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View Full Version : The Epic - 125 West 31st Street - Rental - by FX Fowle / SLCE



Derek2k3
June 5th, 2003, 03:05 PM
Since the thread was deleted...

West 31st Street Residential Tower
btw 31st & 32nd and Seventh Avenue and Broadway
~50 stories
Fox & Fowle/SLCE Architects
Proposed 2003-2005


The buildings have or are still being demolished. You can't see it from the ESB cam because some metal bar is blocking the view...how lucky

http://live7.truelook.com/timages/live7/strends/SouthView/imgbuf/buf_9242/1054645200319683.jpg
The green steepled church is what the development is taking the air rights from.

NY Post...

FRIARS BUILDING ROOMS WITH A DOWNTOWN VIEW

By LOIS WEISS

October 2, 2002 -- THE Franciscan order to which the late Father Mychal Judge belonged is getting a new stairway to heaven in the shape of an environmentally friendly residential tower.

The Franciscan Friars who founded and staff the St. Francis of Assisi parish have anointed the team of Sidney Fetner & Associates and the Durst Organization to develop an approximately 50-story project on their land, located mid-block between 31st and 32nd Streets and Seventh Avenue and Broadway.

While the petite Italianate-style church and an adjacent school building will continue to grace the block, most of the nondescript outbuildings will be torn down. The permitted zoning will give the soaring project glorious, mostly unobstructed views of Lower Manhattan.

Hal Fetner, president of the firm founded by his late grandfather, said a slender tower is being designed jointly by local architects Fox & Fowle and Schuman Lichtenstein Claman Efron.

The developers and architects envision several setbacks leading to a noteworthy crown. "But [the top] won't be lighted as that would waste energy," said Fetner, who is being presented with the Annual Real Estate Tree of Life Award by the Jewish National Fund on Thursday night at the Pierre Hotel.

The SLCE architects are also working with the friars to design their interior spaces, including a new 31st Street entrance, and the entire second- and third-floor living quarters and communal spaces.

"The existing friary will be converted to offices and the splendor of the church will not be altered," said James Davidson, the SLCE partner in charge of the project. "The apartments are being designed to take advantage of maximum glass areas for views, and building amenities will be consistent with other upscale residential rentals."

Twenty percent of the roughly 500 apartments in the project will have affordable rents.

Bob Fox, a partner with Fox & Fowle, said the design of the building's lower portions would be kept in scale with the streetscape through the use of materials, textures and "façade modulation" to reflect the interior uses.

"At the same time, there has to be a dignified and separate entry to the building for the residential tenants," Fox said.

Fox praised Fetner for his commitment to installing environmentally sensitive - but more expensive - design elements in the middle of Manhattan. Fox & Fowle created the city's first "green" office tower at 4 Times Square for the Dursts. Experts say the higher up-front cost of green design pays back in lower costs for long-term owners and better health and productivity for occupants.

"The environment has been very important to us," agreed Father John O'Connor, director of real estate for the Holy Name Provence, which staffs the ministry of St. Francis of Assisi for the archdiocese. "For us, this is an investment in the city of New York and the ongoing ministry we have in the city."

The Friars chose the Fetner/Durst team as partners in the project in part because of their long-term ownership vision, and their commitment to affordable units and green design. No financial data is being made public.




Wednesday, October 02, 2002

http://www.cityfeet.com/news/default.asp?lCityID=1

FETNER DURST DEVELOP
Sidney Fetner & Associates and the Durst Organization have been chosen to be the joint venture partners of the St. Francis of Assisi Parish to construct a new, 50-story, 500-unit green residential tower of 500,000 sf in the middle of the block bounded by 31st and 32nd Streets, Seventh Avenue and Broadway. Schuman Lichtenstein Claman Efron and Fox & Fowle will be the co-architects. While the church itself and its school to the west will remain, most of its other low rise buildings will be demolished. The friars and other ministry functions will move to new locations while the development is underway and will return to their own space in the new tower upon completion, likely in 2005. The as-of-right development is using air rights from church property. The church, which was the home of the late-Father Mycal Judge, sits across from Engine 1 Ladder 24. The church chose Hal Fetner and Douglas Durst to oversee the project because of their commitment to affordable housing, environmentally focused development and long-term family ownership focus. Vornado was among the losing bidders.


There is also a huge site a block away that is preparing for construction.
http://live7.truelook.com/timages/live7/strends/SouthView/imgbuf/buf_9241/1054645200317568.jpg

(Edited by Derek2k3 at 2:06 pm on June 5, 2003)

ASchwarz
June 5th, 2003, 11:23 PM
Derek, thanks for restoring this thread.

Where exactly is this second large development site?

Derek2k3
June 5th, 2003, 11:37 PM
those pictures expired fast..
The site is between fifth and broadway and 31st and 30th.
http://images3.fotki.com/v26/free/7498/3/39399/245775/31st30thStreet2-or.jpg

DominicanoNYC
June 6th, 2003, 06:31 PM
Hmm... Any renderings?

Derek2k3
July 15th, 2003, 11:32 AM
I found out a 50 foot Con-Ed substation is being built on that huge site.
http://www.coned.com/publicissues/images/30/slide9.gif
slightly shorter than what i expected..

Derek2k3
July 28th, 2003, 02:47 PM
Renderer Sean Daly has updated his portfolio in NYSR and *has renderings of 2 new projects. One is a decent 30 story residential tower in Chelsea and the other is a very nice 6 story building in Tribeca I think.
\http://nysr.com/nysr/catalog.cfm?dest=itempg&secid=61&linkon=subsection &linkid=131&itemid=1922

Also here is some unknown tower rendered by Paul Maguire.
\http://nysr.com/nysr/supportdata/maguire1.html

(Edited by Derek2k3 at 2:02 pm on July 28, 2003)

Gulcrapek
July 28th, 2003, 03:32 PM
The Maguire one looks like a KPF proposal from the 80s I saw for that area.

