PDA

View Full Version : Progress of Temporary PATH Station in WTC 'Tub'



NYguy
January 10th, 2003, 10:57 AM
http://pathrestoration.com/gallery/psr/2002/11/tpt1.gif


http://pathrestoration.com/gallery/psr/2002/11/tpt2.gif


http://pathrestoration.com/gallery/psr/2002/10/tpt1.gif


http://pathrestoration.com/gallery/psr/2002/10/tpt3.gif


http://pathrestoration.com/graphics/wsi/v2_wtc_transportation.gif

Zzed
January 10th, 2003, 03:11 PM
thank you for the images.

so much for the footprints, if they weren't shown on the plan i'd have no idea where the towers used to stand.

Agglomeration
January 10th, 2003, 03:59 PM
Hats off to the PA for defying the Twin Towers-are-Deathtraps rhetoric of the mega-memorialists. It appears that the sacred ground theory is wearing thin even with the PA. Keep in mind that the Port Authority lost 75 of its top executives and police officers on 9-11. Let's hope it doesn't start inflaming the NIMBY's and their mega-memorialist allies.

(Edited by Agglomeration at 3:21 pm on Jan. 10, 2003)

TLOZ Link5
January 10th, 2003, 05:07 PM
I've noticed quite often that the mega-memorialists, in this particular case the families, are letting their personal sentiment get in the way of necessity. *They want a full-site memorial, sp they automatically start giving the PA the "shame on you" treatment for daring to say that the PATH station needs to be rebuilt. *And I'm sitting here thinking, "Then where else are they going to put it?"

I mean, I respect the wishes of many of the family members, but a lot of the time they're starting to tick me off. *Sometimes I've entertained the concept of spiting them by leaving 14 acres to a memorial and building a supertall tower on each footprint; see how they react...

amigo32
January 10th, 2003, 10:06 PM
Great pictures! * Yea, I agree TLOZ. *That is an awfully small group of people trying to direct the future of the "Greatset City in the World". *They have the sentiment with them, though, I just hope that more rational heads prevail.

jeez, you can't make everything "hallowed ground".

Agglomeration
January 13th, 2003, 12:09 AM
I got this from looking up the Daily News. Prepare to hurl your guts up:

Ship Out Port Authority
NY Daily News - Letters to the Editor - January 3, 2003

Dear Editor:

Re "Port Authority's Downtown Scam" (Dec. 29):

Manhattan: I applaud your editorial on the Port Authority's outrageous behavior ("Port Authority's downtown scam," Dec. 29). I have a particular interest in the redevelopment of downtown, especially at Ground Zero. My husband, Rich, lost his life there.

I was not surprised to read that the PA has been "planning in secret." That is its modus operandi. Where are the governors of New York and New Jersey? Are they not responsible for overseeing the PA? I urge Gov. Pataki and Gov. Jim McGreevey to release this bistate agency from the land downtown and to seriously consider the deal exchanging the World Trade Center site for airport land. Put the PA back where it belongs - in bridges, tunnels and airports. It doesn't belong in the construction business, and certainly not in planning for this sacred ground.

Maximum rental space should not be the priority for downtown. The Port Authority, a bistate agency with immunity from building and fire codes, should no longer have a place there. De-claw the PA and send it on its way!

Monica Gabrielle
Co-Chairperson
Skyscraper Safety Campaign
www.skyscrapersafety.org

NYguy
January 29th, 2003, 03:56 AM
More photos...


http://www.pathrestoration.com/gallery/psr/2002/12/tpt4.gif


http://www.pathrestoration.com/gallery/psr/2002/12/tpt3.gif


http://www.pathrestoration.com/gallery/psr/2002/12/tpt1.gif

amigo32
January 29th, 2003, 05:05 AM
mmmm.....nice! :) *New construction of any type is a beautiful sight indeed!

DougGold
January 30th, 2003, 12:59 AM
Okay, while I am excited to see the PA being active and constructing their hub, I'm confused by two things. First, how can they possibly build it without knowing what will be built above it? I mean, what if significant skyscrapers are desired to go right above the hub? Wouldn't that need special foundations? Or are they declaring that any significant structures will go on the west side of the site?

And speaking of there even BEING *a west side, I'm assuming that's a road they're building through the site, visible in that great birds-eye photo. (I'm also assuming it's an elevated road, knowing the depth of the site. Are we soon going to be able to drive over that road?

JerzDevl2000
January 30th, 2003, 02:43 AM
I'm glad constuction is moving along well. Obviously, the sooner this is done, the sooner the region and it's economy can get back onto it's feet!

I think the PA should get out of the real estate business, and I'm for the land swap idea. The PA never fufilled it's original mission, from way back in the early 1920's. Anyone wanna guess what it is - it's still on the drawing board!

dbhstockton
January 30th, 2003, 03:17 AM
That's the 1&9 subway you see going through the site. *We shall see soon what the PA decides to do about Greenwich Street. *All indications point to them restoring it.

NYatKNIGHT
January 30th, 2003, 10:46 AM
The PATH station is temporary. They mean to build the real one after the plans are set, but are too urgent for service to wait for that. I thought I read somewhere that they may wind up keeping it there, with minor revisions, if the plan they decide upon allows, but they are prepared to completely rebuild it.

NYguy
January 30th, 2003, 11:05 AM
The station *(tracks placement, etc.) is permanent. *What is being spoken of in the planning as being the "permanent" station is the transportation interchange leading to the tracks, the main concourses....the entrance under constuction now just off Church street is temporary.

NYatKNIGHT
January 30th, 2003, 11:24 AM
Thanks NYguy. I was wondering how they were going to keep service going while building the permanent station, this explains.

fujiBank
March 19th, 2003, 01:31 AM
Hello everyone.....Would love to view these photos....they no longer load on the page...

HELP!!

NYguy
March 19th, 2003, 03:40 PM
Seems that website is down again.

ZippyTheChimp
May 28th, 2003, 07:19 PM
May 28,2003
Work continues on tempy PATH station. Entryway being erected
at Church.
http://www.pbase.com/image/17197958.jpg
http://www.pbase.com/image/17198036.jpg

JCMAN320
May 28th, 2003, 07:39 PM
Cool pics. My father works for PATH and he's been workin in Ground Zero and has taken a load of pics. Im from Jersey City and the Exchange Place station is scheduled for opening on June 29th. I've been down there and it's been completely done over. It's goin to be impressive when it opens. I can't wait till the two stations are joined up again. It will revitalize businees and growth in both downtown Jersey City and Lower Manhattan.

(Edited by JCMAN320 at 6:41 pm on May 28, 2003)

NYguy
July 6th, 2003, 05:36 PM
Photos taken July 5, work continues on the temporary plaza to the PATH trains...


http://www.pbase.com/image/18709400/large.jpg


http://www.pbase.com/image/18709407/large.jpg

NYguy
July 6th, 2003, 05:38 PM
How things are shaping out...


http://www.pbase.com/image/18556000/large.jpg

TLOZ Link5
July 6th, 2003, 06:09 PM
Would anyone know if PATH service from the WTC will be affected when construction of the permanent terminal starts?

dbhstockton
July 6th, 2003, 07:02 PM
I don't think so. *The permanent station is going to be in the same configuration and location. *It's west of Greenwich street anyway; The most intensive work is going to be on the other side of the 1 and 9. * The photo shows that pretty clearly.

STT757
July 7th, 2003, 12:37 AM
I was there on the Fourth of July, I noticed something when I was there that I thought was odd that is *in the picture NYguy posted.

On the roof of the temporary PATH platforms, are those AC compressors?

I thought the temporary PATH station was going to be a bare structure, no amenities. Those look like AC units on top, especially right under the red "G" of the Greenwich street NYguy put on the picture.

NYguy
July 7th, 2003, 05:33 PM
I'm not sure what's going on with that, but here's a larger view...


http://www.pbase.com/image/18555646/original.jpg

STT757
July 8th, 2003, 12:00 AM
Looks like it's going to be air conditioned, which is strange considering that they previoulsy mentioned that the station would be bare and also because the station opens in November.

dbhstockton
July 8th, 2003, 02:59 AM
By "temporary" they mean a few years. *It will have to be bearable in the summer of '04, '05, and probably '06. *It needs to be cooled and ventilated, no biggie. *The tents that they put up in Bryant park for fashion week have AC. *

NYguy
July 8th, 2003, 08:51 AM
NY Times...


A Signal of Rebirth Downtown
By DAVID W. DUNLAP

The fanfare will come another day. So, too, the speeches and ribbon cuttings. For now, let it be noted that the horizon at ground zero has been broken for the first time since the ruins of the World Trade Center were hauled away.

Two slender 60-foot-tall structures — twins, really — stand today like sentinels at the foot of Fulton Street, forming a new gateway to the site.

For many months, clearance and construction have occurred below street level, lending a sense from sidewalk vantage that the 16-acre expanse was unchanged and unchanging. Suddenly, tubular tendrils have sprouted there, reaching upward, expressing aspiration, promising change. Something is really happening.

Not everyone will welcome the sign. Abstract as they may look at the moment, the masts are three-dimensional heralds of the transformation of ground zero — at least a corner of it — from a place of contemplative emptiness back into a bustling, hustling hub.

They do more than break the ground plane. They break the spell.

But their real purpose is utilitarian. These elongated right triangles of steel, spaced 90 feet apart, will support the canopy that covers the Church Street entrance to the rebuilt PATH station, scheduled to open this fall.

In time, they will largely be obscured by the curves of the trusswork cable-stayed canopy, which will cantilever off the masts in two gentle arcs, front and back. That should be completed this summer, said the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, which is constructing the station.

Until then, the pylons are likely to strike some viewers as hauntingly reminiscent in their own abstract way.

No one would mistake them for a deliberate evocation of the trade center, but it is impossible not to be struck by their doubleness. Nor can one fail to notice their almost ghostly whiteness.

The agencies responsible for the site have been fielding queries about the mysterious objects. What are they, callers wonder, supports for a Ferris wheel? Gigantic goal posts?

Certainly not. But perhaps they are more than pillars framing a commuter train station. Perhaps they are stepladders to the sky.

NYatKNIGHT
July 8th, 2003, 10:31 AM
The Times is reporting that "for the first time" the horizon has been broken.... Where have they been, it's been up for over a month.

Agglomeration
July 9th, 2003, 12:07 AM
So evocative, so beautiful, so... functional. NY Guy, I have to jump for joy :cheesy: when I see your picture of these entrance pillars. I predict that they will become permanent landmarks down the road.

NYguy
July 9th, 2003, 09:22 AM
NY Times...

Relatives Say Plans Infringe on Twin Towers' Footprints
By EDWARD WYATT

Several structures now being built within the excavated World Trade Center site encroach on the footprints of the former twin towers, a development that has drawn the ire of a group of relatives of people killed in the Sept. 11 terrorist attack.

Many victims' relatives view those areas as sacred representations of where their loved ones died and want it free from any new development — a position that has been embraced, at least in part, by Gov. George E. Pataki and other rebuilding officials.

But officials at the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey acknowledged yesterday that five structures planned or in place below ground level and within the foundation walls of the former basement of the trade center — an area known as the bathtub — impinge on the tower footprints.

Although the buildings themselves did not extend below ground level into the area where the construction is now taking place, some victims' relatives say that the symbolic tower footprints extend down to bedrock, about 70 feet below ground level. And the footprints have been recognized as holding distinct status; they were incorporated into the requirements for the competition to design the memorial to be built at the World Trade Center.

The latest dispute demonstrates that almost no decision about the site goes unchallenged and that even as plans for the rebuilding of the site move forward, powerful constituencies intend to try to influence even the smallest of decisions.

Greg Trevor, a spokesman for the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, which is overseeing the construction within the site's boundaries, said the structures are emergency exits and other safety-related structures associated with the temporary terminal for the PATH commuter rail line.

The structures include two beneath the trade center's former south tower: an emergency exit from the electrical substation that will power the PATH terminal and trains and an operational shed housing electrical and communications equipment that sits alongside two of the PATH terminal platforms.

Three others sit under the north tower footprint: an emergency exit stairwell to serve the temporary PATH terminal, a crash barrier for one of the PATH tracks and the construction ramp that extends from ground level into the excavated pit.

The structures will be or can be removed once the permanent station is built, Mr. Trevor said. "We're doing everything possible to respect the footprints, but we cannot compromise safety," he said.

But the family members say they doubt the promise of temporary status, adding that they believe the Port Authority could have designed even the temporary structures around the footprints if they had tried.

"Even if they are temporary, they are a violation of the sanctity of the site," said Anthony Gardner, the chairman of the WTC United Family Group, which is part of the Coalition of 9/11 Families.

Mr. Gardner and four other members of the families' advisory council to the Lower Manhattan Development Corporation wrote a letter last week to rebuilding officials asking for an explanation of the new structures.

Mr. Gardner and other family members frequently invoke a promise by Mr. Pataki, who said at a public meeting that the state "will never build where the towers stood."

Jasonik
July 9th, 2003, 04:16 PM
For instance if some wild twist of fate relegates all rebuilding null & void and an at grade park is desired; how can one take SOIL, DIRT and cover the hallowed, sanctified site? *How could we be so insensitive as to suggest such filth covering so sacred a place? *What dirt is worthy? Is any?!

Call me a contrarian or a heartless provocateur, but where does it stop?
How can there be hallowed ground when there is no ground there, just an empty void? *I blame Libeskind for romanticizing the notion of exposed bedrock, and stark void as trubute. *
If nothing is to be built, stop it all right now, leave it a deserted construction site. *Lay of the construction workers, forget all the bankrolling and investment by the PA and Silverstein. *Let all the office space and commercial interests leave the proximity of this wasteland for better shores. *Show the tourists that New York stands for debilitating bureaucracy and indecision, that will show the terrorists and reinvigorate lower Manhattan.
Remember and respect, but for crying out loud, LIVE AND LET LIVE. *

Evan
July 9th, 2003, 05:45 PM
Quote: from NYguy on 8:22 am on July 9, 2003
The latest dispute demonstrates that almost no decision about the site goes unchallenged and that even as plans for the rebuilding of the site move forward, powerful constituencies intend to try to influence even the smallest of decisions.

