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Edward
November 15th, 2002, 12:09 AM
From Moinian Group website:
http://www.moiniangroup.com/900EighthAvenue.htm

Real Estate in Manhattan is all about location, location, location and The Moinian Group’s new Regent Tower couldn’t fit the bill better. *Located on Eighth Avenue and taking up one full block, from 53rd Street to 54th Street, The Regent *exemplifies one of the City’s fastest growing residential neighborhoods.

A 52-story, 570-unit luxury residential high-rise development, The Regent Tower is designed to be a full-service, white glove, doorman building in the heart of Manhattan’s West Side. *Designed by renowned architect, Frank Williams, The Regent Tower will boast a modern, sleek look with units ranging from studios to 2-bedroom apartments. All apartments will be fully equipped with state-of-the-art amenities, including kitchen appliances, lighting and bathroom fixtures and adornments. Walls of windows allow natural light to flood each apartment and breathtaking views of Central Park and the Hudson River are to be enjoyed and never missed.

In walking distance to major modes of transportation, this new residential development is truly central and convenient to all of Manhattan’s neighborhoods. Residents can walk to subway lines including the A,C,E,1,2,3,9,N,R and the Times Square shuttle to Grand Central Station. The 57th Street Cross town and Uptown/Downtown bus stop is only blocks away and of course, the building’s doorman can always hail a cab.

Only steps away from the lights and sights of the theater district, the famous Restaurant Row, bustling night-life hot spots including Studio 54 and The Supper Club and in close proximity to Columbus Circle and Central Park, residents of this new luxury high-rise development will be surrounded by all that makes Manhattan the greatest City in the World.


http://www.moiniangroup.com/images/900EighthAveWeb.jpg

Edward
November 15th, 2002, 12:11 AM
The site of 900 Eighth Avenue (http://www.wirednewyork.com/real_estate/900eighth/default.htm) tower on 18 September 2002. AOL Time Warner Center (http://www.wirednewyork.com/aol/default.htm) is rising beyond, with the Central Park Place and Trump International Hotel & Tower on the right. This view of AOL Time Warner will soon be blocked by a crystal tower of Hearst Magazine Building (http://www.wirednewyork.com/real_estate/hearst_magazine_building/default.htm).

http://www.wirednewyork.com/real_estate/900eighth/900eighth_aol_central_park_18sept02.jpg

Edward
November 15th, 2002, 12:31 AM
Construction of The Regent Tower (http://www.wirednewyork.com/real_estate/900eighth/default.htm) goes ahead on 10 November 2002. Worldwide Plaza condominium (http://www.wirednewyork.com/real_estate/350west50th/default.htm) on the right.

http://www.wirednewyork.com/real_estate/900eighth/900eighth_wwp_10nov02.jpg

Kris
November 15th, 2002, 01:47 AM
That design is so perfectly nauseating. I've already posted this in Real Estate because I couldn't imagine there was something in the architecture section.


November 15, 2002
42-Story Rental Tower to Rise on 8th Avenue
By RACHELLE GARBARINE

Workers are laying the foundation for a 42-story rental building that will fill the block on the east side of Eighth Avenue between 53rd and 54th Streets. The project continues the influx of apartment towers along the avenue in the West 40's and 50's.

The building, at 900 Eighth Avenue, is being developed by the Moinian Group of Manhattan and will have 393 apartments. Also planned are a four-story, 550-car garage, which will replace a city-owned garage that once occupied the site, and 10,000 square feet of street-level stores.

The building will join three rental buildings completed since 1997 on or near the corner of West 50th Street and Eighth Avenue, together totaling 945 apartments.

There are other projects under way on Eighth Avenue or planned nearby. One is the Biltmore, a 51-story structure with 464 rental units that the Jack Parker Corporation and the Moinian Group are building at the northeast corner at 47th Street, next to the Biltmore Theater.

Another developer, Harwood Properties, is in the early planning stages for a residential building on the southwest corner of 44th Street and Eighth Avenue that would include a garage for 436 cars.

Under current zoning, a City Planning Department spokesman said, a 25-story, 241-apartment structure could be built on that site without any special permits. The developer, however, has indicated that he plans to seek permission for a structure of up to 28 stories, with 317 apartments.