BTW, the Con Ed substation is being built on a part of the site. From ESBcam, it's obvious that there are two sections.

NoyokA
June 21st, 2004, 08:40 PM
Project Image & Description:

http://www.usgbc.org/Images/Project/project2603.jpg

Project Description: The 21,979 s.f. project site is a thru block, running from 31st Street to 32nd Street located midblock between 6th Avenue and 7th Avenue. West of the site is a lot containing the existing Church of Saint Francis of Assisi with the churches' existing 4 story rectory abutting the project site. Purchase of air rights from the Archdiocese, plus allotment of a portion of the projects’ program requirements to new facilities for Saint Francis of Assisi, contributes to the 574,000 gross s.f. building. This includes a 5 story base continuous from 31st Street to 32nd Street with a tower set back approximately 85 feet from 31st Street and 48 feet from 32nd Street. The orientation and setbacks satisfy code and zoning requirements and maximize views, light and air. In addition to the new 41,465 gross s.f. facility for Saint Francis of Assisi, the building will provide 77,700 gross s.f. for The American Cancer Society, a 426,440 gross s.f. rental apartment tower, a 4,985 gross s.f. commercial establishment and a 23,512 gross s.f. parking garage. Saint Francis of Assisi will occupy all of the 5 story base, except for a 35 foot wide strip containing the 2 story high residential lobby at the eastern most portion, of the 31st Street side of the St. Francis of Assisi building. The facility for Saint Francis of Assisi provides a separate entry, off 31st Street to a large ground level multipurpose meeting hall for church or community use. Another 31st Street entrance is the access to the Provincialate offices on the second floor. The 4th and 5th floor are sleeping/living quarters for the friars with their dining recreation/library and chapel spaces on the 3rd floor. The 3rd floor roof of the adjacent residential lobby provides a roof garden for the adjacent dining and recreation space and the roof of the 5th floor is the roof garden accessible to the Residential Amenities on the 6th Floor. The American Cancer Society occupies the buildings’ 5-story base off of 32nd Street and floors 7 through 11 of the tower. Offices for the new Headquarters of The American Cancer Society will be on floors 2, 3 and 4 of the 32nd Street side of the base. Residential spaces for adult cancer patients and their caregivers who travel to New York City for the patients' treatment will be on floors 7 through 11. Each of the 5 floors has 12 sleeping units, a communal kitchen and dining area, laundry facilities and a lounge. Each of the sleeping units has a sitting area, sleeping area and a private bathroom. The 5th floor of the base has accessory spaces for the 7th through 11th floor residential spaces including lounge, library, game room and chapel. The ground level, off of 32nd Street, has three functions. The American Cancer Society occupies the western most portion. A ramp leading to the cellar and sub cellar parking garage and the residential service elevator access is at the eastern most portion. A Retail space is in the middle. There are two roof garden setbacks at the 32nd Street base. One occurs at the 5th floor, off of the Lounge for the cancer patients and the other is at the 6th floor off of the Residential Amenities. The residential rental apartments are on floors 13 through 57 of the tower. They consist of 451 apartments consisting of 0, 1 and 2 bedroom units. In addition to the Residential Amenities on the 6th floor, with garden terraces on both the 6th floor roof off of 32nd Street and the 5th floor roof off of 31st Street, Residential Amenities also exist on the 58th Floor with a small terrace. The Amenities on the 6th floor contain a Health Center. The Residential Amenities on the 58th Floor include game room, lounge, conference room and rental office. The residential apartments have access to a bike room in the sub cellar.

Source information and contacts:

https://www.usgbc.org/LEED/Project/project_detail_step_1.asp?PROJECT_ID=2603

Gulcrapek
June 21st, 2004, 08:54 PM
That's a nice surprise... the design is mediocre in my opinion but the height is great.

Gulcrapek
June 21st, 2004, 09:13 PM
I found this there:

https://www.usgbc.org/LEED/Project/project_detail_step_1.asp?PROJECT_ID=2681

NoyokA
June 21st, 2004, 09:37 PM
I found this there:

https://www.usgbc.org/LEED/Project/project_detail_step_1.asp?PROJECT_ID=2681

According to the site Millenium II will have 35 floors.

PHLguy
June 22nd, 2004, 12:56 AM
height?

krulltime
June 22nd, 2004, 01:28 AM
Neat! I like it. It kind of remind me of the millenium tower in the upper west side. :P

This one is going to look good in such a 'mediocre' area full of old stuff. Sometimes it needs new stuff to make it diverse and interesting IMO.

TLOZ Link5
June 22nd, 2004, 02:26 AM
height?

My guess is at least 650 feet.

billyblancoNYC
June 22nd, 2004, 03:25 AM
Whether the design is stellar or not, this will be a huge boost to the area. This block is one that really needs development. The 6th ave boom is about to spread to the sidestreets!

NewYorkYankee
June 23rd, 2004, 04:28 PM
Im sorry, I just skimmed through this tuff, Im in a huryy, but What area of NYC is this in? and is this just a proposal or about to start construction?

RandySavage
July 7th, 2004, 06:03 PM
It's in what I would call Clinton (maybe Chelsea)... not the best area but getting better. The height is 615ft at 58 stories according to Emporis. As of now it is still a proposal (i.e. construction is not about to begin).

djf17
July 8th, 2004, 11:06 AM
This building is not in Clinton or Chelsea.

The building is off Herald Square and the neighborhood is referred to as the garmet district or chelsea heights...

krulltime
December 21st, 2004, 03:07 PM
These are new renderings of the tower:


from Fox & Fowle Architects, P.C. :


West 31st Street Residential Tower
New York, New York
Client: Durst Organization / Sidney Fetner Associates
Completion: 2005


As the design architects for this 580,00 square foot tower, the firm is elegantly resolving varying programs and identities. Adjacent to the St. Francis of Assisi Friary, the mixed-use project includes an extension of offices, chapel, library, and housing for the friars at the base. The building includes a new headquarters for the American Cancer Society and the Hope Lodge treatment center and hospice. The four story facade on 32nd Street incorporates an expansive glass and shadow box curtain wall to give the Society its own strong identity. Above the base, the tower consists of 460 units of luxury housing.


http://www.pbase.com/image/37742014.jpghttp://www.pbase.com/image/37741899.jpghttp://www.pbase.com/image/37741474.jpg

BrooklynRider
December 21st, 2004, 04:33 PM
It's going to be mama ESB with all these baby buildings at her feet.