If only this would inspire Governor Patacki to take action and makes sure something will positively get built.

Eugenius
July 9th, 2003, 05:46 PM
I actually think that the families are not going far enough. *Who said that the footprints should descend only down to bedrock. *I say NONSENSE! *The footprints should descend through bedrock, down to the liquid core of the planet, though bedrock on the other side, and out through Australia. *How dare those Australians build on what is obviously sacred land!

NYatKNIGHT
July 9th, 2003, 05:54 PM
Yes, then they should electrify the footprints so people get zapped if they set foot on them.

Jasonik
July 9th, 2003, 06:13 PM
LOL. . . *oh the sacrilege. *;)

BrooklynRider
July 10th, 2003, 10:32 AM
They should have a solemn ceremony for family members on the sacred ground and serve up a potent batch of Reverend Jim Jones Cool-Aid. *I've lost any connection with these people and any compassion. *

I'm a bad, bad person.

NYguy
July 30th, 2003, 03:02 PM
photos taken 7/29/03

Work along Church St., Path entrance

http://www2.pbase.com/image/19800033/large.jpg


A look at the path tracks down in the "tub"

http://www2.pbase.com/image/19800035/large.jpg

JMGarcia
July 30th, 2003, 04:07 PM
http://www2.pbase.com/image/19800035/large.jpg

Have you noticed how the a/c and mechanizal equipment on the roof of the temporary station reach almost to street level. That doesn't really leave any depth for the pit unless they plan on removing/redoing that whole top platform and everything that sits on it.

Jasonik
July 30th, 2003, 04:26 PM
Same as above-
This is looking North on the West side of the reconnected Greenwich Street, WTC 7 straight ahead, (last post). *They are placing buildings atop this station so this will be their basement. *Undoubtedly some of this will be reworked to accept the new buildings.

http://cakili.image.pbase.com/image/18556000/large.jpg

The 30' pit is further North and West,... now that I think about the waterfall entrance though I begin to ask the same question as you JMG.

NYatKNIGHT
July 30th, 2003, 04:38 PM
It's hard to tell.

http://www.entablature.com/feature/libeskind/1level1.jpg

http://pathrestoration.com/gallery/psr/2002/10/tpt1.gif


(Edited by NYatKNIGHT at 3:52 pm on July 30, 2003)

JMGarcia
July 30th, 2003, 04:45 PM
It looks like it is meant to fit under the base of the museum it just looks bigger than that though.

billyblancoNYC
July 30th, 2003, 05:15 PM
Such a small site, but what a big noise it makes.

dbhstockton
July 30th, 2003, 05:59 PM
Quote: from NYatKNIGHT on 3:38 pm on July 30, 2003
It's hard to tell.

http://www.entablature.com/feature/libeskind/1level1.jpg

http://pathrestoration.com/gallery/psr/2002/10/tpt1.gif


(Edited by NYatKNIGHT at 3:52 pm on July 30, 2003)


Everybody please note that that's a map of the proposed bus parking deck, and not the PATH station. *They've been quietly building on top of the "footprints" since they started rebuilding the station. *They won't be able to build the station unless they build on the "footprints." *Unless they undertake the extensive engineering and excavation required to move the station one block east, which, with the way things work in Manhattan, would probably cost like 15 billion dollars and take 20 years. *Just so "the families" can have their hole in the ground. *The whole thing is so stupid I can't stand it. *Don't get me wrong, the "footprints" need to be the central idea of the memorial, but the "footprints" didn't go down to the bedrock before the attacks and there is no reason for them to do so now.

NYatKNIGHT
July 30th, 2003, 06:18 PM
Oh, you're right. What the......where's that PATH station plan again?

NYguy
July 30th, 2003, 06:23 PM
http://www.pathrestoration.com/graphics/psr/tpt_street_plan.gif


http://www.pathrestoration.com/graphics/psr/tpt_concourse_plan.gif


http://www.pathrestoration.com/graphics/psr/tpt_terminal.gif


http://www.pathrestoration.com/graphics/psr/tpt_wtc_aerial_rendering.gif

Freedom Tower
July 30th, 2003, 08:42 PM
Hey NYguy, in how many years is the site supposed to look like your last posted picture? And is that entire thing the temporary path station? It sure looks big for something temporary.

TLOZ Link5
July 30th, 2003, 10:24 PM
Should be open by the end of the year. *This, and the 1/9 station, and all the damage to the transit system from 9/11 will be repaired.

NYguy
August 4th, 2003, 03:42 PM
A look inside the "pit" from the PA...j


http://www.pathrestoration.com/gallery/psr/2003/05/tpt_5.gif


http://www.pathrestoration.com/gallery/psr/2003/05/tpt_6.gif

ZippyTheChimp
September 3rd, 2003, 12:04 PM
An article ran in the NY Times on May 15 concerning the tempy PATH station. It is archived for sale on the Times site, but I found it here (http://www.hudsoncity.net/tubes/downtowntemporarystationdetails.html).

From the article:
It will also house the single work of art in the station: a 118-by-13-foot mosaic mural designed by Giulio Candussio of the Scuola Mosaicisti del Friuli in Spilimbergo, Italy, northeast of Venice, where it is being fabricated. The mural is a gift from the regional government of Friuli-Venezia Giulia.

Titled "Iridescent Lightning," it is composed of a gigantic jagged bolt running the length of the wall, varying in color from fiery bursts of red and orange to cooler strands of green and blue. Full of peaks and valleys, it is meant to capture the energy and continuity of life.

TLOZ Link5
September 3rd, 2003, 12:48 PM
Sounds very nice.

NYguy
September 4th, 2003, 02:34 AM
Only a couple of months away until public life returns to the site...


http://www.pathrestoration.com/gallery/psr/2003/06/tpt2.gif


http://www.pathrestoration.com/gallery/psr/2003/06/tpt1.gif

sirhcman
September 4th, 2003, 03:59 AM
Lets just hope the rest of the "progress" moves swiftly..

Kris
September 17th, 2003, 09:14 PM
Virtual Tour of the New PATH Station At Ground Zero (http://www.nynewsday.com/news/local/manhattan/wtc/nyc-pathtour0917,0,5032827.realvideo?coll=nyc-topheadlines-left)

TLOZ Link5
September 17th, 2003, 10:02 PM
What did the old concourse look like? To tell you the truth, I've never seen photos.

TonyO
September 18th, 2003, 12:32 PM
Is the 'temporary' PATH station going to be merged with the new "grand" terminal? The canopy that they are showing in the newly released plans looks more permanent than temporary.

DougGold
September 18th, 2003, 12:39 PM
:idea: Since I live in Rockland County, I have no need to ever ride this train, but when it opens I'll be going back and forth a few times just to be there. WHO'S WITH ME???????? :D :D :D :D

ZippyTheChimp
October 12th, 2003, 12:17 PM
After it's open for awhile and the hype dies down, I plan to take the ferry to JC and the PATH back. I'm sure it will be an emotional experience.

Oct 11, 2003. Temporary station entrance.
http://www.pbase.com/image/22213677.jpg

STT757
October 13th, 2003, 12:39 AM
I was just down there a week or two ago and the signals for the PATH are operational, and according to someone from Sub talk a couple days ago they ran a train for the First time from NJ through the tunnels to the World Trade Center and back about three times in a short period of time.

http://www.nycsubway.org

Zoe
October 23rd, 2003, 01:30 PM
PATH Train Makes Test Run At World Trade Center Site
NY1 News
OCTOBER 23RD, 2003

The Port Authority made a test run of a PATH train Wednesday, an important step in restoring train service at the World Trade Center site in Lower Manhattan.
Although the train was only going five miles an hour and only the crew was onboard, PA officials deemed the trial run a success.
Since repairs began in March 2002, workers have put down more than 11,000 feet of new track.
When service resumes in late November, some 67,000 commuters are expected to use the World Trade Center stop every day.

Gulcrapek
October 23rd, 2003, 04:38 PM
I saw that on the news yesterday. It was really strange, to say the least, to see a train running under the 7 floor original remnants... really, really strange.

STT757
October 23rd, 2003, 07:34 PM
http://www.pathrestoration.com/psr/psr.php?page=../lib/gallery.php&year=2003&month=08

NYguy
November 12th, 2003, 04:53 PM
The pavilion over the temporary PATH entrance has a striking presence on Church Street. I'll have to get better photos of it, but in the meantime, a glimpse inside the station which will reopen in a couple of weeks...


http://www.panynj.gov/pathrestoration/gallery/psr/2003/08/tpt5.gif


PATH WTC system

http://www.panynj.gov/pathrestoration/gallery/psr/2003/08/tpt2.gif

NYguy
November 17th, 2003, 09:20 AM
JERSEY JOURNAL...


PATH station at WTC to open Sunday

By Jason Fink
Journal staff writer

More than two years after the PATH station beneath the World Trade Center was obliterated in the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks, a new terminal will open Sunday, restoring service to Lower Manhattan in what will be the first major step in a long rebuilding process.

The temporary station - a permanent World Trade Center stop will open in 2006 - will be a bare-bones operation, lacking the sprawling retail space of the old station, but it will provide the first rail link into Lower Manhattan from New Jersey since the attacks. It will accommodate up to 50,000 daily riders, according to the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, which operates the system.

It will also serve as a crucial link to Jersey City's Downtown business district, with trains running from the Exchange Place station on the waterfront, which re-opened in June. Direct service to Lower Manhattan from Hoboken will also be restored.

Before Sept. 11, 2001, approximately 67,000 people boarded trains at the WTC station on weekdays. But with none of the office space planned for the WTC site yet built, ridership at the temporary station is expected to be well below what it was before.

The $323 million temporary station, financed by a combination of federal and Port Authority funds, as well as insurance proceeds, was built in about 16 months. Trains will run into the "pit" of Ground Zero, with an entrance at street level.

"When the temporary World Trade Center PATH station opens on Nov. 23, it will become the first public space to open within the World Trade Center site," said Anthony Coscia, board chairman of the Port Authority. "For the first time since the horrible and heroic events of Sept. 11, 2001, the general public will be able to walk the site."

The permanent station will be part of the proposed World Trade Center Transportation Hub and will include underground connections to three New York City subway lines and other pedestrian connections to several more, as well as access to ferry terminals along the Hudson River.

NYguy
November 23rd, 2003, 10:59 AM
NY POST...

THE PATH TO REBUILDING

November 23, 2003 -- Anyone trying to measure 9/11's impact on New York's economy - and, particularly, its transportation infrastructure - should take a trip to Ground Zero today and witness a truly historic event: the resumption of PATH train service to New Jersey.

Two years, two months and 12 days after the last PATH train fled the World Trade Center - rescuing passengers moments before the Twin Towers collapsed - that very same train will return to the site to mark the opening of a new station and the renewal of Lower Manhattan's cross-Hudson link.

What, then, did the terrorists accomplish in that regard?

For hearty New York commuters, barely more than a service interruption.

Heck, routine track work on some subway lines can take more than two years.

Such a view, of course, is by no means meant to trivialize what happened on 9/11 - the most catastrophic attack ever on U.S. soil.

Nor to minimize even the setback for commuters and commerce.

Jersey riders have been seriously inconvenienced for 26 months. This has hampered vital commercial activity in Gotham's economic epicenter.

The cost of the new station, not even counting other track work, ran more than half a billion bucks. And it's only temporary; plans for a permanent facility won't even be ready until next spring.

But, again, keep things in perspective: When the final station - to be designed by world-class architect Santiago Cala- trava - is complete, it is sure to be spectacular.

Indeed, in terms of infrastructure, New York likely will be far ahead of where it would have been without the impetus of 9/11 rebuilding.

To wit:

* In addition to the PATH station, a Fulton Street transportation hub is already on the drawing board.

* A brand new skyscraper is rising at 7 World Trade Center.

* Freedom Tower - Ground Zero's 1,776-foot (or more) centerpiece - will break ground by summer.

* Eight candidate designs for a 9/11 memorial were unveiled last week, with a finalist to be chosen by year's end.

Beyond that, there are numerous hints of rebirth, renewal - normalcy.

Many firms have made final decisions to stay in the area. Others that originally left have returned.

And, best of all, Wall Street is headed for a record-profit year.

Take that, Osama!

Make no mistake: We're not entirely thrilled with every aspect of redevelopment at Ground Zero.

And, of course, the pace of rebuilding might have been quicker.

But New Yorkers are famous for their disagreements; the good news is that Gotham's bickering hasn't stalled efforts more than it already has.

Anyway you look at it, the completion of the new PATH station is tremendous testament to New York's, and America's, resilience. It's something to be proud of.

NYguy
November 23rd, 2003, 07:05 PM
Finally! The WTC station has reopened and life returns to the heart of the WTC site. It seems that the world is being made right again, as a vital piece of the NY transportation network has been restored. And its the site of the restoration that makes it esciting - at the heart of the pit.

Now, everyday life returns to the site for the first time since 9/11. Everything is exactly where it was. Going down into the tracks it would have been easy to think that 9/11 didn't happen and the station wasn't damaged. Although the mall is gone, and the lower level food court is gone its the service that's important.

