies are gray, the city’s tallest buildings shrouded in fog. This seems appropriate, somehow, as I reach the last day of my staycation. I’ve lived in New York City for more than a decade, yet much of it remains a mystery to me — or at least unexplored.

I did not make it to Woodside, Queens (http://www.nytimes.com/2008/03/16/realestate/16livi.html?scp=1&sq=woodside%20queens&st=cse), this week for that pint of Guinness, nor to the Lenox Lounge in Harlem (http://travel.nytimes.com/travel/guides/north-america/united-states/new-york/new-york-city/27196/lenox-lounge/nightlife-detail.html?scp=1&sq=lenox%20lounge&st=cse) to hear jazz or the Russian and Turkish Baths (http://travel.nytimes.com/travel/guides/north-america/united-states/new-york/new-york-city/27196/lenox-lounge/nightlife-detail.html?scp=1&sq=lenox%20lounge&st=cse) in the East Village for a shvitz. The Louis Armstrong House Museum (http://cityroom.blogs.nytimes.com/2007/11/06/making-more-room-in-queens-for-satchmo-fans/) and the Lemon Ice King (http://thelemonicekingofcorona.com/), both in Corona, Queens, will also have wait for my next staycation.

http://cityroom.blogs.nytimes.com/2009/03/31/what-i-did-on-my-staycation/

Copyright 2009 (http://www.nytimes.com/ref/membercenter/help/copyright.html) The New York Times Company (http://www.nytco.com/)

Bronxbombers
March 31st, 2009, 02:28 PM
1. Go to Yankees game
2. To take a tour of New Yankee Stadium
3. Go to Knicks game
4. Go to a Rangers game
5. To take a tour of Madison Square Garden
6. To see Central Park
7. To see Times Square
8. To see Radio City Music Hall
9. To see all of the zoos in New York City
10. To see the Empire State Building and the Statue of Liberty.

milleniumcab
March 31st, 2009, 09:40 PM
Let's not forget to take a cab now!....:D..... and it's gotta be YELLOW..

brianac
April 1st, 2009, 05:10 AM
Nice to hear from you MC.

Hope things are OK with you.

The Benniest
April 1st, 2009, 12:40 PM
Let's not forget to take a cab now!....:D..... and it's gotta be YELLOW..
One of my favorite things to do! :D

milleniumcab
April 1st, 2009, 09:52 PM
Thanks for kind comments guys.. Good to be back. I've been really busy lately and still am.:eek:. I'll pop in every now and then..:D

Gekko
May 28th, 2009, 09:06 AM
I went to NewYork last week to see a friend, it was my first time visit and I was truly amazed by the entire city. Especially Central Park, the grass was so green and so beautiful !Perfect place for a summer picnic!

rp23g7
June 11th, 2009, 10:04 PM
Go to 34th street and 12th Avenue. There's a parking lot, enter and head to your left and you'll find a way on the highline.

What is a Highline?

ZippyTheChimp
June 11th, 2009, 10:36 PM
High Line thread (http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?t=2868&page=23)

Edward
June 16th, 2009, 01:39 PM
Be a New Yorker for a day, go to a meetup http://wirednewyork.com/meetups/

meesalikeu
July 15th, 2009, 01:49 AM
this was a perfect summer weekend saturday day with our teen guest:


am -- bagel & coffee breakfast in the west village

top of the rock

times square

around 3pm -- subway to ps1 warmup

water taxi beach, then water taxi from lic to christopher st

malatesta restaurant for dinner

pm -- a quick subway ride up to see times square at night

Derek2k3
September 30th, 2009, 08:08 PM
You Love New York

In celebration of the Daily News' 90th birthday we asked 90 celebrities — and the Daily News' top writers — to name their favorite places in the city.

http://www.nydailynews.com/ny_local/city_guide/index.html


Notice that most of the favorite spots are located in the middle of the island rather than near the waterfront.

meesalikeu
December 6th, 2009, 09:00 PM
well if you blinked you missed it anyway, but here's one thing you won't be able to do in ny anymore:


December 5, 2009

Rock and Roll Annex Is Not Here to Stay

By LARRY ROHTER

http://www.nytimes.com/2009/12/05/arts/ ... 1&ref=arts (http://www.nytimes.com/2009/12/05/arts/music/05rock.html?_r=1&ref=arts)

Barely a year after it opened in SoHo, the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum Annex in New York City is closing. The parent hall of fame in Cleveland confirmed on Friday that its affiliate, a $9 million investment envisioned as part of a broader national expansion, would shut its doors on Jan. 3.