Kolbster
January 5th, 2005, 08:26 PM
lol

Is it really only 615 feet?

Derek2k3
January 6th, 2005, 10:24 AM
615' is the DOB's height of the building to the top floor. To the roof it's 642 feet.

NewYorkYankee
January 6th, 2005, 04:35 PM
This was approved??

pianoman11686
June 10th, 2005, 11:48 PM
Any updates on this project? I've seen its status as "under construction" at a couple different sites. Sorry for bumping, if that offends anyone, but it's been 6 months and I feel like we've all forgotten about this project.

BrooklynRider
June 11th, 2005, 12:32 AM
I was by a week or two ago. The hole is in the ground. It will start rising this summer.

Derek2k3
June 11th, 2005, 01:04 PM
Old pics from March

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/44638978.jpg

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/44638976.jpg

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/44638979.jpg

macreator
June 11th, 2005, 02:31 PM
Looks like it'll be a nice building once it goes up.

BrooklynRider
June 12th, 2005, 03:41 AM
Definitely some height in a low / mid-rise area.

pianoman11686
August 23rd, 2005, 07:51 PM
Walked by the site today, and didn't even know it at first. Then I looked over and saw machinery at work. Site preparation is underway. Pictures taken from 32nd street.

http://images.snapfish.com/3447%3A66723232%7Ffp58%3Dot%3E234%3A%3D937%3D37%3B %3DXROQDF%3E2323%3A598247%3B8ot1lsi

http://images.snapfish.com/3447%3A66723232%7Ffp63%3Dot%3E234%3A%3D937%3D37%3B %3DXROQDF%3E2323%3A59827235ot1lsi

NoyokA
August 24th, 2005, 12:08 PM
Thanks.

antinimby
November 12th, 2005, 09:45 PM
Sorry for the bump, but I'm just so anxious about this one, my favorite residential (at least as it appears on paper) to go up in recent memory.
Updates and photos, anyone?
http://www.pbase.com/image/37742014.jpghttp://www.pbase.com/image/37741899.jpg

lofter1
November 12th, 2005, 09:55 PM
I walked by the site last week -- if memory serves me well (questionable :cool: ) it's up to about floor 6.

kz1000ps
November 22nd, 2005, 04:55 PM
Either Lofter's memory is a bit faulty, or he was viewing activity on the 31st St side (presumably further along).

From 32nd St
http://img340.imageshack.us/img340/7189/dscf00020gq.jpg

Citytect
November 22nd, 2005, 05:30 PM
I hope that's not the buiding technique they're using for this tower.

lofter1
November 22nd, 2005, 06:21 PM
^ That's the building technique they use for almost every residential tower in NYC.


Either Lofter's memory is a bit faulty, or he was viewing activity on the 31st St side (presumably further along).
Correct I was walking along 31st Street and was really paying more attention to the church and how the new building is nestled up to it. The actual number of floors that I saw? No idea ... (brain like a sieve :confused: )

lofter1
November 22nd, 2005, 06:23 PM
^^^ Gotta love that old bridge across 32nd Street :cool:

antinimby
November 22nd, 2005, 09:02 PM
I hope that's not the buiding technique they're using for this tower.Is there another technique you had in mind? Please tell us.

Citytect
November 22nd, 2005, 10:18 PM
Technique was a bad choice of words. Where's the crain?

kz1000ps
November 22nd, 2005, 11:22 PM
I imagine the crane will be coming soon, but the part I photographed has risen to its full height of four floors. It might be that the crane was just out of sight from that angle, as the tower portion rises some 40-50 feet back from the 32nd street wall (even more from 31st), which brings up the fact that, at 60-70 feet in width, this will be one slender tower. Hopefully the finished product will do the renderings and elevations (see post #32) justice.

krulltime
December 29th, 2005, 11:33 AM
From the NYsun...


At the end of the year, about 90 households will get the opportunity to gain residence in the Sidney Fetner & Associates and Durst Organization mixed-use development on the block between West 31st and West 32nd streets and Sixth and Seventh avenues. The 60-story, 480 unit tower is adjacent to the Church of St. Francis of Assisi.

antinimby
December 29th, 2005, 09:43 PM
You know what I find puzzling? The Orion generated and is still generating a lot of excitement, particularly among our "fairweather" Orion forum friends.

But this building, which is essentially the same size, with a better design IMO and also in a better location (centrally located, more subway options, not to mention close proximity to Penn Station) and yet I don't sense as much interest. What gives? Is it the Church that's bothering people? The neigborhood? Cost? Marketing or lack thereof?

lofter1
December 29th, 2005, 11:50 PM
The Orion offers incredible views -- at least to the south and west. And it has a strong presence and can be seen from prominent locations (Times Square, West Side Hiway).

This one sits smack dab in the middle of an area that is building up all around. And the area will get even more tall buildings in the next ten years. So this one will be just another tree in the forest.

This "new" upper Chelsea area has very little feeling of a neighborhood -- just a bunch of non-descript apartments on top of Duane Reade, tanning salons, banks & Starbucks. Like a big strip mall. (Odd how 6th Ave. above 23rd St. had a much stronger sense of place when it was lined with parking lots and great flea markets.)

Drexel
December 29th, 2005, 11:53 PM
Is this going to be a rental or cond building?:confused:

BrooklynRider
December 30th, 2005, 12:20 PM
I think the building has just has taken excessively long, for whatever reason, to rise out of the ground. Orion did a great job hailing its own arrival, but I do not find its location any better than this one.