Take a look...


http://www.pbase.com/image/23566021/large.jpg


http://www.pbase.com/image/23566050/large.jpg


http://www.pbase.com/image/23566068/large.jpg


http://www.pbase.com/image/23566071/large.jpg


http://www.pbase.com/image/23566077/large.jpg


http://www.pbase.com/image/23566193/large.jpg


http://www.pbase.com/image/23566199/large.jpg


The new escalator bank is where it was, its just new. In fact, everything is new except the train cars, and those are going to be replaced soon...

http://www.pbase.com/image/23566225/large.jpg


Imagine Midtown without Penn Station or Grand Central. That's the effect felt Downtown without the PATH terminal. The Port Authority has done a great job with what is now a bare, outdoor station. The only thing missing were the signs for the Newark or Hoboken trains, but they ran where they always did. I was aware the tracks would be in the bottom of the "pit", but its still surprising to see just how close you are to the surroundings.

From the Newark platforms, some inspirational quotes for New Yorkers (and Jerseyans)...


http://www.pbase.com/image/23566240/large.jpg


http://www.pbase.com/image/23566243/large.jpg


http://www.pbase.com/image/23566249/large.jpg


http://www.pbase.com/image/23566265/large.jpg


http://www.pbase.com/image/23566271/large.jpg


Service is free until midnight. Everyone should visit the station, and witness the rebirth of the WTC.

http://www.pbase.com/image/23567206/large.jpg

ZippyTheChimp
November 23rd, 2003, 08:13 PM
The PATH Station Reopens

There are other noticable improvements to the area. The Vesey pedestrian bridge is open, although a few finishing touches remain. Vesey St had a new wider sidewalk, and there are bases installed for light poles.
Liberty St looks more like a street. The firefighters are back home at Engine 10/Ladder 10. A buffet style deli (Essex World Cafe I think) reopened near the Burger King. I don't know if it's the same owner, but the old place made great sandwiches.

I got to the station about 01:30. The rest of the site had the normal tourist activity, who were unaware of the significance of what was going to happen, but the crowd waiting for the station to open were especially quiet.

Many of the PAPD officers were in dress uniform, right down to white gloves, and eager to engage in conversation.

Between the station and the tunnel, there are good views of the bathtub.

This experience was very emotional and uplifting. I'll echo NYGuy - with all the frustrating nonesense that has accompanied the rebuilding, you should all come down here and witness a great achievement.

The PATH Station (http://www.pbase.com/zippythechimp/gallery/path_station)

Kris
November 24th, 2003, 04:30 AM
Excellent photos, as usual.


November 23, 2003

OUR TOWNS

Next Stop, the Trade Center, and Memories of the Last Ride Out

By RICHARD LEZIN JONES

HE'S glad that they kept the name. World Trade Center. Others will no doubt disagree, but Richie Moran believes the greatest memorial at the PATH station opening today — at the heart of ground zero and bearing a hauntingly familiar name — will be the sight of trains rolling in and out again.

And Mr. Moran knows a thing or two about trains. For more than two decades, he has worked in the office of the PATH system's train master, helping to move more than a quarter-million people though the system's 13 stations every day. But since Sept. 11, 2001, he has become known for bringing the system to a propitious stop.

On the morning of the terror attack, Mr. Moran helped lead a team of Port Authority employees who rerouted trains heading for the PATH station beneath the trade center. They also quickly organized a rescue train that carried about a dozen people to safety from lower reaches of the complex while the towers burned above.

It was Mr. Moran, working from his office in Jersey City, who told a conductor to gather up passengers he had unloaded at the station minutes after the first plane struck. Those passengers were taken back to New Jersey. Another conductor, whose train — carrying about 1,000 people — was already rumbling through the tunnels to the trade center as the attack began, got orders from Mr. Moran to proceed through the station without stopping.

The nimble decisions by Mr. Moran and his co-workers saved hundreds of lives, Port Authority officials say. And while Mr. Moran nods gently in affirmation when his actions on that bleak morning are recalled, he deflects any talk that he did anything more than what was expected of him.

"It was an effort by everybody," said Mr. Moran, 55, a resident of Toms River, N.J., who has been the senior stationmaster at PATH for six years. "There were so many people who did so much to move those trains that day."

One of them was Victoria Cross Kelly, then deputy director of PATH. She was preparing for a morning meeting on the trade center's concourse on Sept. 11 when she noticed a surge of activity and followed crowds up to the street level.

"People were running," Ms. Kelly recalled on Friday. "A lot of police were at the top of escalators telling people what to do. I wasn't really sure what had happened."

Nevertheless, Ms. Kelly, a veteran of almost three decades with the Port Authority, returned to the concourse, where she found a black emergency phone that connected her with Mr. Moran's office.

Don't let any more passengers off at the World Trade Center, she warned. Within moments, Mr. Moran went to work shutting down the system that he has spent most of his three-decade career maintaining.

ONE of the most difficult tasks was arranging the rescue train, which faced an unusual challenge: a homeless man who was asleep on the platform and refused to move.

"He said, `I can't get him up, we need the police,' " Mr. Moran said, recalling his conversation with the train's conductor. "I told him, `I don't think you're going to get the police.' "

With some coercion, the man was put aboard the train. About two hours after Ms. Kelly's call, the roughly 30 trains on the line had all been stopped, Mr. Moran said.

It was only then that he gave himself a moment to reflect on the morning. "I went outside, and my hands were shaking," Mr. Moran said. "I didn't even realize it."

Then, he said, he went back to work. The trains were running again by 4:30 that afternoon. At home, Mr. Moran, an Air Force veteran who served in Vietnam, experienced a sensation he hadn't felt since the war.

"I woke up with that same sense of dread that I used to get," he said. "Over there, you could say `one less day' because you knew you were going home, but with this you were already home."

On Friday, Mr. Moran visited the site of the rebuilt PATH station, where he and other officials are to take a ceremonial "first ride" today.

As he walked along the platform at the new station bearing an old name, he said his thoughts often turned to Sept. 11, to those who were saved and those who were lost.

"I was walking through the tunnels down here, and I went home and told my wife about it," he recalled. "She said, `Did you hear any voices?' I said, `I heard all of them.' "


Copyright 2003 The New York Times Company

Kris
November 24th, 2003, 04:46 AM
November 24, 2003

Again, Trains Put the World in Trade Center

By DAVID W. DUNLAP

http://graphics7.nytimes.com/packages/images/nyregion/20031123_PATH/met_PATH_promo_184.gif (http://www.nytimes.com/packages/html/nyregion/20031123_PATH)

http://graphics7.nytimes.com/images/2003/11/24/nyregion/path.583.jpg
The canopy and entrance to the redone PATH station at ground zero, looking east across Church Street and down Fulton Street.

And yesterday, the people returned to ground zero.

Not those who were impelled to work there or compelled to grieve there, but the many more who have been waiting. People without passes and badges, hard hats and breathing masks; people with no more credentials than curiosity or longing. Or the simple desire to spend a beautiful afternoon in the city on the Sunday before Thanksgiving.

The World Trade Center PATH Station opened at 2 p.m. after a $323 million, 16-month reconstruction, to applause and tears along the platforms and aboard the trains. On the sides of the cars, ruby-red "WTC" destination signs glowed once again.

For the first time since the morning of Sept. 11, 2001, ground zero throbbed with ordinary life and resonated with hundreds of vibrant voices.

"I'm making part of history right now," Robert Conard of Silver Spring, Md., said into his cellphone just before 2 p.m., as he was swept with the crowd under the winged entrance canopy on Church Street and into a succession of open-air spaces leading to train platforms 70 feet below ground.

Those pouring in from upstairs met and mingled with passengers getting off the first trains to link Lower Manhattan with New Jersey in more than two years. Before the attack, PATH, the Port Authority Trans-Hudson commuter rail system, carried 67,000 passengers a day home from the World Trade Center.

Since then, commuters have struggled with alternate, round-about routes that have included taking PATH trains that come into Manhattan farther uptown or switching to ferry service. So this morning's rush hour will surely eclipse yesterday's opening.

But that was lively enough. As destinations were announced by a worker with a megaphone — "Journal Square and Newark, track No. 4!" "Track 3 for Hoboken!" — a sea of dark winter coats surged through bright gray and shimmering silver rooms. The spaces are surprisingly luminous and generous in their proportions. But because so much of the station is intended to be temporary, it is deliberately spartan in details, with concrete and exposed steel where there once was travertine.

Wind-breaking screens wrap the main rooms, so the view of ground zero changes under different light conditions from misty to gauzy. It is the first time the public has been able to look around the trade center foundations from within the giant bathtub formed by the rugged slurry walls.

Elsewhere, on interior walls, are giant photographs of Lower Manhattan, accompanied by graphics showing the pattern of streets and skyline. The single amenity is a Hudson News stand on the mezzanine.

A permanent $2 billion PATH station is being designed by Santiago Calatrava, a Spanish architect whose bridges and terminals have been likened to poetry. It is to begin serving passengers in 2006. Like the current station, it will be linked with numerous subway lines.

On "PATH Hill," the broad bank of eight escalators from the mezzanine to the concourse, a defining feature of both the old and new stations, a woman could be overheard explaining to disbelieving companions as they ascended: "There was absolutely nothing here. Nothing. Everything is absolutely new."

Not quite everything. About 50 feet of travertine flooring and six shallow travertine steps from the old World Trade Center concourse can still be found in the vestibule between the station and the E train platform.

Keeping them was "the right thing to do," said Robert I. Davidson, chief architect of the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, who designed the station, working with the engineer Jerrold Dinkels and the Pentagram studio.

There were those in the crowd yesterday, many of them relatives of victims of the Sept. 11 attack, who worried that the Port Authority was not keeping enough, because of its plans to expand the station over more of the twin towers' footprints. Some were also angered that the Port Authority was keeping too much: the World Trade Center name, unmodified, as if the towers themselves were still there.

But Patrick Rodriguez, who was on his way to Newark, said he approved of the name. "I think it should be the World Trade Center because I grew up in New York City all my life," he said, "and that was part of our history they took away from us." Mr. Rodriguez also recalled trips he used to take on PATH to see his father in Jersey City. The screech of the trains as they made the sharp turn into the station brought back memories for many riders, including Agnieszka Warenica, who boarded the train at Journal Square in Jersey City. "I felt like I was coming back after a long time," she said. "I felt like I was home."

Amanda Valdes of Bayonne, N.J., got off the train from Exchange Place in Jersey City wiping tears from her eyes. When she arrived at the base of PATH Hill, she gasped at the familiarity of it all. "Oh, my God," she whispered to her friend, Kelly Gallagher. "They should have done something different."

"I wasn't prepared," she said. "I thought I would be."

Senator Jon S. Corzine of New Jersey, who spent 15 years commuting on PATH when he was a Wall Street executive, may have come closest to explaining why the reopening of the World Trade Center station was such a potent event. "The connection of the ordinary days of our lives with the extraordinary events of that day will never be separated," he said.

Though a case of the flu kept Gov. George E. Pataki from attending the opening, he spoke in an interview on Friday about what goes through his mind when he visits the station, looking up into the void where the twin towers stood.

"You just think of the people who were up there on Sept. 11," he said. "Friends. Heroes. So many who did not have the chance to get on that train."

The train he referred to was the last one out of the World Trade Center on Sept. 11. It was used yesterday for the ceremonial first trip back.

In the second car, No. 801, were Gov. James E. McGreevey, Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg, Mr. Corzine and Senator Frank R. Lautenberg of New Jersey.

They boarded at Exchange Place and heard a two-tone signal at 11:05, accompanied by a voice over the loudspeaker: "Next stop on this train will be the World Trade Center. Next stop, World Trade Center."

Halfway through the mile-long journey came an ever-so-slight pause, prompting Mr. McGreevey to remark, "We wanted a very realistic experience," as he recalled being stuck on a malfunctioning PATH train during the Christmas holidays one year.

"But it's not going to happen today," he added quickly.

"Well, no technology works all the time," Mayor Bloomberg said.

In a moment, the train emerged from the cast-iron tube into daylight. Through windows behind the governor and mayor, the spectacle of ground zero unfolded, as if the train were emerging from a cliff side. As it rounded its way to the platform, the slurry wall of the trade center foundation came clearly into view, as did the long ramp leading into the site from Liberty Street.

(As it happened, Mr. Bloomberg was prescient. Later in the day, a Hoboken-bound car dislodged a communications cable, forcing the temporary suspension of Hoboken service from the trade center station until about 4:15. "We're working out the bugs in the system," said Michael P. DePallo, the director and general manager of PATH.)

One of the first passengers to alight on Track 3 yesterday was Christy Ferer, the mayor's liaison to families of Sept. 11 victims. Her husband, Neil D. Levin, the executive director of the Port Authority, was killed in the attack. His successor at the authority, Joseph J. Seymour, has presided over the reconstruction.

"I'm in awe of the Port Authority because in 16 months they did what they do best: build and engineer," Ms. Ferer said as she looked around the new concourse. Then, recalling her husband, she added, "He'd be very proud to see this organization kick into gear.

"No, let me take that back. I think he'd have expected no less."

http://graphics7.nytimes.com/images/2003/11/23/nyregion/24path.l.jpg
People getting off a train at the newly reopened World Trade Center PATH station.

Copyright 2003 The New York Times Company

Kris
November 24th, 2003, 04:59 AM
http://www.nycsubway.org/nyc/path/path-wtc.html

Kris
November 25th, 2003, 07:33 AM
November 25, 2003

At Ground Zero, a Stream of Commuters and Tears

By MICHAEL LUO

The PATH train lurched around a bend and emerged from the darkness of a cast-iron tube into the morning sun. Reaching for her husband's arm, Carol Webster, 60, turned to face the exposed guts of ground zero for the first time.

Together, Mrs. Webster and her husband, Morris, took in the slurry wall and the tangle of equipment on the floor of the pit as it inched past. All around them, other rush-hour commuters craned their necks to gape. Mr. Webster, who had tagged along with his wife to lend moral support, whispered a reassurance to her, "When you fall off a horse, you have to get right back on." She nodded but kept her hand on his arm.