No explanation for the closing was offered in the brief news release issued on Thursday by S2BN Entertainment, one of the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame’s partners in the venture, or by a spokeswoman for the Cleveland museum. But the 25,000-square-foot annex opened last November, just as the economic crisis was gaining force, and took a three-year lease in a relatively inconspicuous basement space below an Old Navy store at 76 Mercer Street.

“There’s no doubt the economy factored into our leaving,” Caren Bell, a spokeswoman for S2BN Entertainment, said on Friday afternoon. “But over all, we had a good year. We’re moving on to the next phase and exploring opportunities to tour the exhibition.”

When asked if the annex was profitable, she repeated, “We had a good year.”

The museum took on three partners in the annex, and under the terms of the governing agreement, those partners were to finance and operate the project, with the Cleveland hall of fame retaining oversight of all aspects of the operation. S2BN Entertainment is led by Michael Cohl, who recently became the lead producer of a future production of “Spider-Man” on Broadway and who is a former chairman of the Live Nation concert promotion and management group. The other participants are Jam Exhibition and Running Subway, which have produced museum exhibitions and musical theater and multimedia concert programs.

Margaret Thresher, a spokeswoman for the Hall of Fame in Cleveland, said that its partners had decided to “explore similar opportunities to tour this concept or place it in other cities.”

In contrast to the Hall of Fame in Cleveland, which offers a general history of rock ’n’ roll, the annex has a focus on New York’s role in the development of rock and pop culture. A 1957 Chevy of Bruce Springsteen’s, teenage correspondence between Paul Simon and Art Garfunkel, one of Bob Dylan’s harmonicas, memorabilia from the punk mecca CBGB, and the oversize suit David Byrne wore in the Talking Heads film “Stop Making Sense” are among the items on display.

The annex also has a special presentation called “John Lennon: The New York Years,” and it opened with a show devoted to the Clash.

Initial projections talked of the annex’s drawing in around half a million visitors a year, but Ms. Bell declined to provide figures on actual attendance or revenues. “We are not giving out numbers,” she said.

General admission to the annex is $26.50, compared with $22 at the main museum in Cleveland, which also offers more generous discounts for children and those over 65 than the annex does. Visitors typically spend four or five hours looking at the Cleveland exhibits, whereas an estimate of the time required for a full viewing at the annex, even with its high-technology features and club ambience as lures, is less than two hours.

“In New York you have to prove yourself, whether you’re a sports team or a museum,” Joel Peresman, president of the Hall of Fame Foundation, told The New York Times last November, just before the annex opened. “We have an important story to tell. And you have to have something interesting and compelling. Otherwise, New Yorkers are going to blow it off.”

NYGenius1
April 1st, 2010, 10:14 PM
If you need ideas on what to do in NYC, check out this list of 101 attractions there.

http://101reasonsto.com/2010/04/101-reasons-to-visit-new-york-city/

paul_houle
April 5th, 2010, 05:01 PM
http://images.ny-pictures.com/photo2/m/25382_m.jpg (http://ny-pictures.com/nyc/photo/picture/25382/carnegie_deli_enjoy_sandwich)

... more photos of Carnegie Deli (http://ny-pictures.com/nyc/photo/topic/2009/Carnegie_Deli)

JanetJay
July 1st, 2010, 08:38 PM
Eating pizza from any of the west side dehlis on Broadway at Time Square. I've eaten pizza all over Manhattan and the red sauce and mozzarella are by far the best here.

JanetJay
July 1st, 2010, 08:40 PM
Definately the thrift stores on the Upper East Side between 3rd and 5th Avenue - 74th-85th street. A very interesting sub culture of new york city. Even if you don't want to shop, walking and watching (my favorite new york pass time) is great.