The development of the AOL Time Warner residential and office complex on the old New York Coliseum site to the north and the revival of 42nd Street to the south have bolstered developer interest in Eighth Avenue. The new residential towers sit where parking garages, X-rated movie houses and tenements had dotted the avenue, considered the dividing line between Times Square and Clinton.

Joseph Moinian, chief executive of Moinian, said the potential of the once-seedy avenue factored into his decision in 1997 to buy the 900 Eighth Avenue site. He acquired it along with development rights from an abutting structure for $34 million from an earlier developer.

In the intervening years, the Moinian Group ran the formerly city-owned garage while it sought financing and approvals for the apartment building. Because of the development rights, the building will be seven stories taller than zoning would have originally allowed. The developer also got a special permit from the city to build a garage as big as the old one.

Mr. Moinian, like most other rental developers in or near the Eighth Avenue corridor, is building a so-called 80-20 project. In return for the developer's keeping 20 percent of the apartments affordable to low- and moderate-income tenants, the city or state issues bonds to provide low-rate mortgages to developers, who are also eligible for, among other things, a 20-year tax abatement from the city.

The Moinian Group got $136.5 million from the New York State Housing Finance Agency and a letter of credit from KeyBank, said Richard Bassuk, president of the Singer & Bassuk Organization, a mortgage brokerage in Manhattan and the developer's financial adviser.

Andrew S. Heiberger, president of Citi Habitats, a residential brokerage, said that rents had leveled off in the area and that vacant apartments were starting to accumulate. Average rents in buildings in the West 50's are $47 a square foot annually, or $2,662 monthly, for a typical 680-square-foot, one-bedroom, Mr. Heiberger said, with rents in the West 40's at 10 to 15 percent less.

At the Biltmore, leasing is expected to start in February, said Kimberly Cafaro, a vice president at Jack Parker. The average rents for the studio to two-bedroom units are to be $1,900 to $3,900 a month.

Mr. Moinian said rents at 900 Eighth Avenue, which is to be completed in early 2004, had not been set. The studio, one- and two-bedroom apartments will have 600 to 1,200 square feet. Amenities planned at the building, designed by Frank Williams & Partners Architects of Manhattan, include a health club and a fifth-floor landscaped terrace. HRH Construction is the project's construction manager.

Copyright The New York Times Company

JerzDevl2000
November 15th, 2002, 01:53 AM
Nauseating is the right word for it Christian! After all the crazy proposals and construction on 8th Ave, this is a disappointment. When I make it big and live in the city, I'm gonna make sure I either design my own apartment tower or live in one that is more than just a cookie-cutter clone.

Fabb
November 15th, 2002, 03:05 AM
It's not that bad.
I like the top of the tower.

NoyokA
November 15th, 2002, 07:58 AM
no this building sucks. Im glad it will not rise 52 floors.

Eugenius
November 15th, 2002, 09:58 AM
I think that the most obviously annoying part of the building in the rendering is the ugly yellow color. *However, oftentimes, these buildings are build with a different color scheme. *This one might not be so bad after all.

NYatKNIGHT
November 15th, 2002, 12:40 PM
From the street it's going to be all parking garage.

Agglomeration
November 15th, 2002, 03:43 PM
Look on the bright side. Parking in the city is never free. Expect the same usual high rates, which is one reason why so many take mass transit to the area. The fees will be maddening but will also bring in plenty of good money for the city and for the parking lot owner.

TLOZ Link5
November 15th, 2002, 04:39 PM
Hmmm...it's not necessarily hideous IMHO; it just looks very mediocre.

ddny
November 15th, 2002, 08:55 PM
I'm fine with it...at least it doesn't look like another brown brick building.

Rich Battista
November 16th, 2002, 12:07 AM
lol, this is true, i will say it will be close to 500 feet, it will not totally stick out in the area, but fill in a few gaps when it is completed.

Rich Battista
November 16th, 2002, 12:21 AM
can someone estimate a height for me, i would say around 500 feet right????

Edward
November 22nd, 2002, 11:47 AM
Frome Globe St. com
http://www.globest.com/RMI1Z8D1J8D.html

Moinian's 80/20 Project Secures $136.5M in Bond Financing
By Glen Thompson
Last updated: Nov 19, 2002 *03:08PM

NEW YORK CITY-The Moinian Group has received $136.5 million in construction financing for its 393-unit, 80/20 residential project known as 900 Eighth Ave. The low floater, tax-exempt and taxable bonds were issued by the New York State Housing Finance Agency. Singer & Bassuk Organization arranged the credit enhancement with KeyBank N.A.
The project, which will include a 20% affordable-housing component and 80% market-rate units, is located on a full block-front along Eighth Avenue between 53rd and 54th streets. It will feature an 80,000-sf garage and 9,357 sf of retail space. The interest rates at closing for HFA’s tax-exempt and taxable seven day low floater bonds were 1.65% and 1.85%, respectively.