Yesterday, on a morning that proved at once painful and uplifting, downtown workers streamed into the heart of the former World Trade Center site for its first rush hour since the terrorist attack on Sept. 11, 2001. For more than two years, Mrs. Webster, assistant director of admissions at Alliance Theological Seminary, has avoided ground zero, even though her office is just blocks away in Lower Manhattan. The last time she was there was when she stepped off the PATH station escalators to the concourse just as the first plane slammed into the north tower. With a stampede of others, she ran for the exits, dodging cascading debris and panicked people. The memories of what she saw outside — people burning, pieces of airplane falling from the sky — haunt her. Yesterday morning, it flooded back as she returned to the rebuilt World Trade Center station, which officially opened on Sunday.

"I didn't expect the openness of it," Mrs. Webster said. "I thought I could walk upstairs and choose to look at it or not."

The station is only temporary. The concourse level that used to bustle with stores is cavernous. It is enclosed by latticework and semiopaque sheeting, adorned with inspirational quotations, that only partly obscure the surrounding trade center bathtub. Although many commuters said yesterday's rush hour was a step toward normal life in Lower Manhattan, many also said normal was close to impossible here.

As workers charged up the escalators and out of the station yesterday, a woman in the concourse gripped a latticework wall and wept. Outside, a woman waited patiently for her husband to arrive on the next train, because they never ride the same train to work anymore.

Numbers on how many rode yesterday will not be available until today, but commuters and Port Authority officials said the figures were much lower than before Sept. 11. Officials pointed out that yesterday was the start of a holiday week and that many of those who used to come through worked at the World Trade Center. They are expecting 20,000 to 30,000 commuters a day by the end of next year, compared with the 67,000 who used to come through.

At 6:30 a.m., before the main rush began pouring through, the station was mostly deserted. A gaggle of police officers stood watch on the mezzanine level, and Maria Gutierrez, manager of the Hudson News, bustled about readying newspapers and tidying up her store. For two years, she has been working elsewhere, but this morning she was back home, around the same spot she where had worked for four years.

In stages, Port Authority workers switched on the array of escalators in the bank known as "PATH Hill." By 7:30 a.m., all eight were moving, groaning and creaking as they delivered growing numbers of commuters to the concourse, where they were greeted by the beeping of construction vehicles at the site.

As the Websters wandered through the concourse a half-hour later, Sean Coughlin, 40, got ready to board his train in Hoboken with a mixture of dread and anticipation.

Mr. Coughlin, a lawyer for Citigroup Global Markets, managed to flee to New Jersey on Sept. 11 aboard the last PATH train to leave the city that morning. After the attack, Mr. Coughlin, who lives in Montclair, N.J., joined the thousands who lined up for ferry service in Hoboken. He later switched to a New Jersey Transit Midtown Direct train, which meant a subway ride downtown. Both options were significantly slower than his old PATH route.

After disembarking yesterday morning, he walked slowly up the stairs, absorbing everything.

"It's all the same layout," he said. "Wow. The same, same thing."

Coming up to PATH Hill, he swiveled his head to look around, clearly stunned. At the top, like many others, Mr. Coughlin was taken aback by how exposed everything appeared. "I worked right over there," he said, pointing off to his left, where 7 World Trade Center once stood.

Also arriving from Hoboken were Anthony Gardner, Bruce DeCell and Patricia Reilly, all wearing yellow ribbons in memory of relatives killed on Sept. 11. Although only Mr. Gardner is from New Jersey, the three, members of the Coalition of 9/11 Families, rode in together yesterday to experience it. Afterward, they wandered to the side of the concourse and gazed down in silence.

By 9:15 a.m., the surge of commuters had begun to taper off, and Lori Manning and her husband, Harlan Greenberg, rode up the escalators, with Ms. Manning dabbing away tears. On Sept. 11, the couple was among several hundred commuters on the PATH train into the World Trade Center that was diverted to Christopher Street by some quick-thinking Port Authority workers. In the last two years, their hourlong commute stretched to two hours.

Even though they had been watching the construction at ground zero unfold from their offices and were eager for the station to reopen, they were not prepared for the close-up encounter with the site. As their train had rolled around the bend, Ms. Manning, along with a woman across from her, broke down. "It's different being in it," Ms. Manning said.


Copyright 2003 The New York Times Company

NYatKNIGHT
November 25th, 2003, 11:43 AM
Yesterday on the PATH and at the stations you could hear people talking about how good it was to hear the words "World Trade Center" announced over the loudspeakers and used in real-life terminology again. It's not just a place talked about anymore, it's a place that we once again go to and use, and it feels good.

emmeka
November 25th, 2003, 02:29 PM
Oh my god I feel so emotional seeing the words 'WORLD TRADE CENTRE' on the entrance, but i also feel happy and proud at the same time.

NYguy
November 26th, 2003, 09:17 AM
Jersey Journal...

WTC station draws 20,000 PATH riders on first weekday

November 26, 2003
By Jason Fink

About 20,000 people used the new World Trade Center PATH station Monday, the first weekday that the $323 million station was in use.

That number is within the range of what officials from the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, which runs the rail system, had expected by the end of the first year of service, said Steve Coleman, a spokesman for the bi-state agency.

"We're pleasantly surprised at the number," Coleman said yesterday. "We think this is good for Lower Manhattan and the region."

The 250,000 square-foot temporary station, on the eastern edge of the 16-acre site where the Twin Towers once stood, was the first public facility to open since the buildings were destroyed on Sept. 11, 2001.

Though Monday's ridership was within the anticipated range, officials were surprised that the projection was reached on the first weekday of service.

The terminal, which is called the World Trade Center PATH Station, was built over 16 months on virtually the exact site as the station that was underneath the Twin Towers. Riders can look out the windows on their way into the station from New Jersey and see the construction work being done at Ground Zero as trains move through the bathtub, or foundation, of the Trade Center.

Built to move 50,000 daily riders through its four levels, the new station will be added onto over the next several years to create the permanent, $1.7 billion transit hub envisioned as part of the redeveloped Trade Center site. The permanent station is expected to be complete by 2006.

Initial Port Authority projections were that 20,000 to 30,000 people would use the station by the end of its first year and Coleman said yesterday that it will be hard to draw any conclusions about what the daily numbers will be for another month or so.

"We really won't have an accurate trend-kind of figure until after the holidays," he said.

NYguy
January 2nd, 2004, 09:41 AM
NY Post...

PATH PLAN MAY DIM LIBESKIND'S TRIBUTE

By WILLIAM NEUMAN

January 2, 2004 -- The design for a new permanent PATH station at Ground Zero makes significant changes to Daniel Libeskind's World Trade Center master plan by moving the terminal building northward to overlap with the "Wedge of Light," sources told The Post.

Libeskind was shown Santiago Calatrava's PATH design earlier this month, in the midst of his highly public battle with architect David Childs over the Freedom Tower.

Port Authority officials feared Libeskind would reject the design, and told him it would be a blunder to start another fight, this time with Calatrava, a highly regarded architect, the sources said.

A source briefed on the encounter at Calatrava's Manhattan studio said the warning didn't stop Libeskind's wife and business partner, Nina, from initially objecting to Calatrava's changes - particularly his alterations to the Wedge of Light.

The Wedge, a key component of the master plan, is an open plaza centered on Fulton Street, which is designed so that shafts of sunlight will hit the adjoining office towers at key moments each Sept. 11.

But Libeskind disagreed with his wife, the source said, telling Calatrava he approved of the design.

"He loves it," said Libeskind's lawyer, Ed Hayes. "He thinks it fits perfectly into the master plan and has great vision."

Libeskind's original plan for the station showed it attached to the north side of a new Ground Zero office tower that would face Church Street, between Dey and Cortland streets.

Calatrava's proposal detaches the station building from the tower, allowing Dey Street to run between them as a pedestrian promenade, according to sources familiar with the design.

This pushes the station building north so that it partly overlaps with the Wedge of Light.

The move makes the office tower more attractive to developers, since it gives it a northern face on Dey Street for high-rent retail space.

The changes don't alter the basic principle of the Wedge.

Calatrava, who lives in Spain, is known for his aerodynamic glass and steel structures that seem to evoke motion with flowing, winged shapes.

The sources said his PATH design works along the same lines.

PA officials have embraced Calatrava, considered one of the world's foremost architects of transportation facilities, and they are enthusiastic about his design.

ZippyTheChimp
January 2nd, 2004, 11:21 AM
Lyon Airport Station
http://www.calatrava.com/slides/lyon_airport_5.jpg http://www.calatrava.com/slides/lyon_airport_4.jpg

http://www.calatrava.com/slides/lyon_airport_3.jpg http://www.calatrava.com/slides/lyon_airport_2.jpg

Images from http://www.calatrava.com/

NYguy
January 2nd, 2004, 06:59 PM
So much for the "wedge" of light...


http://www.pbase.com/image/24731440/original.jpg

Gulcrapek
January 2nd, 2004, 07:29 PM
So it's elliptical?

dbhstockton
January 2nd, 2004, 07:47 PM
Leaf-shaped. Tantalizing.

JMGarcia
January 2nd, 2004, 09:45 PM
I just love speculating....

http://www.calatrava.com/slides/ciudad_artes_01.jpg

TLOZ Link5
January 2nd, 2004, 10:35 PM
Are two billion dollars needed for a PATH station that 50,000 commuters on average will use daily? There was an article in the Daily News that made such a point. Plenty of that money would be better spent on designing a JFK link.

TomAuch
January 3rd, 2004, 01:14 AM
Looks like the Wedge of Light has been shelved once and for all. Was Libeskind's about-face a reaction/concession to Attia exposing the Wedge, or does Libeskind genuinely not care if the wedge is altered?

billyblancoNYC
January 3rd, 2004, 03:35 AM
Well, hopefully, more than 50K will use it. Who knows.

ZippyTheChimp
January 3rd, 2004, 09:42 AM
It's more than just a train station.

STT757
January 3rd, 2004, 02:42 PM
It's more than just a train station.

Exactly, the design and construction of the actual outside structure of the new station is probably a fraction ($600-700 Million ?) of the project, the majority of the money will go towards design and construction of the under ground concourse which will stretch from the Winter Garden of the World Financial Center, through the World Trade Center site and finaly connect to the MTA's Fulton Street complex (which is a separate project).

The beneficiaries of the underground concourse is much larger than just PATH riders, anyone taking a Ferry to the World Financial Center, Subway riders anyone walking around from the West side to the East side of Lower Manhattan etc..

The scope of the project is much larger than just the 50,000- 60,000 (eventual) PATH riders, the concourse may or may not be retail oriented depending on the location etc..

TLOZ Link5
January 3rd, 2004, 07:41 PM
Arrighty then, quibble withdrawn. But I still want to see an actual rail link to Kennedy in the near future.

BrooklynRider
January 3rd, 2004, 07:44 PM
A futuristic monorail system emerging from a station remotely like the one displayed above, crossing the river and running parallel to the Gowanus Expwy and Belt Pkwy would be SPECTACULAR (and of course about as remote as a weed growing in Antarctica).

TLOZ Link5
January 3rd, 2004, 07:52 PM
A furistic monorail system emerging from a station remotely like the one displayed above, crossing the river and running parallel to the Gowanus Expwy and Belt Pkwy would be SPECTACULAR (and of course about as remote as a weed growing in Antarctica).

Hey hey hey, there's lots of plant life in Antarctica.

Ninjahedge
January 5th, 2004, 12:45 PM
Monorails are rather difficult to design in a temporate climate, especially one like NYC where everyone and their grandmotehr owns something that the city cannot build on, through or over.

I think we do need to link things a bit better with mass transit and PATH, but how is still a question.

I think one thing that would be useful would be to stop treating NYC as the end point in all transportation. It would be nice if there was some way to get across Manhattan without having to touch it at all (not that Manhattan is bad, but you try going from Jersey to Family/Friends in Queens and you let me know what you think about that....).

JMGarcia
January 5th, 2004, 01:50 PM
There have been proposal for years to run through transportation across Manhattan. The ability to run trains through Penn Station, for example, would give a significant capacity increase. It takes a lot longer to turn a train around as opposed to running it through and turning it around somewhere else.

The different unions in NY and NJ have consistently quashed the possibility.

STT757
January 5th, 2004, 06:02 PM
I like the idea of linking EWR and JFK via PATH and the LIRR's Atlantic Ave branch.

The PATH extension to EWR is in the planning stages, as is the planning for "possibly" building a new tunnel under the East river to connect JFK with Lower Manhattan via the LIRR's Atlantic Ave branch.

Make Lower Manhattan a Mid-point of a line that strecthes from Newark Airport, Downtown Newark, Jersey City, World Trade Center, Downtown Brooklyn, Jamaica Queens and finally JFK.

TLOZ Link5
January 5th, 2004, 06:57 PM
It'll happen. The first airport link to surface, however, would be the ferry to LaGuardia. I think a second ferry to JFK is also being considered.

STT757
January 8th, 2004, 12:50 AM
GOVERNORS PATAKI AND MCGREEVEY: RENOWNED ARCHITECT SANTIAGO CALATRAVA TO PRESENT DESIGN FOR WORLD-CLASS TRANSPORTATION HUB AT WORLD TRADE CENTER SITE ON JANUARY 22

Date: January 07, 2004
Press Release Number: 2-2004

Design to Feature Glass-and-Steel Grand Point of Arrival, Natural Lighting on PATH Platforms

Santiago Calatrava – the world-famous architect designing the Port Authority’s World Trade Center Transportation Hub – will publicly present the design on January 22 in New York City, New York Governor George E. Pataki and New Jersey Governor James E. McGreevey announced today.

The Port Authority announced last summer that the Downtown Design Partnership, in association with Mr. Calatrava, would design the World Trade Center Transportation Hub. The partnership is led by the joint venture of DMJM + Harris and STV Group, Inc. – two of the nation’s most successful and respected architectural-engineering firms.