Forum members know what's coming. The other 99.999% of New Yorkers do not. Once the building starts popping its head up on the skyline, I think it will take off. The advantage the Orion has is that it is amongst the tallest buildings in its area - giving it a huge presence. This building, llike 325 Fifth and the other new tower on West 31st suffer from the massive size of the ESB being so close by. To live in its shadow, to me, would be awesome. But, ultimately, you are living in 50 or 60 story tower than looks puny by comparison.

Developers have to be seeing how insignificant even the most breathtaking buildings can be when juxtaposed with the ESB. The additon of a couple of 1000 footers would greatly alleviate the sense that these 600 foot buildings are lap dogs to the ESB.

PHLguy
December 31st, 2005, 04:16 PM
I think it's good for the empire state building to have neighbors finally, even if they are half the height, like this one. I absolutely Love the design of this building by the way! Where exactly will it be, does anyone have a rendering of it's proximity to the ESB?

antinimby
January 1st, 2006, 03:16 AM
Me too.
Fox & Fowle do good solid work.
I think it is a rental not condo.

Where is it you asked? Well, the ESB is at 5th & 34th, this one is bet. 6th & 7th on 32nd/31st St., so you do the math.

hey19932
February 5th, 2006, 10:04 PM
:) any updates?

stache
February 6th, 2006, 04:16 AM
It's up to about ten floors. The tower sits between the streets in the center area of the block.

NoyokA
February 7th, 2006, 08:13 PM
http://img99.imageshack.us/img99/3783/1251nl.jpg

http://img206.imageshack.us/img206/6278/12525vs.jpg

krulltime
February 7th, 2006, 08:49 PM
:) Alright Stern you took some on the North part, I too some of the South part... Here some pics I took on February 6, 2006:


http://i.pbase.com/o4/55/435155/1/55831885.IMG_7143.jpg

http://i.pbase.com/o4/55/435155/1/55831887.IMG_7144.jpg

NoyokA
February 7th, 2006, 09:10 PM
:) Alright Stern you took some on the North part, I too some of the South part... Here some pics I took on February 6, 2006:

Pic 1 is from the south, pic 2 from the north.

sfenn1117
February 7th, 2006, 11:09 PM
I see exposed floor plates. Hopefully it does not look as bad as 325 fifth

CARLOS
April 8th, 2006, 12:03 PM
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v109/nyctowers/2006/DSC01440.jpg



http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v109/nyctowers/2006/DSC01441.jpg

SilentPandaesq
April 18th, 2006, 09:17 PM
went by the site today after work.

lofter1
April 18th, 2006, 10:51 PM
Wonder what will come of that raw brick wall on the building next door to the east?

macreator
April 18th, 2006, 11:20 PM
I have a bad feeling about this building :(

The glass looks pretty crappy, the exposed floor plates are always a bad sign, and I'm worrying that that raw concrete wall is going to be left that way.

lofter1
April 19th, 2006, 10:31 AM
It might end up looking like that apartment tower with the Loews Cinema that went up on 34th just west of 8th Ave.

kurokevin
April 19th, 2006, 12:22 PM
It might end up looking like that apartment tower with the Loews Cinema that went up on 34th just west of 8th Ave.

Wow, you stole the words from right under me. Why do developers feel that the residents want to stare at an ugly side-wall? Sorta defeats the purpous of floor to ceiling glass windows. This building is very dissapointing in these regards. Is this a by product of FAR? And if so, how can something like this be over turned so as to prevent the city from becoming a series of jagged edges and ugly walls that were never intended on being seen?

New York streets have a wonderful street wall, why currently are new projects so intent on destroying that?

NoyokA
April 19th, 2006, 02:33 PM
Wow, you stole the words from right under me. Why do developers feel that the residents want to stare at an ugly side-wall? Sorta defeats the purpous of floor to ceiling glass windows. This building is very dissapointing in these regards. Is this a by product of FAR? And if so, how can something like this be over turned so as to prevent the city from becoming a series of jagged edges and ugly walls that were never intended on being seen?

New York streets have a wonderful street wall, why currently are new projects so intent on destroying that?


Ugly-side walls have nothing to do with FAR, FAR deals with build-outs.

Maybe your thinking of zoning, but even so I can't think of an instance where zoning would create an ugly-side wall.

The main culprit is economics and architects who place elevator shafts to the side of the building, usually because of economics.

finnman69
April 19th, 2006, 03:14 PM
Ugly-side walls have nothing to do with FAR, FAR deals with build-outs.

Maybe your thinking of zoning, but even so I can't think of an instance where zoning would create an ugly-side wall.

The main culprit is economics and architects who place elevator shafts to the side of the building, usually because of economics.

If you are talking about the formed concrete wall, it's a shear wall. It's structural. To stiffen tall concrete buildings like this you have to have continuous solid walls in certain places. The ends of buildings are naturals. sometimes it's done at the interior such as at Trump World Tower(see plan).
http://www.cantorseinuk.com/images/90_cs_detail_img3.gif

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v109/nyctowers/2006/DSC01441.jpg

lofter1
April 19th, 2006, 04:38 PM
I walked "around " this building site today -- looking at it from both 31st & 32nd Streets -- and a few things jumped out at me ...

1. The inter-relation between the lower portion on 31st and the church next door is not well done. First, it rises awkwardly higher than the church and while it steps-back just above the highest point of that side of the church it still creates a blank wall that the church will now butt up against. Second, it seems that they have positioned this low block in this way to make room for the loading dock (which is placed against that sheer wall to the east). This visually squashes the church and visually maximizes the sheer wall. (Most likely this had to do with ramps, etc. but it doesn't look good.) Third, on 31st the street edge of the new building juts out beyond the edge of the church by a number of inches. (Why not recess it back a few inches? This is what they have done on the 32nd street side -- although there it is awkward, as both the buildings to the east and the west now have itsy-bitsy exposed raw brick running up the side with this new building in between.) Just an overall lack of sensitivity to what now exists.