"Financing 80/20 projects is highly labor intensive and takes specialized knowledge,” says SBO president Richard Bassuk. "To make the HFA and credit enhancement process as easy as possible for our 80/20 clients, we act as the client’s financial department providing all analyses and processing required by HFA for the projects, and for arranging the required credit enhancement."

Rich Battista
November 22nd, 2002, 07:58 PM
this is good news for the project. I hope that the project goes through, i cannot wait to see the area of midtown with this, AOL, and Hearst completed.

Edward
April 18th, 2003, 06:40 PM
Construction of 900 Eighth Avenue (http://www.wirednewyork.com/real_estate/900eighth/default.htm). 18 April 2003.

http://www.wirednewyork.com/real_estate/900eighth/regent_900eighth_18apr03.jpg (http://www.wirednewyork.com/real_estate/900eighth/default.htm)

Gulcrapek
April 18th, 2003, 06:47 PM
Thanks. I wondered about this one.

AJphx
April 18th, 2003, 07:20 PM
In the rendering, what are the "windows" of the parking garage made out of? They don't appear to be glass or normal empty space, but some sort of latticework.

and why couldn't they put parking underground?

(Edited by AJphx at 7:22 pm on April 18, 2003)

Kris
April 18th, 2003, 07:22 PM
Because it's a cheap piece of shit.

AJphx
August 11th, 2003, 12:03 AM
Here is a different rendering of the Regent Tower that I found, I'm not sure if it is an older version or not, though.

http://www.moiniangroup.com/images/REGENTPictureWeb.jpg

Does anyone have some new or recent construction photos of this building?

(Edited by AJphx at 12:05 am on Aug. 11, 2003)

Gulcrapek
August 11th, 2003, 12:40 AM
I'm pretty sure that's old. But it shows the true colors better. By the way, the reason for the AG parking garage is two subway tunnels directly beneath the site.

Kris
August 11th, 2003, 01:10 AM
As if parking was needed with the subway so close.

Gulcrapek
August 11th, 2003, 01:13 AM
There are always those who refuse to take the subway (to them a 'dirty' and 'common' method), and therefore the developer must provide some parking for these customers to make a profit.

NoyokA
August 11th, 2003, 10:48 AM
What about all the condo's without parking then, AOLTW and TWT come to mind.

JACKinNYC
August 11th, 2003, 11:04 AM
It reminds me of the Weston Centre in San Antonio (1983).

http://www.skyscrapers.com/re/en/im/df/106261/

Is this building going to be 42 or 52 stories?

Freedom Tower
August 11th, 2003, 01:59 PM
Hey, Jack. You're right. One article says 42 and one says 52. The one that is most recent says 42, though, so I'd go with that one. Besides, these days I wouldn't expect floors to be added, only subtracted, so probably 42 although Im not sure. Is anyone sure about the # of floors?

Derek2k3
August 11th, 2003, 03:47 PM
42

Kris
August 11th, 2003, 06:05 PM
The less visible the better.

JACKinNYC
August 12th, 2003, 03:16 PM
It's about 30 stories right now (8/12/03).

maxinmilan
August 12th, 2003, 03:27 PM
Very conservative. Like many residential high-rises in NYC. The plot deserved better design/architect.

Edward
November 13th, 2003, 11:17 PM
The Marc (http://www.wirednewyork.com/real_estate/900eighth/default.htm). 11 November 2003.

http://www.wirednewyork.com/real_estate/900eighth/900eighth_11nov03.jpg (http://www.wirednewyork.com/real_estate/900eighth/default.htm)

Edward
November 14th, 2003, 09:39 PM
The new name of the building is Marc, with website at MarcNY.com (http://www.marcny.com).

260 West 54th Street
New York, NY 10019
(212) 271-2840

emmeka
November 15th, 2003, 08:30 AM
Wow its gone up quickly, It seems like yesturday that we were discussing wether it was good or not.

