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lofter1
January 27th, 2008, 11:29 PM
I walked by the Times Tower the other day and saw that there are still a lot of unconnected wires hanging here and there, plus lots of new lighting instruments have been added in the past few weeks.

Could be the lighting is behind schedule because they've had some other "issues" to deal with over at the Times Tower.

tmac9wr
January 28th, 2008, 07:02 PM
Are those lights at the base and up on the building staying that bright yellow color, or are there going to be silver covers for them? They seem so out of place in their current state.

lofter1
January 28th, 2008, 11:59 PM
Yellow they shall be ...




Here's how the OVI website (http://www.oviinc.com/projects/New_York_Times/) describes it:
A series of luminaire’s painted ‘taxi’ yellow mounted in custom


mounting configurations ‘animate’ the pedestrian street level and


highlight the cross cables of the tower like a vertical bridge.

antinimby
February 1st, 2008, 04:26 PM
The last available retail space has now been taken. Four are establishments serving food (Dean & DeLuca, Inakaya, Montenapo, Hale and Hearty Soup) and the fifth is a Japanese goods store (Muji).

From eater.com (http://eater.com/archives/2008/01/first_word_5.php):


Thursday, January 31, 2008

"Andrew and Jonathan Schnipper, the brothers who founded New York’s innovative Hale and Hearty Soup chain, have leased 3,200 square feet at the corner of Eighth Avenue and 41st Street for their first new 'concept' restaurant, an updated version of a classic roadside eatery serving burgers, salads and other American favorites in a fast casual, relaxed setting. The 20-year lease also includes 1,000 square feet of outdoor seating."

That building, by the way, is the new New York Times headquarters, whose final restaurant lineup now reads as follows: Montenapo, casual Italian from the Bice Restaurant Group; Inakaya, the 'robatayaki'-style Japanese restaurant; a 60-seat Dean & DeLuca Café; and, er, the roadhouse.

MidtownGuy
February 1st, 2008, 04:49 PM
:)Tremendous news that they have leased to eating establishments. Even better ...outdoor tables are mentioned!
An addition to NYC streetlife instead of food removal and sterilization by bank branch... BRAVO.
After all, what really matters to my daily life is what happens down at street level.

Alonzo-ny
February 1st, 2008, 04:53 PM
Viola! Good development finally.

londonlawyer
February 1st, 2008, 04:56 PM
:)Tremendous news that they have leased to eating establishments. Even better ...outdoor tables are mentioned!....

I don't know who will want to eat outside considering the area's infestation with mentally deraged, filthy, diseased beggars from the PA -- not to mention noise and pollution from 8th Ave. Outdoor seating is nice in the West Village, but not here.

kliq6
February 1st, 2008, 04:59 PM
agreed not the place id want to picnic outside if I had a choice!

MidtownGuy
February 1st, 2008, 09:26 PM
The area is changing, and fast.
If they design the seating area correctly there will be plenty of demand for those outdoor tables. It's a good thing, guys.

londonlawyer
February 1st, 2008, 11:14 PM
Good point.

nykid17
February 15th, 2008, 12:06 AM
http://www.nyc-architecture.com/MID/mid-nyt18.jpg


Idk if anyone has ever took a look at this, but i think this is ultimately what the outcome of the exterior lighting affects will bring.

DarrylStrawberry
April 20th, 2008, 11:29 AM
http://blogs.reuters.com/mediafile/2008/04/17/blink-times-building-just-depreciated-1/

Blink… Times building just depreciated $1 (http://blogs.reuters.com/mediafile/2008/04/17/blink-times-building-just-depreciated-1/)

Posted by: Paul Thomasch (http://blogs.reuters.com/mediafile/author/paulthomasch/)

The New York Times’ fancy new building on 8th Avenue comes at a cost.

First there was the falling glass and other debris, then there was that annoying issue of mice (http://www.reuters.com/article/domesticNews/idUSN0322423520070704) making a home in the skyscraper.

But how’s this for a cost? The New York Times headquarters building is likely to depreciate at a rate of $8 million per quarter, according to its latest earnings release (http://www.reuters.com/article/companyNews/idUSN1737787120080417).


What’s $8 million per quarter? Here’s our rough breakdown:
$2.67 million per month
$88,889 per day
$3,704 per hour
$62 per minute
$1.03 per secondIn other words, the building lost $30 — give or take — while you were reading this post.

v70cat
April 20th, 2008, 02:18 PM
http://blogs.reuters.com/mediafile/2008/04/17/blink-times-building-just-depreciated-1/

Blink… Times building just depreciated $1 (http://blogs.reuters.com/mediafile/2008/04/17/blink-times-building-just-depreciated-1/)

Posted by: Paul Thomasch (http://blogs.reuters.com/mediafile/author/paulthomasch/)

The New York Times’ fancy new building on 8th Avenue comes at a cost.

First there was the falling glass and other debris, then there was that annoying issue of mice (http://www.reuters.com/article/domesticNews/idUSN0322423520070704) making a home in the skyscraper.

But how’s this for a cost? The New York Times headquarters building is likely to depreciate at a rate of $8 million per quarter, according to its latest earnings release (http://www.reuters.com/article/companyNews/idUSN1737787120080417).


What’s $8 million per quarter? Here’s our rough breakdown:
$2.67 million per month
$88,889 per day
$3,704 per hour
$62 per minute
$1.03 per secondIn other words, the building lost $30 — give or take — while you were reading this post.

I think you mixing the companies earning loss with the building depreciation? Not sure how that the two are related?

antinimby
April 20th, 2008, 07:45 PM
Real estate (especially completely new, Class A office) in Manhattan depreciating?

Not a chance.

James Kovata
April 21st, 2008, 12:37 AM
I believe the depreciation relates to the depreciation of the building for TAX purposes, i.e., deducting the cost of the building over time. The building is not losing value.

BrooklynLove
April 21st, 2008, 09:06 AM
stupid article - so much so, even surprising for the times.

Optimus Prime
April 21st, 2008, 01:52 PM
Hilariously stupid, in fact. How do you even write something like that? And how does an editor approve it?

BrooklynLove
April 21st, 2008, 02:25 PM
unfortunately editors are sometimes afflicted in the same manner as writers

v70cat
April 22nd, 2008, 09:45 AM
Hilariously stupid, in fact. How do you even write something like that? And how does an editor approve it?

I agree!

lofter1
April 22nd, 2008, 11:33 AM
stupid article - so much so, even surprising for the times.
The original article didn't come out of The Times ...

Reuters printed the financial article and then some blogger turned it into the bit of fiscal stupidity we're now discussing.

Optimus Prime
April 22nd, 2008, 01:08 PM
^ I read "the times" to mean "these days," but perhaps I give BL too much credit? ;)

BrooklynLove
April 22nd, 2008, 02:02 PM
my bad - sloppy reading on my part. nice to know that NYT wasn't responsible for this toilet paper worthy reporting.

brianac
April 26th, 2008, 06:04 AM
Welcome to the Times Tower, Goodwin Procter!

by John Koblin (http://www.observer.com/john-koblin) | April 25, 2008

http://origin.observer.com/files/imagecache/article/files/042808_times_web.jpg wallyg via flickr.com

The Post's Keith Kelly hears that (http://www.nypost.com/seven/04252008/business/the_worst_of_times_108073.htm) 70 Times staffers are going to take buyouts, which means that about 30 are on the chopping block and it'll be Joe Sexton's Metro team that'll take the brunt of the hit.

There's no good news out of that, but it will thin the crowd for what is about to become a more crowded cafeteria in the Times Building. The law firm Goodwin Procter is moving into the Times building next week, and according to a memo, will start sharing the turkey line with Times employees.
The memo:

As you may be aware, our tenant, the national law firm Goodwin Procter, is moving in on April 28th. Goodwin will occupy floors 23 thru 27 within our space and floors 29 and 30 in the Forest City Ratner (FCRC) space. They will bring approximately 500 employees to the building.
Goodwin’s employees and their visitors will have access to the cafeteria and the 15th floor conference center. As a result we will be putting back into service a passenger elevator car that had been used for our construction related needs for the last year.
We look forward to welcoming Goodwin Procter.

Best Regards,
Building Operations

http://www.observer.com/2008/welcome-times-tower-goodwin-procter

© 2008 Observer Media Group,

Derek2k3
May 3rd, 2008, 07:29 PM
A few views from the tower.
http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3073/2460033529_ef57157ce0_b.jpg

http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2344/2460862536_2a8363d844_b.jpg

http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2177/2460857276_d0999ae450_b.jpg
mborowick (http://www.flickr.com/photos/mattborowick/2460862536/in/photostream/)

lbjefferies
May 3rd, 2008, 09:33 PM
/\ /\ (whistles)

GVNY
May 4th, 2008, 03:02 AM
My goodness, that photograph is certainly one of the best I have ever seen of the Empire State Building.

Top something...maybe 3?

Quite a handsome building and picture.

Daquan13
May 5th, 2008, 11:45 PM
Is the building open for business now?

antinimby
May 6th, 2008, 01:10 AM
Funny.

ZippyTheChimp
May 22nd, 2008, 12:55 AM
Muji Times Square Countdown: Only Eight and Three-Quarters Days To Go

by Dana Rubinstein | May 21, 2008

Only eight days, 21 hours and counting (but who's counting?) until MUJI opens a store in the Renzo Piano-designed headquarters of The New York Times. For those not inclined to count, that's noon on May 30.

This, the second New York location for the Japanese Mecca for "no-brand quality goods," will fill 4,350 square feet on the ground-floor of the tower on Eighth Avenue and 40th Street. MUJI opened its first New York store, at 455 Broadway, in November.

The store will carry 1,750 household items -- including, presumably, those rad cardboard speakers -- and 420 items of clothes.

© 2008 Observer Media Group

The Benniest
May 22nd, 2008, 01:15 AM
Derek, I can't believe I never saw your pictures. They are absolutely brilliant! :eek: The picture of the ESB is one of the best.

Thanks!
Ben

antinimby
May 22nd, 2008, 01:33 AM
The Muji opening is definitely good news.

Seeing the corner spaces of the Times building empty and dark does not look very good.

lofter1
May 22nd, 2008, 01:37 AM
Derek: Great shots. Taken when?

Note that neither 785 Eighth or the Sky House condo are up in those pics.

kz1000ps
May 25th, 2008, 08:32 PM
Some more lobby shots:

http://img359.imageshack.us/img359/553/img7823hn3.jpg

http://img359.imageshack.us/img359/1441/img7825nk7.jpg

http://img153.imageshack.us/img153/4711/img7827zb8.jpg

http://img55.imageshack.us/img55/2664/img7830gi8.jpg

http://img210.imageshack.us/img210/2086/img7831pv0.jpg

http://img153.imageshack.us/img153/8413/img7829ih3.jpg

http://img214.imageshack.us/img214/3882/img7833rw3.jpg

http://img301.imageshack.us/img301/6567/img7832qp5.jpg

stache
May 25th, 2008, 11:47 PM
Great shade of red!

The Benniest
May 26th, 2008, 01:14 AM
This is a very cool lobby for the Times' building.

Very modern and I agree with stache, nice shades of color.

NYC4Life
May 26th, 2008, 06:32 AM
Not the best looking tower in Midtown, but it started the construction boom taking place on 8th avenue and surrounding area.

ablarc
May 30th, 2008, 08:09 AM
Lobby is pretty, but that floor won't last long.

Jasonik
May 30th, 2008, 10:05 AM
It's not http://www.global.pergo.com/images/pergo_site/logo_pergo.gif ?

antinimby
May 30th, 2008, 05:05 PM
Some pics from racked.com (http://racked.com/archives/2008/05/30/muji_midtown_full_reveal.php) of the Muji Grand Opening today.

First, the pre-opening pics, then later the opening and the crowds...

http://curbednetwork.com/cache/gallery/2302/2536638092_ff49c68343_o.jpg

http://curbednetwork.com/cache/gallery/2120/2535822385_7ddc5ffb2d_o.jpg

http://curbednetwork.com/cache/gallery/3002/2536638290_2325c9e3f6_o.jpg

http://curbednetwork.com/cache/gallery/3097/2536638364_ccb1b69a82_o.jpg

http://curbednetwork.com/cache/gallery/2213/2535822577_3fbc30bac7_o.jpg

http://curbednetwork.com/cache/gallery/2300/2536638206_7473cbc117_o.jpg

http://curbednetwork.com/cache/gallery/2154/2535822527_a6a84f9bde_o.jpg

http://curbednetwork.com/cache/gallery/2199/2536767568_edd015f0dc_o.jpg

http://curbednetwork.com/cache/gallery/2299/2535950295_f32f935bce_o.jpg

http://curbednetwork.com/cache/gallery/3022/2535950223_07fbae3a91_o.jpg

http://curbednetwork.com/cache/gallery/3106/2535930883_70a7d30a11_o.jpg
Gift bags

http://curbednetwork.com/cache/gallery/3172/2536767796_6b6c7cb12b_o.jpg

http://curbednetwork.com/cache/gallery/3132/2536990602_46cf6dfa34_o.jpg

http://curbednetwork.com/cache/gallery/3052/2536989952_4e4d43cc57_o.jpg

http://curbednetwork.com/cache/gallery/2366/2536167155_4cdb2999e5_o.jpg

http://curbednetwork.com/cache/gallery/2100/2536989584_123a2c21a6_o.jpg

http://curbednetwork.com/cache/gallery/2260/2536170351_ceaa39d75a_o.jpg

Alonzo-ny
May 30th, 2008, 05:08 PM
I just walked past the building an hour ago! How did i not realise!! Also it looked great as i was walking up 8th, crown looking shimmering.

antinimby
May 30th, 2008, 05:21 PM
You missed out on the free giftbags.

lofter1
May 30th, 2008, 05:22 PM
This NYT MUJI store is really aggravating -- it has lots of interior glass divisions creating enclosed areas for various sections of items, but hardly space for two people to pass in the aisles. Plus through the glass partitions you can see something you'd like a closer look at but then have to mavigate a maze to try and get close. :mad:

The SoHo MUJI store on Broadway / Grand is much more shopper-friendly. same items, better use of space.

antinimby
May 30th, 2008, 05:34 PM
This is the U.S. flagship store. They had to up the shopping experience a notch or two by making it more challenging and different than their other stores. ;)

The Benniest
May 30th, 2008, 06:05 PM
Ugh. I hate stores like that where you have to navigate through a maze to get to something that you spotted through glass. And, and this may only be my personal experience, but depending on how clean that glass, you may run into it which is very uncomfortable. Oops! :o

Ben

lofter1
May 30th, 2008, 07:48 PM
Unfortunately for me, when I was there this afternoon the glass was very clean :o

The Benniest
May 30th, 2008, 08:49 PM
Did you run into it? Haha!