2. OK -- Notice the triangular bump outs on the upper floors of the north facade in the photo above? These just seem silly. What has been created is about a small 60-degree angled space barely big enough for a person to stand. The whole point seems to be to direct the eye towards the view of the Empire State Building to the NE, but one would have to scrunch way into the corner to get the best view. Why didn't they shape these bumpouts so that furthest point is 90-degree angle (then both windows would angle in to the building -- rather than have the eastern window cut sharply back to the main tower). Again -- odd design.

3. They have installed granite-like quoin-ish things at the corners of the base -- kind of corny.

4. I can only assume that the floor plates will have some sort of panel installed to cover them. If not --- oy!!!!!!

kz1000ps
April 20th, 2006, 01:23 PM
Compared to the rendering, this is turning out pretty darn bad, and too bad - they (renderings) made it look kinda nice. That glass looks oh-so-mediocre...hopefully it's just the overcast sky. (see page 2, post 19 for the rederings)

lofter1
April 20th, 2006, 04:01 PM
Unlike on the rendering where the brick appears to be off-white the actual brick is much more yellow.

Below is an enlargement of the rendering showing the awkward relationship between the church and the base on @. 31st ...

vc10
April 21st, 2006, 12:35 PM
I hate white/yellow brick.

2 Gold St is horrible, for instance, but it would be slightly less horrible in red brick.


Unlike on the rendering where the brick appears to be off-white the actual brick is much more yellow.

Below is an enlargement of the rendering showing the awkward relationship between the church and the base on @. 31st ...

krulltime
April 21st, 2006, 12:49 PM
I am sure this one can been seen from NJ already.

BrooklynRider
April 27th, 2006, 03:51 PM
Walking up Sixth Ave from 23rd Street it is a rather striking thing. Looks tremendous, obviously because of the low rise buildings around it.

CARLOS
May 31st, 2006, 10:19 PM
Today May 31, 2006

Jack and the beanstalk !!! ;)
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v109/nyctowers/2006/CIMG0019.jpg


http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v109/nyctowers/2006/CIMG0023.jpg


http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v109/nyctowers/2006/CIMG0022.jpg

hella good
June 1st, 2006, 09:17 AM
its rising really fast, but i have to say that im rather dissapointed by the facade.... this building could be really great... the facade lets it down

Peakrate212
June 1st, 2006, 07:36 PM
yet another dog - Doesnt it seem that New York promotes the worst in mediocre design?

Is it like that in other cities?

ablarc
June 1st, 2006, 08:06 PM
Is it like that in other cities?
'Fraid so.

kurokevin
June 1st, 2006, 08:17 PM
its rising really fast, but i have to say that im rather dissapointed by the facade.... this building could be really great... the facade lets it down

Yes...too too too busy (should of been more like The Orion, now that's a curtain wall!)...and what's with that blank party wall? UGH! at least they had the courtesy of connecting the street level on both sides. Still, this is totally the wrong direction for this part of town. Better than a cheap setback motel. Any shots from the other side other street, I seem to recall the building looking better from the other side...?

lofter1
June 2nd, 2006, 04:02 AM
It looks basically the same on the other side -- just that its almost always in shadow.

CARLOS
June 3rd, 2006, 07:27 AM
Yes...too too too busy (should of been more like The Orion, now that's a curtain wall!)...and what's with that blank party wall? UGH! at least they had the courtesy of connecting the street level on both sides. Still, this is totally the wrong direction for this part of town. Better than a cheap setback motel. Any shots from the other side other street, I seem to recall the building looking better from the other side...?

this is the other side!!!!! 31th street !!!

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v109/nyctowers/2006/CIMG0022.jpg

BrooklynRider
June 5th, 2006, 01:11 PM
It looks huge when you are within a block or two of it, but from Hudson River Park it does not register on the skyline.

lofter1
June 5th, 2006, 09:36 PM
From the Hudson River Park @ 30th St (where today they were planting the trees in the new section above Chelsea Piers that is near completion) you can see this poking out in front of the ESB.

CARLOS
June 15th, 2006, 10:36 PM
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v109/nyctowers/2006/CIMG0100.jpg

ManhattanKnight
June 30th, 2006, 02:44 PM
Topping out this week, apparently:

http://img163.imageshack.us/img163/3986/cyn0005a7bw.jpg

lofter1
June 30th, 2006, 02:47 PM
Peeking out beyond the Times Tower:

http://www.tvn-ny.com/e107_plugins/autogallery/Gallery/Gebouwen%20New%20York/IMG_3186.JPG

stache
June 30th, 2006, 03:54 PM
Looks like the Nelson Bldg has a new friend!

hey19932
June 30th, 2006, 04:24 PM
....or a new enemy

sfenn1117
June 30th, 2006, 08:21 PM
....or a new enemy

Well said. This tower is a disappointment considering the promising renderings.

ManhattanKnight
July 14th, 2006, 05:59 PM
Crane descending, crap ascending. July 14, 2006.

http://img172.imageshack.us/img172/9342/cyn00024ln.jpg

lofter1
July 14th, 2006, 10:57 PM
These arched tops (here as at the new building on 5th / 33rd) seem to have but one purpose: to hide the Water Tank.

Water Tanks are quintessential NYC. If a builder MUST hide the WT there have got to be better solutions than this (take a look along CPW).

BrooklynRider
July 15th, 2006, 02:15 AM
It makes a nice addition to the Midtown skyline from the Brooklyn Bridge.

finnman69
August 2nd, 2006, 11:27 AM
Peeking out beyond the Times Tower:

http://www.tvn-ny.com/e107_plugins/autogallery/Gallery/Gebouwen%20New%20York/IMG_3186.JPG


125 W 31st is looking pretty blah.

FX Fowle is over rated.

NoyokA
August 2nd, 2006, 12:54 PM
125 W 31st is looking pretty blah.

FX Fowle is over rated.