Edward
February 14th, 2004, 10:40 PM
http://newyork.construction.com/features/archive/0401_Cover1.asp
On the MARC
Strong Foundation Supports Eighth Avenue Tower

By Tom Stabile

MARC rises 432 ft. into the city skyline, with a soaring crown accented by a flying column design.

But some of the most impressive work in the 435,000-sq.-ft. structure at 900 Eighth Ave. took place out of sight and in the structural underbelly of a classically compact Manhattan property.

Beneath this 45-story giant is a muscle grid of caisson support, concrete walls and clusters of steel bars that help the structure straddle two subway tunnels that cross through the site.

The project schedule was tight. Excavation started in October 2002, the reinforced concrete superstructure was topped out in September and the building is slated for full occupancy this summer.

The project takes advantage of the promise in the Eighth Avenue corridor, said Joseph Moinian, chairman of the Moinian Group, the New York, N.Y.-based developer.

"When the site became available in 1999 we took the opportunity," he added. "In addition, full-block sites are very rare in New York City, especially an income producing site."

The $76 million building, designed by Frank Williams and Associates of New York, N.Y., will have 393 apartments on 37 floors; ground-floor retail; four-story, 550-car garage; and a common floor with a health club, laundry room, child care center and other amenities.

Jack Kestenbaum, project manager for HRH Construction of New York, N.Y., said it took value engineering and scheduling to keep MARC on track.

"We came up with alternatives to make sure we could get to each stage on schedule," he added.

First came careful focus on the foundation and using solutions designed by structural engineer Rosenwasser Grossman Consulting and executed by foundation contractor Civetta Cousins Joint Venture and concrete contractor Century-Maxim Construction Corp.

Demolition of an existing municipal parking garage took place before HRH arrived on the job. When HRH took over, work to support the future building's load began with a caisson design.

The Civetta Cousins team began by driving thick structural steel tubes into the bedrock on either side of the tunnels for the B and D lines of the NYC Transit Authority, which turn under the site. Next, workers excavated around the piles and anchored clusters of reinforced steel bars to the rock throughout that area. Then the entire complex was encased in concrete.

Once Civetta Cousins completed that phase, Century-Maxim erected giant concrete walls to support the foundation.

"The way the engineer designed it to accommodate that was to create large structural beams, but they were huge supporting walls that were 20 ft. or more high," said Tom Cardullo of Century-Maxim. "They allow the foundation floor to bridge over the subway without putting any load on the tunnel."

Even before the foundation work was complete, the HRH team had coordinated to get the project moving onto the next phase - locating the project crane on the southwest corner of 53rd Street and Eighth Avenue. It also scheduled the foundation work carefully to have the Civetta Cousins work first on the northern portion of the site, then continue to the southern portion while Century Maxim installed the massive concrete girders.

That strategy allowed the team to install a ground-floor slab on half of the 20,000-sq.-ft. floor plate so that staging work for the superstructure erection could begin while the rest of the foundation work continued on the southern side.

Kestenbaum said other key elements of coordinating the project included ensuring significant shoring for perimeter walls and the neighboring Roundabout Theatre, which also impacted the project schedule on matinee days.

On ongoing façade work, Newtown Masonry is handling the brick installation on upper floors, which run on masonry piers in between floor-to-ceiling window units interrupted only by panels covering the HVAC units.

Global of Canada made the precast concrete panels installed over the garage.

HRH also prioritized getting the garage ready for temporary occupancy in November by installing the hydraulic car elevators the valet firm will use.

Kestenbaum said the team has been racing to complete enclosure of the building before the cold weather sets in.

The building's studios and one- and two-bedroom apartments will have several layouts. The developer took advantage of a New York City affordable housing incentive program, including 20 percent of its units for lower- or moderate-income residents.

All units will have top-flight communications, marble bath tiles, stone kitchen floors and countertops, and high-end kitchen appliances.

The cherry on top is the crown design, said Anthony Rafaniello Sr., HRH project superintendent.

"It's very elaborate structurally, concrete-wise," he added. "From the roof it goes up 60 ft.".

twilson
April 22nd, 2004, 09:31 PM
I started work on this building mid April 2003, It was plagued with problems, we all said it was jinxed, it took way too long to build and the roof is an intricate design that nobody will ever notice, the apartments are like matchboxes, it's just a very unimaginative building, we finished a week ago, I'm so glad to be out...