At the Apple Store in Des Moines, IA, they have a special section of the mall that only for Apple, and I ran right into the glass doors while walking in. And yes ... it hurt. :p

Ben

stache
May 31st, 2008, 01:38 AM
I've broken a couple pair of glasses that way... :o

Eugenious
June 5th, 2008, 02:53 PM
French nutjob climbs the NYT building...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0RC40Khx2WQ

JCMAN320
June 5th, 2008, 03:26 PM
I guess those bars weren't too weak after all lol. ;)

kliq6
June 5th, 2008, 03:42 PM
When is that from?

JCMAN320
June 5th, 2008, 03:45 PM
This afternoon it was on channel 7 at noon.

Daquan13
June 5th, 2008, 03:53 PM
I wonder if that was Phillipe, the one who once tightroped between the Twins in '74.

The Benniest
June 5th, 2008, 04:19 PM
This reminds of the man who attempted to parachute off the Empire State Building. :confused:

ManhattanKnight
June 5th, 2008, 04:23 PM
The French aerialist (who was not Philippe Petit--now 58-years-young) climbed the rods on the north face, like the rungs on a ladder, and surrendered to cops awaiting him on the roof. The last moments of the adventure were broadcast live on WABC-TV and ended around 12:30 PM.

http://img377.imageshack.us/img377/2923/uprodsar1.jpg

Alonzo-ny
June 5th, 2008, 04:31 PM
Least hard stunt ever.

The Benniest
June 5th, 2008, 04:37 PM
More photos of the "event" on FOX News:

http://www.foxnews.com/photoessay/0,4644,4144,00.html#1_0

ManhattanKnight
June 5th, 2008, 04:43 PM
I predicted this quite some time ago but, sadly, no one paid any attention. My fate in life. :( http://wirednewyork.com/forum/showpost.php?p=138441&postcount=2105

Jasonik
June 5th, 2008, 04:49 PM
Video and full coverage (http://cityroom.blogs.nytimes.com/2008/06/05/man-scales-new-york-times-building/) of Alain Robert climbing Times building.

NoyokA
June 5th, 2008, 04:51 PM
It was inevitable.

As is the cheasy NYTIMES headline tomorrow about the event.

lofter1
June 5th, 2008, 05:28 PM
The TIMES has good coverage of the episode in its on-line City Room (with a nod to Jasonik) ...

Man Scales Times Building and Is Arrested

NY TIMES (http://cityroom.blogs.nytimes.com/2008/06/05/man-scales-new-york-times-building/)
By Sewell Chan (http://cityroom.blogs.nytimes.com/author/schan/)
June 5, 2008

Updated, 2:12 p.m.

Alain Robert, a French stuntman known for climbing tall buildings, scaled the north face of the New York Times building (http://newyorktimesbuilding.com/) on Thursday, ascending 52 stories to the roof and clutching a bright green banner, before police officers arrested him around 12:22 p.m.

Police and security officials cordoned off the sidewalk below, on West 41st Street, as a crowd assembled. The words on the banner were illegible from the sidewalk, but from office windows inside the tower the slogan on the banner could be clearly read: “Global warming kills more people than 9/11 every week.”

The man later confirmed, moments after being arrested on the roof of the tower, that he was Alain Robert (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/reference/timestopics/people/r/alain_robert/index.html), a 46-year-old stuntman famous for scaling structures (http://thelede.blogs.nytimes.com/2007/05/31/jailing-your-friendly-neighborhood-spider-man/) like the National Bank of Abu Dhabi, the Sydney Opera House in Australia and the Eiffel Tower and Montparnasse Tower in Paris. He wore a T-shirt with his name and the address of a Web site (thesolutionissimple.org (http://thesolutionissimple.org/)), exercise pants and climbing shoes. He had long blond hair. He used no rope, harness or parachute.

Police officers blocked off the sidewalk at the base of the building and asked members of the crowd to move along. Construction workers on a building directly across West 41st Street, facing the northern face of the building, looked on with expressions of astonishment and amusement. A crowd gathered on the sidewalk, pointing, gawking and capturing pictures and images with cellphones, digital cameras and video cameras.

“This is a publicity stunt, it looks like,” Janet L. Robinson, the chief executive of The New York Times Company, said as she entered the building. “There is definitely going to be an arrest.”

Wearing a backpack slung over one shoulder, Arthur Ochs Sulzberger Jr. (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/reference/timestopics/people/s/arthur_ochs_sulzberger/index.html), the chairman of The Times Company and publisher of The Times, who is himself an avid climber, ducked under the police tape and examined the spectacle. He declined to comment.

http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2008/06/05/nyregion/alainrobert-533.jpg
(Photo: Sewell Chan/The New York Times)
Alain Robert, a stuntman, climbed the 52-story New York Times building on Thursday before
he was arrested. His banner read, “Global warming kills more people than 9/11 every week.”

Inside the building, reporters and editors pressed their faces to the glass windows to catch a glimpse of the climber. He weaved in and out of the ceramic rod facade, seeming to rest on the building’s exterior beams every few floors before swinging himself back out the face of the rods to resume his climb. He stopped occasionally to wave to the crowd, which included construction workers on a building across the street and others in front of the Port Authority.

Each time he took his hand away to wave, there were gasps from observers who feared he might fall.

As Mr. Robert climbed the building, police officers from the Emergency Services Unit, using a freight elevator, assembled on the roof. “He’s up to 30-something,” one police officer radioed another. “No, he’s up to 45,” another officer radioed back.

A security guard remarked, “Apparently, he’s a professional climber,” and a police officer replied: “To be honest, looking at this building, you don’t have to be a professional. This building is like a ladder.” (Designed to be environmentally sensitive, the tower is sheathed in distinctive horizontal ceramic rods that are intended to diffuse sunlight, allowing natural light to enter the building while keeping out heat and increasing the building’s energy efficiency.)

Around a dozen police officers were on the roof when Mr. Robert arrived there. One of them put on a hard hat, harnessed himself to the building and sat out on a beam, a couple of feet from the building, as Mr. Robert reached the top. When he got to the top, he calmly perched himself on the same beam, beside the officer, and raised his hands. The pair began talking.

Mr. Robert was placed in handcuffs and led across the roof and into a service elevator. The police officers had evidently made preparations in case he resisted, but he submitted peacefully. A Times reporter asked, “Where are you from and why are you doing this?” Mr. Robert said, “France. Paris.”

Mr. Robert was taken down through the service elevator to an underground service area of the building. A reporter asked why he had chosen The Times’s building. His reply: “This is a green building, which is a fantastic step.” He proceeded to talk about global warming as the police led him away. He said he believed the news media would give more prominence to coverage of global warming if a man climbed a prominent building.

Asked about the difficulty of the climb, he replied: “No, the building was easy. It was just a statement. Plus, I’m a professional climber.”

He added: “My name is Alain Robert. I did climb about 18 buildings around the world and I climbed even the five tallest.”

Then he was moved into a squad car and driven away, east on West 40th Street. He was taken to the Midtown South police precinct.

http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2008/06/05/nyregion/alain.matt-533.jpg
(Photo: Matthew Orr/The New York Times)
A view of Alain Robert from inside the Times building, as he climbed it.

New York’s skyscrapers have long been sites for death-defying stunts. In 1974, a French stunt artist, Philippe Petit, famously walked a high-wire strung between the twin towers of the World Trade Center. (Mr. Petit’s feat is the subject of a new documentary, “Man on a Wire,” (http://www.nytimes.com/2008/04/18/movies/18trib.html) which has received critical acclaim.)

More recently, in 2006, another stuntman, Jeb Corliss, was arrested after trying to jump off the observation deck of the Empire State Building. (Mr. Corliss challenged his indictment in court. A trial judge ruled last year (http://www.nytimes.com/2007/01/18/nyregion/18jumper.html) that as a professional jumper, he was experienced and careful enough to jump off a building without endangering his own life or anyone else’s. But this year, an appellate court overturned the ruling (http://www.nytimes.com/2008/03/05/nyregion/05jumper.html), although it reduced the charge in the indictment from a felony charge of reckless endangerment with depraved indifference to life, to a misdemeanor charge of reckless endangerment.)

Mr. Robert is a practitioner of free-soloing, a kind of climbing done without ropes, harnesses or other external supports. (”Free climbing,” another kind of climbing, involves no equipment to aid in the climb, but does include ropes for protection in the event of a fall.)

http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2008/06/05/nyregion/alain.matt-190.jpg
(Photo: Matthew Orr/The New York Times)
Alain Robert stands on a ledge outside the building.

“Climbing is my passion, my philosophy of life,” Mr. Robert states on his Web site (http://www.alainrobert.com/), adding, “Although I suffer from vertigo, although my accidents left me disabled up to 60 percent, I have become the best solo climber.” The Web site states that in eight years, Mr. Robert has climbed more than “70 skyscrapers and mythical monuments around the world.”

The 52-story steel-and-glass Times building, at 620 Eighth Avenue, between West 40th and 41st Streets, was designed by Renzo Piano and opened last year (http://www.nytimes.com/2007/11/20/arts/design/20time.html). A personal assistant at Mr. Piano’s architectural studio in Paris said he was traveling and not immediately available for comment. Along with The Times, it is occupied by several law firms, including Covington & Burling, Seyfarth Shaw and Goodwin Procter. Before The Times moved last year, it had previously occupied a neo-Renaissance building at 229 West 43rd Street (http://www.nytimes.com/2007/06/10/weekinreview/10dunlap.html) since 1913.

Inspector James McCarthy, the commanding officer of the Midtown South police precinct, said Mr. Robert would likely face several criminal charges, including, at the least, reckless endangerment.

Reporting was contributed by Corey Kilgannon, Eric Konigsberg, Jennifer 8. Lee, Conrad Mulcahy and Allen Salkin.

Copyright 2008 The New York Times Company

The Benniest
June 5th, 2008, 06:15 PM
Well, I'm sure it wouldn't be hard for the NY Times to get coverage of this, as seen from some of the pictures.

lofter1
June 5th, 2008, 07:18 PM
There is ANOTHER climber -- Copy Cat :confused: -- going up right now ...

Live on the TV ...

He's at about floor 30 on the west face above 8th Avenue, but looks to be tiring as she is stretching his arms.

He also seems to be searing hard-soled shoes with a sizeable heels -- not the best climbing shoes.

NYPD has air bags on the sidewalk below ...

lofter1
June 5th, 2008, 07:23 PM
The phantom climber is now looking fairly exhausted. He's at about Floor 40. He's hanging over the top of one of the big openings in the rods.

Of course the problem is that the windows do not open, so there will be no easy way to get him from the front of the rod curtain into the building :eek:

NYPD is wating en masse at the top of the building.

lofter1
June 5th, 2008, 07:27 PM
It's being reported that the 2nd climber's shirt reads "MALARIA"

lofter1
June 5th, 2008, 07:29 PM
This is excruciating -- :eek: -- but hard to turn away from :cool: ...

He looks to be getting cramps in his feet and is trying to stretch as he rests in one of the openings.

Now he looks like he's trying to find a way in through one of the windows ...

lofter1
June 5th, 2008, 07:33 PM
NY1 is now the only channel with live coverage ...

He's on his way up again.

But now he has again stopped and is leaning in through one of the big openings.

A reporter on the street is saying that the 2nd climber is known to some folks on the street and that he is a 32-year old resident from Sunset Park -- an artist who has been planning the climb for weeks to bring awareness to the problem of Malaria ...

lofter1
June 5th, 2008, 07:37 PM
The crowd on the street is cheering him on as he climbs the last of the curtain rods above the windows and approaches the top of the building.

He's now 5 feet from the top ...

NYPD is talking to him ... and he has stopped climbing.

Negotiations :confused:

lofter1
June 5th, 2008, 07:38 PM
He's continuing up and has reached the level of the roof ...

He's ON THE ROOF and in the hands of NYPD.

Phhewwwww :)

Derek2k3
June 5th, 2008, 07:38 PM
It would've been interesting if the tower was designed to climb it. What an attraction it would become.

lofter1
June 5th, 2008, 07:40 PM
We're now getting great helicopter shots of the top of the Times Tower ...

The building looks great.

Apparently a number of the rods were damaged during today's climbs.

Not surprised, as my understanding is that the rods are hollow ceramic with a cable running through the middle and attached to the framework with hardware on either end.

Definitely not built with this in mind.

The Benniest
June 5th, 2008, 07:47 PM
Wow... such excitement this afternoon! :rolleyes:

Thanks for the post-by-post-by-post update lofter. :)

stache
June 5th, 2008, 08:19 PM
I'm curious to know how much stress the rods can take.

NYC4Life
June 5th, 2008, 08:57 PM
Hopefully that NY times article was not plagiarized
by a frenchman. :D

lofter1
June 5th, 2008, 09:04 PM
Helpful to a reporter when the story comes to you :cool:

Second Climber at Times Building in Custody

http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2008/06/05/nyregion/climber2-533.jpg
(Photo: Raymond McCrea Jones/The New York Times)
The second climber passed the 12th floor of the New York Times building around 6 p.m.

NY TIMES (http://cityroom.blogs.nytimes.com/2008/06/05/yes-another-man-is-climbing-times-building/?hp)
By Sewell Chan
June 5, 2008, 6:11 pm

Updated, 7:44 p.m.

Hours after Alain Robert, a French stuntman, scaled 52 stories up the exterior of the New York Times building and was arrested on the roof, another man — remarkably — climbed up the building, this time on the southwestern corner, facing West 40th Street and the Port Authority Bus Terminal. The copycat climber reached the roof around 6:38 p.m. and was immediately taken into custody by firefighters and police Emergency Service Unit officers.

The man was led down from the roof — just as Mr. Robert had been hours earlier — in the building’s freight elevator, by officers who towered over him and wore helmets and strapped with heavy equipment including ropes and straps and rescue harnesses.

As police officers escorted him out of a service elevator, the man identified himself as an information technology worker and “urban climber” from Brooklyn. He said he had climbed two other skyscrapers in Manhattan. It was not immediately possible to independently confirm that claim. The police later identified him as Renaldo Clarke, 33. They said he was taken to Bellevue Hospital Center for a psychiatric evaluation.
Depending on the outcome, they said, he could face the same charges as Mr. Robert: reckless endangerment, making graffiti, criminal trespassing and disorderly conduct. (Mr. Robert had unfurled a banner about global warming.)