The $2 billion World Trade Center Transportation Hub is expected to feature:
A spectacular glass-and-steel Grand Point of Arrival that will become a major architectural landmark.

A permanent PATH (Port Authority Trans-Hudson) terminal that will serve tens of thousands of daily commuters between New Jersey and Lower Manhattan, as well as millions of annual visitors to the World Trade Center Memorial.

Pedestrian connections that will significantly improve access to PATH, ferries and subway lines across Lower Manhattan. By 2020, these connections are expected to accommodate 250,000 daily commuters and visitors.

Natural lighting on the PATH platforms approximately 60 feet below street level.
Governor Pataki said, “Akin to Midtown’s Grand Central Terminal, Santiago Calatrava’s design for the new and permanent World Trade Center Transportation Hub for Lower Manhattan will serve as an architectural icon for the ages, born of hope and forged of steel and glass. It will create a new grand civic space for Lower Manhattan, carrying natural light down to the platforms and into a place once made dark by evil.”

Governor McGreevey said, “The Port Authority’s World Trade Center Transportation Hub, designed by Santiago Calatrava, will significantly benefit the tens of thousands of New Jersey residents who work in Lower Manhattan – easing their commute to Wall Street, the World Financial Center and subway connections. This state-of-the-art transportation system also will enable millions of visitors to the World Trade Center Memorial to pay their respects to the heroes of September 11, 2001.”

Port Authority Chairman Anthony R. Coscia said, “The Port Authority is committed to rebuilding the World Trade Center site by respecting and honoring those who were lost, providing state-of-the-art transportation facilities, and strengthening the economy of Lower Manhattan and the entire region. Santiago Calatrava’s inspiring design will reflect this agency’s commitment and will complement the other iconic elements of the World Trade Center site – the Freedom Tower, the Wedge of Light and the Memorial.”

Port Authority Vice Chairman Charles A. Gargano said, “A world-class mass-transportation system is essential for the continued economic recovery of Lower Manhattan. With one-third of all the people who work in Lower Manhattan coming from New Jersey and millions of square feet of downtown office space up for renewal in the next few years, we must ensure that Lower Manhattan’s infrastructure has the ability to accommodate a revitalized neighborhood.”

Port Authority Executive Director Joseph J. Seymour said, “The World Trade Center Transportation Hub will rival Grand Central Terminal as an architectural achievement and as an economic catalyst. For the first time in a century, Lower Manhattan’s knotted mass-transit network will be untangled. Santiago Calatrava’s work, which will be presented months ahead of schedule, will strike the appropriate balance between beauty and function, comfortably and conveniently meeting the needs of Lower Manhattan residents, commuters and visitors to the World Trade Center Memorial for decades to come.”

Mr. Calatrava said, “I was honored and humbled to be asked by DMJM + Harris and STV to contribute to the rebirth of the World Trade Center site. It is my hope that the World Trade Center Transportation Hub will one day be considered an important contribution to New York City’s rich architectural history, joining such transportation icons as Grand Central Terminal and Terminal 5 at John F. Kennedy International Airport.”

The permanent World Trade Center Transportation Hub is scheduled to begin serving passengers in 2006. It is expected to include underground pedestrian connections to New York City subway stations on the 1/9, N/R and E lines, as well as connections to the 2, 3, 4, 5, J, M, Z, A and C lines at the Metropolitan Transportation Authority’s proposed Fulton Street Transit Center.

The Port Authority is in the middle of an environmental review process for the World Trade Center Transportation Hub, which is being developed in cooperation with the Federal Transit Administration.

A temporary PATH station opened at the World Trade Center site on November 23, 2003. The temporary station – the final piece of the Port Authority’s $566 million program to restore PATH service as quickly as possible between New Jersey and Lower Manhattan – was the first public space to open within the World Trade Center site since the September 11, 2001, terrorist attacks.

The temporary station is an open-air facility that provides a basic level of passenger service. It does not include many of the customer amenities that existed in the World Trade Center PATH station prior to September 11, 2001, such as heating, air conditioning and rest rooms. Those customer amenities will be restored in the permanent World Trade Center Transportation Hub.

The Port Authority began service on the Port Authority Trans-Hudson system, more commonly known as PATH, in 1962 after taking over the system from the bankrupt Hudson and Manhattan Railroad. The system was originally built in 1908, and the tunnels linking New York and New Jersey were the first passenger rail connections between the two states.

Before September 11, 2001, the PATH rapid-transit system of 13 stations carried approximately 260,000 daily passengers between New York and New Jersey. Today, PATH carries approximately 180,000 daily passengers. Prior to September 11, 2001, approximately 67,000 daily passengers boarded PATH at the World Trade Center.

The Port Authority of New York and New Jersey operates many of the busiest and most important transportation links in the region. They include John F. Kennedy International, Newark Liberty International, LaGuardia and Teterboro airports; AirTrain JFK and AirTrain Newark; the George Washington Bridge; the Lincoln and Holland tunnels; the three bridges between Staten Island and New Jersey; the PATH (Port Authority Trans-Hudson) rapid-transit rail system; the Downtown Manhattan Heliport; Port Newark; the Elizabeth-Port Authority Marine Terminal; the Howland Hook Marine Terminal on Staten Island; the Brooklyn Piers/Red Hook Container Terminal; and the Port Authority Bus Terminal in midtown Manhattan. The agency also owns the 16-acre World Trade Center site in Lower Manhattan. The Port Authority is financially self-supporting and receives no tax revenue from either state.

TLOZ Link5
January 8th, 2004, 12:54 AM
Can I get a w00t?

JMC
January 8th, 2004, 01:00 AM
I have a feeling this is gonna lay the smack down....

ZippyTheChimp
January 8th, 2004, 09:18 AM
I've been anticipating this more than anything else about the site.

NYatKNIGHT
January 8th, 2004, 10:52 AM
So have I, and I'm glad his presentation comes relatively early in the rebuilding timetable, being an inspiration for the entire site.

BrooklynRider
January 8th, 2004, 11:11 AM
I am more excited by this WTC project than any other. It, unlike the Freedom Tower, can only create something new and improved, futuristic and welcoming. I can't wait.

Ninjahedge
January 8th, 2004, 12:20 PM
I think making the WTC into a transportation hub is a great idea! You would think that they would have had something like this by now considering all the people and companies that work down there. Not everyone wants to be dropped off at midtown.

It still leaves in question the whole trans-Manhattan thing... I am hoping that the Path train may be the way this is accomplished. Using the subway for more local stops, and the path for connecting the important stops together for more rapid transit....... We will see though.....

Gulcrapek
January 8th, 2004, 05:11 PM
Confetti!!

NYguy
January 8th, 2004, 06:15 PM
It still leaves in question the whole trans-Manhattan thing... I am hoping that the Path train may be the way this is accomplished. Using the subway for more local stops, and the path for connecting the important stops together for more rapid transit....... We will see though.....

The PATH and subway are basically the same thing. You can now use metrocards in the PATH system as well. It remains to be seen if the PATH fare which is now $1.50 ($1 until about a year ago) jumps to match the $2 subway fare....

STT757
January 8th, 2004, 09:40 PM
It's not mentioned in this article but the unveiling at the end of the month will also include the PATH extension to Newark Airport.


JFK rail link on fast track



By MICHAEL SAUL in Albany
and MAGGIE HABERMAN in New York
DAILY NEWS STAFF WRITERS

Four options for a direct rail link from lower Manhattan to Kennedy Airport will be unveiled this month and one will be selected in April for development, Gov. Pataki announced yesterday.
"It is an ambitious project, but one we must pursue if New York City is to join the ranks of Chicago, London and other central business districts that provide direct access to their airports," Pataki said in his State of the State address in Albany.

Downtown business leaders have called the airport link a priority in helping rebuild the area around the World Trade Center site after the Sept. 11, 2001, terror attack.

The options will be unveiled by the Lower Manhattan Development Corp., the Port Authority and the Metropolitan Transportation Authority, Pataki said. They will be winnowed down to the winning choice in April.

"What we're doing right now is a study to find out which is the best ... cost-wise, and also which would be the most efficient routing," said PA vice chairman Charles Gargano.

One idea officials discussed last year is digging a new train tunnel under the East River at a cost estimated at $4 billion to $8 billion.

Another option, proposed by downtown landlord Brookfield Properties, calls for a train that would run along Long Island Rail Road tracks, then switch to existing subway tracks in downtown Brooklyn to complete the trip to Manhattan. That would cost at least $2 billion.

Pataki also announced:


That the design by renowned architect Santiago Calatrava for the permanent World Trade Center PATH station will be unveiled on Jan. 22.

That he will work with Bloomberg to redevelop waterfronts in all boroughs, expand the Javits Convention Center and renew the West Side, and try to bring the 2012 Olympics here.

Ninjahedge
January 9th, 2004, 03:11 PM
It still leaves in question the whole trans-Manhattan thing... I am hoping that the Path train may be the way this is accomplished. Using the subway for more local stops, and the path for connecting the important stops together for more rapid transit....... We will see though.....

The PATH and subway are basically the same thing. You can now use metrocards in the PATH system as well. It remains to be seen if the PATH fare which is now $1.50 ($1 until about a year ago) jumps to match the $2 subway fare....

Yes and no. They are not really the same thing, they are different systems. Like one step below having to switch trains because with this switch, you have to pay again.

If they made it so that I, in Hoboken, could go to Newark, JFK or LaGuardia all on one system, I think I would not only like that, but also like the fact that it would be one train I get on to go all the way instead of jumping around to different ones with all my luggage in tow...

TonyO
January 9th, 2004, 03:24 PM
That's great that you can now use Metrocards on the path system. That does open up the quagmire of having 1.50 left on your metrocard, which before was virtually unusable. I had $1.50 on mine for months until I found out that you can use it on the bus and pay the remaining balance.

They should just make it one system - but they won't anytime soon. Metro North runs in CT but its still Metro North. NYC subways don't run technically in NJ but they do logically. It would kill some confusion if they just called the Path the "P" line or something (although P would not be chosen - "you need to take a P to New Jersey") :)

NYguy
January 9th, 2004, 04:56 PM
It still leaves in question the whole trans-Manhattan thing... I am hoping that the Path train may be the way this is accomplished. Using the subway for more local stops, and the path for connecting the important stops together for more rapid transit....... We will see though.....

The PATH and subway are basically the same thing. You can now use metrocards in the PATH system as well. It remains to be seen if the PATH fare which is now $1.50 ($1 until about a year ago) jumps to match the $2 subway fare....

Yes and no. They are not really the same thing, they are different systems. Like one step below having to switch trains because with this switch, you have to pay again.

If they made it so that I, in Hoboken, could go to Newark, JFK or LaGuardia all on one system, I think I would not only like that, but also like the fact that it would be one train I get on to go all the way instead of jumping around to different ones with all my luggage in tow...

That is the plan as far as "one system" goes. Only it will be in the form of a "one price" combination fare, but if you are using a metrocard its the same as one fare....

NYguy
January 9th, 2004, 04:58 PM
They should just make it one system - but they won't anytime soon. Metro North runs in CT but its still Metro North. NYC subways don't run technically in NJ but they do logically. It would kill some confusion if they just called the Path the "P" line or something (although P would not be chosen - "you need to take a P to New Jersey") :)

Also, there is light rail in NJ which connects to the PATH in Newark, Hoboken, JC, and Bayonne. The PATH train still loses money for the PA, and its still not entirely clear why the operation isn't given to NJ Transit, both are state agencies.


http://www.trainweb.org/subwaymark/transit/US%20East/Jersey%20City/Light%20Rail/njt-hudb_03.jpg


http://www.trainweb.org/subwaymark/transit/US%20East/Jersey%20City/Light%20Rail/njt-lr-hud-hob-092902-02.jpg

STT757
January 10th, 2004, 12:14 AM
The PATH train still loses money for the PA, and its still not entirely clear why the operation isn't given to NJ Transit, both are state agencies.



Every transit system loses money, every one!

And NJ Transit does not operate the PATH because the Port Authority and Governor Rockefeller of New York agreed to let to the Port Authority purchase and operate the Hudson and Manhattan Rail Road in exchange for allowing the Port Authority to deviate from their mission (transportation) by going into the Real Estate Business in Lower Manhattan (World Trade Center).

The Port Authority operating the PATH system is a compromise to New Jersey for allowing Port Authority revenues to build Office Buildings in Lower Manhattan, nothing has changed. The World Trade Center will be rebuilt, the Port Authority thus will continue to control the World Trade Center and the PATH.

BrooklynRider
January 12th, 2004, 12:16 PM
I agree. It is rather baffling that that all of the mass transit systems in this town are money losers. If the biggest city in the country, which can boast the biggest percentage of mass transit riders of any city, can't keep the systems in the black, how can anyone advocate for more public transit?

It just screams MASS mismanagement.

JMGarcia
January 12th, 2004, 12:36 PM
Actually, the NY subway covers a greater percentage of its costs with the fare than almost any other system in the world. The HK subway is the only one that I know of that actually makes a profit but it does so through land development schemes at its stations, an option that the TA doesn't have.

The commuter railroads are actually bigger money losers than the subway.

IMO most of it can be blamed on the unions rather than mis-management.

Ninjahedge
January 12th, 2004, 05:33 PM
That is interesting. Have the Port Authority buy land around areas where they know they are going to improve service or change things around, then get developers in on teh deal to develop around it... they could have made a LOT of cash on teh Pavonia Newport area, but I don't know if they were around early enough to get in on that.....

As for the shared fare, the thing is, I don't think they are allowing a shared fare. You have to use a Metro, not a PATH card to get in, and you do not get the same discounts either. Metro is an additional 20% cash on the card if you spend more than $10? PATH is dicounted fare price overall (a trip is a trip, no cash value recorded on the card)....