Gulcrapek
April 22nd, 2004, 10:02 PM
It's nice to hear stories from the inside like yours... I photographed the building nearly every month and assumed everything was peachy keen.

telebob
May 14th, 2004, 04:50 PM
not a cheap building rentwise.

aslo the is an 80/20 building and there was a lottery for low income people
to get 20% of the apartments.i think u had to make less than $31 k a year.
its rent stabilized.
no value here imo when i looked .

pretty funny you could be paying 3000/mo for a 1 bedroom and have someone next door paying 600/mo .
aprox 7500 people tried the lottery for 20% of the units in the building.

londonlawyer
May 14th, 2004, 05:21 PM
The only problem with this building is that 8th Ave. has a lot of complete shit buildings. Many nice ones have been built in the past decade, but there's still a lot of shit especially on the west side of the avenue between 42nd and 50th. Hopefully, they'll start razing the horrible shit and replacing it with nice new towers.

billyblancoNYC
May 14th, 2004, 05:40 PM
The only problem with this building is that 8th Ave. has a lot of complete shit buildings. Many nice ones have been built in the past decade, but there's still a lot of shit especially on the west side of the avenue between 42nd and 50th. Hopefully, they'll start razing the horrible shit and replacing it with nice new towers.

Give it time. They'll get to it, eventually.

londonlawyer
May 14th, 2004, 11:54 PM
The only problem with this building is that 8th Ave. has a lot of complete shit buildings. Many nice ones have been built in the past decade, but there's still a lot of shit especially on the west side of the avenue between 42nd and 50th. Hopefully, they'll start razing the horrible shit and replacing it with nice new towers.

Give it time. They'll get to it, eventually.

I agree. It's amazing how the part of Madison and 42nd St. near Grand Central were transformed in a few years. Similarly, many new towers have risen on 8th between 42nd and 59th, but more are needed. I think that another area that will be redeveloped over time is 5th between 42nd and 49th. Amidst some beautiful old buildings on that stretch is a lot of shit. The shit's time is numbered though.

Anyway, Bill, it's nice to speak with you on a forum that's not filled with buttmasters from San Francisco who ban people (i.e., me) for debunking their absurd myths! FFlint and LA21st and Chitown must spend a lot of time at the local glory holes. :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:

billyblancoNYC
May 17th, 2004, 02:48 AM
Well, Wired is a much more civil and well-informed forum. Plus, it's centered on NYC, so it helps. Overall, I typcially check out SSP for laughs and sometimes to see what other cities have cooking. Of course, it's always nice that 95% of the people on that board love NYC to death.

Overall, there's no comparison. This is an excellent board, with knowledgable people and good moderators that keep people in check and on the right path.

londonlawyer
May 17th, 2004, 08:41 AM
Well, Wired is a much more civil and well-informed forum. Plus, it's centered on NYC, so it helps. Overall, I typcially check out SSP for laughs and sometimes to see what other cities have cooking. Of course, it's always nice that 95% of the people on that board love NYC to death.

Overall, there's no comparison. This is an excellent board, with knowledgable people and good moderators that keep people in check and on the right path.

I concur!

telebob
May 17th, 2004, 09:48 PM
epeople here know alot so here goes . . .

whats the story with the quasi abandoned building on the corner of
57 st and 9th ave SW corner ???

seems there are two holdout apartments in that group of buildings that
have been holding out now for 15 years !!! all other apts have windows borded up. rest of the building must be a rat condo.(upper crust rats
since the AOL building went up)

buildings have a pretty big footprint.
they are building the Alvin Ailey building right next to it.

must be an interesting story behind the holdouts and the landlord.
who owns it ?

take care.great group .

Edward
May 17th, 2004, 10:40 PM
whats the story with the quasi abandoned building on the corner of
57 st and 9th ave SW corner ???


See the thread about Windermere (http://forums.wirednewyork.com/viewtopic.php?t=677)

londonlawyer
May 18th, 2004, 09:27 PM
I really hope that this building does not get torn down. It's a great building and should be renovated. There are plenty of nondescript, shitty, white brick buildings to tear down to make way for new towers. There's also tons of shit on the west side of 8th Ave. that awaits the wrecking ball. This building, however, should be saved.