He wore baggy red pants and a dirty white T-shirt with the words “Malaria No More” in bold blue letters – and a pair of handcuffs. As he was led out of the elevator and down a long hallway, Mr. Clarke smiled broadly as if being carried victorious off a soccer field, and gave cryptic answers about his motivation.

Asked how his climb would help increase awareness of malaria, he smiled directly into a reporter’s video camera and said, “I’m going to be on the news, no?”

“I got to the top,” he exuded. As he was led out the door onto 40th Street, a crowd of people cheered for him and a throng of news photographers swarmed him as he was put into a police van. He smiled all the while, especially while photographers and cheering passers-by repeatedly slapped the van window near where he sat.

Just as the police cordoned off the sidewalk on the north side of the building, on West 41st Street, this morning, so the police officers closed off the sidewalk on the southern and western sides in the early evening.
Traffic was backed up on Eighth Avenue as the authorities responded to the scene. An astonished crowd gathered outside the bus terminal, which faces the Times building, and watched the spectacle.

http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2008/06/05/nyregion/climber2.jpg
(Photo: Nicholas W. Skyles/The New York Times)
An employee of The New York Times got a close-up view of the second climber.

“He was staring me at me on the fourth floor,” said Kim Severson, a reporter for The Times’s Dining section, who was in the southwest corner of the building when she saw the man pass just a few feet away. “I caught his eyes for one second and he turned and started climbing. He was right by my boss’s desk. At first I thought, ‘Is he a window washer?’ But he had no equipment. He turned and climbed up, at a very rapid pace. He looked very focused. He looked very solemn and determined.”

He appeared to be going at a slower rate than Mr. Robert did, and to be less certain of his footing. Like Mr. Robert, the man was wearing no harness and no rope.

The Times building, at 620 Eighth Avenue, between West 40th and 41st Streets, was designed by Renzo Piano and opened last year. Both Mr. Robert and the copycat climber appeared to scale the building using the horizontal ceramic rods that sheath the exterior — and are one of the building’s most distinctive features. The rods are intended to allow sunlight while keeping out heat, helping the building use energy more efficiently.

Mr. Piano is known for exposing the structural elements of buildings, merging function and design. Along with Richard Rogers, Mr. Piano was the designed of the Centre Pompidou in Paris, a contemporary-arts institution that has been described as a “giant climbing frame.” (http://www.rsh-p.com/render.aspx?siteID=1&navIDs=1,4,25,121,185)

The mood in The Times’s offices — which this morning was one of bemusement and wonder, when Mr. Robert made his climb — appeared to turn toward anxiety and alarm. Several employees who saw the copycat climber ascend the building voiced worries that the man might fall to his death.

Catherine J. Mathis, a spokeswoman for The New York Times Company, said in a statement, “The two climbers are jeopardizing their safety and the safety of others. We are deeply concerned about this situation.”

She later issued a second statement: “Two climbers used our headquarters building to make personal statements. Their illegal and ill-considered actions jeopardized their safety and the safety of others. We are taking steps to prevent future occurrences.”

David W. Dunlap, Christine Hauser, Corey Kilgannon, Patrick McGeehan and Paul von Zielbauer contributed reporting.

Copyright 2008 The New York Times Company

NYC4Life
June 5th, 2008, 09:11 PM
Perhaps they should both try and climb Beekman Tower

The Benniest
June 5th, 2008, 09:33 PM
I agree Lofter. They seemed to have had quite an easy day today. :p

Dagrecco82
June 5th, 2008, 10:26 PM
At least we know the rods are very strong.. or strong enough to hold a 130-150lb man.

The Benniest
June 5th, 2008, 10:41 PM
Not just one 150 lb. man, but two.

;)

antinimby
June 6th, 2008, 12:45 AM
Pics from the NY Times (http://www.nytimes.com/slideshow/2008/06/05/nyregion/0605-CLIMBER_index.html):

http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2008/06/05/nyregion/06building2a_600.jpg
Twice in one day, men scaled The New York Times Building in Midtown Manhattan. Each was taken into
custody by police officers once they reached the roof.


http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2008/06/05/nytfrontpage/23540539.JPG
At about noon, Alain Robert, a French stuntman known for climbing tall buildings, scaled the New York Times
building at 41st Street and Eighth Avenue in Manhattan, clutching a bright green banner that read:
"Global warming kills more people than 9/11 every week."


http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2008/06/05/nyregion/23541692.JPG
As Mr. Robert made his way up the building, a crowd gathered on the sidewalk, pointing, gawking and
capturing pictures and images with cellphones, digital cameras and video cameras.


http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2008/06/05/nyregion/23541307.JPG
Mr. Robert weaved in and out of the ceramic rod facade, seeming to rest on the building's exterior beams
every few floors before swinging himself back out the face of the rods to resume his climb.


http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2008/06/05/nyregion/06building2d_600.jpg
The second climber, 32-year-old Renaldo Clarke of Brooklyn, made the ascent shortly after 6:30 p.m.


http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2008/06/05/nyregion/06building2b_600.jpg
Evening rush-hour traffic was halted as onlookers
watched the events unfold.


http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2008/06/05/nyregion/23541103.JPG
Mr. Robert is famous for scaling structures like the National Bank of Abu Dhabi, the Sydney Opera House in
Australia and the Eiffel Tower and Montparnasse Tower in Paris. He said he climbed The New York Times
building to raise awareness about global warming.


http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2008/06/05/nytfrontpage/23540543.JPG
Mr. Robert was arrested by police when he reached the top of the building.


http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2008/06/05/nytfrontpage/23540545.JPG
He was escorted to a police car after he was brought down. He used no rope, harness or parachute.


http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2008/06/05/nyregion/06building2c_600.jpg
Mr. Clarke was also escorted out of the building.

Copyright 2008 The New York Times Company

kz1000ps
June 6th, 2008, 01:00 AM
LOL at those last two. The frenchman with his disdainful sneer and the IT guy with a "what the hell did I just do?!" smirk. Those are priceless!

(full disclosure: I'm roughly 72.5% french... roughly).

lofter1
June 6th, 2008, 01:00 AM
Atlanta father of NYC daredevil: He 'is not a nut!'

Son of local couple scales Times building after famous climber pulls off same feat

The Atlanta Journal-Constitution (http://www.ajc.com/news/content/news/stories/2008/06/05/new_york_climber.html)
By MARCUS K. GARNER
06/05/08

Renaldo Clarke Sr. never thought highly of daredevils.

So he didn't think twice when he saw a TV news report about two men scaling the New York Times building in New York City.

Until he learned one of them was his son.

"That's my youngest son," the retiree told a New York reporter who called Clarke's southwest Atlanta home Thursday evening.

Renaldo (Ray) Clarke Jr., 32, climbed the 52-story Manhattan building Thursday, behind another better-known climber: the notorious Frenchman Alain Robert, also known as Spider-Man.

Both men were quickly arrested by New York police and are undergoing psychological evaluations in the mental ward of city's Bellevue Hospital Center.

But the senior Clarke won't have anyone calling his son crazy.

"I just want you to know my son is not a nut!" he said.

The younger Clarke is a native New Yorker who works as an artist at an engineering firm in Manhattan.

As news helicopters hovered overhead, broadcasting the feat live on TV, Clarke eventually made it to the top, where he was handcuffed by detectives and hauled away. The Times newsroom broke into applause.

"He did seem apologetic," said Detective Peter Kecthely, who arrested Clarke. "He knew that he was endangering us and the public."

Both men climbed the latticework facade without safety harnesses or ropes to draw attention to separate issues: global warming and childhood malaria.

http://img.coxnewsweb.com/B/04/27/50/image_7150274.jpg
David Goldman/AP
Renaldo Clarke Jr., whose parents live in Atlanta,

slowly climbs up the New York Times building.


Clarke's dad watched the climb on TV in his Atlanta home but had no idea it was his son on the building.

"When (the reporter) started mentioning the malaria issue, I knew that was him," Clarke said.

Clarke said his son became passionate about preventing the mosquito-borne disease when the head of the engineering firm he works for began championing the cause. During his climb, Clarke wore a shirt reading "Malaria No More," the name of an organization that promotes awareness about malaria and raises money for bed nets. Martin Edlund, a spokesman for the organization, said the climber was not affiliated with the group.

"My son was attempting to make a statement," said Renaldo Clarke Sr., 61, a retired Con Ed worker.

Renaldo Clarke Jr. was no stranger to daring deeds, his parents said.

His mother, Constance, said he kayaked from their home in the community of Far Rockaway in the borough of Queens, N.Y., to Brooklyn, just across the East River from Manhattan.

"He started rock climbing and wall climbing when he was maybe 20," she said. "He keeps me on my knees (praying)."

A stunt in which he scaled the Brooklyn Bridge several months ago to cross the famed landmark at its highest point made his father call for a stop to the climbing.

"I spoke to him about it," the father said. "I thought this business was all forgotten."


http://img.coxnewsweb.com/B/07/25/50/image_7150257.jpg
Family photo
The younger Clarke was no stranger to daring deeds,
his parents said.


The younger Clarke grew up in Queens with his parents and three siblings. His parents retired and moved to southwest Atlanta three years ago.

They say he's always had a drive to help others, and that is what spurred him to pull this stunt.

"When he gets involved in something, he's very passionate about it," Constance Clarke said.

A chagrined Renaldo Clarke Sr. said he learned Thursday night that this was the third building his son has scaled, though he doesn't know where the first two buildings were.

There won't be a fourth, he said.

"That's not going to happen again," he said.

Copyright© 2008 The Atlanta Journal-Constitution

stache
June 6th, 2008, 01:59 AM
Come to think of it, global warming and malaria kind of go together -

Alonzo-ny
June 6th, 2008, 11:13 AM
Some great shots from inside, courtesy of a friend.

http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3114/2555453459_343ce099f8.jpg

http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3007/2555453453_d47d95e1be.jpg

http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3154/2555453447_4c6f906a6b.jpg

http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3111/2555453437_0ee0059a1a.jpg

lofter1
June 6th, 2008, 11:33 AM
Great ^ http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/images/icons/icon14.gif http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/images/icons/icon14.gif http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/images/icons/icon14.gif

MidtownGuy
June 6th, 2008, 11:54 AM
WOW, I get dizzy just looking at the photos. How could they have been so confident that the rods wouldn't break loose or snap.

The Benniest
June 6th, 2008, 12:43 PM
Was yesterday a windy day in New York? :p

kliq6
June 6th, 2008, 12:52 PM
No it was a perfect day to climb!

stache
June 6th, 2008, 01:20 PM
this will be the beginning of a new trend.

The Benniest
June 6th, 2008, 01:22 PM
Predictions for the next tower/building to be climbed in or out of New York?

Wrightfan
June 6th, 2008, 01:29 PM
So... speaking as an architect, I have to wonder what kind of claims will be made against Piano?
Heh, as if the falling ice wasn't bad enough.
When I first saw Piano's high rise in Germany using the rods, my first reaction was that it was what Fay Jones would have done if he had designed a skyscraper, however, you can't build in New York what looks great in Arkansas.

If I were to propose a fix, it would be a complete glass barrier 100% at the perimeter, cantilevering out. It's either that or removing the rods entirely for the first few stories.

Chalk another one up to lack of foresight.

lofter1
June 6th, 2008, 06:34 PM
The rods start at a point some 40 feet above the sidewalk.

However there is still some scaffolding around (apparently in connection with build-outs and work to for commercial & retail tenants). That seems to be how the climbers gained access.

Hardly the fault of Mr. Renzo Piano.

NYC4Life
June 6th, 2008, 07:49 PM
Next Building to be scaled i will say is Bank of America. Back at the Times Building, extra security measures have been placed but its only temporary. Those rods that keep sunlight to a minimum have ony kept climbers coming in..:cool:

antinimby
June 6th, 2008, 10:56 PM
How could they have been so confident that the rods wouldn't break loose or snap.Here's how...


Climber Tells of Test Run at Times Building

http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2008/06/06/nyregion/robert-533.jpg
Alain Robert, the French climber who scaled the exterior of the New York Times building on
Thursday, said he completed a test run beforehand. He gave the interview today in his hotel
room with a view of the building.


By Patrick McGeehan
June 6, 2008 (http://cityroom.blogs.nytimes.com/2008/06/06/climber-tells-of-test-run-at-times-building/), 5:12 pm

The French stuntman Alain Robert, the first of two men who climbed the New York Times building, said in an interview on Friday that he chose the 52-story tower because it was so simple to scale and because it was known as a “green” building.

A few nights before his climb of the 52-story building on Thursday, he said, he tested the sturdiness of the rods at 2 a.m. by climbing up on the overhang and tugging on the rods. He said he climbed several feet and discovered that scaling the whole building would not be hard.

Dressed like a rock star in a leather suit and cowboy boots, Mr. Robert, 46, described the Times building as a 1 on a difficulty scale from 1 to 10. He said his prime goal was to ascend as quickly as he safely could to a point beyond the reach of the fire department’s ladders, which he believed was about 200 feet.

Once he could not be stopped, he paused to unfurl a banner and attach it to the building. The banner promoted Thesolutionissimple.org, an environmental group that sponsored his climb.

Peter Myers, director of the group, estimated that the stunt cost “several thousand dollars,” primarily for travel and a week’s stay in a hotel in Manhattan. Mr. Robert and his small entourage were staying in a Hilton-Times Square hotel across the street from the building.

From the window in his room overlooking West 41st Street, Mr. Robert had a close-up view on Friday of the north face of the building, which he had climbed without any ropes or tools. Looking down, he could see two security guards; the building’s landlords had posted them on the roof of the four-story extension of the tower to prevent any more attempts to climb it.

On Thursday evening, Renaldo Clarke, a Brooklyn resident, duplicated Mr. Robert’s feat by climbing the building’s west face. Like Mr. Robert, Mr. Clarke was arrested on the roof. He proclaimed his cause with a “Malaria No More” T-Shirt. (The Moment blog has a critique of his fashion sense today.)

Mr. Robert, a slight man, with shoulder-length brown hair and a nose bent like a prizefighter’s, said he was neither flattered nor insulted by Mr. Clarke’s same-day imitation.

“Since climbing this building is like climbing a ladder, it doesn’t mean he is a good climber,” Mr. Robert said. “For me, it doesn’t change anything.”