I don't agree. I think this building is just fine, that is to say it is presentable and plays a role on the cityscape. What more can you ask from architects on a very limited budget, any number of A-Listers would have walked away from such a small budget. The fault is with the developer who offered, not with the architect who accepted a penny pinching commission, because surely SLCE, Kondylis would have also.

The budget on this project was very small. How small? I revisit the quote on the first page of this thread....

"But [the top] won't be lighted as that would waste energy"

Thats a pretty small budget!

At such considerations we shouldn't expect a building with materials and treatments like the NYTIMES and Hearst. We should, and its unfortunate, be satisfied with a presentable building. For this reason I have more respect for 125 West 31st Street, than I do for the NYTIMES Building and the Orion which have the luxury of expensive materials and treatments, offered by a respectable budget, but a design that leaves a lot to be desired.

finnman69
August 2nd, 2006, 06:48 PM
I don't agree. I think this building is just fine, that is to say it is presentable and plays a role on the cityscape. What more can you ask from architects on a very limited budget, any number of A-Listers would have walked away from such a small budget.

Ultimately it's the creativity of the architect to maximize their budget and to educate the developer. I also seriously doubt the budget for this was all that different from any other recent residential super high-rise tower.

I just don't see any 'effort' out in the design. It was banged out down and dirty. And lighting at the top could have been had for a fraction of the percent of the budget.

also, you are not talking a huge difference in price for a unitized off the shelf Sota curtain wall like at the Orion and the stick built window wall they are installing here. That being said, I think the glass selection is deadly flat in relation to the framing members. You barely perceive the token gestures to break the form of the building. I see the same thing happening at FX Fowle's design for the Mosaic up in Hell's Kitchen but I still hope it will be better.

pianoman11686
August 13th, 2006, 06:55 PM
Feature Story - August 2006

Three-in-One

Novel Team Builds a Mixed-Use Tower with Multiple Personalities

Rental apartments, a lodge for cancer patients, retail spaces, a garage, and a friary will all be wrapped into a new 60-story tower that is set to open next year in Manhattan's Midtown West area between Greeley Square and Penn Station.

http://newyork.construction.com/images/2006/0608_Epic_West31st_feature.jpg
Photo by Diane Greer
Two New York-based developers and a religious order have combined to erect a new 60-story building that has three purposes and a unique profile in Manhattan's Midtown West section.

The Durst Organization and Sidney Fetner Associates partnered last year with the Franciscan Friars of Holy Name Province to build the environmentally friendly tower next to the Church of St. Francis of Assisi on W. 31st Street.

The effort takes advantage of a prime piece of real estate that the order controls in order to create a new home for the friars, a new local office for the American Cancer Society, and a tower of rental apartments.

Construction began on the Epic at 125 West 31st Street last summer. The base portion with the friary and cancer society space is slated to open in March, followed in May by the first rental apartments.

Over the past 80 years, the Franciscans have purchased properties on West 31st and 32nd streets midblock between Sixth and Seventh avenues with an eye toward developing the area, said Father John O'Connor, director of real estate for the order. There were five buildings on the site housing retail spaces and a restaurant, as well as a friar's residence that the order learned several years ago was in need of costly repairs.

Instead of pursuing the repairs, O'Connor said he commissioned a feasibility study four years ago. The study recommended issuing a request for proposals to develop the properties through a joint venture that would not only replace the friary but also generate a future income stream to support the order financially. That RFP resulted in about 10 proposals and eventually the selection of the Durst-Fetner team in a deal that closed in May 2005.

While the development team declined to provide a total project cost, the New York State Housing Finance Agency approved a financing plan in May 2005 that included $220 million worth of loans for the construction effort. That sum did not include additional funds that the order used to pay for building its own space.

The friars selected the Durst-Fetner team due to its strong development background and financing plan, O'Connor said. The Franciscans also liked the idea of a green rental building with an affordable housing component that made up the core of the Durst-Fetner proposal.

To clear the property for the 582,000-sq.-ft. structure, the Franciscans had the five buildings onsite demolished. The developers also bought air rights for the adjacent church and rectory, both of which are owned by the Archdiocese of New York, in order to boost the building's size by more than 30 percent, said Damon Pazzaglini, a senior vice president at Fetner.

The new building has three primary sections designed to incorporate the unique identities and needs of their occupants.

The Franciscans and the American Cancer Society each will own and occupy a section at the base. Durst-Fetner and the friars jointly own the third section, a 459-unit residential tower starting above the 12th floor. The building also has a 4,900-sq.-ft. ground-floor retail space and a 130-space, two-level, below-grade parking garage.

On the 31st Street side of the building, the Franciscans will occupy part of five floors at the base, except for a 35-ft.-wide strip containing the residential lobby. The 43,000-sq.-ft. friary has a separate entrance, auditorium, offices, and three floors of residences. The third-floor roof of the residential lobby provides a garden and recreation space for the friars.

A brick façade on the 31st Street side complements the 100-year-old church and rectory. The residential lobby is recessed from the street and faced in granite to differentiate it from the friary.

Though it is not part of the development team, the American Cancer Society will occupy 80,000 sq. ft., with its regional headquarters on parts of the second to sixth floors on the 32nd Street side, and its first Hope Lodge in New York on floors 7 to 12. The society has other such free, temporary lodges around the country for bone marrow transplant patients and out-of-town family members.

advertisement


An expansive glass and shadowbox curtain wall on the 32nd Street side of the base provides a distinct identity for the society, said Bruce Fowle, senior principal of New York-based FXFowle, the project's architect. The 32nd Street side includes a ramp leading to the 25,000-sq.-ft. garage.

Foundation work proved tricky early on because of an Amtrak tunnel abutting the property on 32nd Street. It was built in 1905 as an open cut in rock.

"Back then, they did not form the walls and then fill between the walls and the overcut," said David Good, project manager for Mueser Rutledge Consulting Engineers of New York, the geotechnical consultant on the effort. "They just poured hard against the overcut so there was upwards of 5 to 10 ft. of over-pour."