Also the Monastary at the top of Manhattan. Fantastic view of New York.

Viktor Schwartz
July 8th, 2010, 01:21 PM
You must visit site for great director Polanski false rumor which is Elaine's restaurant.

Later Mr Polanski, long long time friend, recovered revenge from Vanity Fair magazine for such a wicked story.

May you soar with alpine eagles friends.

manage1
August 14th, 2010, 02:23 PM
Let's see:
1. Times Square
2. Staten Island Ferry
3. Buy NY Cheescake
4. Shop on the streets
5. Amateur Night at the Apollo
6. Statute of Liberty
7. Central Park
8. Monday movies in Bryant Park or Movie in Hudson River Park

Well just a few reasons why I keep visiting..:))

fiona1990
August 19th, 2010, 02:46 PM
I was in NYC in July and as much as I absolutely loved the buzz of the city the only thing missing from the holiday as a whole was a beach and we rode the subway out to coney island for the aquarium and we found the beach and it was so beautiful, we took the sub out a few days later bought bikinis and towels on the pier and had a lovely day out there. It breaks away from the city and gives you different aspects of a holiday.
Really deserves a visit....and only 40mins away from midtown.

JSsocal
August 29th, 2010, 12:41 PM
Well I guess you didn't go to Katz's then...

Merry
February 23rd, 2011, 06:15 AM
OMG :eek:.


Carnegie Deli Introduces $21.95 Carmelo Anthony Sandwich

Carnegie Deli introduced a new sandwich in honor of Carmelo Anthony joining the New York Knicks.

By Jennifer Glickel

http://s3.amazonaws.com/sfb111/story_xlimage_2011_02_R6731_Carnegie_Deli_Introduc es_Carmelo_Anthony_Sandwich_.jpg

MIDTOWN WEST — The famed Carnegie Deli didn't waste a minute creating a new sandwich in honor of the newest addition to the New York Knicks, Carmelo Anthony.

The eponymous sandwich, which Carnegie Deli owner Sandy Levine started selling on Tuesday afternoon, is composed of corned beef, pastrami, salami, bacon, lettuce, tomato and Russian dressing packed between two slices of Rye bread.

"The inspiration for the sandwich was that we may have a championship team in New York," said Levine.

Each of the ingredients has a specific meaning relating to the long-awaited deal the Knicks struck with the Denver Nuggets to acquire Anthony.

"I put bacon in the sandwich because we want Carmelo to bring home the bacon to New York," Levine said.

"And we put salami on it because it's a spicy meat and we just want him to bring some spice to the Knicks, bring some spice to New York, and bring some spice to the fans."

Levine noted that the Russian dressing was a key ingredient, as it's the condiment that delivers the best representational jab at Mikhail Prokhorov, the New Jersey Nets owner who was trying to make a play for Anthony as well.

Even the cost of the sandwich is significant, Levine said of its $21.95 price tag.
"If you multiply $21.95 by three, which is the number of years in Carmelo's contract, you get about $65, which is the price, in millions, that the Knicks are paying to bring him to New York," Levine told DNAinfo.

Levine said that since the monstrous sandwich was added to the menu at approximately 3 p.m., the deli had sold five or six of them by the evening, but all to tourists.

"When New Yorkers find out about it and the news spreads, they'll be here ordering the sandwich because they will be curious to see it," Levine said.

Locals dining at Carnegie on Tuesday night were in agreement with Levine.

"We should have ordered that!" Upper West Side resident Marlowe Rinsler, 28, said of the nearly foot-tall sandwich. "I would definitely come back and try it. How could you not?"

"I know they have pickle-eating contests here, but I think they should have a Carmelo Anthony sandwich eating contest for it, too, because it's not just eating, it's entertainment," Rinsler added.

http://www.dnainfo.com/20110222/midtown/carnegie-deli-introduces-2195-carmelo-anthony-sandwich#ixzz1Em94FpO8

Ninjahedge
February 23rd, 2011, 01:54 PM
Holy....crap.