Mr. Robert said he had been planning to climb the Times building for several weeks and had traveled to New York from his home in France to look it over on a previous visit. He said he had one or two alternatives in the city in mind, but declined to identify them.

He described the Times building as a “perfect target” because a ladderlike curtain of horizontal rods extends from the second floor up to the roof. To reach the lowest rods, he merely had to shimmy his 110-pound body up a beam from the sidewalk on 41st Street to a glass overhang, he said.

He likened it to a building in China, the Jin Mao Tower in Shanghai, a much taller skyscraper (93 floors) that he climbed last year.

“Height doesn’t mean anything,” he said. “Sometimes the higher doesn’t mean the harder.”

He said he tried to minimize the disruption his stunt would cause by choosing not to climb the Eighth Avenue side of the building and not climbing during the morning or evening rush. But he acknowledged that if he had climbed the east face, there would have been no chance of him falling onto pedestrians below.

He said he was never worried about getting caught by security guards before he could get far off the ground.

“I saw that it’s a very quiet environment,” he said of the building’s site. “You don’t feel that it’s surrounded by cops or security.”

All that had changed by Friday morning. After the back-to-back ascents, the building was ringed by police officers and private security guards and workers were creating a makeshift plywood barrier to prevent any more copycats from trying to replicate Mr. Robert’s climb.

Copyright 2008 The New York Times Company

antinimby
June 6th, 2008, 10:57 PM
How did the Times finally ended up taking down the banner he had put up? :confused:

NYC4Life
June 7th, 2008, 01:39 AM
^ It is a green building so perhaps they just wanted to recycle it :p

The Benniest
June 7th, 2008, 05:22 PM
Times Imposes Security Measures After Climbers’ Stunts

http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2008/06/07/nyregion/07building.span.jpg
Outside The New York Times Building on Friday, a television reporter explained security steps taken after two men scaled the 52-story tower. More Photos > (http://www.nytimes.com/slideshow/2008/06/05/nyregion/0605-CLIMBER_index.html)

By JAMES BARRON (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/reference/timestopics/people/b/james_barron/index.html?inline=nyt-per) and ROBIN POGREBIN (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/reference/timestopics/people/p/robin_pogrebin/index.html?inline=nyt-per)
Published: June 7, 2008

Executives of The New York Times Company undertook security studies in planning its new headquarters after 9/11, focusing on terrorist threats but apparently never considering that the building — sheathed in rows of horizontal ceramic bars — could become an urban ladder for climbers, as it did twice on Thursday.

Michael Golden, the vice chairman of the Times Company, said he did not recall any discussion about the possibility that someone could try to scale the 52-story building. “I don’t remember that, no,” he said on Friday.

A day after one man followed by another used the building as a giant jungle gym, the executives responsible for security and engineering met with police officials. The Times Company and Forest City Ratner, the real estate company that owns 48 percent of the building, agreed to a short-term plan to keep would-be climbers away.

The plan, which involved hiring security guards and putting up plywood barriers to close gaps that climbers could squeeze through on their way up, reflected both the seriousness of the issue and the unexpected sense of vulnerability at the Times Building. The ceramic rods are one of the building’s most distinctive features, a lattice of silvery-gray bars that forms an extra outer skin, several feet beyond the plate-glass windows that run to the ceiling on each floor. The plywood installed on Friday gave a construction-zone touch to a metal-and-glass building whose look had been carefully thought out.

http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2008/06/06/nyregion/climb.650.jpg
Workers installed sheets of plywood on Friday to cover gaps that let two men reach the Times Building's ladderlike sheath a day before. More Photos » (http://www.nytimes.com/slideshow/2008/06/05/nyregion/0605-CLIMBER_index.html)

The skyscraper, on Eighth Avenue between 40th and 41st Streets, is the work of the Italian architect Renzo Piano (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/reference/timestopics/people/p/renzo_piano/index.html?inline=nyt-per), who declined to be interviewed on Friday, saying that Mr. Golden had specifically instructed him not to speak to the newspaper’s reporters. Mr. Golden acknowledged this, saying, “I’ve told Renzo, I don’t think there’s any good that comes from this kind of publicity.”

The design work on the building began long before the 9/11 attacks, and after the destruction of the World Trade Center, Mr. Golden said, “there was a great deal of discussion and design changes made for the security” of the new Times Building — “not for people climbing outside, but the kinds of issues 9/11 raised.” He would not discuss the details.

He said he was deeply troubled by Thursday’s events. “I hate the fact that it happened — there’s no good that comes of it,” he said.

But as to whether the Times Company would consider removing the ceramic rods, he said, “No.”

The first climber, a French stuntman named Alain Robert (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/reference/timestopics/people/r/alain_robert/index.html?inline=nyt-per), said in an interview on Friday that the ease of climbing the Times Building was quite obvious to him — on a difficulty scale of 1 to 10, he rated it a 1. Even so, he said, his stunt required some planning. He said he had scouted the building some weeks ago and had even done a brief trial climb about 2 o’clock one morning, apparently undetected.

Ever since the mountain climber George H. Willig scaled the south tower of the World Trade Center in 1977, architects have been careful to avoid making tall buildings easy to climb. “There is a certain logic to how accessible you make the building — how readily are you actually creating a ladder up to the top?” said T. J. Gottesdiener, a managing partner at Skidmore, Owings & Merrill, which designed the Freedom Tower being built at ground zero.

http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2008/06/06/nyregion/robert.190h.jpg
Alain Robert

http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2008/06/07/nyregion/clarke.190h.jpg
Renaldo Clarke

“This is going to be a real big consideration on everybody’s list” because of the two incidents at the Times Building, he said.

For the Freedom Tower, Mr. Gottesdiener said, the architects designed a base of vertical, prismatic glass to avoid climbable ledges. Security issues regarding the facade were discussed at length. “It’s very practical — whether people can actually come and stick their toe in it and start to climb up it,” Mr. Gottesdiener said. “You’ve got to think about what kind of opportunities you’re presenting to people.”

Soon after The Times moved into the building last year, security duties were divided. Security in the lobby was split between officers who worked for the Times Company and others who worked for First New York Partners, a management and operations arm of Forest City Ratner. Under that arrangement, the Times Company was responsible for security on its floors — 2 through 27, and part of 28 — and First New York was responsible for the remaining floors and the exterior of the building.

Abbe R. Serphos, the director of public relations for the Times Company, said that the arrangements had changed in recent weeks. She said that security employees of the Times Company had “started to report to” First New York Partners. “They oversee our security team now,” Ms. Serphos said.

She said the Times Company’s longtime director of security, Jay McKillop, had left recently and “moved on to another opportunity.” Reached by cellphone on Friday, Mr. McKillop declined to discuss the security planning for the Times Building or say whether the issue of climbers had been considered.

John Garrity, an employee of First New York Partners who is director of security for The New York Times Building, also declined to comment. He said he had been instructed not to speak by executives of the Times Company.

No one could recollect a climbing incident at The Times’s former headquarters on West 43rd Street.

Mr. Robert and the other climber, Renaldo Clarke of Brooklyn, were both charged with reckless endangerment, criminal trespass and disorderly conduct. Both were released on bail on Friday.

Steven Emerson, the executive director of the Investigative Project on Terrorism, a nonprofit public interest group in Washington, said the fact that two climbers scaled the building in one day with such ease showed flaws in preparedness. Neither man used any equipment, unlike Mr. Willig, who designed special climbing apparatus for his World Trade Center ascent.

Mr. Emerson said that any news media organization needed tight security, and added that he was surprised that the Times Building did not have “prohibitive perimeter security” — something at street level to stop would-be climbers from getting a foothold. “I just naturally assumed that in the construction of the new building they would have accounted for the fact that it would be a natural magnet, particularly in a post-9/11 world,” he said.

Mr. Robert said in an interview on Friday that he chose the Times Building because climbing it seemed simple.

He said his prime goal was to ascend as quickly as possible to a height beyond the reach of the Fire Department’s ladders, which he figured was about 200 feet.

Once he knew he could not be stopped, he paused to unfurl a banner and attach it to the building. The banner promoted thesolutionissimple.org (http://thesolutionissimple.org/), the Web site of an environmental group that sponsored his climb.

Mr. Robert, a slight man with shoulder-length brown hair and a nose bent like a prizefighter’s, said he was neither flattered nor insulted by Mr. Clarke’s same-day ascent.

“Since climbing this building is like climbing a ladder, it doesn’t mean he is a good climber,” Mr. Robert said. “For me, it doesn’t change anything.”

Mr. Robert said he had been planning to climb the Times Building for several weeks. He described it as a “perfect target” because of the ladderlike curtain of rods, which runs from the second floor to the roof. To reach the lowest rods, he shimmied up a beam from the sidewalk on 41st Street to a glass overhang, he said.

Copyright 2008 New York Times Company

Wrightfan
June 7th, 2008, 06:07 PM
The rods start at a point some 40 feet above the sidewalk.

That last photo posted here shows the rods less than 20 ft. above the sidewalk.

scumonkey
June 7th, 2008, 06:57 PM
optical illusion due to the angle of the shot-those rods are alot closer to 40 feet off the ground than 20.
http://img258.imageshack.us/img258/5231/dscf0117ej7.jpg

nykid17
June 7th, 2008, 10:32 PM
The Bea-utiful Times Tower
http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3176/2560050622_0463a6ea4f_m.jpg (http://www.flickr.com/photos/27467028@N06/2560050622/)
And the "top of the line" security they hired to make sure no more dare devils take on the climb.
http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3063/2560050654_46ac3c3093_m.jpg (http://www.flickr.com/photos/27467028@N06/2560050654/)

HurricaneFanatic
June 7th, 2008, 11:50 PM
I'd be more inclined to call the "Daredevils" potential Darwin Award winners, considering the height of the NY Times Tower. And for one of the few times in history, the NY Times IS the news instead of reporting it.

Wrightfan
June 8th, 2008, 01:25 AM
optical illusion due to the angle of the shot-those rods are alot closer to 40 feet off the ground than 20.
Nope. That's the Eighth Avenue side. 40th and 41st are 20 ft. up, and that's (one of) the side you see in the picture I responded to.

antinimby
June 8th, 2008, 05:04 AM
And the "top of the line" security they hired to make sure no more dare devils take on the climb.
http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3063/2560050654_46ac3c3093_m.jpg (http://www.flickr.com/photos/27467028@N06/2560050654/)You can probably "bribe" her with a candy bar and she'll look the other way. :D

stache
June 8th, 2008, 05:43 AM
Just dangle it from a string - ;)

The Benniest
June 9th, 2008, 11:48 AM
The "French-Spiderman" appeared on The Today Show this morning in an interview. It explains his message that he was trying to get across, why he doesn't use wires/protection, etc.

Video clip here. (http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/21134540/vp/25058517#25058517)

kliq6
June 9th, 2008, 11:50 AM
Predictions for the next tower/building to be climbed in or out of New York?

It should be BOA and then Freedom Tower , but they are not constructed to climb!

NYC4Life
June 9th, 2008, 07:12 PM
Next person to scale the Times Tower should climb up to the flagpole spire :D

BrooklynRider
June 9th, 2008, 11:19 PM
And wave a copy of the NY Post from the top.

stache
June 10th, 2008, 06:16 AM
LOLLLLLLL!!!!!! :p

Daquan13
June 10th, 2008, 09:38 AM
It should be BOA and then Freedom Tower , but they are not constructed to climb!



Let him try to climb the Freedom Tower. He'll be arrested and be accused of being a terrorist.

Optimus Prime
June 19th, 2008, 11:45 PM
I tried to post about this earlier today but the database error ate my post. I was walking under the glass canopy this afternoon at 40th and 8th when what looked like a steel rod (maybe 6 inches long?) fell from the Times Tower onto the sidewalk (beyond the canopy). Thankfully it did not hit anyone but it almost hit a guy who was standing near the curb. He immediately started yelling up to some workers who were doing something on the facade, I would guess 10-15 stories or so up but I booked it out of there before doing an exact count to avoid more potential debris. The guy who was almost hit looked like he could have been with the construction guys, but I'm not sure.

Oh and I checked out Muji after this and concur with the above reviews. The layout is really annoying. The view of the courtyard is pretty nice, though.

brianac
June 26th, 2008, 08:36 PM
And wave a copy of the NY Post from the top.



From the New York Post

NYC COUNCIL MEMBERS EYE BAN ON BUILDING CLIMBING

PROPOSE JAIL, FINES FOR OFFENDERS

AP

Last updated: 2:41 pm
June 26, 2008

NEW YORK - New York City Council members are considering a proposal to outlaw climbing or jumping off buildings in the wake of several skyscraper stunts.

The Public Safety Committee hearing on Tuesday comes weeks after two men scaled a midtown Manhattan tower housing The New York Times.

A grand jury declined to indict one of the climbers, who said he took precautions to make sure no one else was at risk.

The proposal's sponsors say such stunts are a danger to the public and a distraction for police.

The plan would make it a misdemeanor to climb, or try to jump from, any structure more than 25 feet tall.

Violators could face up to a year in jail or a fine of up to $1,000.

http://www.nypost.com/seven/06262008/news/regionalnews/nyc_council_members_eye_ban_on_building__117332.ht m

Copyright Associated Press. All rights reserved.

NYC4Life
June 27th, 2008, 12:14 AM
Better hurry up and scale all the towers before this becomes law :D

BrooklynRider
June 27th, 2008, 11:05 PM
Oh please, like we need yet another prohibitive law in NY.

Those climbers put NYC back on the map internationally for a NY-style publicity stunt. The fear-mongers hijacked it.

lofter1
June 28th, 2008, 09:30 AM
I was near the Times building yesterday -- as I walked by I heard a number of people on the streets pointing out the building and discussing the climbers. Seems it brought huge amounts of PR to Renzo Piano / Times Tower.

The $1,000 fine is ludicrous if the intent is to minimize the "distraction for police" -- if you're going to create a law to dissuade behavior then the penalty should include reimbursement of all costs incurred by the NYPD, etc.

NYC4Life
July 9th, 2008, 06:10 AM
A third man attempts to climb the Times Tower. This is still a developing story and as of this writing, the man is several floors up.

UPDATE: The man has been arrested on the 5th floor. He made it up to the 11th floor before descending back down. He is described as David Malone, age 29 from Connecticut. He hung a banner promoting his website in which he proclaims to be a terrorist expert. Malone also made notes on Osama Bin Laden's plans. However; no further details were available at the moment.