NYguy
January 12th, 2004, 05:35 PM
The PATH train still loses money for the PA, and its still not entirely clear why the operation isn't given to NJ Transit, both are state agencies.



Every transit system loses money, every one!

And NJ Transit does not operate the PATH because the Port Authority and Governor Rockefeller of New York agreed to let to the Port Authority purchase and operate the Hudson and Manhattan Rail Road in exchange for allowing the Port Authority to deviate from their mission (transportation) by going into the Real Estate Business in Lower Manhattan (World Trade Center).

I know why the PA took over operation of the PATH (it was a large loser even then) and EVERY transit system doesn't lose money - not in the way the PATH does. Up until a little over a year ago, the fare was just a$1 and was raised only because of NY officials constant complaining of the $1 fare that wasn't fare to New Yorkers (the city's airports bring in money that covers PATH losses).

The PATH is a very small system that would best be ran under NJ Transit, the states transportation agency. Let the PA focus on the ports and crossings, this was something that was basically forced on the agency...

STT757
January 12th, 2004, 09:26 PM
Up until a little over a year ago, the fare was just a$1 and was raised only because of NY officials constant complaining of the $1 fare that wasn't fare to New Yorkers (the city's airports bring in money that covers PATH losses).

The PATH is a very small system that would best be ran under NJ Transit, the states transportation agency

What do you think the fare is for the Boston T ?..

Just because the PATH fare is less than the NYC Subway's does not mean that the NYC Subway pays a larger portion of it's operating costs through it's fare box.

The PATH fare was and still is cheaper than the NYC Subway system because of several factors..

First the Federal Railroad Agency (FRA) which regulates both passenger and frieght operators in the country considers the PATH system a "commuter" operation and the NYC Subway a "Transit" system.

Two Different systems, two different operating rules, different Government Guidelines etc..

Most imporatantly two DIFFERENT UNIONS!!

The massive Pension plans of the NYC Transit (My Grand Father worked at the NYC Transit Coney Island yard as an Electrician) and other costs are considerably higher in NYC for the MTA.

The cost of doing business in NYC with the Unions and other issues is far greater than what the Port Authority faces in New Jersey from their Unions.

The State of NY was pressuring the Port Authority to raise their fares because of the heat the strap hangers group and other watch dog groups give them about the PATH being a better operation and having a cheaper fare.

The MTA is not run as efficiently as the Port Authority, that's clear. Corruption both from Management, Contractors and Union leaders is more rampant than what the Port Authority faces.

Also the HUGE size of the NYC Subway System and it's age is another drain on resources, coupled with the other problems I mentioned and it's no wonder the MTA is already planning to raise Subway fares AGAIN!

The PATH's newest rail car is 30 years old, the MTA is spending "Billions" on these new 142s and 143s etc. While they are a huge improvement over older cars, and break down less they are EXPENSIVE!

To use an old phrase comparing the NYC Subway to the PATH is comparing "Apples to Oranges", better to compare PATH to Boston's T, SEPTA or even PATCO.

PATH is much smaller per track mile, and has a small fleet of older cars.

And the point about NYC Airports subsidizing the PATH is meaningless since for the last 7 years (untill this year, thanks to Jetblue) EWR has been the busiest NYC airport, it's only a couple thousand off JFK's Numbers for '03.

NYguy
January 13th, 2004, 08:51 PM
What do you think the fare is for the Boston T ?..

Don't care, don't ride it. I do ride the PATH, and I also ride the subways and NJ Transit trains. The operation is better suited to NJ Transit than the PA. Let the PA worry about the ports.

STT757
January 13th, 2004, 11:02 PM
The fare for the Boston T is $1 Dollar, just For your information.

Also the T uses the same type of rail cars as the PATH, they are identical systems. And neither are comparable to the NYC Subway system.


The operation is better suited to NJ Transit than the PA. Let the PA worry about the ports.

NJ would never go along with that unless the World Trade Center was purchased from the Port Authority, and all Port Authority obligations towards it's security etc turned over to someone else.

However we both know that's not happening, Governor Rockefeller wanted the Port Authority to bring to fruition his dream of the World Trade Center in Lower Manhattan. That dream was realized, however to compensate for the tremendous amount of time and resources the Port Authority put into the construction, operation and now reconstruction of the World Trade Center the NY and NJ Port Authority board members agreed to take over and operate the Hudson and Manhattan railroad.

Since ownership and responsibilities to the World Trade Center by the Port Authority have not changed, neither will their obligations to operate and maintain the PATH system.

If they were to have gone ahead with the Dan Doctoroff sponsored "land swap" and had gotten out of the Real Estate business in Manhattan then a case could be made that they should also get out of the business of running a railroad, however it's now clear that the Governor of NY has committed the Port Authority to the World Trade Center's future (thus they will continue to operate the PATH).

The PATH and World Trade Center are both deviations from the Port Authority's mission, however neither the Governor of NY nor the Governor of NJ have any intention of changing the current Port Authority mission.

Operation of the PATH system is a responsibility the Port Authority took on as a result of an agreement between the Governor's of NY and NJ during the planning for the World Trade Center, NY agreed to the World Trade Center and PATH compromise. Governor Pataki and every Governor since Rockefeller has been fine with the compromise, it's a mutally beneficial agreement that both States are legally bound to unless as I mentioned the World Trade Center is sold and security turned over to someone else.

In fact both Governor Pataki and Mayor Bloomberg have voiced support to the plan to have the Port Authority "extend" PATH service to Newark Airport's rail link station, the Port Authority will use a combination of Port Authority revenues and Federal Airport Improvement funds to build the extension. This will benefit Lower Manhattan busineses by creating a direct connection from Lower Manhattan to a major International Airport, and best of all they will not have to touch any Federal Money except the $5 surcharge the FAA puts on airline tickets.

The cost to extend the PATH to Newark Airport's Rail link station is $525 Million, a bargain compared to other transportation projects in Lower Manhattan. As a comparison the reconfiguration of the South Ferry station for the NYC Subway is going to cost $400 Million, just to build a three track stub station.

Federal recovery money can be directed towards bridging Lower Manhattan to JFK and Long Island, with a price tag of $3-5 Billion they need to focus as much resources as possible to accomplish the goal of linking Lower Manhattan to JFK and Long Island.

Hopefully within the next few weeks Governor Pataki will unveil the plans, whether the proposed "Super Subway" or the new East River tunnel proposal.

STT757
January 13th, 2004, 11:10 PM
Visual comparison of the PATH and Boston's T, thanks to NYCsubway.org

http://images.nycsubway.org//i27000/img_27454.jpg

http://images.nycsubway.org//i18000/img_18412.jpg

The PATH and Boston's Orange and Blue lines use the same cars, the system is roughly the same size. However the T's fare is still $1 Dollar, New Hampshire doesn't hassle them to raise the fare.

NYguy
January 14th, 2004, 05:53 PM
The fare for the Boston T is $1 Dollar, just For your information.

Also the T uses the same type of rail cars as the PATH, they are identical systems. And neither are comparable to the NYC Subway system.

NJ would never go along with that unless the World Trade Center was purchased from the Port Authority, and all Port Authority obligations towards it's security etc turned over to someone else.

Umm, the Boston T has NOTHING to do with New York, and I repeat I am not interested. As far as NJ never agreeing to it, of course they wouldn't want to. Why give up an operation that is equally shared with NY? That doesn't mean NJ Transit isn't better suited for it....

STT757
January 14th, 2004, 09:01 PM
NJ Transit is better conentrating on what they have now, and future projects (M.O.M). Instead of going through the headache of aquiring the PATH, and the mess intergrated the different Unions, Pension plans etc into one agency.

NJ Transit is still struggling to this day to integrate the many different rail road operations they inherited from Conrail, who had previously operated NJ's Commuter operations. Separate and competiting rail roads such as the Pennsylvania, Central RR of NJ, Erie and Lackawanna, Reading, NY Central etc all had separate competing rail roads in NJ.

NJ Transit with projects such as Secaucus Transfer, Montclair Connection, Mid-Town Direct/Kearny Connection, Alden plan etc are just trying to unify the systems that went bankrupt 40 years ago..

The Port Authority took over the PATH 14 years before NJ Transit was even created, the PA has since operated the system for over 30 years.
They have the expertise to run the system, not NJ Transit.

NJ Transit runs a long haul commuter operation, the Light Rails are operated by contracted companies (except the Newark Subway), NJ Transit does not have the man power nor funding to take on the PATH.

And I mentioned the Boston "T" fare because of complaints of the PATH's fare being lower than NYC's SUbway, I was just trying to point out that the problem is not that the PATH fare is too low but rather the MTA fare is too high!

Jasonik
January 14th, 2004, 09:41 PM
The T in Boston just (Jan. 4th) raised its fare to $1.25.
MBTA (http://www.mbta.com/traveling_t/passes_index.asp)
Scope (http://www.mbta.com/insidethet/taag_infrastructure.asp)
History (http://www.mbta.com/insidethet/taag_history.asp)
Over 50 major stations

http://www.mbta.com/traveling_t/images/subway/linemaps/SPIDER-MAP.gif


http://www.panynj.gov/path/images/PATH_MAP2.gif
13 stations
Scope (http://www.panynj.gov/facframe.HTM)
Port Authority History (http://www.panynj.gov/hisframe.HTM)
Tube History (http://www.hudsoncity.net/tubesenglish/index.html)


To me, the comparison is not particularly apt.

STT757
January 15th, 2004, 12:14 AM
I was comparing the PATH to the T's Orange and Blue lines since they utilize the same equipment, the map you posted shows the Silver line which is a BUS line!

The Green line is a Light rail, as is the red line. Correct?..

The Orange and Blue lines are comparable to the PATH both in equipment, and network.

I don't even know why the Silver line is listed on that map, buses don't count!

STT757
January 15th, 2004, 12:17 AM
The T in Boston just (Jan. 4th) raised its fare to $1.25.

The State of Taxachusets must be looking for additional revenues to pay some Central Artery debt, putting highway debt burden on transit riders.

TLOZ Link5
January 15th, 2004, 12:51 AM
I was comparing the PATH to the T's Orange and Blue lines since they utilize the same equipment, the map you posted shows the Silver line which is a BUS line!

The Green line is a Light rail, as is the red line. Correct?..

The Orange and Blue lines are comparable to the PATH both in equipment, and network.

I don't even know why the Silver line is listed on that map, buses don't count!

I was wondering what the Silver Line was. I know the Green Line is light rail, but I don't think the Red is.

I once took a shuttle flight from LaGuardia to Logan to visit an advisor at Harvard who'd helped my sister get into Georgetown, so with no other method of transportation available to us (my mom doesn't drive well) we took the T. The service to and from the airport is remarkably similar to that at JFK pre-AirTrain: shuttle buses among the terminals, often with very looooong waits.

JMGarcia
January 15th, 2004, 01:02 AM
The Green line is light rail. The rest are heavy. The Silver line is a joke. It is basically buses but on their own right of way like light rail is. Think of it as light rail on rubber wheels.

Being a native Bostonian I can only long for the days of paying half the taxes I do in NY. ;)

Ninjahedge
January 15th, 2004, 05:28 PM
Red Blue and Orange are normal (I went to Tufts out there, Davis Square was the local stop you could walk to or take the 96 to).

Green was an overhead rail running outdoors for most of its length. I believe it serviced BC and BU.

The Orange Line was known as the "dirty" line. It visited some of the less affluent areas of Boston. The Blue took you to the airport. What fun THAT is with a full load, I'll tell you.

The price back then was 95¢ in 1989. It has not gone up.

Ninjahedge
January 15th, 2004, 05:30 PM
The Green line is light rail. The rest are heavy. The Silver line is a joke. It is basically buses but on their own right of way like light rail is. Think of it as light rail on rubber wheels.

Being a native Bostonian I can only long for the days of paying half the taxes I do in NY. ;)

Then come to NJ where you don't pay taxes on a lot of clothes or food items or gasoline (*cough*Connecticut*cough*), but your property tax is double that of NYC... :P

Jasonik
January 15th, 2004, 05:42 PM
The price back then was 95¢ in 1989. It has not gone up.

The fare was 85¢ in 1993 for the train, 60¢ for the bus, so I think you are mistaken. As I posted earlier the fare today is $1.25 for the train and 90¢ for the bus.

NYguy
January 15th, 2004, 07:27 PM
Bah! Enough of Boston already.... :x

STT757
January 15th, 2004, 07:30 PM
Bah! Enough of Boston already....

Yankee fan?..

Instead of Boston we could talk about Houston!

They got half of the Yankees '03 starting pitching roster, and the Super Bowl.

ZippyTheChimp
January 15th, 2004, 07:37 PM
It's no fun picking on Houston. Boston is a more worthy target.

Ninjahedge
January 16th, 2004, 05:34 PM
The price back then was 95¢ in 1989. It has not gone up.

The fare was 85¢ in 1993 for the train, 60¢ for the bus, so I think you are mistaken. As I posted earlier the fare today is $1.25 for the train and 90¢ for the bus.

Really? I was told not too long ago, by someone who recently visited, that it was still below a buck....

TLOZ Link5
January 16th, 2004, 08:27 PM
The Green line is light rail. The rest are heavy. The Silver line is a joke. It is basically buses but on their own right of way like light rail is. Think of it as light rail on rubber wheels.


Like the Montreal metro, then?

NYguy
January 16th, 2004, 08:40 PM
Bah! Enough of Boston already....

Yankee fan?..

Instead of Boston we could talk about Houston!

They got half of the Yankees '03 starting pitching roster, and the Super Bowl.