Derek2k3
February 27th, 2011, 10:55 AM
This can be a guide for tourists (visit red areas) and for locals (avoid buying anything in red areas).

http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4050/4671594023_b41c2ee662_b.jpg
Eric Fischer's (http://www.flickr.com/photos/walkingsf/4671594023/sizes/l/in/photostream/)

Locals and Tourists #2 (GTWA #1): New York
Blue pictures are by locals. Red pictures are by tourists. Yellow pictures might be by either.
Base map © OpenStreetMap, CC-BY-SA

Full Size: http://www.flickr.com/photos/walkingsf/4671594023/sizes/l/in/photostream/

milleniumcab
February 27th, 2011, 11:15 AM
^^ cool data...:)

Ninjahedge
February 28th, 2011, 09:13 AM
How do you get that many photos in the tunnel?

It has never been that scenic to me! (Looks like many more at the LT than the GWB!!)

milleniumcab
March 1st, 2011, 01:51 AM
How do you get that many photos in the tunnel?

It has never been that scenic to me! Tourists? Quite a few of my passengers are mesmerized by Tunnels. I think it is safe to assume everybody have seen a bridge or two but not everybody have seen a tunnel..

milleniumcab
March 1st, 2011, 01:56 AM
Definitely more tourists visit Yankee Stadium than Shea....OOOPS, City Field...:rolleyes:

Derek2k3
March 1st, 2011, 09:25 AM
If you visit the photostream link, you can see maps for other cities such as London and Paris in the same scale. I would've thought the swaths of red in NY would be more centralized compared to other cities since tourists hardly visit the outer bouroghs. But most other cities follow a similar compact pattern.

Ninjahedge
March 3rd, 2011, 08:44 AM
I know what you are saying MC, but no matter how foreign elephant dung is, not many people want to take a photo of it......

milleniumcab
March 3rd, 2011, 10:31 AM
not many but apparently enough to paint it red in this map.:)

Ninjahedge
March 3rd, 2011, 02:05 PM
That is why I am surprised.

Why would so many take a picture of the inside of the tunnel, AND THEN POST IT?

I can understand the entrance, it is rather interesting, but otherwise all the bridges are much more scenic......


Maybe this is an artificial exaggeration of the concentration due to the limited area that is available in the tunnel.....

milleniumcab
March 3rd, 2011, 11:46 PM
Also, I think the uniformity of lights inside a curving tunnel could make an interesting picture from a moving car..

Ninjahedge
March 4th, 2011, 09:02 AM
Not really.... ;)

(Trust me, very few shots from inside a moving car, in a dark tunnel, ever turn out to be something worth sharing....)

milleniumcab
March 4th, 2011, 10:14 AM
I've never taking one so I trust you..

Ninjahedge
March 4th, 2011, 12:36 PM
Well, trying to take one inside something that is moving is difficult to begin with. Then the low light, the windows, etc....


I think this number just came from all the adolescents on school trips taking pics and posting them for their friends! ;)

milleniumcab
March 5th, 2011, 01:18 AM
If you look closely. most of the red spots are at the entrance of the Tunnel in Queens...now that makes sense..

Ninjahedge
March 8th, 2011, 01:21 PM
Hmmmmm, Yankee Stadium......

citifari
July 9th, 2011, 12:47 PM
Outdoors Photo Workshop / Tour: citifari (http://www.citifari.com)

Cathee Lee
December 11th, 2012, 05:03 PM
I recommend cheaper off-broadway NYC shows like the Comedy Cellar or Monday Night Magic www.mondaynightmagic.com. Only because most people like comedy and magic and some of the best performers are right here at these small venues. The park and zoo and museums can be such a bore. :rolleyes:

Ninjahedge
December 12th, 2012, 10:33 AM
CL, I may agree with you about the Cellar, but posting links on your first post to a commercial site kinda smells of phishing....


Also, responding like you have been here for years and are just joining the conversation with friends (no intro, no "Hi, I just came on, etc etc").... Leaves a bit of a question in intent floating in the air.

Hope this was an innocent faux pas, but please be careful!

chickpea
December 19th, 2012, 06:04 AM
Hello everybody. My wife and I will be back in NYC in april. This year we are planning to go on one of the helicopter trips over Mannhattan. Can anybody recommend one of the several companies and their tours? Which ones are really worth the money?? Thanks for your help!