NYC4Life
July 9th, 2008, 06:47 AM
From: New York Times (oddly enough..LOL :rolleyes:)

Third Man Climbs Times Building and Is Arrested

By Tanzina Vega (http://cityroom.blogs.nytimes.com/author/tvega/)

http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2008/07/13/nyregion/09climber02_533.jpg
A man unfurled a banner that appeared to mention Osama bin Laden as he ascended the face of the New York Times building early Wednesday morning. (Photo: Hiroko Masuike/The New York Times)


Updated, 5:35 a.m. |
A man scaled the front of the New York Times building in Midtown Manhattan in the predawn darkness early Wednesday — the third time in six weeks that a climber had scaled the one-year-old skyscraper, which is sheathed in thin ceramic rods. After staying on the building for about four hours, the man surrendered to police officers and was arrested around 5:20 a.m.

Unlike the two previous climbers, this one — identified as David Malone, an activist who studies Al Qaeda (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/reference/timestopics/organizations/a/al_qaeda/index.html) — did not attempt to make his way to the roof. Instead, he unfurled a banner around the fifth floor of the 52-story building, before climbing a few more stories. Several hours elapsed during which the police appeared to alternate between trying to go after the man and waiting for him to surrender. After he surrendered, police officers walked Mr. Malone out of the building’s West 40th Street entrance and placed him in an ambulance.

The police received a call at 1:23 a.m. Wednesday alerting them that there was a person scaling the skyscraper, at 620 Eighth Avenue, between 40th and 41st Streets. The authorities closed off Eighth Avenue between 40th and 42nd Streets to traffic, as well as West 41st Street between Seventh and Eighth Avenues, diverting vehicles onto other streets. Sidewalks below the Times building were closed to pedestrians.

Police officers tried to catch the climber by cutting through a window on the fifth floor of the building, but after having briefly rested at that level, he had already climbed past them.

The climbing episodes have at this point become something of an embarrassment for The Times. On June 5, two men scaled the building (http://www.nytimes.com/2008/06/06/nyregion/06climber.html), hours apart, reaching the roof before being arrested. The first was Alain Robert (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/reference/timestopics/people/r/alain_robert/index.html?inline=nyt-per), a 45-year-old French stuntman known for climbing tall buildings (http://cityroom.blogs.nytimes.com/2008/06/05/man-scales-new-york-times-building/); the second was Renaldo Clarke (http://www.nytimes.com/2008/06/11/nyregion/11about.html), 32, of Brooklyn, who said he wanted to draw attention to the problem of malaria (http://cityroom.blogs.nytimes.com/2008/06/05/yes-another-man-is-climbing-times-building/).

At the time, Times officials said they tightened security and took other precautions (http://www.nytimes.com/2008/06/07/nyregion/07building.html) to prevent anyone from climbing up the building again.

Now, just over a month later, someone has, yet again.

The Daily News reported on its Web site early Wednesday morning that it had received a call from the latest climber (http://www.nydailynews.com/ny_local/2008/07/08/2008-07-08_times_climb__again_man_scales_papers_hea.html) and that he had identified himself as David Malone, 29, of Connecticut, who had dropped out of the University of Michigan to study Al Qaeda.

A police officer subsequently confirmed that Mr. Malone was the climber. What appears to be Mr. Malone’s Web site, called Bin Laden’s Plan (http://www.binladensplan.com/), states that Mr. Malone “independently researching bin Laden and publicly advocating the aggressive isolation and destruction of Al Qaeda.” (http://www.binladensplan.com/About%20the%20Author.htm) The site goes on to claim that Mr. Malone “has successfully predicted some of the major events of bin Laden’s war” and is now trying to warn of efforts by the terrorist network to goad the United States to invade Pakistan and Iran. (Mr. Malone did not immediately respond to an e-mail message requesting an interview.)

Witnesses said the climber began his ascent near the northern entrance to the building, on West 41st Street, and made his way toward the western entrance, which is on Eighth Avenue, opposite from the Port Authority Bus Terminal.

“I thought he was a worker,” said Michael Pabon, 32, who was outside the bus terminal when he saw the man begin to scale the building. “He turned up to the letter ‘H’ and climbed above it,” Mr. Pabon said, referring to the letter H in the “The” of the New York Times logo, which is painted in giant black letters on the ceramic rods on the Eighth Avenue side of the building.

It was above the “T” in “The” that the climber hung a white banner with red fliers stuck to it, which referenced Mr. bin Laden. Some of the red fliers were also stuck to the windows of various floors in the building as the climber went up.

Witnesses said the climber was using his cellphone repeatedly during his ascent. “He’s some kind of professional,” Mr. Pabon said. “You could see he knows what he’s doing.”

After reaching the 11th floor, Mr. Malone faced out toward the street and talked on his cellphone for several minutes. He then descended to a spot between the ninth and 10th floors. Police officers on the fifth floor had breached a floor-to-ceiling window and some were outfitted with climbing cables and hard hats. A large inflatable cushion had been positioned placed on the sidewalk in front of the main entrance, presumably to save the man if he jumped.

The Times building was designed by the architect Renzo Piano and opened last year. Both Mr. Robert and the second climber appeared to scale the building using the horizontal ceramic rods that sheath the exterior — and are one of the building’s most distinctive features. The rods are intended to allow sunlight while keeping out heat, helping the building use energy more efficiently.

There is a long history of attention-grabbing stunts at New York skyscrapers. The French stunt artist Philippe Petit walked along a high wire strung between the twin towers of the World Trade Center in 1974, a feat that is the subject of a new documentary, “Man on a Wire.” In 1977, the mountain climber George H. Willig scaled the south tower of the trade center.

In 2006, another stuntman, Jeb Corliss, was arrested after trying to jump off the observation deck of the Empire State Building (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/reference/timestopics/subjects/e/empire_state_building/index.html).
Prosecuting the stuntmen has sometimes proved difficult.

In the most recent cases, Mr. Robert, who climbed the Times building on June 5, faced misdemeanor counts of reckless endangerment, trespassing and graffiti. But on June 12 a grand jury decided to dismiss those charges (http://www.nytimes.com/2008/06/13/nyregion/13climber.html), though it did allow Manhattan prosecutors to proceed with two counts of disorderly conduct against Mr. Robert. Lawyers for Mr. Clarke, who faced the same charges as Mr. Robert, said they hoped that he, too, would only face disorderly conduct charges.

On June 26, City Council members introduced a bill that would explicitly make it illegal to scale or jump from a building 25 feet or taller (http://www.nytimes.com/2008/06/27/nyregion/27climb.html).

antinimby
July 9th, 2008, 01:03 PM
This climbing the NY Times thing is getting old.

TREPYE
July 9th, 2008, 01:44 PM
^^ Makes me think of the old timeless question: Why some people can act really idiotic?

I cringe at the alterations that they are going to make to the design to prevent another imbecil from doing this. Hopefully they will just add more security and thats it.

stache
July 9th, 2008, 01:50 PM
The Bea-utiful Times Tower

And the "top of the line" security they hired to make sure no more dare devils take on the climb.
http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3063/2560050654_46ac3c3093_m.jpg (http://www.flickr.com/photos/27467028@N06/2560050654/)

Not more of this, please - :p

millertime83
July 9th, 2008, 02:03 PM
Maybe this is all part of some elaborate viral marketing campaign for the Times to lease out the rest of the building.

philvia
July 9th, 2008, 03:16 PM
A large inflatable cushion had been positioned placed on the sidewalk in front of the main entrance, presumably to save the man if he jumped.


i wish he would have jumped

antinimby
July 9th, 2008, 04:30 PM
They're going to remove the rods from the bottom 9 feet of the screen.

(By the way, I've always thought the rods on the lower floors were unnecessary as long, prolonged exposure to sunlight is not a problem as it's mostly blocked by the other nearby buildings.)



Third Man Climbs Times Building and Is Arrested

http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2008/07/10/nyregion/10climb.533.jpg
Police officers escorted David Malone from the New York Times building early Wednesday.
(Photo: Hiroko Masuike/The New York Times)


Updated, 2:41 p.m. (http://cityroom.blogs.nytimes.com/2008/07/09/third-man-climbs-times-building/) | The New York Times Company is preparing to remove some of the distinctive ceramic rods that sheathe its one-year-old building in Midtown Manhattan, after three men have used the rods to scale the skyscraper over the last five weeks, a law enforcement official said on Wednesday.

The official, speaking on condition of anonymity, said that The Times was looking to remove about 9 feet of the ceramic rods from the bottom of the curtain-like screen that encases the building. The official also said that The Times had indeed increased security coverage of the building after two climbed the building in separate episodes on June 5, but that the level of security coverage had recently been reduced, for reasons that were not immediately clear. Finally, the official said it appeared that Mr. Malone had breached one of plywood barriers that had been erected after the June 5 climbs to deter similar acts.

Asked about those statements, Catherine J. Mathis, a spokeswoman for The Times, declined to offer details. “At this time, we are not going to discuss the steps we may or may not take or discuss the way in which the climber was able to access the building,” she said.

A man later identified as David Malone, a 29-year-old activist from West Hartford, Conn., who studies Al Qaeda, scaled the face of the building in the predawn darkness early Wednesday. After unfurling a banner with the words “Bin Laden’s Plan” repeated on row after row, and staying on the building for about four hours, he surrendered to police officers and was arrested around 5:20 a.m.

Unlike the two previous climbers, Mr. Malone not attempt to make his way to the roof. Instead, he unfurled a banner around the fifth floor of the 52-story building, before climbing a few more stories. Several hours elapsed during which the police appeared to alternate between trying to go after the man and waiting for him to surrender.

Mr. Malone was taken out of the building’s West 40th Street entrance in handcuffs at 5:39 a.m. and placed in an ambulance. He was taken to St. Vincent’s Hospital in Manhattan and then to the Midtown South Precinct, where he was charged with reckless endangerment in the first degree; criminal mischief by intent to damage property; making graffiti; criminal trespass in the third degree; and disorderly conduct by creating a dangerous act.

Mr. Malone, who grew up on Bishop Road in West Hartford, a middle-class suburb of the Connecticut capital, played basketball at the Kingswood-Oxford School, a private high school where he graduated in 1997, according to local news reports.

No one answered the door at the Malone home in West Hartford on Wednesday afternoon.

Lynn Fraser, who lives across the street from the family, said that Mr. Malone “was always his own person” and “always had strong beliefs.” But most of the time, she said, “he was just a quiet kid” who “really just kept to himself.” Ms. Fraser, who has a son around Mr. Malone’s age, said she was vaguely aware that Mr. Malone was working on a politically oriented book but was “speechless” when reporters showed up in her driveway on Wednesday asking questions about him.

In New York City, Mr. Malone’s stunt became known to the authorities at 1:23 a.m., when police received a call alerting them that there was a person scaling the skyscraper, at 620 Eighth Avenue, between 40th and 41st Streets. The authorities closed off Eighth Avenue between 40th and 42nd Streets to traffic, as well as West 41st Street between Seventh and Eighth Avenues, diverting vehicles onto other streets. Sidewalks below the Times building were closed to pedestrians.

Police officers tried to catch the climber by cutting through a window on the fifth floor of the building, but after having briefly rested at that level, he had already climbed past them.

The climbing episodes have at this point become something of an embarrassment for The Times. On June 5, two men scaled the building, hours apart, reaching the roof before being arrested. The first was Alain Robert, a 45-year-old French stuntman known for climbing tall buildings; the second was Renaldo Clarke, 32, of Brooklyn, who said he wanted to draw attention to the problem of malaria.

At the time, officials at The Times said they would tighten security and take other precautions to prevent anyone from climbing up the building again.

Asked whether those measures were effective, Ms. Mathis, the spokeswoman for The Times, said, “While the steps we took were worthwhile, we believe other measures are needed.”

She added, “We are exploring additional measures, some temporary and some permanent, to prevent a recurrence but are not going to discuss the specific changes under consideration.”

Paul J. Browne, the Police Department’s chief spokesman, said, “We have increased our presence in the immediate aftermath of this latest climb and I understand that the Times is taking additional measures to discourage or defeat further attempts to gain access to the ceramic ladder.”

The Daily News reported on its Web site early Wednesday morning that it had received a call from the latest climber and that he had identified himself as David Malone, 29, of Connecticut, who had dropped out of the University of Michigan to study Al Qaeda.

According to the police, Mr. Malone spoke with Jill Coffey, a night editor at The Daily News, after climbing to the 10th floor, where he sat on a ledge for about two hours.

Meanwhile, officers from the Emergency Service Unit, the Hostage Negotiation Team and other units, upon learning of the phone call, tried to persuade Mr. Malone to come down.

“We wanted him to come down to the fifth floor and we persuaded him to do so by telling him he could talk in person with Coffey there and that apparently worked, because he came down to the fifth floor and he talked to Coffey about his bin Laden plan,” said Paul J. Browne, a police spokesman.

Mr. Malone’s Web site, also called “Bin Laden’s Plan” like the message on the banner he unfurled outside the Times building, states that Mr. Malone has been “independently researching bin Laden and publicly advocating the aggressive isolation and destruction of Al Qaeda.” The site goes on to claim that Mr. Malone “has successfully predicted some of the major events of bin Laden’s war” and is now trying to warn of efforts by the terrorist network to goad the United States to invade Pakistan and Iran. (Mr. Malone did not immediately respond to an e-mail message from The Times, sent while he was still on the building, requesting an interview.)
Witnesses said the climber began his ascent near the northern entrance to the building, on West 41st Street, and made his way toward the western entrance, which is on Eighth Avenue, opposite from the Port Authority Bus Terminal.

“I thought he was a worker,” said Michael Pabon, 32, who was outside the bus terminal when he saw the man begin to scale the building. “He turned up to the letter ‘H’ and climbed above it,” Mr. Pabon said, referring to the letter H in the “The” of the New York Times logo, which is made up of giant black letters affixed to the ceramic rods on the Eighth Avenue side of the building.

It was above the “T” in “The” that the climber hung a white banner with red fliers stuck to it. The banner referenced Mr. Malone’s Web site about Mr. bin Laden. Some of the red fliers were also stuck to the windows of various floors in the building as the climber went up.

Witnesses said the climber was using his cellphone repeatedly during his ascent. “He’s some kind of professional,” Mr. Pabon said. “You could see he knows what he’s doing.”

After reaching the 11th floor, Mr. Malone faced out toward the street and talked on his cellphone for several minutes. He then descended to a spot between the 9th and 10th floors. Police officers on the fifth floor had breached a floor-to-ceiling window and some were outfitted with climbing cables and hard hats. A large inflatable cushion had been placed on the sidewalk in front of the main entrance, presumably to save the man if he jumped.