It ended up being difficult to distinguish the wall from the concrete over-pour. To play it safe, the crews moved piles supporting the structure about 5 ft. away from the wall, Good said. They screwed in piles to avoid vibration that might have damaged the tunnel and then cantilevered the foundation over the wall.

The tower façade features a window wall system with floor-to-ceiling glass. On the upper stories, the windows flare out, articulating the façade and expanding the views, Fowle said.

To accommodate long expanses of glass windows, the design calls for shear walls and 10-in.-thick slabs to reduce the need for perimeter columns, Fetner said.

Wind tunnel tests also were a factor in the design of the shear walls. Testing showed that wind, accelerating as it went around the Empire State Building two blocks to the east, would hit the new building and cause diagonal stress, Fetner added. The shear walls stiffened the structure to handle wind impact and counter the stress.

The residential portion will have studio, one-, and two-bedroom units. The project was able to receive low-cost financing and tax incentives under the state housing finance agency's 80-20 affordable housing program by setting aside 92 apartments for lower income tenants, said Hal Fetner, president of the Fetner firm.

Rental rates have not been set, Fetner added. The apartment tenants will have access to a health club, game room, lounge, and conference room.

Design requirements for the friars and cancer society also presented architectural and building challenges. While the society sought 11-ft. ceilings in its offices, the friars wanted 8-ft. ceilings in their residence, Fetner said. Consequently, floors they share in the base had to be staggered and took three months to build.

"Instead of building six floors, you were really building 12 floors," said Kevin Connolly, project executive for Gotham Construction of New York, the construction manager on the effort.

The project, which is seeking silver-level Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design status from U.S. Green Building Council, incorporates sustainable design elements such as stormwater collection for irrigation, green roofs, energy-efficient mechanical systems, and high-performance glazed windows.

The building will use 12.5 percent less energy and 20 percent less water than a conventional peer, said Pamela Lippe, president of New York's e4 inc, which was LEED consultant on the project.

Fetner said that the sustainable building elements added 7 to 10 percent to the cost of the building.

The development also served as a U.S. Environmental Protection Agency pilot project for a deconstruction program led by the Community Environmental Center, with the aid of NY Wa$teMatch, and the Industrial and Technology Assistance Corp., all of which are based in New York. The effort involved deconstructing the five buildings on the site by hand over six weeks in late 2004 in order to facilitate the reuse or recycling of as many materials as possible.

A report prepared for the EPA later that year stated that 36 tons of construction waste had been diverted from area landfills and reused or recycled through the project. The five masonry and wood buildings, which had all been built between 1920 and 1930, facilitated the salvage of resalable materials such as ceiling tiles, wooden floorboards, doors, ceramic tile, vents, paneling, plumbing equipment, shutters, and lighting fixtures.

© 2006 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

Derek2k3
November 24th, 2006, 11:44 AM
http://static.flickr.com/88/276938278_f630d99916_b.jpg
10-22-06
Hog (http://www.flickr.com/photos/hog/)

lofter1
November 24th, 2006, 12:01 PM
Those arching roof tops -- like here ^^^ and at 325 5th Avenue -- are weak efforts to enclose the roof-top water tanks / mechanicals.

And they seem to be a very "un"-New York design element :( ...

stache
November 24th, 2006, 12:36 PM
It wouldn't be so bad if it was a dark grey. I was hoping for a dark granite veneer up there.

BrooklynRider
November 25th, 2006, 05:40 PM
This was a disappointing finish, when you consider the rendering. However, I happened to catch this building during one of those spectacular NYC sunsets and the building glistened in and orangey flash of reflection. On that afternoon/eve - it was magnificent.

nicemarmot
March 1st, 2007, 12:04 PM
This building actually looks pretty nice, and the amenities seem top-notch for a rental. Too bad it's built directly next door to a huge methadone clinic whose addicts all hang out on the block. (I work in the building on the other side of the methadone clinic). Wonder if they're accounting for that in their rental prices?

Fahzee
March 1st, 2007, 12:49 PM
This building actually looks pretty nice, and the amenities seem top-notch for a rental. Too bad it's built directly next door to a huge methadone clinic whose addicts all hang out on the block. (I work in the building on the other side of the methadone clinic). Wonder if they're accounting for that in their rental prices?

instead of free pens, can we expect to find free needles with www.theepic.com printed on them?

lofter1
March 1st, 2007, 01:19 PM
Too bad it's built directly next door to a huge methadone clinic whose addicts all hang out on the block.

Is that on 31st or 32nd?

Derek2k3
June 14th, 2007, 01:55 AM
People have begun moving in.

http://farm2.static.flickr.com/1394/545708245_4ac82e3dda_o.jpg

http://farm2.static.flickr.com/1341/545708269_9f5553685b_o.jpg

http://farm2.static.flickr.com/1412/545708259_c57d2a474b_o.jpg

londonlawyer
June 14th, 2007, 01:58 AM
[QUOTE=Derek2k3;170092]People have begun moving in.

http://farm2.static.flickr.com/1394/545708245_4ac82e3dda_o.jpg
[QUOTE]

The crown should have been glass instead of concrete, but it's a nice tower anyway.

stache
June 14th, 2007, 08:12 AM
That beige stucco is the absolute worst, and now they've plastered huge illegal ads all over it. Maybe they're trying to be contextual with the nearby discount stores?