TonyO
May 19th, 2004, 11:24 AM
I really hope that this building does not get torn down. It's a great building and should be renovated. There are plenty of nondescript, shitty, white brick buildings to tear down to make way for new towers. There's also tons of shit on the west side of 8th Ave. that awaits the wrecking ball. This building, however, should be saved.

It does have some character, but I doubt that they could get the rich clientele to purchase apartments in a building that has such small windows. The real estate is much more valuable than the building. I walk by it all the time and it just begs to be torn down.

londonlawyer
May 19th, 2004, 09:10 PM
I really hope that this building does not get torn down. It's a great building and should be renovated. There are plenty of nondescript, shitty, white brick buildings to tear down to make way for new towers. There's also tons of shit on the west side of 8th Ave. that awaits the wrecking ball. This building, however, should be saved.

It does have some character, but I doubt that they could get the rich clientele to purchase apartments in a building that has such small windows. The real estate is much more valuable than the building. I walk by it all the time and it just begs to be torn down.

I support building trophy towers for the rich. However, we must preserve these old buildings. They have details that will never be produced again. Middle class people (i.e., New Yorkers with incomes of $125,000 or less) can live in them. In fact, such people would be lucky to live there. If this building gets renovated, it would be better than many of the ultra expensive boxes that have been built on the East side.

telebob
June 2nd, 2004, 01:43 AM
they tore down a building that went over 56 st and are building something
to replace it. its on both corners of 56 st and West Side Highway. any idea what it will be ??

old spot was drab and dreary at the part of the street where the building was. probably full of ghosts from people murdered in the pitch
black darkness. now its open air.

i think the old building was the sanitation dept.

Gulcrapek
May 29th, 2005, 08:00 PM
5/29/05

http://img173.echo.cx/img173/5743/marc55ns.th.jpg (http://img173.echo.cx/my.php?image=marc55ns.jpg)

http://img173.echo.cx/img173/2318/marcup1sg.th.jpg (http://img173.echo.cx/my.php?image=marcup1sg.jpg)

http://img173.echo.cx/img173/8130/marc49ci.th.jpg (http://img173.echo.cx/my.php?image=marc49ci.jpg)

http://img173.echo.cx/img173/7152/marc32au.th.jpg (http://img173.echo.cx/my.php?image=marc32au.jpg)

http://img173.echo.cx/img173/9096/marc23jo.th.jpg (http://img173.echo.cx/my.php?image=marc23jo.jpg)

macreator
May 30th, 2005, 10:22 AM
What a disaster for such a nice site. The building is even more bland than some of what I considered the worst looking apartment buildings in NYC. The base is awful as well and those windows! Looks awful. Even worse than the rendering which I suppose shouldn't have been a surprise.

The only thing that perhaps could help the building a bit would be to add some trees and ivy above the building's base on that odd looking terrace.

Fabrizio
May 30th, 2005, 10:50 AM
That´s an especially nice Duane Reade at the corner.

Fabrizio
May 30th, 2005, 11:10 AM
Go to this building´s web site: www.marcny.com

Follow the flash sales-pitch presentation:

The first image they show is the Central Park skyline with the San Remo and some lower rise buildings.

The next image of the city is Times Square. Do they show the new recent shiny towers? No. They feature one of the old small-scale, so-called, "crappy" buildings.

The home page continues with more old classic buildings and click on "location".

Ineresting ain´t it?

macreator
May 30th, 2005, 05:27 PM
Whoever said that the apartments in the Marc were like matchboxes was right.

Have a look at one of the virtual tours of the studio or one bedroom apartments on the Marc website, the apartments are INCREDIABLY SMALL!

There seems to be less than a foot between the length of the bed in the bedroom until the window...I guess if you're a bit above average height you're in trouble.

My friend has a nothing special studio that would go for a two bedroom in the Marc easily in terms of space.

I guess that's what the new buildings are like now -- it's a shame. I'm glad I held on to my apartment.

Fabrizio
May 30th, 2005, 05:58 PM
Of course it´s not going to matter to any of us what the apartments look like. It´s what we get down at the street that counts. And here we´ve basically got a parking garage with tacky screens covering it. Can you believe all those HUGE parking signs on the facade? They´re so big they´ve become one of the building´s major decorative elements. Of course they´re absent from the clever architectural rendering. Also notice that the architectural rendering shows the building against an empty sky... as if it were the lone high-rise in a low-rise neighborhood.

czsz
May 30th, 2005, 08:29 PM
That base is an instant eyesore. More cage-like and befitting a zoo than a city.

macreator
May 30th, 2005, 10:50 PM
And unfortunately that area seems to have a lot of similar bases. Reminds me of the Sherraton hotels nearby that have parking garages above ground with similar lattice cage designs. It's so awful. I wish at somepoint a developer would just put up the extra cash to put in a ventilation system and just continue the glass over the garage.