The Times building was designed by the architect Renzo Piano and opened last year. Both Mr. Robert and the second climber also scaled the building using the horizontal ceramic rods that sheath the exterior — and are one of the building’s most distinctive features. The rods are intended to allow sunlight while keeping out heat, helping the building use energy more efficiently.

There is a long history of attention-grabbing stunts at New York skyscrapers. The French stunt artist Philippe Petit walked along a high wire strung between the twin towers of the World Trade Center in 1974, a feat that is the subject of a documentary, “Man on Wire.” In 1977, the mountain climber George H. Willig scaled the south tower of the trade center.

In 2006, another stuntman, Jeb Corliss, was arrested after trying to jump off the observation deck of the Empire State Building.

Prosecuting the stuntmen has sometimes proved difficult.

In the most recent cases, Mr. Robert, who climbed the Times building on June 5, faced misdemeanor counts of reckless endangerment, trespassing and graffiti. But on June 12 a grand jury decided to dismiss those charges, though it did allow Manhattan prosecutors to proceed with two counts of disorderly conduct against Mr. Robert. Lawyers for Mr. Clarke, who faced the same charges as Mr. Robert, said they hoped that he, too, would face only disorderly conduct charges.

On June 26, City Council members introduced a bill that would explicitly make it illegal to scale or jump from a building 25 feet or taller.
Councilman Peter F. Vallone Jr., a Queens Democrat and former prosecutor who sponsored the bill, said in a statement:

We need to deter more copy cats, otherwise New York will become a Disneyland for daredevils. Soon anyone selling their book or ginsu knives will be scaling buildings and unfurling signs. We may not deter all jumpers and climbers, but they should be aware that their next stunt could take place on the inside of a jail cell.
Both The Times and the police expressed dismay at the latest stunt.
“We don’t think these antics should be romanticized in any way,” Mr. Browne, the police spokesman, said, adding, “The individuals should be held accountable, prosecuted for it.”

Ms. Mathis, the spokeswoman for The Times, said: “This is a very serious matter. The climber’s irresponsible and dangerous action jeopardized his safety and the safety of others.

Copyright 2008 The New York Times Company

Jasonik
July 9th, 2008, 04:56 PM
...The Times was looking to remove about 9 feet of the ceramic rods from the bottom of the curtain-like screen...

Plan B. (http://www.botachtactical.com/tagrho.html)

ZippyTheChimp
July 9th, 2008, 06:32 PM
Plan C (http://www.health-safety-signs.uk.com/productimages/caution-high-voltage.gif)

The Benniest
July 9th, 2008, 08:24 PM
If people weren't stupid enough to climb buildings in the first place, the Times Building wouldn't have this problem at all. :) We wouldn't have to remove ~ 9 ft. of the bars off the ground, use high voltage (;)), or anything.

NYC4Life
July 10th, 2008, 01:47 AM
My job is just around the corner from the Times on 40th, and there is virtually no visible security. I spotted just 2 "security guards" working a tower that extends for a whole block on all sides.

scumonkey
July 10th, 2008, 02:18 AM
I was hopping for the electrification of the rods but alas...
they already started removing them- I don't think this will stop 'em if they really wanna climb:rolleyes:

NYC4Life
July 10th, 2008, 07:01 AM
It won't deter those looking for a thrill and certainly alot of attention, but it will at least make it more difficult to climb. I observed the rods from street level and looks faily easy for anyone daring enough to climb.

BrooklynLove
July 10th, 2008, 08:13 AM
The climbing will stop once the media stops giving it so much attention. This guy's attempt was pathetic and his cause tired yet he still gets plenty of coverage.

stache
July 10th, 2008, 09:46 AM
Slow news day.

lofter1
July 10th, 2008, 11:23 AM
Ripping Renzo's Rods From The Times Tower Facade

CURBED (http://curbed.com/archives/2008/07/10/ripping_renzos_rods_from_the_times_tower_facade.ph p#reader_comments)
July 10, 2008

http://curbed.com/uploads/2008_07_NYTDeRod1.JPG
Workmen pulling the rods from the north face of the NY Times Tower.

Deconstructionism is taking on a whole new meaning over at the
New York Times Tower on Eighth Avenue where an entire nest of
socially conscious spidermen (http://curbed.com/archives/2008/06/05/spiderman_2.php) went to work de-rodding part of the
building yesterday. Shortly after Spidey Number 3 (http://curbed.com/archives/2008/07/09/spiderman_iii.php) was taken into
custody for scaling Renzo Piano's ladder-like facade early Wednesday
morning a crew was put to work dismantling the lower-lying rods above
West 41st Street. Previous attempts to apply a pest repellent (http://curbed.com/archives/2008/06/06/times_tower_installs_spider_repellent.php) at the
Times Tower clearly have not been successful. The gang in charge at the
Old Gray Lady have high hopes that fewer rods will thwart the web of
climbers and other attention grabbers, but had previously said it wouldn't
alter the Piano facade. The Vice Chair of the Times Company said "We’re
going to sort this out within the design sensibility of the building."
We'll have to wait to see what news is fit to print on this one.

· After 3rd Climber, Times Alters Its Building's Facade (http://www.nytimes.com/2008/07/10/nyregion/10climb.html?ref=nyregion) [NYT]
· Times Tower Installs Spider Repellent (http://curbed.com/archives/2008/06/06/times_tower_installs_spider_repellent.php) [Curbed]

http://curbed.com/uploads/2008_07_NYTDeRod2.JPG
Prying free one of the ceramic rods.

http://curbed.com/uploads/2008_07_NYTDeRod3.JPG
A full body-height of rods will be coming down.

http://curbed.com/uploads/2008_07_NYTDeRod4.JPG
Previously the rods extended all the way down to the awnings.

http://curbed.com/uploads/2008_07_NYTDeRod5.JPG
Renzo Piano's clean edges will now be ragged and tattered.

nyt

NYatKNIGHT
July 10th, 2008, 11:34 AM
Why not just coat the bottom rods with a slippery substance. That'll learn 'em.

lofter1
July 10th, 2008, 12:07 PM
Yeah ^

Some sort of mechanism up top that drizzles oil all down the facade and keeps those rods "slippery when wet" ...

ZippyTheChimp
July 10th, 2008, 01:02 PM
How about making the lower rods freewheeling - like a rolling pin.

The Benniest
July 10th, 2008, 02:57 PM
^^ That'd be funny to watch. :D

TREPYE
July 10th, 2008, 03:36 PM
http://www.nydailynews.com/img/2008/07/10/gal_bramhall_07_10.jpg (javascript:LoadGallery(nextImage, false))

(Daily news)

ZippyTheChimp
July 10th, 2008, 04:00 PM
^^ That'd be funny to watch. :DThey could install cameras, run features in the newspaper, maybe air footage on that silly show, MXC (http://www.tv.com/most-extreme-elimination-challenge/show/19800/summary.html?tag=tabs;summary)

lofter1
July 11th, 2008, 11:07 AM
Renzo Relents ...

Architect Supports Changes to Times Tower


http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2008/07/11/nyregion/11times_650.jpg
Marilynn K. Yee/The New York Times
The New York Times Building’s facade is being modified to deter people from climbing the tower.


NY TIMES (http://www.nytimes.com/2008/07/11/nyregion/11building.html?_r=1&ref=nyregion&oref=slogin)
By SEWELL CHAN
July 11, 2008


The architect Renzo Piano said on Thursday that he supported plans by officials of The New York Times to alter the facade of the newspaper’s year-old tower, which he designed, to prevent people from scaling the veil of ceramic rods that sheathe the tower, as three men have done in the past five weeks.


Mr. Piano, who designed the 52-story tower in Midtown Manhattan, said he was “totally in agreement” about the need for the adjustments, which include removing the rods closest to the base of the building and installing permanent glass panels to hinder people from climbing onto the glass canopies around the building and then onto the rods.


The final scope of the alterations has not yet been determined, Mr. Piano said in a telephone interview from Sicily, where he was on vacation, but the changes will probably occur over the next few weeks.


On Wednesday morning, a Connecticut man, David Malone, 29, climbed about 11 stories and hung a banner from the Eighth Avenue side of the building, which faces the Port Authority Bus Terminal. He used the rods like a ladder, as two earlier climbers — a French stuntman, Alain Robert, and a Brooklyn man, Renaldo Clarke — did on June 5.


Hours after Mr. Malone’s climb, workers began to remove a few rods, but officials at The Times have declined to comment on that or on any other changes to the building.


“I’m frankly quite worried about this new fashion of going up on buildings,” Mr. Piano said in the interview. “This is what I call an inappropriate use of the building.”


Mr. Piano said of the tower: “It was built to be responsive to design after 9/11. The big challenge was to make a building that is not like a fortress, but that is transparent, and open to the city.” He added, “This problem of climbers is honestly something we didn’t think about.”


Mr. Piano said that his architectural firm, Renzo Piano Building Workshop, began meeting with Times officials immediately after the building was scaled on June 5.


In a separate phone interview, Bernard Plattner, a partner at the firm, which is based in Paris, said he had taken part in several conference calls with Michael Golden, vice chairman of The New York Times Company, and David A. Thurm, a senior vice president of The Times.


“We have to give a very strong sign to the police that there is something effectively happening to prevent fanatics from climbing the building,” Mr. Plattner said.


The main idea under discussion — shortening the veil of rods by what Mr. Piano called “six or seven feet” from where they begin — would deter most would-be climbers and “fundamentally doesn’t alter this building,” he said.


On the northern and southern sides of the building, he added, little glass panels would be put in place — similar to plywood barriers temporarily installed after the previous stunts — to prevent people from climbing onto the canopies.


Mr. Piano said that he was looking forward to other, more important changes in the building: the completion of retail spaces on the tower’s ground floor (where Muji, a Japanese clothing and housewares store, has opened a shop) and the opening of a roof garden. :D


Copyright 2008 The New York Times Company

BrooklynLove
July 12th, 2008, 10:49 PM
http://www.nydailynews.com/img/2008/07/10/gal_bramhall_07_10.jpg (http://javascript<b></b>:LoadGallery(nextImage, false))

(Daily news)

This cartoonist and I must be related.

Wrightfan
July 14th, 2008, 04:58 PM
so when the next guy uses a ladder or other such aid to span the 9 foot gap and ascend the remaining rods- do they then remove another 9 ft?

antinimby
July 14th, 2008, 05:02 PM
That is the plan.

NoyokA
July 14th, 2008, 06:05 PM
Hopefully eventually until the entire height is reached.

BrooklynLove
July 14th, 2008, 06:49 PM
so when the next guy uses a ladder or other such aid to span the 9 foot gap and ascend the remaining rods- do they then remove another 9 ft?

Or ignore him.

stache
July 14th, 2008, 07:21 PM
Where's the fun in that? ;)

brianac
July 23rd, 2008, 04:48 PM
July 23, 2008, 3:00 pm

Building a Better Climber Deterrent

By Tina Kelley (http://cityroom.blogs.nytimes.com/author/tkelley/)

http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2008/07/23/nyregion/climb-190.jpg
The scene outside the New York Times building on Wednesday as officials discussed the recent climber problem. (Photo: Andrew Henderson/The New York Times)

The vertical playground is closing.

In an effort to keep all (http://cityroom.blogs.nytimes.com/2008/06/05/man-scales-new-york-times-building/) those (http://cityroom.blogs.nytimes.com/2008/06/05/yes-another-man-is-climbing-times-building/) climbers (http://cityroom.blogs.nytimes.com/2008/07/09/after-3-climbs-facade-at-times-building-is-altered) from crawling on the New York Times building, a small crowd of architects, Times administrators and security experts gathered this morning on West 40th Street, near Eighth Avenue, to figure out a more elegant solution than the plywood barriers erected to keep people with causes — and death wishes — from scaling the facade.

In the spirit of If-You-Rebuild-It-They-Won’t-Come, Bernard Plattner, a partner at the firm of Renzo Piano (http://rpbw.r.ui-pro.com/), which designed the building, held up prefabricated pieces of something resembling a sample of gray countertop to see if the dozen or so people liked the look.

As soon a reporter approached, notebook in hand, their media sensors were activated, and they quickly regrouped and encouraged us to talk to Michael Golden, vice chairman of The New York Times Company.

“The decision has been made to stop people from being able to climb the building, within the design of the building,” Mr. Golden said.

He declined to describe what sort of materials were under consideration, for fear of giving a map to future climbers.

“We’ve done all this, and it’s effective but ugly,” he said, pointing to the plywood. “We’ve got a gorgeous building, it works beautifully in every respect save one, and we’re trying to close that final thousandth of a percent.”

http://cityroom.blogs.nytimes.com/2008/07/23/building-a-better-climber-deterrent/

Copyright 2008 (http://www.nytimes.com/ref/membercenter/help/copyright.html) The New York Times Company (http://www.nytco.com/)

TREPYE
July 23rd, 2008, 05:18 PM
^ Oh boy I really hope that they dont eff this view up!


For those who do not like the building walk through the lobby, its a real treat! The transparency theme really comes out at street level. And when you go outside make sure you look up at this.....
http://i130.photobucket.com/albums/p242/Lofter1/NY%20Times%20Tower/L1NYT_77f2.jpg

Its an incredible experience to look up at this view of the tower. The pics no way do justice to the actual experience of looking at all that structural detail . Almost surreal, as if you were inside a giant machine.

antinimby
August 12th, 2008, 11:22 PM
This pic caught my eye. I like how it looks blue-ish under the weather and lighting conditions...

http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3031/2754410735_633954b7b6.jpg
s.kelly (http://flickr.com/photos/skelly/2754410735/sizes/m/)

Finnster
August 13th, 2008, 11:17 AM
Does anyone know what the status of the lighting is? I thought they were going to light the whole building from the outside and the top is still dark at night. Anyone? Bueller?

LeCom
August 13th, 2008, 02:02 PM
Mr. Piano said of the tower: “It was built to be responsive to design after 9/11. The big challenge was to make a building that is not like a fortress, but that is transparent, and open to the city.” He added, “This problem of climbers is honestly something we didn’t think about.”
Mr. Piano, I respect you but you're a dolt if you design a building with essentially four enormous ladders for the facade and don't think that people climbing it might be a problem. Not every guy on the street is an architectural critic that sees the rods and appreciates the energy-saving horizontal array as a passive-solar design feature. Some just look and go "check it out, it's pretty much a ladder".

lofter1
August 13th, 2008, 02:15 PM
To be fair, Piano designed other buildings prior to the Times Tower which used the ceramic rods as part of the facade.