Spoon
June 14th, 2007, 11:57 AM
I tried to like this tower but I don't. I hate that beige ridge up the side and that dumb beige top. It looks awkward and blocks the chrysler from a lot angles from where I live. Oh well.

macreator
June 14th, 2007, 02:57 PM
An unfortunate choice of glass for the curtainwall

Derek2k3
June 16th, 2007, 04:42 AM
Some more...

http://farm2.static.flickr.com/1074/555372792_08937147a7_o.jpg

http://farm2.static.flickr.com/1229/555372850_9628185fc5_o.jpg

http://farm2.static.flickr.com/1359/555372840_2fe6ea4f2f_o.jpg

http://farm2.static.flickr.com/1309/555372788_9875e7021d_o.jpg

http://farm2.static.flickr.com/1090/555372800_63b28d2c06_o.jpg

http://farm2.static.flickr.com/1437/555373714_540eb288a2_o.jpg

lofter1
June 16th, 2007, 12:07 PM
This one (much like 325 Fifth) seems to be an alien-of-sorts which has arrived for an extended vacation in mid-town and has decided to stay ...

pianoman11686
June 16th, 2007, 02:08 PM
Looks good from certain angles, bad from others. (What else is new?)

kz1000ps
June 17th, 2007, 01:24 PM
Yesterday. All I can say about this one is.. "whatever"

http://img509.imageshack.us/img509/7784/img4868dq6.jpg

http://img509.imageshack.us/img509/6100/img4871nj5.jpg

ablarc
June 17th, 2007, 01:31 PM
http://farm2.static.flickr.com/1437/555373714_540eb288a2_o.jpg
What's going on up here?

(I don't mean the window cleaning.)




Stache had it right: shoulda been black granite.

Calvin
July 13th, 2007, 02:03 PM
Don't even think about renting at the Epic Apartments ( 125 West 31st St. NY ). It is rare that a building can add an unpredictable 20 minutes to your morning commute, but the Epic manages. How? The building is defective and should have never received its residency permits because it only has 4 tiny elevators for 59 floors. Worse, the elevators are the cheapest and least dependable on the market - poor under any circumstances and a disaster in a taller buiding where any moderate wind knocks them out of commission. Ask the management whether all four elevators have ever worked at the same time. It has never happened and is not likley to. Welcome to the tallest walk-up in Manhattan.

Derek2k3
July 25th, 2007, 01:04 AM
You'd never think this was a product of 2007.

http://farm2.static.flickr.com/1247/890854585_5a8c7e60e7_o.jpg


http://farm2.static.flickr.com/1335/890855023_90370f0d66_o.jpg


http://farm2.static.flickr.com/1130/890847375_643fdc2a95_o.jpg

RandySavage
July 25th, 2007, 01:31 AM
Promising renderings, nasty result.

Tectonic
July 25th, 2007, 09:08 AM
Using Different colors could have made this building look much better.

Derek2k3
August 1st, 2007, 02:00 AM
^I know. As soon as that beige brick went on...

http://farm2.static.flickr.com/1017/969357523_5204d6a54a.jpg (http://www.flickr.com/photo_zoom.gne?id=969357523&size=o)

http://farm2.static.flickr.com/1090/969357541_36705e3240.jpg (http://www.flickr.com/photo_zoom.gne?id=969357541&size=o)

http://farm2.static.flickr.com/1173/969357603_e3fefc4b85.jpg (http://www.flickr.com/photo_zoom.gne?id=969357603&size=o)

Derek2k3
August 9th, 2007, 01:20 PM
The developers and architects envision several setbacks leading to a noteworthy crown. "But [the top] won't be lighted as that would waste energy," said Fetner,

http://farm2.static.flickr.com/1133/884184871_40084badee_b.jpg
JACK NAPIER
Lies! noteworthy crown, please.

stache
August 9th, 2007, 08:37 PM
I don't get the impression people are clamoring to move into this place.

BrooklynRider
August 10th, 2007, 02:35 AM
I thought everyone wants to live at the mouth of Penn Station, next to a soup kitchen, and across the street from a fire station? Isn't that what luxury living is all about?

NoyokA
August 10th, 2007, 02:44 AM
Quintessentially "Only in New York"

NewYorkDoc
August 10th, 2007, 04:01 AM
The skyline needs more bright lighting effects. IMO.

smallfish
September 16th, 2007, 08:51 PM
I don't get the impression people are clamoring to move into this place.
You got the wrong impression, it is over 85% leased in 4 months.

stache
September 16th, 2007, 08:55 PM
Methinks you exhibit a biased opinion -

BrooklynRider
September 17th, 2007, 11:00 PM
Considering the renderings that were published, it turned out to be rather horrid in reality. I still can't imagine who wants to live in the direct path of the bridge and tunnel set.

antinimby
September 27th, 2007, 02:51 AM
The lowrise, base on the 32 St. side serving as the residences for the Friars, blends in nicely with the original church building:

http://img171.imageshack.us/img171/8683/img0010fd4.jpg


Next to that is the entrance lobby to the rental residences in the tower:

http://img120.imageshack.us/img120/6397/img0009ac3.jpg


Meanwhile, on the 31 St. side, there's even a little space dedicated to retail as well as a parking garage entrance and the entrance to the American Cancer Society headquarters (not shown):

http://img98.imageshack.us/img98/8898/img0011ag9.jpg

fioco
September 27th, 2007, 12:23 PM
^ Those photos are excellent. They give a very different impression of the building: A better resolution at street level than skyline. Thanks.

antinimby
September 27th, 2007, 02:30 PM
You're welcome. Yeah, I've always been concern about how they are at streetlevel.

Their appearance on the skyline is important but in this city, it's all about how they meet the ground.

ramvid01
September 27th, 2007, 06:35 PM
Although I am not as strong a critic as some of this building in the skyline (it isnt downright terrible but it could have been better) I am very happily surprised to see how well it interacts at streetlevel. Quite the pleasant surprise. Thanks AN.

sfenn1117
September 28th, 2007, 01:40 AM
Definitely thanks for this....the base looks nice, both sides.

Derek2k3
January 24th, 2010, 09:56 PM
http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2742/4291023590_50d3aef524_o.jpg
Michael-SpeedraceR (http://www.flickr.com/photos/michael_speedracer/4291023590/sizes/o/)

Take that banner down already. Same for Tower 31.

kz1000ps
January 25th, 2010, 12:19 AM
Why is every single development in the area so intent on reinforcing the visual cacophony already there?