This is done with a building on 51st street and 1st avenue where due to obligations to keep the original U.N. school fascade, the developer built the garage on the second floor of the building. You wouldn't know it from the outside as the glass windows used in the lofts above in the first half of the building conceal the garage wonderfully.

Fabrizio
May 31st, 2005, 03:12 AM
If you let the developers have their way with unbridled development, this will be the future of Hell´s Kitchen. Dreary ticky-tack "luxury" towers. 2,500 dollar match box rentals. Of parking garages and Duane Reade.

Sorry folks I´ll take the NY-style tenemenets, the dive bars and the occasional porn palace over this sanitized, suburbanized, know-nothing, "we-could-be-anywhere" uncreative, un-NY, environment. Because among those tenements and dive bars, I might also find the side-walk cafe, the butcher shop, the shoe repair guy, the bakery, the store-front theatre troupe, the caberet, the small cheap ethnic restaurant.... and the kind of street life that a great neighborhood is all about.

Funny that while this building´s sales-pitch shows the old architectural detailing on nearby buildings as a plus, we´ve got folks who want to tear down the Windemere. Go figure.

Gulcrapek
May 31st, 2005, 01:16 PM
In defense of the garage, it had to be above ground because of the subway tunnels running under the site.

(I think that's mentioned somewhere else)

macreator
May 31st, 2005, 07:12 PM
In defense of the garage, it had to be above ground because of the subway tunnels running under the site.

(I think that's mentioned somewhere else)

It is but IMO they could have done a much better job if they had just been willing to spend a bit more money.

Derek2k3
May 31st, 2005, 08:49 PM
One of the only nice things about the building is how it lights its crown.

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/44141879.jpg

NoyokA
May 31st, 2005, 08:55 PM
You would think Frank Williams would design something to his ability, especially since he has been away from the architectural scene for so long, this was his break-out chance.

Fabrizio
June 1st, 2005, 02:40 AM
About the parking: plenty of great buildings (residential, hotel and office) are built without parking garages. This is NYC: hail a cab or take the subway. And look what those parking entrances do to the ambience of the side streets.... not to mention how they encourage an increase in traffic. Very nice lighted crown ...but in a neighboorhood like this, it´s ALL about the street, folks...the street.

Derek2k3
July 5th, 2007, 10:31 PM
http://farm2.static.flickr.com/1267/732493397_7d64a2abdb_o.jpg


http://farm2.static.flickr.com/1085/732492915_ef5f74cf0e_o.jpg


http://farm2.static.flickr.com/1070/732492933_acf0522d8f_o.jpg


http://farm2.static.flickr.com/1148/733374002_7758c30bce_o.jpg

Derek2k3
September 25th, 2009, 10:41 AM
http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2604/3953477226_1fc913994e_o.jpg


http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3469/3953477224_07c75225bb_o.jpg
Nothing says luxury more than a Duane Reade and a giant park sign outside your entrance. The city shouldn't allow parking for new residential buildings in Manhattan at all.

lofter1
September 25th, 2009, 11:29 AM
Oftentimes (if not always) accommodations for parking spaces when a large residential project is planned is mandated under the NYC Zoning Regulations. The idea is to keep the added residents' cars from taking up all the spaces on the street.

Derek2k3
September 25th, 2009, 11:38 AM
Right, though I realize it's a problem in neighborhoods to have cars circling the block looking for parking spaces, but eventually wouldn't this deter people from owning cars in Manhattan?

Of course this would also discourage car-owners from moving to the city and result in a less profitable development for the owner and the city...I think that's why it hasn't banned-money.

antinimby
September 25th, 2009, 12:11 PM
Provisions for residential parking shouldn't be allowed for buildings that are built right over a subway line as is the case here.

What a dumb city.

lofter1
September 25th, 2009, 12:25 PM
That particular parking structure pre-exists the Marc and was re-done and the Marc built atop it.

Derek2k3
September 25th, 2009, 12:39 PM
We went through this already.
They rebuilt the garage.