That was low.... :x

But the Houston rockets won't "rocket" anywhere. (to meet them in the World Series would be sweet though... :D )

JMGarcia
January 16th, 2004, 09:48 PM
The Green line is light rail. The rest are heavy. The Silver line is a joke. It is basically buses but on their own right of way like light rail is. Think of it as light rail on rubber wheels.


Like the Montreal metro, then?

Montreal is more like heavy rail on rubber. The Silver line is more like a single trolley bus.

Kris
February 13th, 2004, 02:39 PM
WTC station back to being PATH's busiest

Friday, February 13, 2004

By Jason Fink
Journal staff writer

Exceeding early expectations, the World Trade Center PATH train station is now the busiest in the system, averaging more than 30,000 weekday riders since last month.

Officials from the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, which runs the system, said they did not initially expect the Lower Manhattan station to reclaim its position as the busiest in the system until two years after it reopened. But ridership has surged since the station opened on Nov. 23.

The first major construction project to be completed at the Trade Center site since the Sept. 11, 2001 attacks, the station is serving as a temporary, bare-bones prelude to the $2 billion permanent transportation hub expected to be completed by 2009.

Though the platforms and tracks now in use will not be moved, significant additions will be made to the station and connections to New York City subways will be improved. When it is complete, the permanent Trade Center station is expected to serve more than 80,000 riders a day.

When average ridership passed 30,000 in the middle of January, the Trade Center station surpassed the 33rd Street station, which averages about 29,500 on weekdays.

"Direct rail service between New Jersey and Lower Manhattan is a vital cog in the engine that drives our regional economy," said Gov. James E. McGreevey.

Jason Fink covers Jersey City. He can be reached at jfink@jjournal.com.

Copyright 2004 NJ.com

Kris
May 5th, 2004, 07:32 AM
May 5, 2004

ABOUT NEW YORK

Stinging Eyes as the PATH Hits Daylight

By DAN BARRY

WORLD TRADE CENTER, next and last stop."

As if summoned to life by the conductor's chant, the train lurches deeper into the darkness. It creaks and cries as it slinks beneath the Hudson River, lured ever forward by the promising green lights that disrupt the underworld dusk. Here, on the PATH train, unnatural light feels natural.

A few dozen yards from the last stop, though, the silvery train emerges into the invasive sunlight that shines upon ground zero. It snakes across the space where the twin towers once stood to provide a close-up view of men in white construction helmets, of steel girders on the ground, of massive spools of wire. Aboard that train, you feel the shiver of inappropriate intimacy, of psychic trespass.

It doesn't matter whether you take that ride once or 1,000 times, you never quite get used to it. So says the conductor.

"That's because I never saw daylight before," he says.

Six times a day, five days a week, Eugene Rogers is the conductor on one of the PATH trains wending their way to the renovated World Trade Center station. And just about every time, he finds himself gazing in silence at the ground zero panorama, until the train comes to a stop with an exhalation like a sigh.

"I knew so many people over so many years," he says. "My riders."

Mr. Rogers, 58, has been with the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey for his entire adult life, save for a two-year hitch in the Army that included three months in Vietnam. He started as a token clerk, and then moved up to conductor just as the finishing touches were being put on the trade center.

For more than 20 years of weekday mornings now, he has worked exclusively on the Newark-to-Trade Center line. That is by choice: he's the kind of man who thinks about the Hudson River when he's under it, and he liked how the Newark stretch of the trip stays above ground. He also wanted a schedule that would allow him to get to know his passengers.

"That's what makes my day go fast," he says. "I'm a sociable train."

On that Tuesday morning, around 9, the trainmaster back in Journal Square called him on his walkie-talkie. Evacuate your train at Exchange Place station, he recalls the boss saying. Pick up anyone at the trade center stop and get out. There's been an explosion of some kind.

Mr. Rogers and the train's engineer, Noel Roman, did as they were told. They picked up a maintenance man, a couple of PATH employees and a homeless man that Mr. Rogers roused from a bench. Theirs, he says, was the last PATH train to leave the station before the towers fell.

Who knows how many of his riders died that day. Riders who would nod to him, call him by name, wish him a good day. Whenever photographs of the victims appeared in print, he would look closely at their features and, occasionally, feel the pang of loss.

Mr. Rogers worked for two years as a conductor on the trains going to West 33rd Street, while construction crews tried to reconnect the PATH line to lower Manhattan. When his superior called to ask whether he would read some of the victims' names at the memorial service marking the first anniversary, he said that he would be honored.

"I read 14 names," he says. "I read in the P's."

SIX months ago, the PATH trains finally returned to the World Trade Center station - or, rather, an approximation of that station. Where there had been shops and bustle all cast in the false light beneath the towers, there is now an eerie grayness - in the concrete, in the escalators, in the exposed steel, in the stray pigeons pecking about.

And there is daylight.

Sometimes, especially after rush hour, Mr. Rogers has a few minutes until the train returns to Newark, so he stands on the barren platform, staring at the absence in daylight. Everything is so strange, he says, that he has yet to pinpoint where the conductors' locker room used to be.

Most of all, he says, he thinks about seats unfilled on his sociable train.

A couple of weeks ago, Mr. Rogers noticed a passenger staring at him. After a while, the man broke into a smile and said, "Gene." The man went on to explain that it was his first trip back to the trade center station since the collapse, and that he had remembered the conductor's name because it was the same as his own.

The man stood to shake the conductor's hand. Then the two Genes embraced, as another PATH train groaned toward daylight.

Copyright 2004 The New York Times Company

BigMac
June 15th, 2004, 08:54 AM
New York Daily News
June 15, 2004

Vegetable vendors sprout at WTC site

Derek Rose

New York blueberries, homegrown lettuce and fresh-baked bread are making their return to the World Trade Center site for the first time since Sept. 11, 2001.

Four green market farmers will set up tables of homegrown produce on the north side of the entrance to the WTC PATH terminal starting Thursday.

The move is "a significant step toward fulfilling our commitment to restore the bustling street activity that existed in the area before 9/11," Port Authority Vice Chairman Charles Gargano said.

The farmers sold their produce last summer at nearby Liberty Park, which is under renovation.

The market will be open Thursdays from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. An additional market day may be added next month.

Copyright 2004 Daily News, L.P.

krulltime
June 16th, 2004, 10:29 AM
New York blueberries, homegrown lettuce and fresh-baked bread are making their return to the World Trade Center site for the first time since Sept. 11, 2001.

That is a great thing. I was wondering about them. One time I bought fresh-baked bread from one of the vendors.

BigMac
June 24th, 2004, 06:10 PM
NJ.com
June 24, 2004

'It's much more than a PATH station,' audience told of plans at WTC site

By Wendy Mbekelu
Journal staff writer

The Port Authority of New York and New Jersey presented plans to the public in Jersey City Tuesday night for the permanent World Trade Center PATH station.

Louis Menno, a PATH program director, gave a half-hour presentation summarizing the findings of a draft environmental impact statement in the City Council Chambers at City Hall. He said the Port Authority built the temporary station now in use in Lower Manhattan as quickly as possible following the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001 but that the station will be unable to meet the long-term needs of PATH commuters.

Ridership is projected to exceed pre-Sept. 11 levels by 25 percent, he said, and without an infusion of capital, operations at the temporary station will have to cease sometime between 2009 and 2025, according to the report.

The permanent station will accommodate 81,000 passengers per day, up from the current 50,000, he said.

The number of pedestrian connections to New York City subways will increase - connections to the 1/9, 4/5, J/M/Z lines will be available, along with existing connections, to the R/W, A/C/E, 2/3 lines - and access will be provided to memorial that will be built at the site.

"It is much more than a PATH station," said Steve Coleman, the Port Authority spokesman. "What we are building there is a transportation hub that will greatly benefit commuters by allowing them to easily connect from the PATH to other modes of transportation. Currently those connections do not exist."

One debate is whether to construct the permanent terminal with or without a pedestrian connection to Liberty Park Plaza. According to the report, that will have no effect on the design or the construction schedule but, without a connection, pedestrian traffic will increase at Liberty and Church streets.

The Port Authority, in conjunction with the Federal Transportation Authority, will work to minimize adverse environmental impacts by installing barriers to reduce noise, fitting machinery with mufflers and using sulfur-free fuels. The bi-state agency is also working closely with preservation groups to minimize effects on historic and archeological structures.

At City Hall on Tuesday night, computer monitors flickered with images of the completed terminal, showing a glass, steel, and concrete structure built to capture the maximum amount of natural light and to give commuters views of adjacent buildings.

Unlike the current terminal, the permanent hub will be climate-controlled. It is slated to open in 2006.

An audience of less than 20, most of them Port Authority staff, came out for Tuesday's meeting.

"I'd be lying if I said we wouldn't be using this facility, it's new and improved, but we feel it is a missed opportunity not to connect to the Upper East Side," said John Bowen, president of the New Jersey Railroad Passengers Association, during the public comment period.

© 2004 NJ.com

NYguy
June 24th, 2004, 08:12 PM
"I'd be lying if I said we wouldn't be using this facility, it's new and improved, but we feel it is a missed opportunity not to connect to the Upper East Side," said John Bowen, president of the New Jersey Railroad Passengers Association, during the public comment period.

What does he mean by that? The PATH terminal will be directly connected to the Fulton St transit center...

STT757
June 25th, 2004, 12:22 AM
NJ-ARP has their own proposal they were floating to directlyc connect the PATH system with the Lexington ave line, as seen here..

http://www.nj-arp.org/path_lex.html

krulltime
June 25th, 2004, 12:42 AM
Unlike the current terminal, the permanent hub will be climate-controlled

Now this is really good! Glad to hear that one. 8)

Ninjahedge
June 25th, 2004, 09:59 AM
The path trains are already getting a bit crowded during rush hour. Do you really think making them more accessable will help things?

I think having the extension there would be a good thing, but we should not OPEN that extension until the system itself is streamlined a bit (we need better track controls and the like to improve efficiency).

Hoboken Station could also stand a facelift and improvements in such rudamentaries as VENTILATION and track access.

We will see what happens though....

NYatKNIGHT
June 25th, 2004, 12:50 PM
Christopher, 9th and 14th St. PATH stations could really use some work. Too few turnstiles, and they're like a sauna.

Zoe
June 25th, 2004, 12:51 PM
The Hoboken station needs a total makeover. A building like the Port Authority Bus station on 42nd should be built over the tracks and the bus station there. Include a parking garage, bus platforms, update the PATH station, improved cab station and tie it into the train station. That way you accomplish ventilation, elevators, better access, integrate shops and put some office space above it. That area is an eyesore, hard to believe it stays like that in such a high rent area.

I know we got off subject, my apologies, but I had to vent

Ninjahedge
June 25th, 2004, 03:04 PM
Well, the Hoboken station should do a lot of things, not the least of which being some way to get traffic and other things OVER the tracks and to the other side. Right now there is only the loop around to get UNDER the tracks and then down and around the tunnel entrance. If they could just extend Hudson street over the tracks, there would be a more direct conection to downtown JC.

As for the station, it needs a few more spots for the path trains. It also needs to be more easily accessable from all turnstyles (try going to track 2 from the other side od track 1, you have to go up and around if you miss the doors, etc....)

Christopher needs work, but you had everyone in the village squawking about how that would somehow "ruin" the village.

Ruin the village because there is another PATH entrance? This is the line that I get pissed off about with the "preservationists" NIMBY's.

But all the old stations need some better way to ventilate. Shafts would be handy, because it gets BRUTALLY hot in those tunnels!

But they should still build the extension when they are doing this now. They should not do it like it is pictured now, maybe an offshoot from the WTC loop would work better. This way, if they WANT to do this in the future, they can. But they don't HAVE to run the lines that way until they are able to make the changes needed elsewhere.

billyblancoNYC
June 25th, 2004, 06:42 PM
The Hoboken station needs a total makeover. A building like the Port Authority Bus station on 42nd should be built over the tracks and the bus station there. Include a parking garage, bus platforms, update the PATH station, improved cab station and tie it into the train station. That way you accomplish ventilation, elevators, better access, integrate shops and put some office space above it. That area is an eyesore, hard to believe it stays like that in such a high rent area.

I know we got off subject, my apologies, but I had to vent

I wouldn't mind seeing the PA Bus Term moved Westward, away from TS. It should be the base of a mixed-use development. It would help spark the development there and allow for a nice development on the current site.

MrShakespeare
November 24th, 2004, 01:33 PM
http://www.newsday.com/news/local/wire/ny-bc-nj--pathridership1122nov22,0,1851466,print.story?coll= ny-ap-regional-wire

Ridership at restored WTC PATH station outpacing estimates


November 22, 2004, 5:10 PM EST

NEWARK, N.J. -- PATH ridership at the World Trade Center station has exceeded expectations since the service was reactivated a year ago, the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey said Monday.

Average weekday ridership was just under 40,000 trips, almost 40 percent higher than the 26,000 daily trips anticipated, according to Anthony Coscia, chairman of the bistate agency.

Coscia said the $560 million project to restore PATH service to the World Trade Center following the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks took just 26 weeks when it normally would have taken years.

Coscia said because the agency believed PATH service was a cornerstone of the regional economy, "We put a huge emphasis last year on trying to get service restored."

Copyright © 2004, The Associated Press

NYguy
November 25th, 2004, 08:42 PM
Average weekday ridership was just under 40,000 trips, almost 40 percent higher than the 26,000 daily trips anticipated, according to Anthony Coscia, chairman of the bistate agency.

That's good news to hear. And no WTC tenants to speak of yet. When the new WTC complex is up and open, the PATH terminal will be its busiest ever, higer even than pre-9/11 levels.

STT757
November 26th, 2004, 12:06 AM
When the new WTC complex is up and open, the PATH terminal will be its busiest ever, higer even than pre-9/11 levels.

PATH extension to Newark Airport should add another 6-8,000 daily riders by 2009.