Was there ever an instance with climbers prior to NYC?

antinimby
August 14th, 2008, 06:29 AM
Getting the retail space at the corner of Eighth & 40th St. ready for a Dean & DeLuca...

http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3217/2762182018_76631a18b9_b.jpg
wyliepoon (http://flickr.com/photos/wyliepoon/2762182018/)

The Benniest
August 14th, 2008, 09:54 AM
^ I'm sure coffee lovers who work in the Times building love that this is going in. :p :cool:

Derek2k3
September 6th, 2008, 06:40 AM
http://www.nydailynews.com/ny_local/2008/09/03/2008-09-03_bill_to_halt_highrise_stunt_nuts.html

http://assets.nydailynews.com/img/2008/09/04/alg_nytimes.jpg
David Malone scales the New York Times building on July 9.

Bill to halt high-rise stunt nuts

BY FRANK LOMBARDI
DAILY NEWS CITY HALL BUREAU
Thursday, September 4th 2008, 1:22 AM


Spider-Man beware!

Climbing, hanging, jumping or swinging on or from Gotham's skyscrapers is going to be hazardous to your freedom.

Taking aim at would-be stunt idiots who want to make jungle gyms of the city's high-rise structures, the City Council is set to pass a bill today making such acts, or attempts, a criminal A-misdemeanor punishable by up to one year in jail and a $1,000 fine.

Councilman Peter Vallone Jr. (D-Queens), the main sponsor of the bill, originally aimed it at the likes of daredevil parachute jumper Jeb Corliss, who was nabbed by guards as he was about to jump off the observation deck of the Empire State Building on April 27, 2006.

The measure gained further impetus this summer with the seeming-epidemic of nut-climbers who scaled the 52-story New York Times tower at 620 Eigth Ave. Two men - pro-climber Alain Robert and amateur-copycat Renaldo (Ray) Clarke - made separate successful climbs almost to the top on June 5. A third man, David Malone, surrendered to cops after his partial climb on July 9.

"We don't want New York City to become a Disneyland for daredevils," said Vallone, chairman of the Public Safety Committee.

According to Vallone, his committee is set to vote on the bill this morning and send it to the full Council for adoption later in the afternoon. Mayor Bloomberg supports the bill and is expected to sign it into law. The new anti-Spider-Man law will take effect 90 days after the mayor signs it.

Police and prosecutors have testified at hearings that the stunt creeps have avoided stiff penalties because existing laws don't make their acts punishable without having to prove reckless endangerment.

Vallone's law will make mere acts like scaling a building a crime without having to prove they endangered life or property.

Several minor changes have been made in the bill since its last hearing in June, including raising the height of buildings covered by the prohibition from 25 feet to 50 feet. Also, a prohibition against "suspending" oneself from a building was added to expressly cover bungee-jumping, rappelling or similar acts. Recreational climbing structures and training facilities were exempted.

Vallone, a former prosecutor, warned would-be Spider-Men that "their next stunt can be inside a jail cell."

flombardi@nydailynews.com

NYC4Life
September 18th, 2008, 05:21 AM
September 16, 2008

http://img528.imageshack.us/img528/5752/nytimestowerxl5.jpg

http://img411.imageshack.us/img411/930/nytimestower2vy2.jpg


Looking Uptown from West 33rd Street & 8th Avenue

http://img528.imageshack.us/img528/4519/west33rdstreetand8thavebw8.jpg

londonlawyer
September 18th, 2008, 12:35 PM
The corner of 34th and 8th with that Riese restaurant and all of that other crap is one that I hate with a passion.

Daquan13
September 18th, 2008, 03:25 PM
Seems as though this building is being scaled more than the Twins were!

NYC4Life
September 18th, 2008, 10:04 PM
The corner of 34th and 8th with that Riese restaurant and all of that other crap is one that I hate with a passion.

That's the ugliest stretch of 34th street. Coming north from 8th avenue, all you see are the rears of ugly buildings.

lofter1
October 4th, 2008, 12:45 AM
Thar she glows ...

http://i130.photobucket.com/albums/p242/Lofter1/NY%20Times%20Tower/L1NYT_855.jpg

http://i130.photobucket.com/albums/p242/Lofter1/NY%20Times%20Tower/L1NYT_853.jpg

http://i130.photobucket.com/albums/p242/Lofter1/NY%20Times%20Tower/L1NYT_852.jpg

nytimes

The Benniest
October 5th, 2008, 02:27 AM
Beautiful. The Times Building looks beautiful during sunset. :cool:

scumonkey
December 8th, 2008, 07:08 PM
Times Co. to Borrow Against Building
http://www.nytimes.com/2008/12/08/business/media/08times.html?_r=1&ref=todayspaper


By RICHARD PÉREZ-PEÑA (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/reference/timestopics/people/p/richard_perezpena/index.html?inline=nyt-per)
Published: December 7, 2008
The New York Times Company (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/news/business/companies/new_york_times_company/index.html?inline=nyt-org) plans to borrow up to $225 million against its mid-Manhattan headquarters building, to ease a potential cash flow squeeze as the company grapples with tighter credit and shrinking profits.
The company has retained Cushman & Wakefield, the real estate firm, to act as its agent to secure financing, either in the form of a mortgage or a sale-leaseback arrangement, said James M. Follo, the Times Company’s chief financial officer.
The Times Company owns 58 percent of the 52-story, 1.5 million-square-foot tower on Eighth Avenue, which was designed by the architect Renzo Piano (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/reference/timestopics/people/p/renzo_piano/index.html?inline=nyt-per), and completed last year. The developer Forest City Ratner owns the rest of the building. The Times Company’s portion of the building is not currently mortgaged, and some investors have complained that the company has too much of its capital tied up in that real estate.
The company has two revolving lines of credit, each with a ceiling of $400 million, roughly the amount outstanding on the two combined. One of those lines is set to expire in May, and finding a replacement would be difficult given the economic climate and the company’s worsening finances. Analysts have said for months that selling or borrowing against assets would be the company’s best option for averting a cash flow problem next year.
Standard & Poor’s (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/news/business/companies/standard_and_poors/index.html?inline=nyt-org) recently lowered its credit rating on the Times Company below investment grade, and Moody’s Investors Service (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/news/business/companies/moodys_corporation/index.html?inline=nyt-org) has said it was considering a similar move. Times Company stock, which has lost more than half its value this year, closed on Friday at $7.64, down 30 cents.

antinimby
December 15th, 2008, 01:42 AM
Hurray, Dean & Deluca is now finally open!


http://img113.imageshack.us/img113/3839/img0331py1.jpg


The inside decor is a bit too icy and sterile looking. I would have used warmer colors but oh well...

http://img117.imageshack.us/img117/3449/img0334bw1.jpg

http://img386.imageshack.us/img386/1273/img0335km6.jpg

http://img168.imageshack.us/img168/8544/img0336ou3.jpg

http://img355.imageshack.us/img355/8052/img0337jv6.jpg

http://img355.imageshack.us/img355/859/img0338sl3.jpg

http://img266.imageshack.us/img266/5113/img0339ki0.jpg

antinimby
December 15th, 2008, 01:50 AM
The entrance to subway station on the corner is also open for business...


http://img266.imageshack.us/img266/9872/img0340vn1.jpg

http://img117.imageshack.us/img117/6032/img0341sg9.jpg

antinimby
December 15th, 2008, 01:55 AM
Meanwhile, the Times staff will have another dining option very soon as Schnipper's at the other corner on Eighth will be "coming soon"...


http://img117.imageshack.us/img117/2002/img0343to2.jpg

http://img117.imageshack.us/img117/5488/img0344rz5.jpg

sfenn1117
December 15th, 2008, 03:26 AM
thanks for the photos.

DarrylStrawberry
January 23rd, 2009, 08:16 AM
Times Co. Is in Talks to Sell Part of Building

By TERRY PRISTIN (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/reference/timestopics/people/p/terry_pristin/index.html?inline=nyt-per)
Published: January 22, 2009

The New York Times Company (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/news/business/companies/new_york_times_company/index.html?inline=nyt-org) is in advanced negotiations to sell a substantial portion of its 52-story headquarters building on Eighth Avenue in Midtown Manhattan to W. P. Carey & Company, an investment and management firm that specializes in so-called sale-leaseback transactions, the newspaper company confirmed on Thursday.

Under the deal, the Times Company would sell the 19 floors it currently uses in the building but not the 6 floors it leases to other tenants. The Times Company would continue to occupy and manage its floors and would have the right to buy back the space at a predetermined price when a 10-year lease expires. Designed by the architect Renzo Piano (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/reference/timestopics/people/p/renzo_piano/index.html?inline=nyt-per), the building stretches from 40th to 41st Street. It was completed in 2007.

A spokeswoman for the Times Company, Catherine J. Mathis, declined to say how much W. P. Carey would pay for the space, what it would cost to repurchase it or what the rent would be. The Times Company previously said that it was pursuing a sale-leaseback arrangement for up to $225 million and would use the proceeds to repay some of the company’s long-term debt.

“Because we are in continuing discussions, we cannot comment on the status of the sale-leaseback,” Ms. Mathis said Thursday. Guy B. Lawrence, a spokesman for W. P. Carey, declined comment on the discussions.

The Times Company owns 58 percent of the 1.5-million-square-foot tower. The developer Forest City Ratner owns the rest of the building. Forest City’s portion will not be included in the sale.

In a sale-leaseback transaction, the seller maintains control over its space and the responsibility for paying taxes, maintenance and utility costs. W. P. Carey’s investors would be guaranteed a specific return for the life of the lease.

Executives and brokers who specialize in sale-leasebacks say it is unusual for a transaction to include a buyback provision at a specified price. Typically, a seller may be given a first right of refusal.

Founded in 1973 by William Polk Carey, W. P. Carey has its headquarters in Rockefeller Center in New York. It operates in 14 countries and arranges sale-leasebacks for a wide variety of industries. The company has about $10 billion in assets under management, about $2 billion of which is owned by its public company. The other $8 billion in assets are owned by W. P. Carey’s four real estate investment trusts and managed by the public company.

An urban office tower would not be a typical acquisition for W. P. Carey, which usually buys industrial buildings, retail properties or suburban office parks. This week, the company paid $15 million for a cold-storage facility in Glendale Heights, Ill., which is leased to Kronos Foods. In a recent $39 million deal, W. P. Carey acquired four manufacturing plants and a headquarters building in North Carolina leased to Frontier Spinning Mills.

The Times Company has been seeking various ways to raise money to pay down its debt. One of its two $400 million revolving credit lines will expire in May, but the company has said that it will not seek to renew the full amount.

This week, the company said it had reached an agreement for a $250 million loan from the Mexican billionaire Carlos Slim Helú (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/reference/timestopics/people/s/carlos_slim_helu/index.html?inline=nyt-per).

nykid17
January 26th, 2009, 07:35 PM
New Restaurant

http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3443/3230093152_9ec9750547.jpg

http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3298/3228718665_4597e7d0e7.jpg

Jasonik
January 26th, 2009, 08:47 PM
I'm a bit leery of establishments that proclaim their "quality" in neon signage...

scumonkey
January 26th, 2009, 11:00 PM
It's a burger/fish taco joint, from the former owners of Hale and Hearty Soups- can't wait!
http://schnippers.com/images/SQK-ABOUT.jpg

BrooklynLove
January 27th, 2009, 12:12 AM
It's a burger/fish taco joint, from the former owners of Hale and Hearty Soups- can't wait!

Hopefully they won't be as insane as they are with the H&H prices. Who am I kidding - of course they will be.

antinimby
January 31st, 2009, 03:16 AM
^ I checked out their prices today (well yesterday now). They were pretty good.

Obviously, they're open now...

http://img294.imageshack.us/img294/7969/img0575uy7.jpg

http://img120.imageshack.us/img120/8545/img0582he9.jpg

http://img297.imageshack.us/img297/9901/img0581jo4.jpg



Meanwhile, on the 40 St side next to MUJI, the Japanese restaurant INAKAYA is also about to open...

http://img187.imageshack.us/img187/4396/img0583op2.jpg

ablarc
February 4th, 2009, 06:25 AM
^ Little pockets hoping for prosperity.

Fingers crossed.

TREPYE
February 7th, 2009, 06:12 PM
http://image.guim.co.uk/Guardian/arts/gallery/2007/nov/26/architecture.photography/GD5406466@Jonathan-Glancey-arch-2976.jpg (http://www.guardian.co.uk/arts/gallery/2007/nov/26/architecture.photography?picture=331370918)

What is it about this tower that is so......Gotham? I have been trying to put my finger on it but I cannot define its classic NYC architectural quality.

Tectonic
February 7th, 2009, 06:52 PM
The spire and crown, done differently from ESB and Chrysler but regal just the same.

RandySavage
February 7th, 2009, 07:16 PM
What is it about this tower that is so......Gotham? I have been trying to put my finger on it but I cannot define its classic NYC architectural quality.

I think there a couple reasons:

1. In some ways it is reminiscent of the neo-gothic style:
http://patrickmarini.files.wordpress.com/2006/07/ny_ge.jpghttp://www.american-architecture.info/USA/CHICAGO/CHIC-LN/017A.gif

2. The exterior cables, steel bars and color bring to mind NYC's bridges:
http://www.nyc-architecture.com/TEN/001-bridge_cables_1_small.jpg

TREPYE
February 9th, 2009, 12:17 AM
Yeah the crown definitely gives it some NYC flare.....but I gotta say that the observation about the cables and stuff how it relates to the bridges is very astute....I hadn't thought of that one before, good one. One more reason to love this tower.

nykid17
February 9th, 2009, 01:05 AM
Best new mOdern buiLding in toWn
wHo doeSn'T loVe iT?
[don't answer] lol

TREPYE
February 10th, 2009, 12:48 AM
http://images.photo1.walgreens.com/232323232%7Ffp4334%3A%3Enu%3D3234%3E2%3A3%3E4%3B2% 3E23252%3A35%3A3963ot1lsi

http://images.photo1.walgreens.com/232323232%7Ffp43246%3Enu%3D323%3A%3E9%3A%3B%3E%3A% 3C3%3EWSNRCG%3D3233924357336nu0mrj

MidtownGuy
April 15th, 2009, 08:49 PM
Schnipper's put some chairs out, so that's good.

http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3576/3445400435_89e50f11b8_o.jpg




and the restaurant "Montenapo" finally reveals itself:

http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3581/3446215624_ff7067e733_o.jpg

Nice view of the birch trees



The signage on both of these places is very nice.

http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3328/3446215804_6c9126b844_o.jpg

NYCboy1212
May 3rd, 2009, 11:34 PM
Heres some pics ive taken
http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3661/3499462756_7b32e30eea_b.jpg

http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3343/3498645177_4c123ba630_b.jpg

http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3600/3499464052_92e85636b4_b.jpg

kz1000ps
May 4th, 2009, 12:31 PM
Black and white pictures are a perfect match for this building. Good stuff!

MidtownGuy
May 13th, 2009, 10:29 PM
http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3327/3530063488_eec602be1c_o.jpg

Common Sense
May 14th, 2009, 09:16 PM
Hey does anyone know if this building is lit up at night? I remember the pics of the big yellow lights. Is the pole lit?

Derek2k3
May 23rd, 2009, 01:56 PM
It is, but the spire is so thin it doesn't make much of an impact.

http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3350/3556377273_23a4d2ff51_o.jpg

Derek2k3
May 24th, 2009, 02:42 PM
A photo from mudpig (http://bighugelabs.com/flickr/onblack.php?id=3553430775&size=large) that shows how the spire is lit. Of course the image is enhanced...

http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2472/3553430775_9b98ce3bd1_b.jpg

Common Sense
May 24th, 2009, 05:22 PM
Very cool. I guess with all the inside lights on you never see skeleton lit by the flood lights. One of my favorite new buildings.

lesterp4
May 24th, 2009, 05:26 PM
I was under the impression that the whole top was supposed to be lit, not just the spire.

MidtownGuy
May 25th, 2009, 11:18 PM
Me too, that would be so much more dramatic

Jasonik
May 27th, 2009, 12:25 PM
What about the roof garden?

kz1000ps
June 23rd, 2009, 07:34 PM
Random observation -- 1 Penn Plaza and the NYTT look like brother and sister, respectively, from way down here:

http://img31.imageshack.us/img31/7855/img2027v.jpg

meesalikeu
August 5th, 2009, 04:30 PM
as seen from the esb saturday morning...

http://i51.photobucket.com/albums/f370/meesalikeu2/number%20three/P1200222.jpg

nykid17
October 1st, 2009, 11:54 PM
Times Tower on cloudy Gotham day:
http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2567/3972854517_db842e5d03_b.jpg

NoyokA
October 2nd, 2009, 01:17 AM
Random observation -- 1 Penn Plaza and the NYTT look like brother and sister, respectively, from way down here:

http://img31.imageshack.us/img31/7855/img2027v.jpg

Two dreary boxes.

stache
October 2nd, 2009, 02:50 AM
With different fathers.

londonlawyer
October 2nd, 2009, 08:15 AM
Two dreary boxes.

You don't like the NYT?

Derek2k3
October 2nd, 2009, 12:33 PM
http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3218/2431184895_b0976943cd_o.jpg
rider314 (http://www.flickr.com/photos/12420203@N02/2431185071/in/photostream/)

http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2267/2431184989_f4041050fc_o.jpg
rider314 (http://www.flickr.com/photos/12420203@N02/2431185071/in/photostream/)


http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3111/2431185071_48d1b33679_o.jpg
rider314 (http://www.flickr.com/photos/12420203@N02/2431185071/in/photostream/)

Tectonic
October 5th, 2009, 10:26 PM
Day and Night

http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3561/3985859326_677f9029d5_o.jpg

http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3460/3985102693_4d5db062ba_o.jpg

http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2642/3985102905_58ac3b850e_o.jpg

antinimby
October 5th, 2009, 10:31 PM
Hands down, the best skyscraper built in the city this decade.

nykid17
October 6th, 2009, 01:45 AM
That crown just screams Gotham.
And if you look at Derek's second picture, towards the top, before the crown, the verticality of the rods blend in to almost appear as slabs of slate.
There's something with this tower.
I can't put my finger on it, but I will.

oquatanginwan
October 7th, 2009, 04:42 PM
That latest batch of pictures is excellent. I agree with the earlier comments, this tower is massively underrated. The ceramic rods look like stone in the sunshine and the crown looks like modern Gothic pinnacles. It's just an amazing amalgamation of the modern glass and steel skyscraper and the classic stone of Gotham.

Daquan13
October 8th, 2009, 12:10 PM
Great pics!

Derek2k3
October 26th, 2009, 02:19 AM
http://72.51.38.241/~corecode/uploads/photo/uploaded_photos/corecode_aianycfa/209/HM%20White.jpg

http://www.hmwhitesa.com/case-study/new-york-times-building/rooftop-garden_01.html

HM White Site Architects
New York Times Building Garden Court and Sky Garden ADDRESS: 1 Times Square, New York, NY CLIENT: Forest City Ratner Companies ARCHITECT: Renzo Piano Building Workshop with FXFOWLE Architects ENGINEERING: Thornton Tomasetti Engineers / WSP Flack + Kurtz LANDSCAPE ARCHITECT: HM White Site Architects with Cornelia Orberlander


http://www.hmwhitesa.com/Images/case_NYT_intro_1a.gif


New York Times Building
Rooftop Garden

THE CROWN

The rooftop garden design for the 52nd floor of the New York Times Building is currently in progress with installed completion anticipated for Fall 2009.

The rooftop garden showcases a glass pavilion surrounded and connected with a lush landscape for building tenants floating over the City. The leaves of the trees flutter in the summer breezes with an audible rustle while casting shaded relief from the sun on the rooftop. The trees frame the garden and establish an intermediate verdant enclosure to the urban vistas beyond.

The outward presence of the garden establishes a new urban landmark. The crown of Red Maple trees, visible from the street and afar, creates an iconic symbol of the Hudson Valley ecology and change of season in the Manhattan skyline.


http://www.hmwhitesa.com/Images/case_NYT_2_1b.jpg

lofter1
October 26th, 2009, 02:34 AM
What are the chances that the roof garden will be on next year's Open House New York?

antinimby
December 7th, 2009, 01:59 AM
You can just tell which floors are occupied by the newspaper and which floors are rented out to other companies.

Notice the cafeteria, too (hint: double height floor and orange in color)

By the way, check out neighbor 11 Times Square also. Looks good from that angle, doesn't it?

http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2765/4161250608_7695922bc4_b.jpg
Tim Conway (http://www.flickr.com/photos/timconway/4161250608/sizes/l/)

MidtownGuy
December 7th, 2009, 03:48 AM
As can be seen in this photo, the crown is very dark at night, a non-presence.

Alonzo-ny
December 7th, 2009, 06:01 AM
Whatever did happen to the exterior lighting?

BrooklynLove
December 7th, 2009, 09:05 AM
Just a guess, but maybe a cost savings measure?

lofter1
December 7th, 2009, 12:11 PM
The roof-top garden is still being worked on. Maybe the lighting will come with completion of that.




http://72.51.38.241/~corecode/uploads/photo/uploaded_photos/corecode_aianycfa/209/HM%20White.jpg

http://www.hmwhitesa.com/case-study/new-york-times-building/rooftop-garden_01.html

New York Times Building
Rooftop Garden

THE CROWN

The rooftop garden design for the 52nd floor of the New York Times Building is currently in progress with installed completion anticipated for Fall 2009.

Derek2k3
December 7th, 2009, 12:21 PM
The building does have exterior lights on, it's just that the interior lights drown them out since the tower uses clear glass.
In that pic just compare the opaque areas of the exterior i.e. (the mechanical floors) with the exterior walls of other buildings. I've only seen spotlights shning from the lower levels and from the Port Authority, which explains why it's so faint near the top. Also the spire is lit and all the tension rods on the north and south elevations are lit.

Derek2k3
January 24th, 2010, 10:30 PM
http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4031/4297753880_916e1a7440_b.jpg
david gardener (http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidgardener/4297753880/in/pool-newyorkers)


http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2706/4300124549_bfbb540632_b.jpg
mudpig (http://www.flickr.com/photos/11746711@N08/4300124549/)

antinimby
January 25th, 2010, 12:12 AM
One Worldwide Plaza is the star of that ^ show right there.

fioco
January 25th, 2010, 04:48 PM
Yes, 'a star', on a stage crowded with aristocracy, celebrities and wannabes. Must be New York!

econ_tim
August 15th, 2010, 04:25 PM
http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4100/4894364515_273bc2e28c_b.jpg

MidtownGuy
August 16th, 2010, 01:51 PM
The crown is so dead at night.

Derek2k3
October 1st, 2010, 02:20 AM
http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4104/5022776593_06ba14f573_b.jpg
antonkisselgoff (http://www.flickr.com/photos/antonkisselgoff/5022776593/sizes/l/in/photostream/)





http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4085/5022777705_01cced9f60_b.jpg
antonkisselgoff (http://www.flickr.com/photos/antonkisselgoff/5022777705/sizes/l/in/photostream/)

JCMAN320
October 1st, 2010, 12:31 PM
The crown is so dead at night.

I thought the renderings showed the crown lit up at night. Someone forget to install a light switch or bulbs?

lofter1
October 1st, 2010, 01:05 PM
Renderings also showed trees and a garden up there.

londonlawyer
October 1st, 2010, 01:08 PM
http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4100/4894364515_273bc2e28c_b.jpg

Aren't these hideous blue and brown brick pieces of s..t behind 440 W 42nd? They're disgusting.

lofter1
October 1st, 2010, 01:26 PM
Yep, that's West 41st between Dyer & Tenth. A fairly cruddy blockfront there.

antinimby
October 1st, 2010, 01:29 PM
With very little chance of being redeveloped any time soon. The location is not pretty, to put it mildly.

lofter1
October 1st, 2010, 01:31 PM
The game changer would be if the 7-line extension station were to go in here. A Tenth Avenue station entrance would be right across the street.

This block is also locked in by the Lincoln Tunnel ramps to the south. There are [theoretical] plans to build around and over the bus ramps, which would connect this block. Plus there's the plan for the Boulevard Park on the block to the west connecting down to the Rail Yards.

Maybe not in our lifetimes ...

londonlawyer
October 1st, 2010, 01:34 PM
That is crappy.

NoyokA
December 2nd, 2010, 10:05 PM
This is the spacing the NYTIMES tower should have used. It would have allowed the atmosphere to color the tower and would allow tenants an almost unobstructed view. Instead its a costly experiment that looks like someone painted dish-water over a simple box.

http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4085/5218856479_e2aa6bdcdc_b.jpg

With the exception being at night, I find the NYTIMES Building as dreary as the "hideous blue and brown brick pieces" shown five posts above this.

scumonkey
December 2nd, 2010, 10:27 PM
I thought the spacing on the times tower was for the purpose of affecting heat and light from the sun,
and not so much for the visual effect, it seems more-so purposed for here?
I absolutely loath this KOTH, and have grown quite fond of the times building- spacing and all.

londonlawyer
December 2nd, 2010, 10:48 PM
....
I absolutely loath this KOTH...

What's a KOTH?

scumonkey
December 6th, 2010, 02:48 PM
Acronym for your new found way of describing a "POS"...
Kandahar On The Hudson

Derek2k3
February 8th, 2011, 08:40 AM
http://farm6.static.flickr.com/5085/5346894235_5677e06e39_z.jpg
antonkisselgoff (http://www.flickr.com/photos/antonkisselgoff/5346894235/sizes/l/in/photostream/)



http://farm6.static.flickr.com/5085/5346896425_aa7704572b_b.jpg
antonkisselgoff (http://www.flickr.com/photos/antonkisselgoff/5346896425/sizes/l/in/photostream/)

TREPYE
February 8th, 2011, 01:07 PM
http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4104/5022776593_06ba14f573_b.jpg
antonkisselgoff (http://www.flickr.com/photos/antonkisselgoff/5022776593/sizes/l/in/photostream/)



Best tower built in NYC of the last decade (2000-20010).

Derek2k3
February 8th, 2011, 01:19 PM
And for the next 17,999 years.

HoveringCheesecake
February 8th, 2011, 02:44 PM
One of the best, definitely. They need to get that lighting installed on the fins on the roof. Wasn't that the plan?

Derek2k3
March 6th, 2011, 05:43 PM
http://farm6.static.flickr.com/5015/5490587104_f10c6468b9_b.jpg
Large: chrisk1982 (http://www.flickr.com/photos/chrisk1982/5490587104/sizes/l/in/photostream/)


http://farm6.static.flickr.com/5172/5498266595_9dbdc056ea_b.jpg
Large: chrisk1982 (http://www.flickr.com/photos/chrisk1982/5498266595/sizes/l/in/photostream/)

lesterp4
September 30th, 2011, 09:46 PM
I just walked by the NY Times and saw that there is a new Wolfgang Steakhouse taking the space of Montenapo which has been sitting vacant for a year. This might work better since he is a very popular chef.

londonlawyer
October 1st, 2011, 12:18 AM
Acronym for your new found way of describing a "POS"...
Kandahar On The Hudson

I like that!

PS: This photo looks almost as alluring as the inside of Salma Hayek's thigh!
http://farm6.static.flickr.com/5085/5346894235_5677e06e39_z.jpg

ZippyTheChimp
April 27th, 2014, 09:04 PM
http://imageshack.com/a/img843/5516/kgj5.jpg

Tectonic
April 28th, 2014, 03:03 AM
Landmark of the future?

arcman210
April 28th, 2014, 09:19 PM
Landmark of today.

TREPYE
April 29th, 2014, 10:31 AM
Wasnt sure about it during renders, but looking at it from all sorts of angles around the city and noticing, up close and afar, how remarkably well it blends into the cityscape, skyline and texture (despite the fact that it is perhaps a little too dark at night).... this is and should be a first ballot Hall of Famer. Hopefully, like all the other NYC classics, this one ages like a fine wine.
It certainly bears that NYC elegance....

NYBOY75
May 31st, 2014, 12:35 PM
In my mind I said this before the top of the tower seems so un-finished. What is the purpose of the crew-cut like top of this tower? I am not talking about the spire but the steel that takes it over 800 feet.

kz1000ps
June 4th, 2014, 03:39 PM
What is the purpose of the crew-cut like top of this tower?

It looked purrrdy in renderings:

http://imageshack.com/a/img835/8008/plkjg.jpg

It comes from the time when "transparency" was the buzzword and everyone was trying to dematerialize their buildings through the copious use of glass. Sometimes I like the top and sometimes it looks like a hot mess...depends on what angle you're seeing it from.