TLOZ Link5
November 26th, 2004, 04:25 PM
NJ-ARP has their own proposal they were floating to directlyc connect the PATH system with the Lexington ave line, as seen here..

http://www.nj-arp.org/path_lex.html

I'm skeptical about that, despite how interesting the projoect sounds. The Lexington Avenue Line is already badly overcrowded as any East Sider can attest to, so the last thing that's needed is ten thousand commuters from New Jersey sharing the tracks with them every day. If the project could be put off until the Second Avenue Subway is built, then that's a different story.

STT757
November 26th, 2004, 06:37 PM
That plan to connect the PATH with the Lexington Ave line comes from the need to get NJ riders to the East side, and to connect NJ with the NYC Transit system.

A better idea that's been floated is to extend the L train to Hoboken, with stops at 10th Ave and 14th street in Manhattan and stops in "North" Hoboken and Hoboken Terminal "South" in New Jersey.

TLOZ Link5
November 27th, 2004, 06:53 PM
So then the new L-train cars would be obsolete. Would it take much effort to reconfigure the route maps and announcements?

antinimby
February 9th, 2008, 07:03 PM
From the NY Times (http://www.nytimes.com/slideshow/2008/01/31/nyregion/20080131_PATH_SLIDESHOW_index.html):


The New 'PATH Hill'


http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2008/01/31/nyregion/31PATH_14.jpg
The exterior of the entrance of the North Access entrance to the PATH station, on Vesey Street, as it is
expected to appear later this year.


http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2008/01/31/nyregion/31PATH_07.jpg
The street-level entrance area as it will appear after completion later this year. Escalators can be seen at
far left.


http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2008/01/31/nyregion/01path.03sub.jpg
The street-level entrance area of the PATH station North Access project, as it appears now.


http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2008/01/31/nyregion/31PATH_05.jpg
The North Access entrance project is the aboveground structure at center and left in dark-green steel.
To the right is a side view of the "Survivors' Stairway." At lower left is the concrete box through which the
No. 1 subway line runs. The glass-clad tower at rear is 7 World Trade Center.


http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2008/01/31/nyregion/31PATH_01.jpg
The new "PATH Hill" escalator array at the World Trade Center site will begin serving New Jersey commuters
later this year.


http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2008/01/31/nyregion/31PATH_04.jpg
The current temporary entrance to the PATH station on Church Street. This will be replaced by the new
entrance, called North Access, around the corner on Vesey Street.

BrooklynLove
February 9th, 2008, 10:48 PM
i love progress. very cool.

antinimby
February 9th, 2008, 11:11 PM
By 2013, the number of...

Port Authority PATH stations built: 3

MTA Fulton Street stations built: 0

stache
February 9th, 2008, 11:25 PM
So the north entrance will be permanent?

antinimby
February 9th, 2008, 11:31 PM
Nope, temporary as well.

Calatrava's will be permanent.

BrooklynLove
February 10th, 2008, 08:44 AM
what we really need is an accomplished business leader who loves new york and has no need/desire to add to his/her already large pot of wealth to take the helm at the mta. i'd love to see bloomberg in that spot once his mayoral term concludes, but that's a pipe dream.

NoyokA
February 10th, 2008, 02:40 PM
I still can't believe how much money they're wasting on these temporary path terminals. Why didn't they just build a tent like the 2nd on the site of the 3rd and scrap that 40 foot ceiling and those escalators that will become scrap themselves in a couple of months. Give Fulton Street some of the money that the PA is wasting here, it just seems so wasteful.

It does raise the question though, how does the PA have so much money to burn when the MTA is struggling to survive?

antinimby
February 10th, 2008, 02:58 PM
It doesn't matter what you give to the MTA, they would waste it away very quickly anyway.

Giving them money would only be a temporary fix.

The MTA's problem is not so much about money as it is about what they're able or not able to do with it.

Their problem is systemic and in order to fix the root cause, they need an organizational, top to bottom overhaul. Anything short of this would just be a band aid.

arcman210
February 10th, 2008, 03:17 PM
the temporary path station should have gone here in the first place. work on the permanent path station could have been started years ago if that had been done.

BrooklynLove
February 10th, 2008, 07:33 PM
AN - i agree 100% with you re mta

DarrylStrawberry
March 23rd, 2008, 12:44 PM
3.23

GreenwichBoy
March 31st, 2008, 05:23 PM
Entrance Moving North for New WTC Transit Hub

NEW YORK (AP) -- The entrance to the World Trade Center's transit hub is moving north for the next few years.

The 50,000 daily commuters who use the temporary PATH hub will have to enter at Vesey Street near the 7 World Trade Center skyscraper, instead of around the corner on Church Street.

The Vesey Street entrance opens Monday night. The Church Street entrance will stay open until mid-April.

The old entrance is closing to accommodate ongoing construction of the $2 billion-plus transit hub, designed by Spanish architect Santiago Calatrava. The design is expected to be completed by 2011.

brianac
April 11th, 2008, 04:22 AM
A New Phase Downtown as a Big Tent Is Folded Up

By DAVID W. DUNLAP (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/reference/timestopics/people/d/david_w_dunlap/index.html?inline=nyt-per)
Published: April 11, 2008

Since June 2007, a 37-foot-high, saddle-shaped polyester-and-aluminum tent — far more graceful to behold than it sounds — has been the public face of the World Trade Center project. The tent shelters the Church Street staircase at the temporary PATH terminal. This was to close at midnight Friday to permit construction of the permanent transportation hub. The tent will not be discarded. But it will disappear.

http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2008/04/11/nyregion/11tent-650.jpg (http://javascript<b></b>:pop_me_up2('http://www.nytimes.com/imagepages/2008/04/11/nyregion/11tent_CA0.ready.html', '11tent_CA0_ready', 'width=720,height=600,scrollbars=yes,toolbars=no,r esizable=yes'))David W. Dunlap/The New York Times
A tent that has been over the Church Street PATH station stairs since last year is coming down.

Its replacement is already in place: a boxy structure on Vesey Street that will serve PATH until 2011. Though it is less exposed to the elements, it is also the most utilitarian of the three temporary PATH entrances that have been built at ground zero since 2003.

The $275,000 tent was intended to have an “aspiring quality,” said Bartholomew Voorsanger of Voorsanger Architects. It designed the project under contract with Phoenix Constructors, which is building the permanent hub for the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/reference/timestopics/organizations/p/port_authority_of_new_york_and_new_jersey/index.html?inline=nyt-org). “It sent a signal to the public using PATH that there was a brighter, more exciting future coming,” Mr. Voorsanger said.

That signal came from about 2,400 miles away: the workshop of Tentnology in Surrey, British Columbia. James R. MacDonald, a partner in Voorsanger Architects, came across the company online. It calls itself a manufacturer of “portable fabric architecture,” like party, event and emergency tents; portable shelters; shade structures; and band shell and stage covers.

The project was a challenge, said Suzanne Warner, whose title at Tentnology is sales goddess. (Her husband, Gery, is the president.)

“It was like an airplane,” she said of the tent design, meaning that it had to be lightweight enough to get off the ground, yet strong enough to take forces and stresses.

Ms. Warner said she was not prepared for the bureaucratic entanglements and labor rules that she found in New York City, which added to the complications of the job. “I felt like Eva Gabor in reverse,” she recalled.

In the end, however, Ms. Warner said, “We were delighted to see it there.”

The end of the tent at the PATH terminal is not the end of the tent itself. “It will be preserved,” said Steven Coleman, a spokesman for the Port Authority. “We are exploring options for what we may want to do with it.”

Mr. Voorsanger seemed satisfied that it had achieved its purpose. “Everybody involved with ground zero feels the emotional need for an honorific response,” he said, “even though it’s low-budget and temporary.”

Copyright 2008 The New York Times.

EugeneNYC
April 11th, 2008, 12:52 PM
275K for a tent??? Damn I'm in the wrong profession.

Alonzo-ny
April 11th, 2008, 03:09 PM
It cost a few mil to move a crappy staircase, That might be a better option.

brianac
May 8th, 2008, 05:34 AM
At Rail Hub, Bird Will Still Soar, but With a Bit Less Polish

By DAVID W. DUNLAP (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/reference/timestopics/people/d/david_w_dunlap/index.html?inline=nyt-per)
Published: May 8, 2008

They have not clipped the wings of the birdlike structure that is to be the aesthetic centerpiece of the World Trade Center transportation hub and PATH terminal, but Port Authority officials now plan to shrink it as they search for ways to keep the project within a $2.5 billion budget.

They also plan to change some construction methods in a way that would, generally speaking, result in a slightly less refined structure.

More substantial revisions may be needed if no contractor can be found to build the project for $2.5 billion, said Anthony J. Sartor, a commissioner of the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/reference/timestopics/organizations/p/port_authority_of_new_york_and_new_jersey/index.html?inline=nyt-org) and chairman of its trade center redevelopment subcommittee. Bids will be invited next month.

In a memorandum sent on Wednesday to Anthony R. Coscia, the authority’s chairman, Mr. Sartor pledged that the hub “will be completed and functioning in 2011.”

“Even with these potential design alterations,” Mr. Sartor said, “the hub will retain its signature ‘winged’ design, provide enhanced transportation services and substantial public space for commuters, residents and visitors alike, and serve as an essential anchor to the broader redevelopment of the World Trade Center site and Lower Manhattan.”

Rather than seeking more money — particularly since critics say that $2.5 billion is extravagant enough for what is essentially a commuter rail station — the authority has capped the budget. Therefore, as construction costs have risen, authority officials have whittled away at elements of the original design by Santiago Calatrava (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/reference/timestopics/people/c/santiago_calatrava/index.html?inline=nyt-per), one of the world’s best known architects and engineers, and the firms of STV and DMJM Harris. Mr. Sartor said the authority had been “working collaboratively” with Mr. Calatrava.

The process, called “value engineering,” is meant to find savings in building methods that neither compromise safety nor diminish aesthetics.

Among other revisions already made to the project, skylights have been eliminated from the terminal’s below-ground mezzanine.

Now, the authority plans to reduce the street-level perimeter of the transit hall by 10 to 15 percent. This is the main entrance into the hub, and its canopy is a winged, elliptical, glass-and-steel structure that Mr. Calatrava has likened to a bird taking flight.

The authority also proposes to use standard concrete in the ceiling girders of the mezzanine rather than architectural concrete, which has a finish so smooth it can be mistaken for polished stone. Authority officials maintain that the public would have to look carefully to notice the difference.

In a statement released by his office on Wednesday, Mr. Calatrava noted that “an architect must always be creative and flexible,” adding, “I believe that we have made the design better in many, many ways, through this exercise.”

http://www.nytimes.com/2008/05/08/nyregion/08terminal.html?ref=nyregion

Copyright 2008 (http://www.nytimes.com/ref/membercenter/help/copyright.html) The New York Times Company (http://www.nytco.com/)

brianac
May 19th, 2008, 08:23 PM
April 1, 2008, 7:12 am

A New Twist at the PATH Station

By David W. Dunlap (http://cityroom.blogs.nytimes.com/author/ddunlap/)

http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2008/03/31/nyregion/01dunlap.1.jpg
The new “temporary” entrance to the PATH station at the World Trade Center, facing Vesey Street, will serve commuters until 2011. This picture was taken on Monday evening, hours before its scheduled opening. (Photos: David W. Dunlap/The New York Times)

This is the third temporary PATH (http://www.panynj.gov/CommutingTravel/path/html/index.html) terminal entrance and exit to have been constructed since 9/11. The modest structure stands on Vesey Street, at the confluence of Greenwich Street and West Broadway, opposite the 7 World Trade Center plaza.

http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2008/01/31/nyregion/31path.span.jpg
Like the current station and the one that was destroyed, it has an imposing bank of escalators (http://cityroom.blogs.nytimes.com/2008/02/01/step-by-moving-step-path-hill-takes-shape/) running between the mezzanine and concourse levels. It will be in use until 2011, when the final version of the terminal, designed by Santiago Calatrava, will be completed.

http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2008/03/31/nyregion/01dunlap.2.jpg
On the mezzanine level of the existing station, the route to the new Vesey Street escalators is already clear.

http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2008/03/31/nyregion/01dunlap.3.jpg
What will be lost in the transition is the viewing area on the concourse of the Church Street entrance. Commuters could glimpse through this fence at the construction activity at ground zero. It was one of the best public vantages available anywhere around the site.

Copyright 2008 (http://www.nytimes.com/ref/membercenter/help/copyright.html) The New York Times Company (http://www.nytco.com/)

ablarc
May 25th, 2008, 02:53 PM
In a statement released by his office on Wednesday, Mr. Calatrava noted that “an architect must always be creative and flexible,” adding, “I believe that we have made the design better in many, many ways, through this exercise.”
Whistlin' in the dark.

kz1000ps
May 25th, 2008, 08:09 PM
The fact that he called it an "exercise" is bad enough.

ZippyTheChimp
August 28th, 2008, 09:33 PM
Sherpa: Check your PMs on duplicate posts.

Sherpa
August 28th, 2008, 11:03 PM
SEE YOU IN '16, SANTIAGO —While the Port Authority struggles to put together a new timetable for the completion of the World Trade Center, Downtown Express unearths a 2007 engineering study commissioned by a pair of Lower Manhattan agencies that claims Santiago Calatrava's (can we still even call it Santiago Calatrava's?) WTC PATH station won't be open until 2016. The Port Authority hasn't acknowledged the report, but "a source currently incolved in the rebuilding process" told DE "the dates could be even longer off." [Downtown Express; previously]

scumonkey
August 29th, 2008, 03:10 AM
^ it appears someone is not paying attention?!:rolleyes:

NYC4Life
August 29th, 2008, 03:50 AM
We shall all wait to see the Paterson report coming out in September. That will give us a more clearer picture on the scheduled completion dates, hopefully. :confused: