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NYguy
January 18th, 2003, 07:22 PM
Here's a lengthy Times's article on the project...
http://www.nytimes.com/2003/01/19/realestate/19COV.html?pagewanted=all&position=top

http://graphics7.nytimes.com/images/2003/01/19/realestate/19COV.184.jpg
Behind Columbus Monument, a 7-level luxury mall nears completion, with towers above.


http://graphics7.nytimes.com/images/2003/01/19/realestate/19cov2.184.jpg
Cutaway view of AOL Time Warner Center shows Jazz at Lincoln Center on the upper floors; the Rose Theater at left and Allen Room at right, overlooking Columbus Circle through two glass walls. Below the Allen Room is the retail atrium, leading to the Whole Foods Market in the basement. Below that is an Equinox health club.

TLOZ Link5
January 18th, 2003, 07:31 PM
I read that article. *Very informative and interesting.

DominicanoNYC
January 18th, 2003, 09:27 PM
I passs by that building everyday and I've seen renderings of the buildning. It's going to be a really nice building.

amigo32
January 19th, 2003, 02:18 AM
Yea, you're right Dominicano, *that will be one sweet building. *I can't wait to get a chance to see it when it is completed.

dbhstockton
January 19th, 2003, 05:19 PM
Amazing that the project was filed as an alteration to gain easier approval. *That kind of law bending and streching sounds like something out of Robert Moses' playbook. *

NYatKNIGHT
January 20th, 2003, 12:51 PM
This article also mentions the renovation of Columbus Circle:

At the same time, however, they will gain a renovated and relandscaped Columbus Circle, under a $21 million project designed by the Olin Partnership. It is obviously in the developer's interest to raise Columbus Circle from what the landscape architect Laurie D. Olin described as its malformed current state. "It's the kind of public-private partnership you hope will happen,"

Mr. Olin said. His design will reinforce the geometry of the circle with a new fountain around the Columbus Monument, an inner ring of yellow buckeye trees, a landscaped berm, an outer ring of honey locusts and concentric decorative paving.

The paper showed a rendering of the circle, but it's not in the website.


And what's this about a 150 foot prow?

AOL Time Warner plans to begin constructing its headquarters and CNN studio space this summer and will move into the building in phases next year. The company will declare its presence graphically through a 150-foot-high steel-frame prow at the 58th Street edge of the building, which is to form a kind of gateway across Eighth Avenue with 2 Columbus Circle, the future home of the Museum of Arts and Design (formerly the American Craft Museum). AOL Time Warner is considering fanlike displays within the prow, which is as tall as the Statue of Liberty, minus the pedestal.

"Our intent is certainly not a Times Square kind of presentation," said Philip R. Pitruzzello, vice president for real estate projects, but for corporate branding in "some contextually appropriate way."

The City Planning Department will see the prow design this week. "We're hoping that whatever will be in the prow will in some way complement 2 Columbus Circle,"...


(Edited by NYatKNIGHT at 11:56 am on Jan. 20, 2003)

Rich Battista
January 21st, 2003, 09:31 PM
sounds like a great idea to me

NYatKNIGHT
March 11th, 2003, 11:52 AM
Images taken on March 9.


Street Level

http://www.imagestation.com/picture/sraid54/p291f2a32c635507575e42c1f39bb3e9a/fc84f503.jpg



The highly reflective glass lends different contrasts of light on each angle.

http://www.imagestation.com/picture/sraid54/p84286c76d0a41ca38dbdae92d2474983/fc84f500.jpg


The sky is perfectly mirrored on the lower north tower from this angle.

http://www.imagestation.com/picture/sraid54/pce733a4b8c072b5d3dfb446d7b9d8007/fc84f4fe.jpg


Working on the crown - north tower

http://www.imagestation.com/picture/sraid54/p6d50621890384ee98b4d9b9240662cb4/fc84f4fc.jpg


Columbus Statue at the base

http://www.imagestation.com/picture/sraid54/p1f4db3144a1c7e5b32b676188cc2a5ac/fc84f51a.jpg


Maine Monument and Trump Int'l.

http://www.imagestation.com/picture/sraid54/p54baa91238d7219498488b54be793e8d/fc84f514.jpg


From behind 2 Columbus Circle - angles and glass

http://www.imagestation.com/picture/sraid54/p2bee95096400a1b02542f1d86725d9ed/fc84f50f.jpg


Down Central Park South at sunset

http://www.imagestation.com/picture/sraid54/p4c54a52365ee0287a77b81f182f3f975/fc84e966.jpg


A Central Park shot while in the neighborhood

http://www.imagestation.com/picture/sraid54/pf86064c0af3b938cff8eae0918cacba2/fc84f37d.jpg

diVinci
March 11th, 2003, 01:03 PM
NYatKnight...

Is it me...or are none of the images opening?

fvcrew22
March 11th, 2003, 01:11 PM
not sure, but i can't see them either......

TLOZ Link5
March 11th, 2003, 06:35 PM
I think it just might be you. *The images are working fine for me.

Try clicking and holding the mouse button on each image until you get a pop-up menu. *Select "Load Missing Image;" however, I can't guarantee that it will definitely work.

maxinmilano
March 11th, 2003, 07:06 PM
Of course is not aq masterpiece like Portzamparc's LVMH Tower or Piano's NYTimes bldg but this project is a good project. Bold and elegant at the same time, linked with the history of the city (the grid, the quotation of the crown) but at the same time not too superficial in this way. It's a good project in a good position maybe a little bit underestimated.

diVinci
March 11th, 2003, 07:37 PM
Yes...the server site he posted them on is now working.
I can see them just fine and they are great photos!

Notice how the glass facade, in bright daylight, is bluer, brighter and it appears gray on a cloudy "gray" day.
Interesting how the glass reflects the color of the environment and the overall light conditions. *Overall, this complex is going to be spectacular...especially when the new landscaping of Columbus Circle will be integrated.

(Edited by diVinci at 6:44 pm on Mar. 11, 2003)

billyblancoNYC
March 12th, 2003, 11:15 AM
Rreally, a wonderful project all around. *GREAT for NYC - one complex with a super lux hotel, super lux condos, a corp headquarters for a huge corp, tv studios, a wonderful cultural complex (Jazz@Lincoln Center), a shpooing mall, huge grocery (maybe the best in the country), and a floor dedicated to insane restaurants (French Laundry NY, Jean Georges Steakhouse, $500 a person sushi - moving from Beverly Hills, and so on).

Wonderful.

Fabb
March 12th, 2003, 02:00 PM
Yes, the diversity of uses is amazing.
The most successful of them will probably lack room in a couple of years.

Kris
April 8th, 2003, 10:39 AM
Fire breaks out in new AOL Time Warner headquarters
Staff Writer

April 8, 2003, 10:04 AM EDT

A four-alarm fire early Tuesday damaged the new AOL Time Warner building under construction at Columbus Circle, officials said.

About 170 firefighters battled the 12:37 a.m. blaze, on the fourth through seventh floors of 10 Columbus Circle, said Amanda Schmidt, a fire department spokeswoman.

An elevator mechanic was treated at the scene for minor injuries, officials said. No other injuries were reported.

The fire was placed under control at 2:35 a.m., officials said.

The cause was under investigation, and the extent of the damage was not immediately known, Schmidt said.

Spokesmen for AOL Time Warner and the developer, The Related Companies, did not immediately return calls for comment.

Last September, four people were injured, one critically, when gusting winds blew a piece of plywood off the building.

The 2.1 million-square-foot AOL complex will eventually become the media giant's new headquarters and the home of Jazz at Lincoln Center, as well as a hotel, a 191-unit residential development in two 80-story glass towers, a 504-space parking garage and a seven-level shopping mall.

The groundbreaking ceremony for the $1.7 billion center took place in November 2000, and the complex is slated to begin opening next September.

In 2002, the company lost $98.7 billion. Last summer, it also announced that it was under investigation by the Securities and Exchange Commission and the Justice Department for transactions at America Online.

Copyright © 2003, The Associated Press

Fabb
April 8th, 2003, 02:46 PM
in two 80-story glass towers

Yeah, right.
I understand that it's advertised as such towers, but journalists shouldn't be as liar as the people who sell the apartments.

(Edited by Fabb at 1:47 pm on April 8, 2003)

billyblancoNYC
April 8th, 2003, 03:44 PM
Is the Columbus Circle renovation going on at all yet? *It doesn't seem like it. *

TLOZ Link5
April 8th, 2003, 07:13 PM
Quote: from Fabb on 1:46 pm on April 8, 2003
in two 80-story glass towers

Yeah, right.
I understand that it's advertised as such towers, but journalists shouldn't be as liar as the people who sell the apartments.

(Edited by Fabb at 1:47 pm on April 8, 2003)


Yeah, but we all wish that they really were that height.

Kris
April 13th, 2003, 05:54 PM
http://www.rion.nu/v5/post/041203/IMG_1650lg.jpg
http://www.rion.nu

Ptarmigan
April 14th, 2003, 07:56 PM
That building will sure add something to the New York skyline. Its a rather impressive building.

Fabb
April 15th, 2003, 05:11 PM
Meanwhile, AOL-Time Warner is suffering from financial difficulties. I don't know if this new building is an asset or a burden for the company.

(Edited by Fabb at 4:11 pm on April 15, 2003)

Derek2k3
June 20th, 2003, 11:44 PM
Here is the larger view of this beautiful rendering by Neoscape.

http://www.cadalyst.com/caddies/aec2003/macleod_big.jpg

Rod MacLeod of Neoscape, Inc., rendered One Central Park, Sectional Perspective to help with sales and marketing. Other designers involved were Lon Grohs, Nils Norgren, Jeremy Siew, Evan Buxton, and Bob Quinn. MacLeod coordinated with three architects and the site developer to produce a series of renderings of One Central Park. He primarily used form•z from auto•des•sys, Discreet 3ds max, and Adobe Photoshop on both the Macintosh and PC platforms.

\http://www.cadalyst.com/caddies/aec2003/macleod.html
\http://www.neoscape.com/antarctica.html
\http://nysr.com/nysr/catalog.cfm?dest=itempg&secid=61&linkon=subsection &linkid=131&itemid=1931
Neoscape also did the recently posted renderings for Bloomberg Tower.

Fabb
June 21st, 2003, 04:20 AM
What will be on the roof above the concert halls ? Tennis courts ? Swimming pool ?

TLOZ Link5
June 21st, 2003, 03:01 PM
I think it's meant to be an open deck for AOL employees, or something.

DominicanoNYC
June 21st, 2003, 09:00 PM
That's what great about the TWC. It's great inside and out. The interior is very modern.

ZippyTheChimp
June 23rd, 2003, 07:54 PM
Early this morning. The crown is sawtoothed on the east and west sides.
http://www.pbase.com/image/18189003.jpg

TLOZ Link5
June 23rd, 2003, 10:58 PM
I was hoping the crowns would be more distinctive.

Fabb
June 24th, 2003, 08:21 AM
So was I.
The crow is hardly a distinct part of the façade.

ZippyTheChimp
June 24th, 2003, 08:59 AM
I suppose as the sun moves across the south, the panels will contrast light and shadow, but the effect will be missing from the north - and the park.

Kris
June 24th, 2003, 10:32 AM
Probably floodlit at night. Crowns are silly anyway.

DominicanoNYC
June 24th, 2003, 11:13 AM
Quote: from ZippyTheChimp on 7:59 am on June 24, 2003
I suppose as the sun moves across the south, the panels will contrast light and shadow, but the effect will be missing from the north - and the park.

I think that is what's going to happen. The slants make the crown seem like a darker shade of blue than the rest of the building.

TLOZ Link5
June 26th, 2003, 09:10 PM
The exterior scaffolding is now being taken off of the South Tower.

weevil27
August 1st, 2003, 10:21 AM
So what's the deal with the height? *It's obviously not going to be 80 stories. *Does anyone know when that changed? *There's a big difference between 80 stories and 55!!!

Fabb
August 1st, 2003, 10:33 AM
That never changed.
Well, at least concerning this design, not the inumerable projects that failed.

The twin towers are advertised as 80-story buildings because their height is roughly that of an 80-story residential building.
Although this is in fact another lie, because there's no apartment in the crown and a true 80-story residential building would really be 790 ft tall.

NYguy
August 3rd, 2003, 02:58 AM
8/01/03....View from 5th Ave and 59th Street


http://www.pbase.com/image/19918060/large.jpg

ZippyTheChimp
August 11th, 2003, 10:00 PM
AOL-TW may get smaller - sort of.

August 11, 2003

AOL Time Warner Considers Cutting 'AOL' From Name

By DAVID D. KIRKPATRICK

America Online, in a self-effacing role reversal, is petitioning AOL Time Warner to remove the "AOL" from the parent company's name.

The request means that AOL has now come full circle. When AOL, as America Online is commonly known, acquired Time Warner to create the company two and a half years ago, its executives insisted on putting the "AOL" at the front of the name, one executive involved said last week.

Now America Online's chief executive, Jon Miller, is seeking to more clearly separate the AOL brand names from the parent company, in part to avoid association with the many corporate travails and scandals that followed the acquisition, AOL Time Warner executives said.

Mr. Miller's petition is highly likely to succeed, in part because many executives from the Time Warner side of the company have argued for months that the AOL should be dropped from the name because of the AOL division's woeful performance after the merger.

AOL agreed to acquire Time Warner at the peak of the Internet boom, when its stock was highly priced, in a deal initially valued at $165 billion. But AOL's revenue was only a quarter of Time Warner's, and after the merger closed, the AOL division fell into a quagmire of collapsing advertising revenue, consumer defections to higher speed connections and federal investigations into its accounting.

Today, AOL Time Warner said Richard D. Parsons, chairman and chief executive of AOL Time Warner, was weighing Mr. Miller's proposal in advance of a board meeting next month.

A company spokesman said: "Dick Parsons and senior management are considering a name change as a result of the America Online request, but this is a decision that will be made in do course with the board."

A name change is purely cosmetic, of course. But it would entail a change of the company's ticker symbol, currently AOL, as well as its signs in Rockefeller Center and around the country.

News of the request was first reported in pre-publication copies of "There Must Be a Pony in Here Somewhere," a book about AOL's acquisition of Time Warner, by Kara Swisher with Lisa Dickey. Its publisher, Crown, part of the Random House division of Bertelsmann, distributed the early copies to journalists in advance of its publication on Oct. 14.


Copyright 2003 The New York Times Company

Jasonik
August 11th, 2003, 10:25 PM
he-he. *


K Rogers is a gamblin' man, and he knows when to run.

Kris
August 17th, 2003, 10:47 AM
http://www.quarlo.com/8_15_2003/03081510.jpg
http://www.quarlo.com/8_15_2003/03081511.jpg

http://www.quarlo.com

James Kovata
August 17th, 2003, 12:53 PM
Aren't the first tenants scheduled to move in in September?

TLOZ Link5
August 17th, 2003, 01:46 PM
Them, and the retail/gastronomy tenants, as well as Jazz @ Lincoln Center.

The complex is so vast and multi-faceted that the various zones will be opened on later dates. *I believe that residents won't be moving in until early 2004.

(Edited by TLOZ Link5 at 3:35 pm on Aug. 17, 2003)

Ernest Burden III
August 19th, 2003, 01:39 PM
and the retail/gastronomy tenants

http://nysr.com/nysr/supportdata/Burden3.html

Well, there's one of 'em.

billyblancoNYC
August 19th, 2003, 06:00 PM
Nice. *Yeah, the restaurants are gonna be top notch - Jean Georges Prime (steakhouse), a "new' French Laundry, a sushi place that was in Beverly Hills for 20 yrs where the chef tells you what to order and you pay $500 for the privledge, and a couple more. *Architecturally speaking, I'm sure they will all be spectacularly designed, hopefully with great views.

Ernest Burden III
August 20th, 2003, 08:31 AM
I haven't seen the designs of the sushi one, but the other three are really great. *I rendered two, and may or may not render the third (to be decided by client). *And the views are pretty spectacular!

billyblancoNYC
August 20th, 2003, 10:42 AM
You have the renderings for the other places? *That would be cool to see.

Kris
September 18th, 2003, 06:02 PM
September 18, 2003

Time Warner Drops 'AOL' From Its Name

By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

NEW YORK -- Acknowledging the failures of the largest merger in U.S. history, the board of AOL Time Warner Inc. voted Thursday to remove the letters "AOL" from the company's name.

The largest media and entertainment company in the world will now be called Time Warner Inc., as it was before the merger announced on Jan. 10, 2000 that was billed as a way to jump-start a media revolution by combining "old" and "new" media companies.

"We believe that our new name better reflects the portfolio of our valuable businesses and ends any confusion between our corporate name and the America Online brand name for our investors, partners and the public," chief executive Richard Parsons said in a statement.

The name change will be phased in over the next several weeks, and will affect the company's logos, the way promotes its brands and even its ticker symbol, which is currently "AOL" but will revert to "TWX."

The change will also affect the name on the company's new headquarters building, a gleaming 80-story structure in Manhattan's Columbus Circle currently known as AOL Time Warner Center. The building is nearly complete and will be opened to its first occupant, the Mandarin Oriental Hotel, in the fall. Time Warner plans to move in next spring.


Copyright 2003 The New York Times Company

BrooklynRider
September 29th, 2003, 10:54 AM
Was out over the weekend and stopped by this building site.

This building looks gorgeous. It was especially so on Saturday as the clouds floated quickly across bright blue skies - all reflected in the windows. Me and my buddy were surprised, but pleased, to see a rather large amount of admirers stopping all around Columbus Circle to study the building. This building has come out much better than anyone could have imagined and really transforms the circle into a destination - as anticipated.

DougGold
September 29th, 2003, 11:52 AM
when is the first public part of this building (shops, restaurants, even a lobby?) expected to open? I want to know when I can go inside this thing!

Fabb
September 29th, 2003, 03:21 PM
Hopefully, it'll be a better public space than an eye-catcher in the skyline.

TLOZ Link5
September 29th, 2003, 04:21 PM
The hotel will be open first from what I've heard.

I happen to like the building. It's definitely awesome when you're viewing it head-on. Is it a disappointment? To an extent; it's not exactly what we had hoped for in the renderings, but it's definitely better than the average NYC mixed-use project, or any project for that matter.

Fabb
September 29th, 2003, 05:21 PM
Better than the average is not good enough for this unique location.

TLOZ Link5
September 30th, 2003, 01:23 AM
It'll have to do. The crown could have been better, though.

BrooklynRider
September 30th, 2003, 02:08 PM
I think as architecture this building design more than succeeded. It has all the grandeur the city was looking for as an anchor for Columbus Circle. As you approach it from 8th Avenue, you are naturally drawn around the Circle in front of it, because, as you circle, the building's angles continually change. Stand on any corner in the circle and it is totally different, yet equally impressive.

It remains to be seen how "welcoming" the building will be once the sidewalk is opened up and public spaces completed.

NoyokA
September 30th, 2003, 03:53 PM
Considering the building envelope was 750 feet (max), Im not complaining as it has made an impact on the skyline.

TLOZ Link5
October 1st, 2003, 01:27 PM
Depends on the angle. From Jersey it's definitely impressive, as it is from LaGuardia. We also have to consider the elevation of the terrain there. It could seem like more thant 800 feet from certain vantage points.

NYatKNIGHT
October 1st, 2003, 02:19 PM
The elevation there is 80' above sea level. Most midtown skyscrapers are about 40'-65' above sea level (most downtown skyscrapers are 10'-30' above sea level).

The glass is darker than I had hoped and from some angles it looks like a formidable wall, but from other angles it's very cool, especially from the street. I want to go inside!

ZippyTheChimp
October 18th, 2003, 09:31 AM
Depends on the weather...
http://www.pbase.com/image/22399015.jpg

http://www.pbase.com/image/22399097.jpg

billyblancoNYC
October 18th, 2003, 11:53 AM
Wish the "crown" was gold (or a contracsting color), like in the rendering. You think that part will be lit up nicely, like Bear Stearns?

TLOZ Link5
October 18th, 2003, 12:37 PM
I don't see why not.

yanni111
October 18th, 2003, 06:11 PM
wow those pics are awesome, it makes that area look like its only seperate city somehow with the twins rising above the rest.

matt3303
October 19th, 2003, 12:11 AM
Yeah, the two towers bring the various scattered buildings to a nice focal point. As it was said before, I wish the crowns were red or green like they were in the designs.

Chicagoan
October 19th, 2003, 01:42 AM
Yeah, the two towers bring the various scattered buildings to a nice focal point. As it was said before, I wish the crowns were red or green like they were in the designs.

Or maybe make the finials on the crown positive and in stainless steel.

Edward
October 26th, 2003, 10:47 PM
Time Warner Center (http://www.wirednewyork.com/aol/default.htm) from 58th Street. 17 October 2003.

http://www.wirednewyork.com/aol/images/twc_columbus_17oct03.jpg (http://www.wirednewyork.com/aol/default.htm)

Gulcrapek
October 26th, 2003, 11:00 PM
Looks incredibly dull in that picture. Usually it's better.

TLOZ Link5
October 27th, 2003, 12:28 AM
The "prow" looks great, very ethereal.

Kris
October 27th, 2003, 04:14 AM
Is that bluish mark permanent? What is it?

Just Rich
October 27th, 2003, 11:02 AM
I agree the prow looks very cool in this picture.
Nice and transparent.
Does it serve a purpose or have any useable space?

NYatKNIGHT
October 27th, 2003, 12:07 PM
From the Times article in the very first post of this thread:

"We're hoping that whatever will be in the prow will in some way complement 2 Columbus Circle.

DominicanoNYC
October 27th, 2003, 05:32 PM
Nice angle Edward.

yanni111
October 27th, 2003, 09:48 PM
so that wall thing is supposed to be a prow? Whats its prupose, it looks pretty stupid to me. I bet you they use it as ad space for huge banners.

TAFisher123
October 27th, 2003, 09:58 PM
The building defintely looks the best from that angle:
http://www.pbase.com/image/22459567.jpg

Chicagoan
October 27th, 2003, 10:23 PM
Ahh!!!

Purely crystalline. Simply Sublime.

Freedom Tower
October 27th, 2003, 11:33 PM
Those are some beautiful buildings.

billyblancoNYC
October 28th, 2003, 10:33 AM
The building defintely looks the best from that angle:
http://www.pbase.com/image/22459567.jpg

Amazing shot. Great job.

TLOZ Link5
October 28th, 2003, 05:05 PM
HOT!!!!!!

dbhstockton
October 28th, 2003, 06:59 PM
It actually looks like the renderings!

DominicanoNYC
October 28th, 2003, 09:00 PM
You should all see how the glass looks during the morning. If it's a bright morning and you get it from that great angle it will be perfect.

James Kovata
October 29th, 2003, 01:40 AM
So...when will these buildings get their night time lighting? Any indications on what it will look like?

Chicagoan
October 30th, 2003, 07:32 AM
So...when will these buildings get their night time lighting? Any indications on what it will look like?

I was thinking about this myself. Chances are it willjust be accent lighting, but nothing like the ESB. Buildings with apartments in them never [ have i seen or heard of] being lit in that matter... for obvious reasons.

So I do not expect it to be anything dramatic.

TLOZ Link5
October 30th, 2003, 10:25 AM
Trump Palace is floodlit at night, and for some time so was Cityspire's dome. I also cannot see a building in such a great location not being highlighted on the skyline in any way.

Chicagoan
October 30th, 2003, 06:09 PM
Trump Palace is floodlit at night, and for some time so was Cityspire's dome. I also cannot see a building in such a great location not being highlighted on the skyline in any way.

The crown on Trump Palace is floodlit and, as you correctly mentioned, Cityspires dome. But that is considered accent lighting.

Try living in an apartment with huge lights glaring right out of your window. It gets especially bad with all glass buildings. That is why it is never done. You can, I am sure, find examples where even lighting on adjacent commercial buildings were turned off or redirected because of this.

I can see the insets on TW Center being lit at night. And of course, some minimal neon piping, but that is it.

yanni111
October 30th, 2003, 08:16 PM
yeah probably some neon piping, sorta like 101 Park Ave has those white lines lit up on its top

TLOZ Link5
October 30th, 2003, 09:23 PM
yeah probably some neon piping, sorta like 101 Park Ave has those white lines lit up on its top

Speaking of which, they ought to have that on some of the boxes downtown.

DominicanoNYC
October 30th, 2003, 09:42 PM
It'd be great if the building has at least the lighting of the insets.

NYguy
November 1st, 2003, 12:46 AM
when is the first public part of this building (shops, restaurants, even a lobby?) expected to open? I want to know when I can go inside this thing!

From the NY Post...

"Related Cos. CEO Stephen Ross says there's a firm opening date for the giant shopping and dining atrium of the new Time Warner Center. It's Feb. 4."

TLOZ Link5
November 1st, 2003, 02:40 AM
Well, that's a load of sh*t.

Kris
November 10th, 2003, 09:08 PM
http://www.rion.nu/v5/post/111003/IMG_8754lg.jpg
http://www.rion.nu/v5/post/111003/IMG_8746lg.jpg
http://www.rion.nu/v5/post/111003/IMG_8627lg.jpg
http://www.rion.nu/v5/post/111003/IMG_8744lg.jpg

www.rion.nu

TLOZ Link5
November 10th, 2003, 09:11 PM
Wow. :shock:

DominicanoNYC
November 10th, 2003, 10:06 PM
I'll share a few of my pics too. They're not of high quality but they are some of the best I've been able to get.
The Links:
http://www.pbase.com/image/23188678/medium
http://www.pbase.com/image/23188769/medium
http://www.pbase.com/image/23188541/medium

JMC
November 11th, 2003, 01:14 AM
Anyone gone around the block, yet ? How's it look from behind?

:roll:

Chicagoan
November 11th, 2003, 01:48 AM
The pictures from rion are beautiful. I too would like to see photos of the west side of the building.

Exactly one year ago today I was staying at a hotel across the street to the south and the building was mostly bones back then. I couldn't waite to see it completed. now the skin in on.

I cannot waite to see it again.

DominicanoNYC
November 11th, 2003, 09:19 PM
Anyone gone around the block, yet ? How's it look from behind?

:roll:
I see it from behind everyday. I've even taken a few pics from that view, but I think that I deleted the pics :? I see if i might still have them, but I doubt it.

DominicanoNYC
November 12th, 2003, 09:55 PM
Tada! Here's a pic or a link to a pic:
http://www.pbase.com/image/23252832/original

Gulcrapek
November 12th, 2003, 10:09 PM
There are a few pictures of the back in the recent photo thread...

DominicanoNYC
November 12th, 2003, 10:30 PM
Oh. :?

JMGarcia
November 13th, 2003, 07:15 PM
A Towering Price Tag
The costliest U.S. building ever? The $1.8B Time Warner Center

By Justin Davidson
STAFF WRITER

November 13, 2003

Only in Manhattan could a battleship-gray colossus rise 750 feet into the sky and go largely unnoticed by the people at its feet. For two years, drivers and pedestrians have been picking their way through Columbus Circle, so preoccupied with the shifting construction barricades that they paid little attention to the cause of all the disruption: the Time Warner Center, a pair of 80-story glass towers jutting asymmetrically from a two-block base that curves like a cutlass blade. Now, suddenly, the building is there, and as the leaves thin, it will be visible from much of Central Park - just as, to the delight of investors and real estate brokers, the park is the centerpiece of the towers' wide-screen views.

The building, a ritzy vertical campus that will shelter a daily population of thousands, is opening in staggered stages. The Mandarin Oriental Hotel, which occupies floors 45 through 63 of the north tower, comes first - guests begin checking in on Saturday. The shopping mall will hold its ribbon-cutting early next year, and tenants gradually will move into offices and the breathtakingly expensive apartments throughout the spring. The final piece is the cultural kernel: Jazz at Lincoln Center, designed by Rafael Viñoly and inserted into the wedge between the towers, will open in the fall of 2004.

It is hard to get around the raw fact of the complex's bulk. As you approach it from the north, its sheer glass cliff hulks menacingly over Broadway, two ungainly slabs merging into a single, formidable silhouette. Upper West Siders who bemoan each new construction fence as a sign that the neighborhood is being converted into a thicket of high-rises will see this view daily, and loathe it. One Columbus Circle turns its coldest, thickest shoulder to the folks uptown.

But it has a more flattering profile, too, one that brings out the syncopated rhythms lurking in its oversized frame. Stand on the corner of Eighth Avenue and 58th Street, and the oblique angles pile up toward the clouds, jauntily linking the city's converging geometries. The building's base, a four-story shopping mall, wraps itself around Columbus Circle. The towers stand askew, lining up along the diagonal of Broadway. The gap between them continues the westward path of Central Park South, as if the street had become airborne and merged with the sky.

The Time Warner Center, at $1.8 billion the most expensive single building ever planted in American soil, was designed by New York- based David Childs of Skidmore Owings and Merrill. But behind that simple statement of fact is a 17-year history of false starts, grandiose ambitions and vertiginous risks. At various times during construction, a forklift driver died in an accident, winds battered the site, killing a worker and injuring pedestrians with flying debris, and a fire broke out inside the frame. Nothing about this project has been easy.

When the Javits Center opened in 1986, New York stopped needing its Coliseum, a stale white loaf of a building thrown down where 59th Street used to be. The city put the site up for sale and from the beginning, developers thought on an imperial scale. The architect Moshe Safdie, working for Boston Properties, proposed a thick bundle of structures, the tallest of which would have reached 925 feet high - almost 20 more stories than the current building. Critics fumed and the Municipal Arts Society deployed protesters carrying black umbrellas to show how the building's shadow would darken Central Park.

Safdie's design was yanked, the economy curdled, the site's price plummeted and Boston Properties eventually withdrew. The project did not really begin to move again until the late 1990s, when two things happened: The developer Steve Ross persuaded Time Warner that the company, nicely ensconced at Rockefeller Center, needed an urban icon to call its own; and then- mayor Rudolph Giuliani decreed that the new building would have to carve out some space for the performing arts - specifically, the first auditorium built expressly for jazz. Ross landed the deal and turned to an architect who already had floated a handful of rejected designs for the project: David Childs.

Childs had to pack a lot of uses and requirements into one big building, and he did so by paring the design down from the earlier tapering clusters he had proposed. He reduced the number of layers in his cake to three: the curved galleria, a pair of crystalline pedestals and the towers, rotated away from the street grid and twisted into rhomboids, so that the whole building seems to twirl upward.

It's ironic that Childs is now locked in battle with the Ground Zero master planner Daniel Libeskind over the shape of the future Freedom Tower - Libeskind apparently insists on his hip origami shapes, while Childs is holding out for a more straitlaced, Brooks Brothers skyscraper. The Time Warner Center is not unconventional in spirit, but it is based on a quite Libeskind-like play of oblique and acute angles. (The resulting corners provided Ismael Leyva, who laid out the apartments, with an opportunity to set bathtubs into narrow, windowed nooks overlooking the Hudson River.) The difference is that Libeskind uses angles, tilted roofs and canted walls for their aesthetic appeal, while Childs cautiously doles out asymmetry as the solution to an urbanistic problem: How to get a massive building to fit in at a complicated intersection where it doesn't really belong.

The complex, which stands astride the border of corporate midtown and the residential Upper West Side, struggles with the balance between neighborliness and capitalist triumphalism. Childs has nestled the circular plaza in a streetwall of masonry and store windows, and the shops open onto the sidewalk as well as the atrium, which means floor traffic circulates freely between indoors and out. The powerhouse lobbies (Time Warner, Mandarin Oriental and the hyper-luxury apartments) have been discreetly relegated to the side streets.

But in fine Parisian style, the building also acts as the terminus of a grand boulevard, Central Park South, and its glass gates align with the statue of Christopher Columbus. Childs would have Columbus Circle be our Place de la Concorde. There is, to be sure, something anticlimactic about proceeding down this grand way and arriving, finally, at a kitchen aids store (Williams-Sonoma). But architecturally, the mall is merely scaffolding for the keystone: the shimmering, see- through curtain of a floating jazz club. That's how far jazz has come in its 100-year history: from flypaper honky- tonks to the sixth-story glass-covered centerpiece of a mammoth corporate headquarters. Here, jazz is not about roots, but about respectability.

The amounts of money involved in erecting this structure were enormous, and those figures trickle down to the street. It still costs only a $2 subway fare to emerge into the renovated station, but everything else here seems to have been priced in another planet's currency. An overnight stay in a suite with a park view at the Mandarin Oriental costs $1,600, and the fancier suite is $12,000 - although, for those travelers in a more austere mood, a nice little room goes for a mere $595. The penthouse apartment in the south tower was recently sold for $45 million, and while the price of sirloin at the Jean-Georges Vongerichten steakhouse in the galleria hasn't been set, it seems likely to be princely.

The only completed interiors for now are in the hotel, which is an orgy of expensive materials. At the bar, plunk your beer down on a counter of hammered nickel and leather trim, or take it to a booth of stone carved with Asian motifs. The spa's shower stalls are made translucent by sheets of what is described as "rice- paper glass." Every surface has been ruthlessly beautified.

It's not just the hotel, but the center as a whole that represents a gamble on epic luxury (not to mention the future fortunes of its troubled corporate namesake). The building is unmistakably meant to impress: It has the sleek, glazed mass of a bodybuilder-turned-movie star. But Childs has also attempted to endow it with something like quirkiness or bonhomie.

Most important skyscrapers have a signature crown; this one has a disappointing row of overlapping blades on top, which gives it the look of a high-tech razor. But Childs draws the eye around the front, rather than up to the spires. The most appealing feature is not the mast, but the "prow," an empty, transparent six-floor shaft that serves no obvious purpose, but reaches out to the virtually windowless Huntington Hartford Museum across Eighth Avenue. The prow is Childs' folly - a blank slate for a laser show, a glass billboard, a refreshing breath of ambiguity in a building crammed with purpose.

Copyright © 2003, Newsday, Inc.

Kris
November 15th, 2003, 09:38 PM
November 16, 2003

Yes, It's a Mall, but a Far Cry From the Food Court

By WILLIAM GRIMES

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The chefs Gray Kunz, left, and Jean-Georges Vongerichten at the Time Warner towers at Columbus Circle.

Some New Yorkers will go almost anywhere for a good meal. In the East Village, they have pushed through to Avenues A, B, C and D. They have prowled the blood-spattered sidewalks of the meatpacking district for the latest brasserie, and they have found their way to converted bodegas on the Lower East Side.

In a few months, however, the city's culinary adventurers will face what may be their steepest test yet. To eat the food of some of the finest chefs working in the United States today, they will have to go to a shopping mall.

In early February, if all goes according to plan, the Time Warner Center on Columbus Circle at the southwest corner of Central Park will open the doors to a cluster of dining establishments it calls, rather grandly, the Restaurant Collection.

The developers of the project, Apollo Real Estate Advisors and the Related Companies, are betting heavily that the combined star power of the chefs there will make Columbus Circle, and the $1.7 billion Time Warner towers, the city's premier dining destination.

Situated on two floors of the center's seven-floor retail atrium, the collection comprises five restaurants, each run by a brand-name chef.

The names are imposing. On the fourth floor, Thomas Keller will preside over Per Se, an East Coast version of the French Laundry, his almost mythic restaurant in the Napa Valley.

Jean-Georges Vongerichten, whose flagship restaurant, Jean Georges, is just across Columbus Circle, will run a New York version of Prime, his hugely successful steak house in Las Vegas. His neighbor will be Masa Takayama, a Japanese chef whose dinners at Ginza Sushiko in Beverly Hills ran $250 per person ($300 during blowfish season). Mr. Takayama has closed the California restaurant and will open Asayoshi in the complex, where he will be pleased to serve a $500 dinner.

One floor down, diners will find two larger, less expensive restaurants, but two instantly recognizable names. Gray Kunz, who lifted Lespinasse, in the St. Regis Hotel, to star status, will run Café Gray, a large brasserie with an Eastern European flavor. Last week, Charlie Trotter, the highly acclaimed chef and owner of Charlie Trotter's in Chicago, signed on to open a seafood restaurant.

The restaurateurs, in turn, have signed up A-list designers like Adam Tihany and David Rockwell. Four of the atrium restaurants are scheduled to open simultaneously on Feb. 5 as part of the grand opening of all the retail stores. Mr. Trotter, as the latecomer, said he planned to open in the fall. A sixth restaurant, Asiate, on the 35th floor of the Mandarin Oriental Hotel in the north tower, opened this week.

When all the pieces are in place, New York will have a new restaurant district. This one just happens to be vertical, and created all at once. Whether New Yorkers will take to the idea is the unanswered question.

Kenneth A. Himmel, the president and chief executive of Related Urban Development, the retail-development division of the Related Companies, clearly believes that they will. Mr. Himmel, who developed Water Tower Place in Chicago and Copley Place in Boston, went after star chefs because he has retail space to rent and the developers have condominiums to sell, at breathtaking prices. "No one wants to go up," Mr. Himmel said, referring to retailers. "Everybody wants to be on the street. To get them to go up you have to offer a tremendous rationale for why they should be there."

Mr. Himmel stalked his restaurateurs determinedly. He offered Mr. Keller a partnership deal with Related and Apollo, guaranteeing the kind of money that would make it possible to install an enormous kitchen with a wood-burning oven and a bread bakery. (Mr. Himmel puts the cost of Per Se, Mr. Keller's restaurant, at more than $12 million. That's more than four times the cost of Rocco's on 22nd, the restaurant in the Flatiron district whose birth pangs were chronicled in the NBC reality series "The Restaurant.")

Mr. Keller was also given a powerful advisory role in selecting the other restaurants in the project, and he used it to lobby for Mr. Takayama. Mr. Vongerichten, too, was offered a partnership deal.

Stars Attract a Star

With the first two stars signed up, Mr. Himmel was in a strong position to attract others, who work under a standard landlord-tenant arrangement. Mr. Kunz said: "With these names, we have almost an insurance policy. If I'd been the sole restaurant, it wouldn't have worked."

Another insurance policy, as Mr. Himmel tells it, is the nature of the interlocking parts of the atrium, which makes the restaurants a tasty filling between two thick slices of bread. The slice on top is Jazz at Lincoln Center, whose theaters, performance spaces and recording studios, starting on the fifth floor, will guarantee nighttime traffic and well-to-do patrons.

Below, on the concourse level, Whole Foods will operate a giant food hall modeled after the food halls of London's great department stores.

To help banish the specter of mall-ness, the developers offered an alternative to the atrium escalators. They put an entrance on 60th Street, next to the Mandarin Oriental, with three express elevators nearby leading directly to the restaurants.

Some restaurateurs and industry consultants wonder whether the project will succeed. The look and tone of the atrium and public space could be irresistibly alluring or an appetite-killer. It may, in the end, boil down to how New Yorkers feel about escalators and handbag stores near their restaurants.

"I'd say expectations are high but vague," said Clark Wolf, a restaurant consultant. "I do think they have enough critical mass for people to go up and visit at least once. That pushes people over the obstacle of going to Columbus Circle and going up to the fourth floor."

In a way, the dismal economy of the last couple of years may help. Although some restaurateurs have grumbled that Time Warner, in a classic instance of bad timing, will dump high-priced tables on a market that cannot absorb them, Mr. Wolf observes that New Yorkers may be more than ready for a thrill.

"We've had some notable interesting restaurants open in the last couple of years, but nothing spectacular," he said. "This is a big deal. People are going to talk about it."

Local restaurateurs already are. It is hard to ignore a half-dozen high-end restaurants at your doorstep. Terrance Brennan, the chef and owner of Picholine, said he is taking the view that Time Warner will be good for everyone by bringing a lot of excitement and a lot of diners to the area.

"We might lose a little business in the beginning," he said, "but after that people will come back. We'll just sharpen our knives a little more."

Some restaurateurs, after sniffing around the project in its early stages, developed cold feet. "It's very upscale, but I personally just don't like to be in a mall," said Jeffrey Chodorow, whose restaurants include China Grill and Tuscan, and who recently joined forces with Alain Ducasse to open Mix in New York. "It's hard to bring people into that environment."

Stephen Hanson also balked. "I'd rather step away from that project and feel sorry for myself later if it turns out to be a runaway success," said Mr. Hanson, whose restaurants include Blue Fin and Ruby Foo's, both in the theater district. "By default they'll do good lunch business. But who is the customer at night? To the east I see Central Park, to the immediate west is housing projects. The only way you can go is south, and one thing I've learned operating restaurants in Times Square is that if you are more than two or three blocks away from the theater, you're at a disadvantage."

In dining terms, this is "The Matrix" plus "Lord of the Rings" with a couple of Disney-animated blockbusters thrown in. Opening weekend, so to speak, is more or less guaranteed to be huge.

Six Dining Styles and Milieus

The chefs involved have wisely avoided stepping on one another's toes. Diners will get six distinct dining styles and environments, although some chefs, notably Mr. Trotter, have only begun drawing up their menus. Mr. Himmel said the Trotter restaurant would be a reinterpreted oyster bar, with slight Asian touches. Mr. Trotter will say only that the place, as yet unnamed, will be a seafood restaurant with some sort of raw bar as a component. The main point, for serious diners, is that Mr. Trotter is in charge, and they won't have to fly to Chicago to eat his food.

Mr. Vongerichten said he would, essentially, do what he does at Prime in Las Vegas, bringing a French sensibility and more inventive appetizers and side dishes to a traditional steakhouse repertory of main dishes. His style is worlds apart from the brawny, he-man American steakhouse ideal.

Mr. Keller, too, does not want to change the ingredients that have routinely put the French Laundry on top of most lists of the best restaurants in the United States. "The vision is the same," he said. "If Derek Jeter were traded to another team, he'd still step up to the plate and swing the same way." Per Se will follow the French Laundry format of serving the same prix fixe tasting menu at seven dinners and three lunches a week, with each meal requiring about three hours to consume. Mr. Takayama will offer an easier entry point to the full-price Takayama experience, setting aside space for a small sake bar with its own menu.

Mr. Kunz, with an eye on Vienna, Budapest and Prague, said he had in mind a brasserie where customers could come at any time of day. He has a strategy, too. "My target is to get the secretaries upstairs, and hope their bosses will follow," he said.

Alone and apart, Asiate, a French-Japanese fusion restaurant priced somewhere between the fourth- and third-floor atrium restaurants, has a few months' head start to make an impression on the city's diners. The Mandarin Oriental has placed its faith in Noriyuki Sugie, a young Japanese chef who honed his talents at Charlie Trotter's in Chicago.

He is aiming high, and it is clear that the hotel wants its restaurant to be regarded as an equal to the glamour restaurants in the building next door. Rudy Tauscher, the Mandarin Oriental's general manager, said, "We don't want to be a destination for the views"

Unlike Mr. Sugie, Mr. Tauscher knows the neighborhood. He was the general manager at the nearby Trump International Hotel and Tower for five years. (The building houses Jean Georges.) He has a few memories that make him smile when people ask why he thinks Columbus Circle could ever be a dining destination.

"Everyone asked, how can you open a restaurant on that side of the park?" he recalled. "There's nothing there." Somehow, diners managed to find their way. "This part of the West Side will reinvent itself, and you'll see a repositioning over the next few years," Mr. Tauscher said. "This is going to be quite a lively spot."


Copyright 2003 The New York Times Company

TLOZ Link5
November 15th, 2003, 11:06 PM
It doesn't look that much like a mall. I'll give it that.

ZippyTheChimp
November 15th, 2003, 11:40 PM
What? No Applebee's?

Gulcrapek
November 15th, 2003, 11:45 PM
Could be. They'd have to rename it "L'Aple-Beas".

Kris
November 16th, 2003, 12:32 AM
http://graphics7.nytimes.com/images/2003/11/16/nyregion/rest_graph2.gif

emmeka
November 16th, 2003, 05:28 AM
It doesn't look that much like a mall. I'll give it that.

No, but it does look like the entrance to a mall. I can just imaging the avenues of shops branching off in certain directions behind that photo.

ZippyTheChimp
November 16th, 2003, 01:50 PM
The act of going out to dinner an important ritual, it remains to be seen whether this vertical arrangment will attract steady customers.

The clientele of the pricy Mandarin Hotel will help the restaurants - especially during blowfish season.

When Columbus island is renovated, the view out will be nice.

NYguy
November 16th, 2003, 04:28 PM
Did anyone get the Post today? There was supposed to be a section there on the inside of Time Warner Center...

TLOZ Link5
November 16th, 2003, 05:56 PM
Rooms with a View
by Dan Levine

November 15, 2003 -- If you want to see what 23 top designers do with spaces 73 floors above Central Park, today's your last chance.

The event, at the new Time Warner Center at 1 Central Park, runs till 5 p.m - but you'll have to get tickets through Telecharge.

The designers featured include Mario Buatta and Campion A. Platt (for Platt's work, see photo.)

The idea is to show off two 3,000-square-foot condos at the center, while raising $50 per person for the Central Park Conservancy, Design Industries Foundation Fighting Aids and the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation.

You can also gain inspiration. Paige Rense, the editor-in-chief of Architectural Digest, notes, "there are ideas in the show that people can adapt for their own homes."

It's a good thing, since you're probably not using the hand-done Venetian plaster in the room designed by Joanne deGuardiola.

That room also includes two Mies van der Rohe day beds, a mixture of 18th-century antiques and pieces by Lichtenstein, Warhol and De Kooning.

A room called "the Den of Don'ts," designed by Elissa Cullman, is filled with cigars, cognac and a custom wine closet.

"Mind you," an Architectural Digest spokesman points out, "the apartments don't come that way."

Telecharge: (212) 239-6200 or www.telecharge.com

billyblancoNYC
November 17th, 2003, 11:14 AM
It may not be a typical NY dining experience, but the impressive list of chefs in these places will draw them in. Just Keller alone was a great addition for the city, now Trotter, too. Of course the others will also bring in the crowds. It's an amazing idea, I think, and it will work. Not sure another one like this would work, but this one should. The chefs, plus the location and the people in the hotel, offices, and residences alone should keep these places humming. Oh yeah, and the view...

NYatKNIGHT
November 17th, 2003, 12:21 PM
There will be a lot of activity inside this building, much of which could be seen from outside, especially at night. And inside will be looking outside as well. I can't think of too many buildings with that kind of connection between outside and inside.

emmeka
November 17th, 2003, 03:20 PM
If you look at that cross-section of the mall you can get a feel of the plce, and i think that its pretty damn great.

http://www.cadalyst.com/caddies/aec2003/macleod_big.jpg

NYguy
December 1st, 2003, 07:51 PM
NEWSDAY...

Pricey Hotel Opens in Manhattan

The Associated Press
December 1, 2003

With the lighting of joss sticks, ringing of bells and a ceremonial ribbon-cutting, Manhattan's newest hotel officially opened its doors on Monday to a public eager to pay upward of $600 a night and gaze at the Hudson River while taking a bath.

Mayor Michael Bloomberg, who led the opening celebration in the sumptuous foyer of the $200 million Mandarin Oriental New York hotel, said the occasion reflected New York's continuing recovery from the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001.

"Today is just another example that the city is doing well," said Bloomberg, noting that the Mandarin Oriental's 251 luxury suites are part of some 2,200 new hotel rooms being added to the city during the 10 months ending next March.

"It's because of the 8 million people of New York City who have gotten together and taken the responsibility to carry us through tough times," Bloomberg said.

The hotel is a key part of the Time Warner Center -- twin 750-foot glass-walled skyscrapers that radically alter the west side skyline and give new life to the rundown Columbus Circle area.

The complex includes Time Warner corporate headquarters, CNN studios, two Jazz at Lincoln Center theaters, hundreds of shops and restaurants and 225 private condominium apartments as well as the 54-story hotel.

The condominiums start at $1.5 million and go up to $36 million for each of the two penthouses.

The hotel's rooms begin at $595 and range upward to the $12,000 per day presidential suite with, among other things, a 62-inch plasma TV screen. Ten stories of mechanical equipment separate the hotel from 65 of the condos on still higher floors.

Aides said most of the hotel's suites even have bathrooms with views -- of the Hudson River to the west and Central Park to the east.

Bloomberg noted that about two-thirds of the hotel's 421 employees were recruited in all five boroughs through the city's small business and labor departments.

In keeping with the custom of its parent company, the Hong Kong-based Mandarin Oriental Hotel Group, the hotel invited Feng Shui master Pun Yin to conduct a traditional "fortunate and festive blessings" ceremony, using tokens of good luck and fortune including incense, apples and two bronze lions.

The ceremony, which Pun Yin said was to "garner positive energy for the hotel and all of its guests," ended with her scattering gold leaf over the floor as symbols of peace, harmony and prosperity.

Bloomberg also used the occasion to indirectly criticize some Republican party officials who have suggested they might hire a cruise liner to serve as a waterside hotel during the 2004 Republican National Convention, which will be held here.

While there was nothing to prevent the use of a cruise ship, "I think people would be well advised to stay in one of the great hotels that New York City has," said Bloomberg -- himself a nominal Republican after switching from the Democratic party to run for mayor in 2002.

"They (the hotels) are mostly walkable to the convention and you have a chance to experience what makes New York City great," he said. "Being isolated from what makes New York City great takes away the reason for the convention coming here."

James Kovata
December 16th, 2003, 12:59 AM
Well, I think this complex is turning out to be rather spectacular. I had cocktails in the lobby and was seated next to the window.....very nice view indeed, with a snow-filled Central Park on Sunday afternoon.

Kris
February 4th, 2004, 05:23 AM
February 4, 2004

Glamorous Glass Gives 10 Columbus Circle a Look of Crystallized Noir

By HERBERT MUSCHAMP

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Time Warner Center at 10 Columbus Circle, 60th Street and Broadway, was designed by David Childs of Skidmore, Owings & Merrill.

It is good to see Skidmore, Owings & Merrill back in the business of piling up big chunks of quartz. Stone was never this firm's strength. Ten Columbus Circle does ample penance for the opaque minerals Skidmore deployed so extravagantly during its neo-Art Deco phase. There's some flame-pattern gray granite at the building's base, but it's there mainly for contrast with the giant cluster of glass crystals, which appears to have been quarried from the sky.

Designed by David Childs, with Mustafa K. Abadan as lead partner, the building has great glamour. It is far more romantic than the Jazz Age tributes conceived by Mr. Childs in his wanton postmodern youth. With 10 Columbus, the mood is modern noir. The two towers are worthy descendants of Radio City. The building draws us into the city of long shadows, relieved here and there by silver glints.

If you're of a certain antiquity, you may recall a protest that was held in the 1980's against the shadows that an earlier version of this building would have cast on Central Park. (In a gesture that Christo might have dreamed up in collaboration with Gene Kelly, the protesters carried open umbrellas.) Mr. Childs's response to the demonstration is somewhat perverse. As realized, the two towers of 10 Columbus Circle have taken the form of shadows themselves: they resemble the oblique, cinematic oblong forms cast over the cityscape in black-and-white movies of the 1940's and 50's. Now we've got four shadows for the price of two.

There are sound contextual reasons for it. The parallelogram shape of the towers derives from the angle of Broadway's intersection with the orthogonal street grid of Manhattan. The towers thus appear to be extruded out of irregularities in the existing urban fabric. This reverses the figure-ground relationship of the 1980's design, which imposed the hulking towers symmetrically on axis with Central Park West. In that form, the composition resembled the Colossi of Memnon at Luxor. The design's Art Deco trim heightened the anachronistic Egyptian Revival effect.

The realized building remains Egyptian in scale (the towers could have gone higher), while the plain geometric forms hark back to the architect and pharaoh Amenhotep. You will notice an echo in the pyramid-shaped pilasters used by Philip Johnson for the Trump International Hotel and Condominiums across the street. You will also notice Mr. Trump's signs advising prospective tenants at 10 Columbus that his own building will ruin their views. What apprentice thought up that self-defeating campaign? ("You're fired!'') Mr. Johnson's design isn't that bad.

Ten Columbus is a balancing act. Besides negotiating the angles introduced by Broadway, the design squares the circle, with street grid around it. The base is composed of overlapping grids, which create an impression of an arcade in two dimensions. The overlap technique derives from the temple fronts Palladio superimposed on the facades of his 16th-century churches. At the roofline of the base, a curving course of angled glass panels serves the function of pediment and frieze.

The classical elements and proportions reach back to Columbus Circle's roots in the City Beautiful movement of the turn of the last century, a legacy marked by the statue of Columbus atop his column and by the Maine Memorial at the southwest entrance to Central Park. Mr. Childs had this background in mind when designing the first version. One of the follies of that period was the notion that architects should resume the City Beautiful project, effectively wiping out the Modernist ``rejection of history'' that had aborted it.

What was lost sight of then was the degree to which the beauty of New York City derives from heterogeneity. Diversity is its history, too, a saga of which the City Beautiful vision is one chapter among many. Ten Columbus folds that chapter into its forms, along with Art Deco and International Style. In formal terms, the result may not be an architectural breakthrough. But the building adds its own synthetic DNA to the circle's rich, eclectic mix.

Jazz at Lincoln Center, a performance and rehearsal space designed by Rafael Vi~noly, will occupy the top portion of the grand portal that occupies the center of the base, on axis with Central Park South. I'm inclined to see the architecture above the base as crystallized jazz. This is where the design fully expresses its urban ambitions, particularly in the flaring gem-cut setbacks that mediate between the base and the towers.

This is scenographic, not architectonic design. Gordon Bunshaft, the glass master of Skidmore's International Style phase, might well have disapproved. It is the ghost of another architect, Wallace K. Harrison, that hovers benignly over this design.

The architect of the Trylon and Perisphere at the 1939 World's Fair, a collaborator on Rockefeller Center, the United Nations headquarters and Lincoln Center, and not least the designer of Time Inc.'s previous headquarters on Avenue of the Americas, Harrison was perhaps the most gifted iconographer in mid-20th-century New York.

Instead of mimicking a tradition, 10 Columbus perpetuates one. Mr. Childs had hoped to use a brighter shade of glass, one that was pale white in effect. This would have produced a different aesthetic but not necessarily a better one. The darkness of mood will remind some spectators of Black Rock, the CBS headquarters on 52nd Street designed by Eero Saarinen. That building, too, was criticized for emphasizing iconography over structural expression.

Opinion will be divided over the mall of shops and restaurants that occupies the base of 10 Columbus. To appreciate this place, it probably helps to be a surrealist like Walter Benjamin. Chronicler of the shopping arcades that preceded department stores, most notably in Paris, Benjamin saw such places as the dream labyrinths of the industrial age. Some atmospheres require a haze: if it weren't for New York's smoking laws, the restaurant arcade at 10 Columbus would be an apparition. So, wear shades or squint.

No one has done more than Rem Koolhaas to quicken our appreciation for the surreal density of Manhattan. The multiple uses of 10 Columbus - corporate headquarters, performing arts complex, condos, a hotel, restaurants and shops - are very much in the spirit of Mr. Koolhaas, as is the semblance of Harrison. But invoking Mr. Koolhaas here is double-edged. If the reference helps to reveal the contemporaneity of 10 Columbus, it also reminds us of the distance that still separates New York from the most inspired architecture of our day.

I see no reason why Mr. Childs shouldn't step into Harrison's shoes. Though over 60, he is still the most promising young architect in New York. For years he handicapped himself with the doctrine of appropriateness, a dogma in place of a conviction. There may be no such thing as progress in the history of architecture, but in the development of individual architects and cities the concept still holds. That is what 10 Columbus proves.

Harrison himself was less appreciated in his own time than he has come to be in ours. His theatricality was held against him. In the case of Mr. Childs, the reverse appears to be true. When he turns up the footlights and lets drama come to the fore, as he has here, an imagination lights up.

Copyright 2004 The New York Times Company

Ernest Burden III
February 4th, 2004, 12:19 PM
It may not be a typical NY dining experience, but the impressive list of chefs in these places will draw them in. Just Keller alone was a great addition for the city, now Trotter, too...

If you want to see what the Keller bar and dining room will look like, and the Jean Georges dining room (the bar is great but I didn't render it), they are both shown in the 'recent works' near the top of my site:


http://www.acmedigital.com/

I was very impressed with the people at Related Companies who were working on the restaurants. There is a terrific commitment to quality there. I think the spaces will be spectacular, and the building a great success.

Ernest Burden III

BigMac
February 5th, 2004, 12:30 AM
USA Today

February 4, 2004

Towering ambition for fine dining

By Jerry Shriver

http://images.usatoday.com/life/_photos/2004/2004-02/04-timewarner-inside.jpg
Grand opening preparation at New York's Time Warner Center, will feature six restaurants.

NEW YORK — How long will it take before gourmands start referring to the dining areas in the new Time Warner Center as the "food court of the gods"?

About a New York minute. The soon-to-be-unveiled feasting options are audacious even by the standards of a city that calls itself the restaurant capital of the world. Five of the country's top chefs and a rising international star will dish out fare at six upscale restaurants designed by the biggest names in the business — all under one roof.

The chef/owners and project developers will discover whether the rebounding economy can support such a huge dollop of decadence and whether customers used to dining at chic street-level places will flock to a vertical mall.

Though the eateries may come to symbolize New Yorkers' love affair with food, the 80-story twin-tower complex housing them carries a deeper significance. As the first major addition to the skyline since 9/11, the 2.8-million-square-foot, $1.75 billion Time Warner Center is expected to transform the mundane Columbus Circle area, off the southwest corner of Central Park, into a must-visit destination.

The center also contains 50 luxury retail shops, performance spaces for Jazz at Lincoln Center (opening in the fall), a 59,000-square-foot Whole Foods Market, the Mandarin Oriental Hotel and 201 apartments that cost $2.6 million to more than $40 million.

But the talk after the complex opens Thursday will center on the restaurants, which open between mid-February and late fall. "They're the most important concentration of restaurants in a single building anywhere in America," Zagat Survey founder Tim Zagat says.

The most anticipated opening will be that of Per Se, which marks the return of Thomas Keller to New York, where he began his career. For the past decade he has run the French Laundry in the Napa Valley and won worldwide acclaim. That restaurant will close for renovations while Keller gets Per Se up and running; then he'll commute between the two "as needed."

Keller says rumors that Per Se, designed by Adam Tihany, cost $12 million, making it one of the most expensive restaurants ever built, "are in the ballpark." But the French Laundry will remain his home base. "I believe a modern chef can have six or seven restaurants but only one kitchen. Mine is the French Laundry."

Foodies are drooling, but some are skeptical about whether the city can support this many luxury eateries (at least five of the six will charge $60-plus per dinner) and whether New Yorkers will accept the vertical-mall approach.

"Conventional wisdom says this is risky, but I don't know that that applies here," says Michael Batterberry, editor in chief of Food Arts magazine. "It's key that this project be seen as a sign of rebirth. Conventional wisdom also says New Yorkers don't like to go upstairs to eat well, but Asiate, with those views from the 35th floor (of the Mandarin Oriental) turns you around on that. The center may be more attractive to tourists than New Yorkers, but so what?"

Kenneth Himmel, president of Related Urban Development, who helped spearhead the project, says that generous views of Central Park will ameliorate the mall feel, as will the separate ground-floor entrance with a lobby, doorman and elevators just for the restaurants and Jazz at Lincoln Center. And he believes that the restaurants are distinct enough from one another and carry enough star power that they will not compete with one another.

"I was a lot more nervous a year ago than today. The economy is getting better. We have an interesting window of opportunity right now. New Yorkers like innovation and they're willing to be experimental — if you deliver."

Copyright 2004 USA TODAY

BigMac
February 5th, 2004, 02:56 AM
The New York Times

February 5, 2004

At New Towers' Opulent Debut, Even the Guards Are All Dolled Up

By ALEX KUCZYNSKI

http://graphics7.nytimes.com/images/2004/02/04/nyregion/gala.184.1.jpg
Thousands turned out Wednesday night at the opening gala for the Time Warner Center.

Cindy Crawford swanned past a tray of risotto and mushroom tarts. Bryant Gumbel complained about traffic. Sir Howard Stringer, chairman of Sony USA, escorted Nobuyuki Idei, the chairman of Sony, through the crowd with the tenderness of a prom date.

And Larry King, his gray hair brushed and sprayed to television-ready perfection, leaned over a railing on the third floor of the Time Warner Center last night and, gazing at Gov. George E. Pataki, jokingly suggested:

"How much if we both go over the rail?"

In a Federico Fellini-meets-Michael Bloomberg kind of way, it was just another night, and just another New York premiere.

But the starlet trotted out in front of the klieg lights last night was not an actress or a pop star or a debutante. It was the Time Warner Center, the $1.7 billion, 2.8 million square foot consumer biosphere that, after seven years, has risen at Columbus Circle.

As fleets of Town Cars battled honking taxis, the doors to the center opened last night with apple martinis for an expected 5,000 guests, a gymnastic performance by Cirque du Soleil, a "surprise" concert by Jewel and Marc Anthony, and a light show that washed the 50,000-square-foot atrium with vivid hues of turquoise, red and green. Even the security detail was festive: undercover police officers dressed as party guests.

More than 8,000 invitations went out to a list that included fixtures from New York society (Anne Bass), politics (Vernon Jordan), media (Wolf Blitzer), business (Mr. Stringer), culture (Renée Fleming) and celebrity (Sean Combs). Even Donald Trump, who has nurtured something of a feud with the developers of Time Warner Center, was invited. (He was in California and did not attend.)

The complex, which was developed by the Related Companies and Apollo Real Estate Advisors, houses the 865,000-square-foot headquarters of Time Warner, which the company will inhabit later this year; 191 luxury condominiums; the new 150,000-square-foot home of Jazz at Lincoln Center; a 504-car parking garage; a 40,000-square-foot Equinox gym; an Olympic swimming pool; a 60,000-square-foot Whole Foods market, the largest supermarket in Manhattan; and a 251-room Mandarin Oriental Hotel, which has already booked bar mitzvahs and weddings until 2006, said Sonia Rendigs, a spokeswoman for the hotel.

"There are only x number of Saturday nights in a year, and a lot of them have been booked up," Ms. Rendigs said.

If it seems excessive to hold such a lavish party for a retail complex, New York City has a recent tradition of celebrating buildings and stores as if they were heads of state or debutantes of the year.

In 1983, Trump Tower opened on Fifth Avenue with a series of publicity-grabbing parties; for a time afterward, the building was a more popular tourist attraction than the Statue of Liberty and the Empire State Building, causing high-end clients to flee rather than face lines outside the building and crowded escalators.

In 1987, the Winter Garden at the Financial Center was baptized with a party held by Bergdorf Goodman in honor of the designer Christian Lacroix and his line of pouf dresses. In 1991, the new Galeries Lafayette department store opened in the former Bonwit Teller space on 57th Street with a dinner party for 420 to benefit the Paris Opera and Ballet and the American Ballet Theater. In 1999, the LVMH building on East 57th Street, by noted architect Christian de Portzamparc, opened with a dinner for 650 people - including such guests as Hillary Clinton and Gwyneth Paltrow - to benefit the Municipal Arts Society.

In order to avoid the stigma of self-promotion and bestow the gloss of high-mindedess, the festive christening of a building is often promoted as a benefit. True to the formula, last night's evening was advertised on the invitation as a benefit for the Lincoln Center Consolidated Corporate Fund, an entity that allows corporations to give unrestricted donations to the performing arts companies and training academies of Lincoln Center. But none of the guests were required to donate money in order to attend the event. Instead, Time Warner and the Related Companies donated $100,000, Time Warner executives said.

Even the most glamorous openings and the best philanthropic intentions do not guarantee that a building will retain its appeal. Trump Tower lost its Harry Winston boutique but gained a Starbucks. Galeries Lafayette closed its doors after three years.

Party guests last night were generally surprised that the evening was a benefit.

When asked if she knew the evening was a benefit, Sarah Collaton, a producer who most recently produced "Live From Baghdad" for HBO, said, "No. For what?"

Dr. Bob Arnot had the same reaction, as did Peggy Siegal, who was working public relations for the event.

Others were impressed at the mall-like quality of the new complex.

Alex von Bidder, an owner of the Four Seasons restaurant, was not wearing black tie, as the invitation had suggested, and remarked, "Black tie? Why? It's a shopping mall," when he was asked about his attire.

David Hershkovits, the editor of Paper magazine, said he had expected a more glamorous evening.

"I ask my wife out for a night on the town," he said, "and we wind up in a food court."

Restaurateurs like Thomas Keller, Gray Kunz, Jean-Georges Vongerichten and Charlie Trotter - who all have restaurants in the complex - served hors d'oeuvres. At one restaurant, Masa Takayama, an average dinner will cost $400. By 8 p.m. hundreds of guests were lined up at the escalators leading to the restaurant floor.

Governor Pataki said he was thrilled with the center, with what a symbol of a vibrant New York it was, and added that he was especially excited to visit the restaurants.

"And they're cheap too!" he said, with jovial sarcasm.

Libby Pataki nodded at her husband and said, "We're coming here for Valentine's Day."

"Yeah, for breakfast," he said.

Kenneth A. Himmel, the president of Related Urban Development, said on Monday that he was impervious to criticism and that his complex would not only thrive but also would change Manhattan. "New York has never seen anything like this," he said.

On Monday, Mr. Himmel eyed the hundreds of construction workers in muddy boots who were trucking in sound and lighting equipment.

"You know, you spend millions to get this place cleaned up, and these guys come in with their boots and tear it all apart," Mr. Himmel said. "And then we have to clean it up by noon Thursday? Good luck."

http://graphics7.nytimes.com/images/2004/02/04/nyregion/gala.184.2.jpg
The $1.7 billion complex houses offices, a hotel, condominiums and stores including New York City's largest supermarket.

Copyright 2004 The New York Times Company

James Kovata
February 5th, 2004, 08:54 AM
What does the nighttime accent lighting (if any) on the building look like?

krulltime
February 5th, 2004, 11:11 AM
:( I wish that I was invited...

BigMac
February 5th, 2004, 07:37 PM
Yahoo! News

February 5, 2004

Time Warner opens grand new headquarters on Central Park

By MADISON J. GRAY, Associated Press Writer

http://us.news2.yimg.com/us.yimg.com/p/afp/20040205/capt.sge.hsn58.050204210737.photo00.default-261x392.jpg
The Time Warner Center, seen from Central Park in New York City. The center which officially opened today is comprised of 2.8 million square feet and includes 350,000 sq. feet of retail, a restaurant and entertainment complex

NEW YORK (AFP) - Media giant Time Warner opened its 1.7 billion dollar headquarters, an ambitious complex overlooking New York's Central Park and aimed at becoming a "cultural and lifestyle destination."

The Time Warner Center was inaugurated Wednesday after four years of construction in a black-tie soiree hosted by New York state governor George Pataki and other dignitaries.

"The Time Warner Center is both a showcase and a workplace," Time Warner chairman and chief executive Richard Parsons said in a statement.

"A blend of architectural elegance and hi-tech practicality, it brings together the style of the world's greatest city with the unmatched creative energies of the world's premier media and entertainment company.

"New York now has a landmark structure worthy of its status as an international capital, and Time Warner has a headquarters that reaffirms its commitment to the continuing vitality of New York."

The complex of 260,000 square meters (2.8 million square feet) includes twin towers of 55 stories on Columbus Circle.

It includes 40 luxury retail stores, five restaurants, some 200 apartments -- the most expensive of which sold for 45 million dollars -- a sports club and a jazz center affiliated with the adjacent Lincoln Center performing arts district.

William Mack, a development partner and a co-founder and managing partner of Apollo Real Estate Advisors, said, "The successful completion of this project is testament to the continued vitality of New York and to the future of the city's newest cultural and lifestyle destination.

"We are confident that the success of this project will continue to draw the attention and support of the world's business, retail and residential communities for years to come."

The headquarters of the world's biggest media-entertainment group includes office and studio space as well as production and broadcast facilities for live transmission of CNN and CNNfn.

It also includes the 251-room he Mandarin Oriental hotel, commercial office space, and a 504-car parking facility.

Copyright 2004 Yahoo! Inc.

BigMac
February 5th, 2004, 07:45 PM
More pictures from Yahoo! News:

http://us.news2.yimg.com/us.yimg.com/p/ap/20040204/capt.nyr11002042253.time_warner_center_nyr110.jpg

http://us.news2.yimg.com/us.yimg.com/p/ap/20040204/capt.nyr10102041409.time_warner_center_nyr101.jpg

http://us.news2.yimg.com/us.yimg.com/p/ap/20040205/capt.nyr11802052228.time_warner_center_nyr118.jpg

http://us.news2.yimg.com/us.yimg.com/p/ap/20040205/capt.nyr11902052226.time_warner_center_nyr119.jpg

http://us.news2.yimg.com/us.yimg.com/p/ap/20040205/capt.nyr12902050432.time_warner_center_nyr129.jpg

http://us.news2.yimg.com/us.yimg.com/p/ap/20040205/capt.nyr13202050526.time_warner_center_nyr132.jpg

I'll be on the lookout for a night shot of the exterior.

NYguy
February 6th, 2004, 08:13 PM
Those photos look great. That's is how a new tower should debut in Manhattan...

NY POST...

SHOPPERS IN MALL HEAVEN

By FARRAH WEINSTEIN

February 6, 2004 -- Look out, suburbia — Manhattan finally has a first-class mall of its own.

And the New Yorkers who flocked to Columbus Circle yesterday to see the shops in the pristine new Time Warner Center couldn't be happier.

"The entire place is great," gushed Amanda Beale, 22, a student from Washington Heights. "I'm having a blast. It's New York's mall, and it's more upscale than Woodbury Commons or Roosevelt Field."

"It's beautiful," said Aviva Zions, 28, who was shopping in chic women's clothing store Sisley.

"At first I was a little uneasy about it being too much like a suburban mall, but it's a nice respite from dodging the cold. It's not that extensive for shopping, but it has a nice selection."

The seven-story marble-and-glass colossus, which so far is about two-thirds occupied, will eventually feature a mix of more than 40 luxury and specialty retailers, including Hugo Boss, Joseph Abboud, A/X Armani Exchange, Cole Haan, J. Crew, Eileen Fisher, Thomas Pink, Coach and Williams-Sonoma.

Newcomers to the city include J.W. Cooper, which sells stunning sterling silver belt buckles and other cowboy gear.

The restaurants are even more impressive, with offerings from world-class chefs Charlie Trotter, Thomas Keller, Gray Kunz and Jean-Georges Vongerichten.

Amazingly, there's also a special Bloomberg-approved smoking lounge in the new Davidoff cigar shop.

Another highlight is the huge and well-organized Borders bookstore, where scanners allow customers to listen to any CD.

The pampered set can easily go bankrupt here by slathering up at so many beauty shops, including L'Occitane, Face Stockholm, Sephora and Aveda.

Sephora was so crowded, another frenzied female couldn't fit inside.

At Aveda, Cory Peterson and Candy Vanek were sampling the hand creams.

"We work a block away and we love this," said Vanek, a 36-year-old secretary. "People are going crazy. To be able to shop and look at Central Park is a luxury."

"What took them so long to build this?" added Peterson, a 37-year-old paralegal. "Now I can pick up clothes, flowers, records and wine — and then get out."

Cindy Crawford, whose husband Randy Gerber runs the Stone Rose bar in the complex, turned out at the opening party Wednesday night.

"It's not like the Bellagio but it's a little like the forums in Las Vegas," she said.

"You could spend a whole day here — shopping, eating and topping it off with a drink."

Navigating the mall is easy thanks to directories on each floor. ATM machines are everywhere. You can smell the food cooking from the top floor. And a man in a Zamboni-like cleaning machine buzzes around the sparkling, marble floors.

Alondra Marte, an 18-year-old architectural student, admitted to a queasy feeling while leaning on a glass railing on the third level, looking down at the throngs of shoppers.

"If you're scared, you definitely can't come here," she said.

"But if not, it's pretty cool."

Classmate Adamo Maiorano disagreed. "It's an architectural paradise," he said.

Shoppers yesterday included Manhattan Borough President C. Virginia Fields, who picked up a $115 portfolio from Tumi.

"We are continuing to grow and build, and this is the first major project completed since 9/11," she said. "This is a sign that we are back."


http://www.nypost.com/photos/news02060420.jpg

TOWER OF FISCAL POWER:
The multileveled mall in the Time Warner Tower draws in thousands of shoppers in a buying mood yesterday.

Jasonik
February 6th, 2004, 09:51 PM
The skewed geometry seemed odd to me until I saw it from this vantage point. This must be the view for which it was designed.
A really magnificent building.

http://us.news2.yimg.com/us.yimg.com/p/ap/20040204/capt.nyr11002042253.time_warner_center_nyr110.jpg

BigMac
February 6th, 2004, 09:54 PM
The skewed geometry seemed odd to me until I saw it from this vantage point. This must be the view for which it was designed. A really magnificent building.

I'm glad it's being received as well as it has been so far. It's an attractive building; I like how it fits in to the curvature of Columbus Circle.

http://us.news1.yimg.com/us.yimg.com/p/rids/20040204/i/r1547202555.jpg

Kris
February 9th, 2004, 02:51 AM
February 9, 2004

A Building Too Bright

To the Editor:

Re "Glamorous Glass Gives 10 Columbus Circle a Look of Crystallized Noir," by Herbert Muschamp (An Appraisal, Feb. 4):

I fear that the high praise given to the "giant cluster of glass crystals" at the new Time Warner Center at Columbus Circle will lead to even more such use of dazzling materials for future buildings in New York City.

But aren't architects aware of the blinding aspect of these walls when the sun's rays strike them? Try looking at those Columbus Circle towers at sunset or in the early morning.

It's impossible!

The blaze created when glass materials are used at the World Trade Center site may remind people of Sept. 11. Is this what we want?

Bring back the soft beige stone that absorbs the strong sunlight and avoids making every tall building seem not in your face but in your eye.

LUCY ADAMS
New York, Feb. 4, 2004

Copyright 2004 The New York Times Company

Gulcrapek
February 9th, 2004, 05:26 PM
Um... no.

Don't look at them in the early morning if you don't want to.

NoyokA
February 9th, 2004, 05:29 PM
I agree, there should be an initiative against windows.

dbhstockton
February 9th, 2004, 05:51 PM
Someone should tar over the Chrystler's spire! Too shiny! September 11th!

krulltime
February 9th, 2004, 05:58 PM
:shock: I went to the stores today and the Mandarin Hotel Lobby. I recommend to go and check it out. The inside where the stores are is all modern looking and so clean and the views from the Hotel Lobby are amazing!

Go check it out!!!

P.S. The prices are too expensive. :cry:

Jasonik
February 9th, 2004, 06:24 PM
Someone should tar over the Chrystler's spire! Too shiny! September 11th!

:lol:

I bet the light reflected light blinds migrating birds too! :wink:

Gulcrapek
February 9th, 2004, 06:30 PM
How about sealing up every window in every building, so we can see that lovely, soft beige stone from the comfort of our own living room! Or kitchen, bedroom, or bathroom too!

And water, that water. When the sun shines, it gives off a glare like no other. I recommend filling in all bodies of water with landfill, or decking over them to create a soft, beige stone plaza.

fioco
February 9th, 2004, 06:46 PM
O dear, Somehow I've entered the Twilight Zone! I can scarce believe my eyes or ears. Get me outta here!

ZippyTheChimp
February 9th, 2004, 06:59 PM
Bring back the soft beige stone that absorbs the strong sunlight and avoids making every tall building seem not in your face but in your eye.

LUCY ADAMS
New York, Feb. 4, 2004

Lucy in the Sky...
Blinded by the Light.

TLOZ Link5
February 9th, 2004, 07:32 PM
The design has nothing to do with the WTC, but with the twin-towered apartment buildings of CPW.

BigMac
February 9th, 2004, 11:47 PM
Does the TWC have an observation deck that is open to the public?
I can imagine how good the view of Central Park would be.

Gulcrapek
February 9th, 2004, 11:54 PM
The closest you get is the 35th (really 17th) floor of the Mandarin Oriental. There's a nice view northeast, east, and southeast.

NYguy
February 10th, 2004, 09:50 AM
NY Post...

TW DREAM SUITE

By BRADEN KEIL

February 10, 2004 -- Call it the Richard Parsons Project.

Though Time Warner cost shareholders billions of dollars with its disastrous merger with AOL, the Time Warner chairman is about to move into the swankiest, and priciest, office space in the city.

Parsons' suite of offices at the twin-towered Time Warner Center, is being built out at a cost of some $25 million and is to be completed next month. The raw space alone would be worth $20 million on the open market.

"It's the workplace equivalent of the $45 million residential apartment that sold there," said a building insider.

Parsons' office suite, which the public has not been allowed to see, is a high-tech assemblage of several rooms and offices on the 21st floor.

It has views of Central Park, and will include a theater-style screening room, a paneled conference room with plasma screens, gadgets galore and a giant terrace overlooking the park.

The floors will be marble and the paneling made from rare woods, and the office suite will have concierge services, a real estate source said.

Time Warner has bought 800,000 square feet on 15 floors of the 2.7 million-square-foot complex at Columbus Circle - considered the most expensive building in the world, at a price of more than $1.8 billion.

"The Time Warner Center is both a showcase and a workplace," Parsons said in a recent statement. "New York now has a landmark structure worthy of its status as an international capital, and Time Warner has a headquarters that reaffirms its commitment to the continuing vitality of New York."

And a chairman's office to match.

A company spokeman says Parsons' amenities will not be all his.

"The terrace is available for those on the floor, and not exclusively for the chairman," said Time Warner spokesman Ed Adler. "The screening room, located down the hall, is available for the whole company.

Critics call the new digs a trophy address, and argue that even with its extraordinarily high cost, the new building won't allow Time Warner to consolidate its offices in one place.

A state-of-the-art studio has been built for CNN and CNNfn, but many of the other shows will stay put in existing tv studios.

So is Parsons going to join the Time Warner complex's new state-of-the-art gymnasium, E at Equinox, where a membership costs $23,500 a year?

He was recently asked the question, and reportedly gave an adamant "No" as his response.


http://www.nypost.com/photos/bizlede021004.jpg

BrooklynRider
February 10th, 2004, 03:01 PM
I agree, there should be an initiative against windows.

LOL - thanks for my laugh of the day.

BTW, I was there on Saturday. Totally packed. The "mall" was nice, but nothing to write home about. The great draw and only unique characteristic (besides a great supermarket on the lower level) is going up to the 2nd or 3rd level and looking out through the front window onto Columbus Circle and Central Park. A view I can't recall having before this project.

ZippyTheChimp
February 11th, 2004, 01:24 AM
Felix Salmon (http://www.felixsalmon.com/) on the Time Warner Center.

RandySavage
February 17th, 2004, 12:28 PM
Does anyone know what this strange space (7-level narrow, glass) will be used for? It appears to be permanently blocked off from the interior of the mall. Maybe advertisements?

http://img22.photobucket.com/albums/v65/RandySavage/100_0047.jpg

NYatKNIGHT
February 17th, 2004, 12:47 PM
That is the "prow". This is an excerpt from an article in the first page of this thread:

AOL Time Warner plans to begin constructing its headquarters and CNN studio space this summer and will move into the building in phases next year. The company will declare its presence graphically through a 150-foot-high steel-frame prow at the 58th Street edge of the building, which is to form a kind of gateway across Eighth Avenue with 2 Columbus Circle, the future home of the Museum of Arts and Design (formerly the American Craft Museum). AOL Time Warner is considering fanlike displays within the prow, which is as tall as the Statue of Liberty, minus the pedestal.

"Our intent is certainly not a Times Square kind of presentation," said Philip R. Pitruzzello, vice president for real estate projects, but for corporate branding in "some contextually appropriate way."

The City Planning Department will see the prow design this week. "We're hoping that whatever will be in the prow will in some way complement 2 Columbus Circle,"...

RandySavage
February 17th, 2004, 01:25 PM
Thank you, sir.

I was in the "Shops at Columbus Circle" this weekend. The view through the 4-story atrium window is really impressive - and will be even more so when the renovation of the fountain is complete.

NYguy
February 19th, 2004, 09:21 AM
Watch the videos...

the shops
http://www.nynewsday.com/news/local/manhattan/nyc-shopsvideo,0,4812159.realvideo

the building
http://www.nynewsday.com/news/local/manhattan/nyc-justinvideo1,0,4406310.realvideo

Pottebaum
February 19th, 2004, 07:07 PM
How many...ummm....urban retail centers (aka; malls) are there in Manhattan?

I'm hoping places like this don't become to popular. I'd hate to see the City's shopping streets struggle.

Agglomeration
February 20th, 2004, 02:38 AM
Well, considering the sheer volume of people that walk the city sidewalks every day, I doubt that shopping street closures will happen on a large scale. Of course I could be wrong.

billyblancoNYC
February 20th, 2004, 02:52 AM
How many...ummm....urban retail centers (aka; malls) are there in Manhattan?

I'm hoping places like this don't become to popular. I'd hate to see the City's shopping streets struggle.

Not many. The Manhttan Mall on 34th and 6th... recently cut in half and replaced by offices. The new Bloomie HQ on Lex. TWC, of course. Trump Tower on 5th. Maybe you could count Citigroup.

Not too many.

Eugenius
February 20th, 2004, 12:47 PM
How many...ummm....urban retail centers (aka; malls) are there in Manhattan?

I'm hoping places like this don't become to popular. I'd hate to see the City's shopping streets struggle.

Not many. The Manhttan Mall on 34th and 6th... recently cut in half and replaced by offices. The new Bloomie HQ on Lex. TWC, of course. Trump Tower on 5th. Maybe you could count Citigroup.

Not too many.Add to that the Concourse at Rockefeller Center, and the past/planned shopping area at WTC. In addition, the Port Authority is probably the closest thing that NY has to a mall, with a number of food court-like areas, a bowling alley and an arcade. It has a decent number of stores, but they are mostly stagnating.

NYguy
March 7th, 2004, 01:53 PM
NY Post...

SOUND & FURY AT TW CENTER

By SAM SMITH

http://www.nypost.com/photos/news03070421.jpg

HUM BUGGING: Noise expert Alan Fierstein measures the "hum" that's been grating residents around the Time Warner Center. He suspects noise from an air-conditioning unit is echoing off the towers.

March 7, 2004 -- The ritzy Time Warner towers have created a new "buzz" - and it's not the word-of-mouth kind.

Some well-heeled residents at the southwest corner of Central Park claim the buzz - a constant, high-pitched hum torturing residents in the area - is due in part to the new structure.

"It's very possible the face of the Time Warner building is causing the sound to be reflected around the neighborhood," said Alan Fierstein, owner of Acoustilog, a consulting firm specializing in city noise and soundproofing.

"Without any fault of the Time Warner company, the noise level has gone from acceptable to unacceptable."

One resident, Rob, who asked that his last name not be revealed, said he's lived on 57th Street for 10 years but began hearing the noise only this year, when the 80-story twin-tower structure opened.

"Now it's all I hear," he said. "It's worse at night when the traffic is gone."

Some believe the sound is just regular street noise - perhaps amplified by the new behemoth. Others think it is created by wind coming into contact with the new building, much like a whistle that was attributed to the West 56th Street Cityspire tower 15 years ago. The owners of that building made modifications to silence the noise.

Fierstein believes the offending tone is emanating from an air-conditioning unit on top of the 1775 Broadway building, which houses Newsweek magazine. He compared the noise to "someone playing one note on a clarinet all day every day."

Fierstein measured the level of the tone in an apartment unit at 1 Columbus Circle, across the street from the building, and found the sound violated the city's noise ordinance.

Rosemary Vodner, who lives at 1 Columbus Circle, has bought a "white-noise" machine to drown out the sound.

"It will drive you crazy," she said.

When asked if anyone had complained about the noises from the unit, building management at 1775 Broadway said it was nothing The Post should be interested in and hung up the phone.

TLOZ Link5
March 8th, 2004, 05:20 PM
City Review (http://www.thecityreview.com/cps/timwarnr.html):

http://www.thecityreview.com/cps/timwar1.jpg

Time-Warner Center seen from Fifth Avenue

By Carter B. Horsley

This huge mixed-use, twin-towered project opened in early 2004 after years of controversy. The project replaced the former New York Coliseum.

The complex consists of retail space, offices including the headquarters of Time Warner, a jazz facility for the nearby Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts, a Mandarin Oriental hotel, CNN TV studios and 225 condominium apartments. It was developed by The Related Companies and designed by David Childs of Skidmore, Owings & Merrill. For a while the project was known as the AOL-Time-Warner Center but that company eventually dropped "AOL" out of its name.

The development of this major site at the southwestern corner of Central Park and the western end of Central Park South after the decision to erect a new convention center for the city near the Hudson River at 35th Street resulted in a very heated and protracted controversy.

The Related Companies, Apollo Real Estate Advisors and the Palladium Company took on the project after protests by numerous civic groups over the environmental impact of the previous plan for the site by Boston Properties led to a reopening of the bidding process for the site's development. One of the issues was the length of shadows that the skyscraper project would cast on Central Park.

http://www.thecityreview.com/cps/timwarbk.jpg

Back of Time Warner Center center from the northwest

Boston Properties had originally commissioned a rakishly angled twin-tower project that was designed by Moishe Safdie, but then scrapped that design and commissioned Mr. Childs of S.O.M., whose first design was thematically related to some of the famous twin-towered residential skyscrapers of Central Park South, but significantly taller than them. Subsequently, Boston Properties and Mr. Childs scaled down the project somewhat.

Mr. Childs's new design is about the same size of his last design for Boston Properties but instead of that Post-Modern, Art Deco-style design the plan was "modernized' with glass facades and the massing of the towers was more sharply outlined with less architectural detailing. The caps of the twin towers retain a piered look, and while the towers will be much lighter in color than the bronze-color recladding by Donald Trump of the former Gulf & Western Building at 1 Central Park West (see The City Review article) just to the north on Columbus Circle, their glossiness will be more in context with that structure than with the very rigorous and interesting green-metal clad tower at One Central Park Place one block to the south on the northwest corner of Eighth Avenue and 57th Street that was designed by Davis Brody. (Safdie's more rugged modernism was in more context with the Davis Brody building.)

http://www.thecityreview.com/cps/timwarnn.jpg

View from north on Broadway

The best feature of the project is the very spectacular 35th floor lobby of the Mandarin Oriental Hotel, whose entrance is on 60th Street. The luxurious lobby has a lounge with enormous windows overlooking Central Park and Central Park South. It is the best public view in midtown until the observatory reopens at 30 Rockefeller Center (see The City Review article).

The building's base on Columbus Circle is a four-story retail mall that is spectacular in size and opulently designed around a four-story-high atrium with a large glass wall facing Central Park South. The retail mall has curved alleys with bridges and the top floor is devoted to several luxury restaurants. Atop the retail mall is the jazz facility that also has spectacular windows looking across Central Park South. In the basement of the retail mall is a very large supermarket and on the third day of the project's opening there were lines waiting to descend by escalators to the supermarket.

The towers are setback considerably on the site which extends half way into the long "double" block. There are large, albeit much smaller, residential buildings to the west.

A pale imitation of the great high-rise architectural heritage of Central Park West, this very large project is not a masterpiece and would look more at home in a Houston suburb or someplace in New Jersey. The angled towers are deceptively thin and their facades are studded, which adds a discrete visual interest.

In terms of massing, the project is not as interesting as the more rugged One Central Park Place and not as glistening as Philip Johnson's design of the glass facade at the Trump International Hotel on the north side of Columbus Circle and not as picturesque as the former Huntington Hartford Gallery of Art on the south side of the circle whose fate remained uncertain at the time of this project's opening (see The City Review article) and 240 Central Park south on the east side of the circle (see The City Review article).

Nonetheless, this massive project is definitely more attractive than the banal New York Coliseum complex it replaced. Indeed, its completion is notable given the site's controversial history.

The controversy over its development was almost as dramatic as that over the redevelopment of 42nd Street, which eventually resulted in a very dramatic and very successful renaissance of the Times Square district.

This area, on the other hand, was not in need of new "urban renewal" as that function had been served by the creation several decades before of Lincoln Center.

http://www.thecityreview.com/cps/timewa1.jpg

View of Time Warner Center from roof of Metropolitan Museum of Art

The terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, however, changed the psyche of the city.

In its October 15, 2001 issue, Crain's New York Business gave the following commentary about this project that it termed "The Next Rockefeller Center":

"There seems to be no end to the superlatives used to describe the emerging AOL Time Warner complex at Columbus Circle: The biggest construction project in New York City since the World Trade Center. The largest construction loan for a private project in U.S. History. The next Rockefeller Center. When it opens in late summer or fall of 2003, the complex will have five floors of stores and restaurants, 1.1 million square feet of offices, Jazz at Lincoln Center, a hotel, TV studios and more. Perhaps the biggest impact of the project is an unanticipated and symbolic one: Just as the city's two tallest towers have been destroyed, two more that eerily resemble them are slowing rising uptown."

While the half-hearted modernism of this project is uninspired, its presence will be hard to ignore and is further proof that the West Side has arrived. Indeed, perhaps the most significant part of the project will be its luxury hotel component, which is extremely sumptuous.

It is also likely that the top apartments will fetch very impressive prices and that New Yorkers' affection for twin towers will continue.

http://www.thecityreview.com/cps/trumpin3.jpg

"The Donald" (Trump) put up a sign atop his neighboring tower shortly before the opening of Time Warner Center to suggest his project had better views

There is a lot of traffic here but also excellent public transportation and the project is only a few blocks south of the Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts. There are no balconies and no roof deck, but the hotel has a spa.

Despite some quibbles, this is New York's most impressive mixed-use building. It could have been considerably taller as no one seems to care any more about the shadows!

It is slick and its public spaces are spacious although one is surprised that more people leaning on the mall's rails don't get vertigo, an indication perhaps that New Yorkers and tourists alike are starved for grandeur. The mall, while it smacks of suburban shopping, is pretty grand.

In their great book, "New York 1960, Architecture and Urbanism Between The Second World War and The Bicentential," (The Monacelli Press, 1995), Robert A. M. Stern, Thomas Mellins and David Fishman provide the following commentary about the New York Coliseum:

"By the end of World War II Columbus Circle, the Upper West Side's principal gateway, had become the slightly seedy northern terminus of the theater district, home to such theaters as the Cosmopolitan Theater (John Duncan, 1904); Joseph Urban (1923). Postway activity began with a proposal for a new indoor sports arena in 1946. A 25,000-seat facility intended to supplement Madison Square Garden, the arena was the brainchild of the Garden's president, General John Reed Kilpatrick, and Robert Moses, who proposed it in combination with a 200,000-square-foot exhibition and convention space. Difficulties in obtaining funding authorization in Albany, as well as the growth of television - which cut down the audiences willing to pay to attend sporting events - stalled the project. In December 1952 Robert Moses, in his dual roles as chairman of the Mayor's Committee on Slum Clearance and chairman of the Triborough Bridge and Tunnel Authority, secured federal funds for the redevelopment of two blocks immediately west of Columbus Cirle, which were combined to create a site big enough for a major convention and exhibition facility to be known as the Coliseum. The new building would fill the void left in 1951 by the conversion of the Grand Central Palace (Warren & Wetmore, 1911) into an office building. Moses proposed to meet the site-acquisition costs with funds obtained through the new federal Title I program, which was intended to help clear slums and build affordable housing. Because the program required that projects receiving funding must be dominated by residential construction, Moses dedicated more than half the site to residential purposes, although he counted the land used for parking as part of the housing. Acquisition costs for the site, bounded by Columbus Circle, Broadway, Columbus Avenue, West Fifty-eighth and West Sixtieth streets, were very high, in fact the highest ever in the nation, six times the average cost of a typical Title I project in New York....The site also brought with it problems of tenant relocation: 243 families lived on the site, along wiht 362 hotel- and rooming-house occupants. And in addition to the former Cosmopolitan Theater, which was being used by NBC for some of its most popular television programs, the site included the twenty-two-story Gotham National Bank (Sommerfeld & Steckler, 1920). The Coliseum project was challenged in the courts when a pawnbroker named Kaskel sued the city, claiming that the site was not a slum. Despite expert testimony by William C. Vladeck, president of the Citizens' Housing and Planning Council, who claimed that only 10 percent of the tenements were substandard or unsanitary and only 2 percent of the site was a slum, New York State's highest court denied the plaintiff's objections by a vote of 5 to 2. Although Skidmore, Owings & Merrill were at one point rumored to have been selected to design the Coliseum, the job was ultimately awarded to Leon and Lionel Levy, who had been associated with the project since its conception, in consultation with John B. Peterkin, Aymar Embury II and Eggers & Higgins. Preliminary designs called for a fluted, boxlike building that confroted the circle's concavity with a giant convex curve swinging from Fifty-eighth to Sixtieth Street. Joseph Addonizio, of the West of Central Park Association, characterized it as 'oversized salt box'; Albert S. Bard, of the City Club, called the design 'just plain punk.' By May 1954, when construction got under way, the design had evolved into a facility combining a twenty-story, 241-foot-tall, 533,000-square-foot office tower runnning east-west along Fifty-Eighth Street - a programmatic element not included in the original plan - with a four-story, 273,672-square-foot exhibition hall (half again as big as Grand Central Palace), an 850-car underground garage and two 300-family, red-brick-clad, slablike apartment houses designed by Sylvan and Robert Bien for the site's western end. The final design not only lacked the auditorium that such facilities usually have but also the 6,000 fixed balcony seats originally planned to overlook the exhibition hall's main floor, which would have helped it better function for the kinds of large meetings that were often key features of business and political conventions. The Coliseum faced Columbus Circle with a 421-foot-long, 106-foot-high windowless wall, which was clad in light gray brick above a dark granite base and adorned only with four eleven-foot-square aluminum medallions, designed by Paul Manship....Not only did the broad, ponderous rectilinear mass disregard the circle's geometry, it also blocked the axis of Fifty-ninth Street, which was demapped through the site. To minimize congestion and compensate for the loss of this street, Fifty-eighth and Sixtieth streets were widened.....The building's design, which Moses characterized as 'conservative modern,' satisfied few observers. Just as construction was about to begin, Art News editor Alfred M. Frankfurter blasted the design....Frankfurter felt the building's design was 'pedestrian' and riddled with 'hybrid pseudomodern detail.'....Moses was handed a copy of Frankfurter's editorial as he arrived late at the dinner; as the event's principal speaker, he made indirect reference to the attack, telling his audience that public officials had no right to experiment on a big scale.'...The Coliseum opened on April 28, 1956....From the first the Coliseum was a building New Yorker loved to hate....To many architects the most galling aspect of the Coliseum complex was not its bland and boxlike appearance but its complete disregard for the geometric challenge posed by Columbus Circle....In 1957, John Barrington Bayley, an architect trained in Modernism under Walter Gropius at Harvard but now converted to the cause of a revived Classicism, proposed a scheme that ringed the circle with a colossal portico and enclosed galleries honoring the dead of World War II and the Korean War....Bayley also proposed a new pedestrian plaza for the center, raised above the level of traffic, and a grand Bernini-inspired stairway leading to a new concert hall and opera house, presumably sited at the southwest corner of Eighth Avenue and Fifty-eighth Street....In 1961, the circle was modestly spruced up when Douglas Leigh, the creator of outdoor advertising spectaculars, contributed thirty-six fountains in two tiers to ring the base of the rostral column carrying Gaetano Russo's statue of Columbus. In 1968, the Triborough Bridge and Tunnel Authority proposed to augment the Coliseum complex by bridging Sixtieth Street with an expanded exhibition hall identical to the original and by constructing a new office building on the northwest corner of Broadway and Sixtieth Street, again nearly identical to its original counterpart. Contemplating the TBTA's aerial perspective drawing of the expanded scheme, Ada Louise Huxtable...[declared that] this plan would 'put the final stamp of spoilage on what could have been one of the city's handsomest public spaces, if anyone had cared.' The TBTA's expansion plans did not go forward."

The city eventually built a new convention center, the Jacob K. Javits center along the Hudson River north of 35th Street, because the Coliseum was no longer able to attract major conventions and exhibitions because of its small size.

In time, the city sought to redevelop the Coliseum site and in the late 1980s invited developers to bid on the site, ushering in a new era of controversy for the site.

"In a first round of fantasies," wrote Elliot Willensky and Norval White in their excellent book, "The A.I.A. Guide to New York City Architecture, Fourth Edition," (Three Rivers Press, 2000), "the old Coliseum would have given way to a dual set of enormous towers (Moshe Safdie, architect), a new colossus that threatened to throw an elongated shadow across the lawns of Central Park while exacerbating the traffic volume at this node in the Broadway corridor. Round two was initiated by the pullout of a key tenant and the winning of a lawsuit brought against the City and the Triborough Bridge and Tunnel Authority by the Municipal Art Society and allied groups, who charged double-dealing. The resultant rethinking brought a new round of proposals by myriad developers and architects. The winning scheme has a somewhat milder intensity of development and David Childs of Skidmore, Owings & Merrill is at its helm."

An early design by David Childs called for a twin-towered project that was stylistically similarly, albiet much larger, to some of the great Art Deco-style twin-tower residential skyscrapers of Central Park West. His final design for Time Warner Center was scaled down somewhat and is not as pretty as his earlier design.

While the retail component of the Time Warner Center is upscale, if not upper scale, the project's mix of mega-supermarket, super deluxe hotel, expensive restaurants, offices, expensive apartments and a jazz facility is impressive.

In his superb book, "Upper West Side Story, a History and Guide," (Abbeville Press, 1989), Peter Salwen notes that a century ago Columbus Circle was pretty lively:

"At Bustanoby's Domino Room, Broadway and 60th Street, the patronage was half broadway, half Fifth Avenue. Bustanoby's was declared in bold black and white, a theme carried into the furniture, draperies and even the china, with what one regular called 'a completely equipped turkey-trotting department in a ballroom at the rear of the main restaurant.'....By night, Columbus Circle was brilliant with light. 'On all the surrounding buildings are great electric signs,' reported one habitué. 'Long rows of steely electric arc-lights disappear in dwindling perspectives far down the intersecting streets. From six directions electric cars - moving clusters of light - dash across the center of the Circle, while from high up, at the top of its tall column, the statue of Columbus looks down, moody and dark.' At Reisenweber's, on the Circle's southern edge, people even went to dance at teatime, in the afternoon. Here was an establishment that spread out and up through three adjoining buildings and astonished with a stream of entertainment novelties. To Reisenweber's came Maurice Mouvet, the sleek, swivel-hipped original of a hundred silent-film gigolos, an international figure (actually born in Brooklyn, though he posed successfully as a romantic Latin) who had introduced the danse des Apaches to Paris and the tango to New York....Reisenweber's was the loudest, if not the gaudiest, of the lobster-palaces....In the vast, red-carpeted dining room - capacity 750 - New York saw its first floor show, complete wiht dancing girls and a revue staged by Gus Edwards and climaxed by the Five Jansleys, who performed heart-stopping acrobatic feats atop a fifty-foot ladder. The turkey trot, most memorable step of the ragtime era, was introduced in Reisenweber's Hawaiian Room. In the rooftop dance hall, Sophie Tucker, the Red Hot Mama, would look around to see who had come that night, shake hands with the customers at some of the built-in settees, and launch into a program that ranged from the frankly suggestive to the sentimental and mawkishly patriotic....Another high point for Reisenweber's came in January 1917, when cornetist Nick La Rocca opened there with a five-piece group he called The Original Dixieland Jass Band. They were a phenomenal success....Within a month the ODJB recorded 'At the Darktown Strutters' Ball'....On the circle, even the standardized, sanitized Child's Cafeteria had glamor. F. Scott Fitzgerald described it at 4 A.M.: 'Within its pale but sanitary walls one finds a noisy medley of chorus girls, college boys, debutantes, rakes, filles de joie - a not unrepresentiative mixture of the gayest of Broadway, and even of Fifth Avenue.' And when night ended, 'the great plate-glass front turned to a deep creamy blue, the color of a Maxfield Parrish moonlight - a blue that seemed to press close upon the pane as if to crowd its way into the restuarant. Dawn had come up in Columbus Circle, magical, breathless dawn, silhouetting the great statue of the immortal Christopher, and mingling in a curious and uncanny manner with the fading yellow electric light inside.'"

Fitzgerald neglected to mention cigarette smoke and in early 2004 Mayor Bloomberg's anti-smoking edicts and reports that noise should not be tolerated late at night suggest that Columbus Circle may never fully regain its raucous past even as it becomes more rarefied.

All photos and the article copyright of The City Review

BigMac
March 8th, 2004, 08:57 PM
http://www.thecityreview.com/cps/trumpin3.jpg[img]

[i]"The Donald" (Trump) put up a sign atop his neighboring tower shortly before the opening of Time Warner Center to suggest his project had better views
Trump is more competitive than I would have imagined. ;)

matt3303
March 8th, 2004, 09:16 PM
Trump must be annoyed now that his one-Columbus Circle dominating highrise is now miniscule compared to the TWC monster. That angle from Central Park shows off the tower's less beautiful side.

Gulcrapek
March 8th, 2004, 10:07 PM
It's only miniscule in footprint (and volume) compared to TWC. It's not that much shorter in height.

Edward
March 10th, 2004, 12:30 AM
Time Warner Center (http://www.wirednewyork.com/aol/default.htm) prominently in the center, with the crane of Hearst Magazine Building (http://www.wirednewyork.com/real_estate/hearst_magazine_building/default.htm) in front of Central Park Place (http://www.wirednewyork.com/central_park_place.htm). On the left recently completed Nicole (http://www.wirednewyork.com/real_estate/400w55th/default.htm) and the construction of Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater (http://www.wirednewyork.com/manhattan/ailey/default.htm). 6 March 2004.

http://www.wirednewyork.com/aol/images/time_warner_sunset_6march04.jpg (http://www.wirednewyork.com/aol/default.htm)

TLOZ Link5
March 10th, 2004, 01:30 AM
Nice shot, Edward!

ZippyTheChimp
March 28th, 2004, 07:24 PM
Did anyone else, on seeing the finished sidewalk along Columbus Circle, wonder why no trees were being planted?

Well today, square sections of paving blocks have been removed and about a dozen trees are being planted.

Could they have made such a dumb mistake, or were the holes already there and covered up?

TonyO
March 28th, 2004, 07:45 PM
So that's what they have been up to, I wondered why they were tearing them up so quickly.

It sure looked like the paving stones laid down were permanent. I didn't wonder why there were no trees since there aren't any on the other sides of the building, the only trees appear to be west of the building on 60th.

I wonder why there is no real curb. The security posts only go out 1/2 the width of the sidewalk and then there is another 15-20 ft. of stones that slope directly to street level. Its bad design and makes walking there not an obvious path. Most people walk on the building side of the posts.

Gulcrapek
March 28th, 2004, 10:38 PM
Has anyone observed any night lighting system?

Kris
April 5th, 2004, 01:35 AM
April 5, 2004

High Winds Blow Metal Sheets Off Skyscraper

By THOMAS J. LUECK

Wind gusts shot through Manhattan yesterday, sending construction material tumbling from an upper floor of the Time Warner Center on Columbus Circle and posing the threat of debris falling from buildings across the city.

The winds peaked between 5:45 and 6 p.m., according to the National Weather Service, with top gusts of 34 miles per hour recorded in Central Park and 46 miles per hour at Newark Liberty International Airport. The Weather Service predicted even higher winds today.

Because of the wind-tunnel effect created by skyscrapers, the threat of damage appeared most severe in Manhattan, particularly at the huge, nearly completed Time Warner Center, where gusts have taken a toll in the past.

The police and fire officials said that about 5:30 p.m., two pieces of sheet metal, about 6 inches wide and 18 to 24 inches long, fell from a 76th-floor section that remains under construction at 58th Street and Eighth Avenue. No one was injured. But Fire Chief Jim Hodgens, who was on the scene last night, said one piece of the falling debris had "narrowly missed" a pedestrian before landing on the sidewalk in front of the shopping center at the base of the complex, which was filled with shoppers. The other piece fell to the sidewalk on the 58th Street side of the building.

Ilyse Fink, a spokeswoman for the city's Department of Buildings, said two violation notices had been issued against the building. One of the violations was for failing to secure or clean up debris that had been left in the construction area on the 76th floor, and the other was for failing to safeguard the public.

The center is being built by Columbus Center L.L.C., a consortium including the Related Companies. Officials of the consortium could not be reached last night.

The project has been the site of wind-gust accidents in the past. In the worst, a piece of plywood blew off the 45th floor on Sept. 11, 2002, and struck a 36-year-old construction worker in the head. The worker, who had been eating lunch on a bench on the 58th Street side, died a short time later.

"Everything up there is secured now," Chief Hodgens said last night after the entrance to the mall was closed for an hour, from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m., and a section of 58th Street near the accident scene was closed to traffic.

Larry Cesnik, a market researcher who lives across 58th Street from the complex, said the near miss yesterday was a reminder of how dangerous wind gusts can be at the southwest corner of Central Park.

"Of course, I'm concerned about things falling, especially with all the wind right here," he said. "I'll look up from now, that's for sure."

A wind-related accident was averted on Fifth Avenue, the police said, when firefighters removed two pieces of plywood that had been blown by the wind and were hanging from the side of the building at 172 Fifth Avenue, at 22nd Street.

Jeff Tongue, a meteorologist with the National Weather Service, said gusts were likely to roar through Manhattan again today and tomorrow.

"In general, people walking at ground level should be O.K., '' he said. "It's when you get high up, the wind funnels create problems."

Jo Piazza contributed reporting for this article.

Copyright 2004 The New York Times Company

BigMac
April 5th, 2004, 08:25 PM
NY1 News
April 5, 2004

Construction At Time Warner Center Shut Down After Debris Falls From Building

The city’s buildings commissioner shut down construction at the Time Warner Center Monday, a day after pieces of metal fell from the roof of the building.

Mayor Michael Bloomberg said construction would be suspended until the builders come up with better safety methods.

Debris which was apparently being stored on top of the building was knocked loose by high winds Sunday evening, causing it to come crashing down on Columbus Circle.

The mayor says the construction company had already been given four summonses.

“We are not going to have to walk down the streets and look up at a building and wonder if something is going to come off it,” said Bloomberg. “We said we want construction in this city. We have the best construction workers, but we have some rules and we're not going to endanger the people in this city. The buildings commissioner sent that message this morning when she shut them down.”

The management of the Time Warner Center issued the following statement: "An exhaustive inspection of the three acres of roof space was conducted immediately following the incident to insure that all areas are free of debris. We continue to cooperate with all local agencies to insure the safety of the area surrounding the building."

Time Warner is the parent company of NY1.

Copyright 2004 NY1 News

Kris
April 6th, 2004, 12:16 AM
April 6, 2004

Work Ordered to Stop at Columbus Circle

By ANDREA ELLIOTT

A day after high winds sent sheet metal tumbling 76 stories from the Time Warner Center, barely missing a pedestrian, Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg yesterday ordered all outdoor construction to cease at the Columbus Circle site until the builders present a plan to protect against dangerous gusts.

This was the fourth time debris has fallen at the site since Sept. 11, 2002, when a construction worker was struck by a piece of plywood and died, the city's Buildings Department said. The company in charge, Related Management, was cited on Sunday, and two other construction companies have received three citations since construction started, the department said.

"The law says that you have to batten down all construction material every single day before you go home, and this is a site where we've given four summonses out," Mayor Bloomberg said at a news conference in Queens. "We are not going to have to walk down the streets and look up all the time at the building wondering whether something is going to come off it."

Alan Segan, a spokesman for Time Warner Center, said in a written statement: "An exhaustive inspection of the three acres of roof space was conducted immediately following the incident to ensure that all areas are free of debris. We continue to cooperate with all local agencies to insure the safety of the area surrounding the building."

The mayor's action came on a second day of nearly 40-mile-an-hour winds that caused gritty-eyed New Yorkers to look skyward as they made their way down sidewalks or up into the streets from their subterranean commuting. Pieces of trash circled in the air like hawks, windows thundered and cabs shook at stoplights as winds swept through the city's canyons. In the higher reaches of the city, where wind increases in force, the gusts were humbling, causing officials at the Empire State Building to close the west side of the observation deck yesterday.

"It took your breath away, it was so painful," said Emma Davies, 33, a tourist from Oxford, England, who stood on the southern side of the observation deck yesterday morning. "You could feel the railing shaking."

The Fire Department reported no wind-related injuries, though falling debris was cited at several other construction sites on Sunday.

In Chelsea, the wind was not about to knock Maureen Bayley down. She glared into its invisible face and tried to push forward, but went nowhere. The resulting image was probably replicated throughout New York's streets: a nanny pushing a baby stroller that would not move.

Finally, the gust passed and Ms. Bayley was moving again, across Ninth Avenue and into Chelsea Market for relief. Her heroic efforts were lost on Tyler, the baby who lay sleeping in the stroller.

"He's dreaming through the wind, that's for sure," said Ms. Bayley, 40, an immigrant from Trinidad and Tobago, where, to her memory, only hurricanes produced such gusts, she said. "But this is not a hurricane here; this is a normal, windy day."

In fact, New York City experiences equally forceful winds only 15 days a year, on average, said Jeff Warner, a meteorologist at Pennsylvania State University. The strongest gust reported yesterday, as of the late afternoon, was 37 miles an hour in Central Park. Sunday's high was the same.

The force of such winds can double as they pass through city streets lined with high-rise buildings - what is known as the wind-tunnel effect. When the wind gets funneled into a corridor between tall buildings, it is forced to accelerate, Mr. Warner said.

On the ground, such gales often send pedestrians lurching into alcoves for cover, but up higher, the effects are even more hair-raising: newer buildings will sometimes tremble because they tend to be built with lighter, more economical materials.

But a little shaking does not mean less resistance, said Anton Davies, a wind engineer whose Canadian firm - Rowan Williams Davies & Irwin - has consulted on numerous skyscraper projects in New York City. The city's newer buildings are designed to withstand gusts of up to 104 m.p.h., Dr. Davies said.

Just the sound of the wind was enough to keep Thomas Propp from his sleep on Sunday night.

"It sounded like waves of water beating against the window," said Mr. Propp, 49, a yoga teacher from East Berlin who was staying on the third floor of a hotel on East 17th Street.

Similar tremors were felt on the street.

"The wind is so strong that you feel the car is shaking," said Bouabdelli Mohamed, 39, a cabdriver who said that only the winds in the mountains of his native Algeria compare, in his mind, with New York City's wind power. "It's supposed to be spring, huh?"

Gusty winds are more commonplace in the financial district, but that did not prepare Lisa Piccuirro, a magazine account executive, for the wind that came as she walked along Exchange Place during her lunch break.

"It was like a Michael Jackson video, where the wind blows all your clothes," she said. "My hair was going crazy."

Jennifer Steinhauer and Colin Moynihan contributed reporting for this article.

Copyright 2004 The New York Times Company

BigMac
April 7th, 2004, 11:02 AM
NY1 News
April 7, 2004

Construction Resumes At Time Warner Center

Construction at the Time Warner Center resumed Wednesday after being halted when metal debris came crashing down onto Columbus Circle.

The Department of Buildings lifted a stop-work order at the site Tuesday after the building's management company agreed to a new set of safety guidelines, including ensuring that all windows are secure each day and that no construction material is left unsecured on exposed roof areas. There will also be a final Friday inspection to make sure everything is OK before the weekend.

A metal object from an unoccupied apartment fell from an open window when winds picked up on Sunday, narrowly missing someone walking on the street.

Time Warner, NY1’s parent company, is a primary tenant of the building.

Copyright 2004 NY1 News

BigMac
April 8th, 2004, 03:45 PM
New York Post
April 8, 2004

Time Warner Builder Facing Fines

By Braden Keil

The latest round of debris falling from the Time Warner Center could bring fines of up to $10,000, officials said yesterday as they allowed construction to resume.

According to the city's Department of Buildings, the two infractions that occurred Sunday could cost the complex the maximum fine of $5,000 each.

The fines are being considered just as the developers have been given the go-ahead by the city to continue construction on the building's exterior after Mayor Bloomberg imposed a two-day work stoppage.

Yesterday, city inspectors and Time Warner Center employees were observed on the main rooftop of the complex clearing possible projectiles, including plastic buckets, ladders, tools and other unsecured items.

At the Columbus Circle site, a construction worker was killed in 2002 after being hit by a large piece of plywood.

Copyright 2004 NYP Holdings, Inc.

Kris
June 24th, 2004, 02:18 AM
June 24, 2004

BLOCKS

Amid All the Signs, Confusing a Circle for the Square

By DAVID DUNLAP

COLUMBUS CIRCLE isn't Times Square.

That has been the mantra of city planners during the development of the Time Warner Center. By late last week, though, with all the signage around the base of the building, it was getting harder to tell the difference between circle and square.

Besides the store logos that already fill several third- and fourth-story windows (Sephora, J. Crew, A/X Armani Exchange, Bose), and the recent appearance of giant Time Warner and CNN letters at the base of the building's glass prow on West 58th Street, an enormous new banner suddenly obscured one of the center's distinguishing architectural features: the virtually transparent cable-net glass wall framing the central atrium.

The banner, about 60 feet by 45 feet, proclaimed, "Samsung Welcomes the Olympic Flame to New York," heralding its arrival last Saturday. It is true that the banner was up for only a few days. And the image was a torch-bearing athlete, not a cellphone or television. But the only name to appear twice was Samsung.

To all intents and purposes, in other words, it was a billboard.

That is not how Kenneth A. Himmel sees it. He is the president and chief executive of Related Urban Development and the partner in the Time Warner Center project who is responsible for the retail space. Mr. Himmel said the banner reflected the unusual circumstance of New York City's pursuit of the 2012 Olympics and added that such displays would be "very infrequent."

"Is that going to be a normal policy of ours to put something like that up?" Mr. Himmel said. "The answer is no. We would do that only for very special circumstances, under a citywide event, for something the city was sponsoring."

As for those corporate displays in the upper windows of the building's base, Mr. Himmel explained that they masked the stores' back-of-the-house space: windowless areas used for offices, storage or dressing rooms. The signs also provide an identity for stores that otherwise have little or no exposure on the street.

What sets them apart from standard signs, Mr. Himmel said, is that they are recessed four feet behind the glass, making them less obtrusive. "You can argue whether you think it's subtle or not," he said, "but it certainly allows for less commercial signage because it's set back from the window significantly."

And it turns out that there may be a beacon of hope for New Yorkers who like to travel in less commercial circles.

For years, Time Warner has been trying to devise a display to fill the building's empty glass prow, an architectural feature nearly 150 feet high created by the tapering intersection of the curved facade and the straight-edged 58th Street facade. As its thinking evolved, the corporation even considered using that space, which is almost as tall as the Statue of Liberty (without her pedestal), to show some of its many brands.

Finally, it has settled on an architectural sculpture made of rectangular translucent polycarbonate panels alternating with horizontal steel bars, arrayed along a slender spine in a 12-part composition that is meant to conjure the 12 hours on a clock, the 12 months of the year and the 12 notes of the chromatic scale in Western music.

In the day, the sculpture will stand for itself. At night, the internally illuminated elements will change in hue, saturation and intensity, creating abstract imagery and patterns. The company might use the sculpture from time to time to promote special events.

Otherwise, it will be a "peaceful end point," said Philip Pitruzzello, vice president for real estate projects at Time Warner. "Something very slow will be going on. You can think of tai chi - slow, meditative motion using light."

Installation of the sculpture is to begin in late summer or early fall.

"We are very pleased that they moved in that direction," said Richard Barth, executive director of the City Planning Department. "We did not see this as a place where there should be flashing commercial signage."

But the feeling that private interests are dominating the circle was reinforced Friday when a photographer for The New York Times, Nancy Siesel, was taking pictures for this column. Although she was on the sidewalk in front of the Time Warner Center, she said two security guards, neither of whom would identify himself, insisted that she stop.

"You're not allowed to photograph the structure of the building," Ms. Siesel quoted the first guard as telling her. She showed them her press identification card, issued by the Police Department, and insisted that she was within her rights to photograph a building from the public way on assignment. But she said the second guard told her, "If you persist, I'm going to call the police." Pressed, he backed down from this threat.

Though unfamiliar with the particulars of the encounter, Mr. Himmel said, "If someone on our security force stopped a photographer from a newspaper from photographing the building, they probably overstepped."

"There should be no restrictions in terms of the public's ability to photograph the building from the outside," he said, "because it's a public space."

Copyright 2004 The New York Times Company

NewYorkYankee
June 24th, 2004, 06:58 PM
What are the heights/stories of the buildings?

NYguy
June 24th, 2004, 08:04 PM
But the feeling that private interests are dominating the circle was reinforced Friday when a photographer for The New York Times, Nancy Siesel, was taking pictures for this column. Although she was on the sidewalk in front of the Time Warner Center, she said two security guards, neither of whom would identify himself, insisted that she stop.

"You're not allowed to photograph the structure of the building," Ms. Siesel quoted the first guard as telling her. She showed them her press identification card, issued by the Police Department, and insisted that she was within her rights to photograph a building from the public way on assignment. But she said the second guard told her, "If you persist, I'm going to call the police." Pressed, he backed down from this threat.

Very interesting. First they threaten us with a "no subway photos" ban and now this. Now I'll have to go and take pics....

BigMac
June 24th, 2004, 08:37 PM
What are the heights/stories of the buildings?
The Time Warner Center is 751 feet and 55 stories high.

TonyO
June 28th, 2004, 10:58 PM
They finally removed the scaffolding from in front of the Mandarin Oriental hotel. It looks like an actual finished building now.

ZippyTheChimp
June 29th, 2004, 11:11 PM
Time Warner Center (http://www.pbase.com/zippythechimp/time_warner)

fioco
June 30th, 2004, 01:53 AM
Truly a superb portfolio -- the best I've seen of the TWC.
I especially like this one: http://www.pbase.com/image/30754933
The glass wall for 'Jazz at Lincoln Center' has its curtain teasingly open. Beneath, a painterly reflection of clouds. You've an artist's eye.

krulltime
July 1st, 2004, 04:21 PM
Off topic... :shock: Zippythechimp, you have some of the best collection of pictures of NYC that I have ever seen!

http://www.pbase.com/zippythechimp

Honestly you know how, where and what to take pictures. Praise You. 8)

I will learn from you master...(thanks)

ZippyTheChimp
July 1st, 2004, 06:22 PM
Thank you.

Some advice: If you plan to take photos inside TWC, bring along family or friends. I did, but she was shopping. At some point, a polite young man walked up to me and asked, "How are you today, sir?" That told me the next line wouldn't be good.

He explained that photos of the view outside were permitted, as were those of family and friends, but not photos of the shops and "structure." At this point, my wife was approaching, and I introduced her as Mrs Terrorist, and was it ok if I took her picture in front of the structure. I immediately got The Look, which translates into "Stop talking now."

On a subsequent trip for the outdoor shots, I was understandably alone. I had to wait awhile at the curb for the shot to set up. I was hoping someone would ask me what I was doing there. The line was ready: "I'm waiting for a cloud." Alas, it didn't happen.

BigMac
July 1st, 2004, 06:51 PM
He explained that photos of the view outside were permitted, as were those of family and friends, but not photos of the shops and "structure." At this point, my wife was approaching, and I introduced her as Mrs Terrorist, and was it ok if I took her picture in front of the structure.
Ha! Good for you.

Ernest Burden III
July 1st, 2004, 11:00 PM
At some point, a polite young man walked up to me and asked, "How are you today, sir?" That told me the next line wouldn't be good.

...On a subsequent trip for the outdoor shots, I was understandably alone.

I, and other renderers I know, have been stopped by NYPD for taking photographs in public. Naturally, I am taking pictures of buildings, not smiling Oklahomans. I have yet to be told by a police officer that I CANNOT photograph public facilities from a public location...

Interiors are not really public, so if I need to shoot a space I have to arrange permissions from a client in advance and take it with me in writing in my pocket.

"I've been thrown out of better places than this!"

NYatKNIGHT
July 14th, 2004, 03:30 PM
It's pretty cool seeing the view of Columbus Circle and the park behind Aaron Brown on CNN from their studios in the south tower. That, plus all the shops, restaurants, hotel, jazz center, and open atrium, few buildings in the city are as much in the public eye.

krulltime
July 25th, 2004, 01:14 AM
SECRETS OF TIME WARNER CENTER


July 24, 2004

You can spot Ricky Martin . . .

The Latin Hearththrob, who lives in the TWC, can be seen around mall closing time chatting on his cell in the spacious third-floor public area. "The mall is empty then," said a shop employee who refused to give her name. "It's safe for celebs to come down and shop."

. . . but you can't call mom.

There aren't public pay phones in the building yet (although signs say they're already there). The building is not yet set up for wireless Internet connectivity, either.

The best view's from the fourth floor . . .

If you don't live or work in the TWC, try coming up the mall elevators to the fourth-floor restaurant area. Central Park South - with its high tree line - extends as far as the eye can see.

. . . but the second floor's the hangout.

Baby carriages and strollers jockey for space in front of the Borders bookstore as nannies and their sleeping charges take refuge from the heat. (Both times I fell fast asleep in the TWC - however, a security guard woke me up.)

Neighbors at the Coliseum are unhappy . . .

Condo owners at this building behind the TWC on West 60th Street report around-the-clock noise problems from delivery trucks. "I don't mind a little activity," says one long-term resident. "It's chaos I can't stand. It never stops." Despite calls to the TWC building management and 311, Coliseum doormen say neither has responded.

. . . but those at 30 W. 60th have been helped.

Residents facing south report an increase in sunlight due to the strong afternoon glare off the TWC's west tower. "My afternoon light sucked before," says resident Lisa Brubaker.

The grocery store's a great place for lunch. . .

Whole Foods has a food court to rival Boston's famed Faneuil Hall. I actually dreamed of the Thai chicken wings.

. . . but you need to get more generous with the crumbs.

The number of homeless occupying the entrance to Central Park (directly across from the TWC) has increased significantly since the building's opening in December. "You would think people who have the money to shop there would be more gracious with their leftover food," says Wendell, a Washington Square Park personality who made the move uptown. "But they're not. I stay for the trees." - Jason Sheftell

- Jason Sheftell


Copyright 2004 NYP Holdings, Inc.

krulltime
July 25th, 2004, 01:23 AM
TIME WARNER CENTER'S HIT TOP PRICES, BUT IT'S NOT SOLD OUT


By ANNE BECKER
July 24, 2004

Five months ago, 5,000 guests celebrated the opening night of the $1.7 billion Time Warner Center.

Boldface names from Governor George Pataki to showgirl Elizabeth Berkeley clinked glasses. Kevin Bacon and Calvin Klein prowled the fourth floor, where world-renowned chefs Thomas Keller and Masa Takayama offered tastings from their new restaurants.

The gossip was about a London financier who had thrown down a record $45 million for a 12,500-square-foot penthouse on the 76th and 77th floors. It was the buzzed-about real estate event of the year.

But don't worry if you missed it. While Time Warner Center might have seemed like the city's hottest destination, there's still time to move in.

"I would've thought it would be sold out by now," says Jonathan Miller of leading New York real estate appraiser Miller Samuel.

"With its location and views, I would've expected it to be sold out in a year and a half, and it's been three," he says. "This isn't inconsistent with other projects we've seen lately, but it's not fast."

Five of the units left are in the Mandarin Oriental, the 65-unit northern tower that's said to have attracted a jazzy, jet-setting group of largely foreign buyers. The remaining 20 are in One Central Park, the southern tower with 135 units overall. Available units run the gamut from a $2 million two-bedroom on the 53rd floor of One Central Park to two full-floor, 8,400-square-foot, $30 million penthouses - one in each tower.

According to The Related Group, the center's sponsor, these remaining units are nothing to worry about.

No other New York residential complex has ever sold $300 million of property in three years. And since sales kicked off in August 2001, there have been six price increases, raising prices for the units about 18 percent. And hey, Ricky Martin lives there.

"The reality ended up being better than the dream for us," says Susan DeFranca, senior vice president at Related. "It's not like we're at 85 percent [sold] because we had to slash prices to unload everything."

One factor affecting the rate of sales has been a crush of recent entrants in the super-luxury market. Trump Park Avenue and One Beacon Court (Beyonc‚'s building) have brought 255 units to the market.

Miller points out that similar buildings like 515 Park, the Chatham and 838 Fifth all sold out within a year in the late 1990s, but at 35 units, 96 units and 10 units respectively, they are all smaller.

Certainly the Time Warner Center has brought up prices in its neighborhood. Since marketing for the project began three years ago, condo prices in the Lincoln Center area have gone up 50 percent. That's compared to just 19.8 percent for Manhattan as a whole, according to Miller Samuel research.

At the same time, the Time Warner Center has taken business away from nearby buildings. "I had two apartments at 2 Central Park West, and a year ago they would've been sold in two months," says the Corcoran Group's Patricia Cliff. "But I must've shown them 50 times, and everyone who came to look ended up buying at Time Warner. It was just like this siphon for the whole neighborhood."

Early buyers at Time Warner, no doubt aware of the price rise, have moved to resell or rent out their units. Douglas Elliman's Michael Shvo currently has a $7.5 million sales listing for a three-bedroom, 3 1/2-bath corner unit in the south building.

The seller purchased early for $5.5 million, and was turning down $7 million offers for the unit within a week of putting it on the market.

"Obviously, there was a tremendous amount of hype around the product, and there's always a slowdown when a building's finished - the hype can't go on forever," Shvo says. "But it's not that the enthusiasm went down. People are very happy there."

Cliff says she currently gets at least three prospective renters calling each day for a $12,500-a-month, 1,400-square-foot one-bedroom facing the park. An $8,000 two-bedroom listed by Bellmarc was just pulled, when the owner decided to stay put.

What residents do get is unencumbered shopping. There are more than 40 upscale stores, known collectively as "The Shops at Columbus Circle," on seven levels. Since the center opened in February, 97 percent of the retail space has been leased, according to Kenneth Himmel, president and CEO of Related Urban Development.

From February to June, combined sales for the center rose every month, averaging $1,200 a square foot. "That's not good - that's spectacular," Himmel says. "I said publicly that I'd be incredibly happy if this project hit $1,000 a square foot."

Foot traffic at those stores is often light. Save for the ridiculous overcrowding at basement behemoth Whole Foods (a recent lunchtime visit was replete with salad-bar elbowing), weekday activity in the shops is slow.

"We're definitely a weekend store," says Conisha Wade, manager at J. Crew. "During the week, we do have some people from CNN who shop on their lunch hour. But traffic's not heavy."

Last Tuesday, Bar Masa - the 39-seat neighbor of ultra-exclusive sushi joint Masa - was seating walk-in customers with no wait. A lone customer sat at the bar as waiters clustered in front of the kitchen. "We're not surprised we're able to seat people really quickly," manager Tommy Todd says. "This is a mall and you have to get New Yorkers to overcome that."

Still, some retail tenants report numbers that reflect Himmel's glowing assessment. Solstice, the upscale sunglasses store on the third floor, consistently posts the biggest profits of all the chain's 40 national outlets, according to assistant manager Chris Bryant.

And there are several new tenants yet to move into the center. Gray Kunz's Caf‚ Gray is scheduled to open Sept. 1, the Bouchon Bakery should open just before Christmas and the new restaurant from steak maven Charlie Trotter is expected to open next spring.

As for the residences, "there are a lot of New Yorkers who don't want condos and shopping downstairs - who want a more discreet experience," says Hall Wilkie, president of luxury broker Brown Harris Stevens. "It appeals to a high-end part of the condo market, and it's a lot of inventory to absorb."

"But they've been getting great prices, it's made such a change to the neighborhood, it's been important to the city. So is it a success? That's an unqualified yes."

Others remain more skeptical about the center. "Look, this was a big building to sell out - when you have 200 apartments to sell, it's kind of hard to have people breaking down the doors and getting into bidding wars," says Cliff, who has sold four apartments in the building and rented two. "Is it a success? It's much too soon to say. The jury's still out."


Copyright 2004 NYP Holdings, Inc.

BrooklynRider
July 26th, 2004, 03:18 PM
I was by TWC last Wednesday night. The trees planted out front seem to be drying up and headed toward an early death.

James Kovata
July 26th, 2004, 10:44 PM
I was in New York last month and noticed that there was no night-time decorative lighting on TWC. Was I just looking at the wrong time, or am I correct? If I am correct, are there any plans for lighting?

Gulcrapek
July 26th, 2004, 11:05 PM
I've been waiting for them since it opened. No satisfaction.

TonyO
July 30th, 2004, 04:28 PM
I was by TWC last Wednesday night. The trees planted out front seem to be drying up and headed toward an early death.

Its summer but it looks like fall there because many of the tiny leaves are on the sidewalk. Do nurseries have a return policy?

BigMac
September 28th, 2004, 12:52 PM
New York Post
September 28, 2004

Mall Death Leap

By ANGELINA CAPPIELLO, ERIKA MARTINEZ and KATE SHEEHY

A tragic 35-year-old artist struggling with schizophrenia climbed onto the rafters of the ritzy Time Warner Center atrium yesterday and leaped to his death — as horrified shoppers looked on, cops said.

"I saw the guy lying there, and somebody was screaming, 'He's still alive! Call 911!' " said a shaken worker at the plush indoor mall at Columbus Circle.

"It was like a boom, and we thought a bomb went off. Everybody screamed."

Police said Glenn Moosnick climbed over the 3-foot-high railing on the atrium's fourth floor and scrambled his way along a crisscross of metal rafters before jumping at around noon.

Moosnick — clad in a yellow T-shirt, bluejeans and sandals — landed in front of a William-Sonoma store, near a bronze Botero sculpture.

"I saw him coming down, he just passed by," said Stephen Cucci, 22, who was working at the Armani Exchange on the third floor at the time.

"He looked alive [afterward]. He wasn't screaming or anything."

A passer-by said he was on his way to lunch when "I saw people running out of the building.

"I went over to the guy, and he was groaning but incoherent."

Authorities said Moosnick died shortly after at Columbia-Presbyterian Hospital.

He had been a resident at Fountain House, a group home for the mentally ill on West 47th Street, officials said.

Moosnick's grieving younger sister, Heather, said her brother was supposed to meet their mom yesterday afternoon so that the pair could open a bank account for him.

Heather said her talented sibling was a poet and artist.

"He suffered from schizophrenia for 10 years . . . [But] for the first time, he actually was doing really well," the Manhattan woman said, fighting back tears.

"He was just a beautiful person who connected with a lot of people."

Heather said her brother was on medication and "didn't seem depressed."

Still, "he's been suicidal off and on," she said.

"He believed that God lives in the sun and talked to him, and probably just heard a voice saying, 'Come home.' It must have just been that one moment of psychosis."

The suicide at Time Warner follows a spate of problems there that earned it the dubious distinction of carrying "a curse." Woes have included the death of a construction worker in 2002.

Additional reporting by Braden Keil

Copyright 2004 NYP Holdings, Inc.

TLOZ Link5
September 28th, 2004, 03:12 PM
Oh, God. The poor guy. Suicides of this nature are becoming too high-profile in New York lately.

How ironic (and sad) that I'm at a computer at Bobst library as I write this.

NoyokA
October 21st, 2004, 09:27 PM
Has anyone else noticed that the initially dreary skin on TWC has since unfolded into a silky, detailed, beautiful skin?

Gulcrapek
October 21st, 2004, 11:06 PM
From morning til about 3. In the afternoon and night, it's dull. Especially that there seems to be officially no nighttime lighting. Not that that has to do with the skin, but still.

RedFerrari360f1
October 22nd, 2004, 08:07 PM
Im still excited for the circle/statue park to be complete and operatinal. It, along with the redisgn of numeral 2 will really complement TWC well.

Johnnyboy
October 22nd, 2004, 08:59 PM
From morning til about 3. In the afternoon and night, it's dull. Especially that there seems to be officially no nighttime lighting. Not that that has to do with the skin, but still. thats very very true. It would look exelent on that building if they lit it up at night very nicelly at the top like Bloomberg tower

ZippyTheChimp
October 23rd, 2004, 08:52 PM
When the sun doesn't shine
http://www.pbase.com/zippythechimp/image/35416709.jpg

A break in the clouds. A patch of blue.
http://www.pbase.com/zippythechimp/image/35416966.jpg

Even with the monument still under construction, the circle is starting to look great.

Bob
October 23rd, 2004, 10:14 PM
Great building. A stunted WTC North.

TLOZ Link5
October 23rd, 2004, 10:39 PM
They're putting up those retro lampposts, I see. Personally, I don't like them as much as the cast-iron replicas that they have on Madison Avenue and 8th Street, or around City Hall Park, just to name a few. Better than the cobraheads, at least.

Jude1017
November 11th, 2004, 06:55 PM
Did anybody notice the Time Warner Center crowns lit up last night? They were bright white. However, the southern tower was lit up for a few floors below its crown with a dimmer white.

Gulcrapek
November 11th, 2004, 11:13 PM
Oh snap. To quote the mantra of another board I go to, "pix plz."

Kris
November 16th, 2004, 01:48 PM
Costliest Building Ever?

By Justin Davidson
Staff Writer

November 13, 2004

Only in Manhattan could a battleship-gray colossus rise 750 feet into the sky and go largely unnoticed by the people at its feet.

For two years, drivers and pedestrians have been picking their way through Columbus Circle, so preoccupied with the shifting construction barricades that they paid little attention to the cause of all the disruption: the Time Warner Center, a pair of 80-story glass towers jutting asymmetrically from a two-block base that curves like a cutlass blade.

Now, suddenly, the building is there, and as the leaves thin, it will be visible from much of Central Park - just as, to the delight of investors and real estate brokers, the park is the centerpiece of the towers' wide-screen views.

The building, a ritzy vertical campus that will shelter a daily population of thousands, is opening in staggered stages. The Mandarin Oriental Hotel, which occupies floors 45 through 63 of the north tower, comes first - guests begin checking in on Saturday.

The shopping mall will hold its ribbon-cutting early next year, and tenants gradually will move into offices and the breathtakingly expensive apartments throughout the spring. The final piece is the cultural kernel: Jazz at Lincoln Center, designed by Rafael Viñoly and inserted into the wedge between the towers, will open in the fall of 2004.

It is hard to get around the raw fact of the complex's bulk. As you approach it from the north, its sheer glass cliff hulks menacingly over Broadway, two ungainly slabs merging into a single, formidable silhouette.

Upper West Siders who bemoan each new construction fence as a sign that the neighborhood is being converted into a thicket of high-rises will see this view daily, and loathe it. One Columbus Circle turns its coldest, thickest shoulder to the folks uptown.

But it has a more flattering profile, too, one that brings out the syncopated rhythms lurking in its oversized frame. Stand on the corner of Eighth Avenue and 58th Street, and the oblique angles pile up toward the clouds, jauntily linking the city's converging geometries. The building's base, a four-story shopping mall, wraps itself around Columbus Circle.

The towers stand askew, lining up along the diagonal of Broadway. The gap between them continues the westward path of Central Park South, as if the street had become airborne and merged with the sky.

The Time Warner Center, at $1.8 billion the most expensive single building ever planted in American soil, was designed by New York- based David Childs of Skidmore Owings and Merrill.

But behind that simple statement of fact is a 17-year history of false starts, grandiose ambitions and vertiginous risks. At various times during construction, a forklift driver died in an accident, winds battered the site, killing a worker and injuring pedestrians with flying debris, and a fire broke out inside the frame. Nothing about this project has been easy.

When the Javits Center opened in 1986, New York stopped needing its Coliseum, a stale white loaf of a building thrown down where 59th Street used to be.

The city put the site up for sale and from the beginning, developers thought on an imperial scale. The architect Moshe Safdie, working for Boston Properties, proposed a thick bundle of structures, the tallest of which would have reached 925 feet high - almost 20 more stories than the current building. Critics fumed and the Municipal Arts Society deployed protesters carrying black umbrellas to show how the building's shadow would darken Central Park.

Safdie's design was yanked, the economy curdled, the site's price plummeted and Boston Properties eventually withdrew.

The project did not really begin to move again until the late 1990s, when two things happened: The developer Steve Ross persuaded Time Warner that the company, nicely ensconced at Rockefeller Center, needed an urban icon to call its own; and then- mayor Rudolph Giuliani decreed that the new building would have to carve out some space for the performing arts - specifically, the first auditorium built expressly for jazz.

Ross landed the deal and turned to an architect who already had floated a handful of rejected designs for the project: David Childs.

Childs had to pack a lot of uses and requirements into one big building, and he did so by paring the design down from the earlier tapering clusters he had proposed.

He reduced the number of layers in his cake to three: the curved galleria, a pair of crystalline pedestals and the towers, rotated away from the street grid and twisted into rhomboids, so that the whole building seems to twirl upward.

It's ironic that Childs is now locked in battle with the Ground Zero master planner Daniel Libeskind over the shape of the future Freedom Tower - Libeskind apparently insists on his hip origami shapes, while Childs is holding out for a more straitlaced, Brooks Brothers skyscraper.

The Time Warner Center is not unconventional in spirit, but it is based on a quite Libeskind-like play of oblique and acute angles. (The resulting corners provided Ismael Leyva, who laid out the apartments, with an opportunity to set bathtubs into narrow, windowed nooks overlooking the Hudson River.)

The difference is that Libeskind uses angles, tilted roofs and canted walls for their aesthetic appeal, while Childs cautiously doles out asymmetry as the solution to an urbanistic problem: How to get a massive building to fit in at a complicated intersection where it doesn't really belong.

The complex, which stands astride the border of corporate midtown and the residential Upper West Side, struggles with the balance between neighborliness and capitalist triumphalism.

Childs has nestled the circular plaza in a streetwall of masonry and store windows, and the shops open onto the sidewalk as well as the atrium, which means floor traffic circulates freely between indoors and out. The powerhouse lobbies (Time Warner, Mandarin Oriental and the hyper-luxury apartments) have been discreetly relegated to the side streets.

But in fine Parisian style, the building also acts as the terminus of a grand boulevard, Central Park South, and its glass gates align with the statue of Christopher Columbus. Childs would have Columbus Circle be our Place de la Concorde.

There is, to be sure, something anticlimactic about proceeding down this grand way and arriving, finally, at a kitchen aids store (Williams-Sonoma). But architecturally, the mall is merely scaffolding for the keystone: the shimmering, see- through curtain of a floating jazz club. That's how far jazz has come in its 100-year history: from flypaper honky- tonks to the sixth-story glass-covered centerpiece of a mammoth corporate headquarters. Here, jazz is not about roots, but about respectability.

The amounts of money involved in erecting this structure were enormous, and those figures trickle down to the street. It still costs only a $2 subway fare to emerge into the renovated station, but everything else here seems to have been priced in another planet's currency.

An overnight stay in a suite with a park view at the Mandarin Oriental costs $1,600, and the fancier suite is $12,000 - although, for those travelers in a more austere mood, a nice little room goes for a mere $595. The penthouse apartment in the south tower was recently sold for $45 million, and while the price of sirloin at the Jean-Georges Vongerichten steakhouse in the galleria hasn't been set, it seems likely to be princely.

The only completed interiors for now are in the hotel, which is an orgy of expensive materials. At the bar, plunk your beer down on a counter of hammered nickel and leather trim, or take it to a booth of stone carved with Asian motifs.

The spa's shower stalls are made translucent by sheets of what is described as "rice- paper glass." Every surface has been ruthlessly beautified.

It's not just the hotel, but the center as a whole that represents a gamble on epic luxury (not to mention the future fortunes of its troubled corporate namesake).

The building is unmistakably meant to impress: It has the sleek, glazed mass of a bodybuilder-turned-movie star. But Childs has also attempted to endow it with something like quirkiness or bonhomie.

Most important skyscrapers have a signature crown; this one has a disappointing row of overlapping blades on top, which gives it the look of a high-tech razor. But Childs draws the eye around the front, rather than up to the spires.

The most appealing feature is not the mast, but the "prow," an empty, transparent six-floor shaft that serves no obvious purpose, but reaches out to the virtually windowless Huntington Hartford Museum across Eighth Avenue.

The prow is Childs' folly - a blank slate for a laser show, a glass billboard, a refreshing breath of ambiguity in a building crammed with purpose.

Copyright © 2004, Newsday, Inc.

James Kovata
November 16th, 2004, 01:53 PM
Am I missing something here? The Newsday article seems like it should have been published last Fall.

Jasonik
November 16th, 2004, 04:14 PM
^Agreed

NewYorkYankee
November 16th, 2004, 04:40 PM
That is exactly what I was thinking.

tone99loc
November 17th, 2004, 02:59 AM
Beautiful shots Zippy! No question TWC has extended the skyline and revigorated the entire area...

TonyO
November 21st, 2004, 03:35 PM
NYTimes
November 21, 2004

Time Warner Center Draws a Diverse Global Group

http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2004/11/21/realestate/21cov2-1.jpg
OF TIME WARNER AND THE RIVER Gregory H. Olsen and his daughter Krista Dibsie at their Time Warner apartment, designed by Aman & Carson Interiors.

By WILLIAM NEUMAN

IN a city where real estate is both spectacle and obsession, the Time Warner Center has played a prominent role in New York's millennial epic. Emerging from years of struggle over the future of Columbus Circle, the project passed through the crucible of Sept. 11, 2001 (steel was going up and condominium sales were in their fourth week when the World Trade Center was leveled) and into a real estate boom of big-name architects (David Childs of Skidmore Owings & Merrill designed it), celebrity buyers (the pop star Ricky Martin took an apartment) and stratospheric prices.

If nothing else, the two-pronged complex, like a giant tuning fork vibrating to the zeitgeist, has given the current boom its biggest number and the city its most expensive apartment ever: the 76th-story, full-floor condo that the Mexican-born financier David Martinez bought in the summer of 2003 for $42.25 million.

A little over a year later, the 198 apartments at Time Warner are about 85 percent sold, according to Louise M. Sunshine, the chairwoman and chief executive of the Sunshine Group, which marketed and sold the condos for the developers, the Related Companies and Apollo Real Estate Advisors. Ms. Sunshine trademarked the term "five star living" as the mantra for the center, which includes stores, the corporate offices of Time Warner, the Mandarin Oriental Hotel and restaurants. Total apartment sales so far, she said, add up to $810 million.

It would seem, then, a good time to try to answer the perpetual question of New York real estate watchers: Who is buying, and where did the money come from?

A study of transactions at the Time Warner Center, based on deeds, mortgage documents and other papers filed with public agencies, and interviews with real estate professionals and condo buyers, paints a picture of a diverse and exceedingly wealthy cast of characters culled from the upper ranks of the global economy.

Infinite permutations of possible lobby encounters or elevator rides spring to mind. Prince Turki bin Khalid of the Saudi royal family might chat with the Turkish construction magnate Ali R. Bozkurt, who has worked on major projects in Mecca and Medina and was held hostage by Iraqi forces during the invasion of Kuwait. Pamela and Richard Kramlich, collectors of avant-garde video art, might strike up a conversation with Gerard L. Cafesjian, a collector of the glass sculptures of Dale Chihuly. At least 10 doctors are involved in Time Warner transactions, as well as a hospital administrator, a pair of cosmetic dentists and entrepreneurs in the fields of insurance and drug plans, and New Yorkers might be forgiven if they fantasize about one particularly crowded elevator car stuck somewhere on a high floor.

In other words, for all its global trappings and glitz, the Time Warner Center is still a New York apartment house, which means it is a place of stories, chance meetings and crisscrossing lives. Here are a few of them:

South Building, One Central Park

76th floor, full floor with terrace, $42.25 million. David Martinez is the managing partner of Fintech Advisory, a firm with offices in London and New York that specializes in buying and selling the debt of countries and corporations. For his record payment, Mr. Martinez acquired two units, filling the entire 76th floor and half the 77th. (Actually, the buildings have only 53 floors, according to the condominium's offering plan, but, reasoning that a more prosaic structure might squeeze 80 stories into the same 700 feet, the developer decided to number them from the top down, starting at 80.)

Mr. Martinez knocked out the floor separating the two units to create a massive, south-facing living room with a 25-foot ceiling and panoramic windows. He took possession of the apartment in August 2003, but people who have seen the unit say it remains largely raw space. A person informed of some of the financier's plans said Mr. Martinez intends to install a large reflecting pool, some 15 feet across, in the center of the living room. Plans for a giant aquarium were scrapped because of complications in reinforcing the floor, the person said. Mr. Martinez and his architect, Peter Marino, did not return calls.

74th floor, three bedrooms, $9.1 million. Gregory H. Olsen's apartment seems almost like a bargain next to the $20 million he has reportedly paid to go into space with a crew of Russian cosmonauts, perhaps next year. Mr. Olsen's company, Sensors Unlimited, based in Princeton, N.J., makes infrared sensors used by the military and by industry for things like detecting spoiled fruit. He sold the company for $700 million in 2000 at the height of the technology boom, then bought it back for close to $7 million two years later. Mr. Olsen, who lives in New Jersey, finished work on the apartment this month and says he will use it two or three nights a week. He said he is looking forward to having his grandchildren over for Thanksgiving. "It's a great view of the parade," he said.

72nd floor, three bedrooms, $9.5 million. Using a company called Harbour-Land Enterprises, David Kwok Po Li, 65, agreed to buy this four-bedroom apartment four days before Sept. 11, 2001. Mr. Li is chief executive of the Bank of East Asia in Hong Kong and a director of Dow Jones, Campbell Soup, Hong Kong and China Gas and other corporations. Calls to Mr. Li's representative in New York were not returned.

71st floor, three bedrooms, $8.2 million. Susan A. Hancock and Raymond W. Otis sold their computer marketing firm, the Hancock Information Group, in 2001 to a subsidiary of Barry Diller's IAC/InterActiveCorp for an undisclosed amount. The couple's primary residence is in Winter Park, Fla., and they used the Florida-based designer Sam Ewing to create an apartment that would accentuate their collection of modern art, which has an emphasis on Japanese artists like Takashi Murakami. Ms. Hancock is on the acquisition committee at the Whitney Museum of American Art. Mr. Otis said he likes his new apartment because it's not like home. "You walk out the front door and you're right in New York," he said. "It hits you right in the face."

70th floor, 4 bedrooms, $9.1 million. Keith L. Reinhard is the chairman of DDB Worldwide, one of the world's largest advertising agencies. He is credited with coming up with the McDonald's slogan "You deserve a break today."

69th floor, two apartments, $8.1 million. Prince Turki bin Khalid picked out these two units while in New York the summer before 9/11, although documents filed with the city show the contracts were not made final until a month after the terror attack. His lawyer, Nancy Dutton, said he did not consider pulling out of the transaction. The prince, a sports aficionado who works with the Saudi national soccer team, will keep the apartments and hopes to use them once American sentiment toward his country becomes more favorable, she said. In the meantime, one of the apartments is being used by friends as a pied-à-terre and the other is vacant. In at least one way, the details of the prince's purchase suggest an alternative to the popular perception of the Saudi royals as an undifferentiated clan with uniformly bottomless pockets. About two-thirds of the purchases at Time Warner were made in cash. The prince got a mortgage.

66th floor, three bedrooms, $5.3 million. Time Warner's marketing team focused on art collectors and successfully sold several of them on the complex. The addition of Tobias Meyer and Mark Fletcher to the roster of condo owners could only have made their job easier. Mr. Meyer is director of Sotheby's contemporary art department worldwide. Mr. Fletcher is a consultant who works with collectors. They moved in August from a prewar building on the East Side. "We came from a very respectable apartment on Park Avenue and sort of shook off the respectable life," Mr. Fletcher said jokingly. Calling the view "totally addictive," he added, "You can stand in your kitchen and make your cappuccino in the morning and see the park."

66th floor, two bedrooms, $2.3 million. Ali R. Bozkurt is the chairman of BMB, a Turkish firm that specializes in the construction of roads, airports, tunnels and power plants. Mr. Bozkurt also owns a stake in an American company with a license to drill for oil in Kazakhstan. In August 1990, Mr. Bozkurt was at a construction project in northern Kuwait when the Iraqi army invaded. In his self-published memoir, "When I Was Saddam's Hostage," Mr. Bozkurt recounts the eight-day ordeal of his captivity in brutal desert conditions at the hands of Iraqi soldiers. The experience, he wrote, made him see the world differently, and he has since worked to promote democracy. Mr. Bozkurt's broker, Michael Shvo, president of the Shvo Group, said his condo is being offered for rent for $9,800 a month.

65th floor, four bedrooms, $6.7 million. It didn't take long for a pair of Time Warner tenants to land in court, although the dispute had nothing to do with the sort of neighborly spats typical of other New York buildings. The deed filed with the city shows that the Latin pop star Ricky Martin signed a contract for this condo in late February, not much more than a week after his lawyers were in state court in Manhattan filing a $2.5 million lawsuit against Angelo Medina, his longtime manager. Mr. Martin had opted not to renew Mr. Medina's contract the previous year, and the lawsuit charged the manager had not delivered on services for which he'd been paid in advance.

But Mr. Medina was not only Mr. Martin's former manager, he was his future neighbor. Mr. Medina's condo, a two-bedroom, $3.7 million unit, is also on the 65th floor, but in the north tower. Mr. Medina's unit faces north and Mr. Martin's faces south.

Mr. Medina responded to Mr. Martin's legal action in May, filing a $63 million lawsuit in Puerto Rico, alleging that the singer had broken a promise to let him continue representing him on the island. Peace was restored last month, however, when the two men agreed to settle their differences. Mr. Medina, who also owns a television sports channel and a professional basketball team in Puerto Rico, said he ran into Mr. Martin earlier this month in the lobby of his building, and they exchanged a quick hello. "It was nice," he said.

64th floor, five bedrooms, $8.8 million. Verna R. Harrah worked as a cocktail waitress and a real estate agent before marrying her first husband, Bill Harrah, the Nevada casino magnate, in 1973. After his death in 1978, the casino business was sold for $300 million and Mrs. Harrah received a large portion of the proceeds. She went on to become a movie producer, scoring a hit with her first film in 1997, the reptilian thriller "Anaconda." The movie took in $136 million in worldwide ticket sales, according to the Web site boxofficeguru.com. A sequel, "Anacondas: The Hunt for the Blood Orchid," has taken in $42 million since its release in August, according to another Web site, the -numbers.com.

56th floor, two-bedroom duplex, $4.2 million. Chester C. Davenport is the managing director of Georgetown Partners, a private investment firm based in Bethesda, Md. He is considered one of the wealthiest black entrepreneurs in the nation, with a net worth estimated in 1999 at $100 million. Mr. Davenport declined to discuss his plans for the apartment.

52nd floor, two bedrooms, $2.1 million. John W. Kluge was once the richest man in America, parlaying the sale of television and cellphone companies into a huge fortune. Last year he stood at No. 17 on the Forbes list of the world's wealthiest people, with an estimated net worth of $10.5 billion. Edward A. Hopkins, an associate of Mr. Kluge, said the apartment was bought at Mr. Kluge's "direction," but declined to discuss his plans for the condo.

North Building,

Residences at Mandarin Oriental

76th floor, five bedroom duplex, with terrace, $24 million. At 6,511 square feet, only the full-floor penthouses are larger than this duplex unit, which is under contract to Jack Silver, the president of SIAR Capital. Mr. Silver's firm runs a fund that invests in companies poised for growth. "We bought ourselves a one-of-a-kind apartment," said Mr. Silver, who expects to take possession of the condo next month. "The views from the north tower are much better," he said. "You see the entire park, you can see well into New Jersey, well into Nassau County and it's just extraordinary." Mr. Silver and his wife, Shirley, both grew up in New York. "I'm from Queens and she's from Brooklyn and we started with nothing," he said.

76th floor, four bedrooms, with terrace, $15.7 million. Michael Hirtenstein, the chief executive of WestCom, is in contract to buy this apartment, which he said he chose because of the terrace and the perks of living over a hotel. "It's 32 seconds into the swimming pool," he said. "I've timed it." December will be a busy month for Mr. Hirtenstein, whose company provides bandwidth and telecommunications services to the financial industry. He said he expects to close a deal on Dec. 9 to sell an 80 percent stake in WestCom to J. P. Morgan Chase. Papers were filed with the Federal Trade Commission this month to clear the way for the sale. One week later he will close on the apartment.

75th floor, six bedrooms, $15.6 million. At least 10 doctors were involved in purchases at the Time Warner Center. Topping the list is Dr. Joseph H. Levine, a cardiologist at St. Francis Hospital in Roslyn, N.Y., where he is the director of the Cardiac Arrhythmia and Pacemaker Center. In March, Dr. Levine and his wife, Karen T. Levine, formed a company called KJ Home Acquisition, which bought an apartment created by combining two units into a single 5,325 square foot condo, according to documents filed with the city and state.

A lawyer for the couple, Stuart Gross, said that Mrs. Levine holds a majority interest in the company, and that other family members hold a stake as well. The Levines declined to discuss their plans for the apartment. Other doctors in the complex include dermatologists and fertility experts.

75th floor, three bedrooms, $8.5 million. Nurzhan Subkhanberdin is the chairman of Kazkommertsbank, the largest private bank in Kazakhstan. The bank has reported assets of $4 billion. Mr. Subkhanberdin's lawyer, Scott Segal, said the banker plans to use the apartment during trips to New York.

75th floor, two bedrooms, $2.9 million. This unit was purchased by Pacific American, an import-export company. Pacific American had offices on the 47th floor of the World Trade Center's north tower at the time of the terrorist attack. The firm's managing director, George F. Meng, told a reporter from The San Francisco Chronicle that after the first plane hit, he hunkered down in his office, waiting for rescuers and trying to keep the smoke out by sealing his door with paper towels and tape. Finally, after the south tower collapsed, he made his way down the stairs and got out of the building just before it came down. Reached at his new office at One Penn Plaza, Mr. Meng was reluctant to talk about his high-rise acquisition. "We're going to use it for the company's purposes," he said.

74th floor, three bedrooms, $8.4 million. Veronica Atkins, the widow of Dr. Robert C. Atkins, reportedly sold her stake in his diet products company after his death last year. In a report in June, The Boston Globe estimated the doctor's estate at $600 million, with much of it expected to go toward financing diet research.

73rd floor, three bedrooms, $8.7 million. Michael A. Spencer is chief executive of ICAP, a London-based bond trading firm. Mr. Spencer was No. 163 on a list of the wealthiest people in Britain published this year by The Mail on Sunday. The paper estimated his net worth at £253 million (the equivalent of about $470 million).

71st floor, six bedrooms, $15.3 million. Gerard L. Cafesjian was executive vice president of West Publishing when it was sold to Thomson in 1996 for $3.4 billion. Mr. Cafesjian, who was born in Brooklyn, cashed out his partial ownership stake for an undisclosed amount. A collector of glass pieces by artists such as Dale Chihuly, he has given more than $50 million toward the creation of a contemporary art museum in Yerevan, Armenia.

69th floor, two bedrooms, $3.8 million. Pablo Ardila, 35, took office earlier this year as governor of Cundinamarca, the Colombian province that includes the capital, Bogotá. Mr. Ardila and his parents, Jaime Ardila and Hellen Sierra Ardila, arranged for the purchase of the Time Warner apartment this summer through a company they control, Mr. Ardila said.

"My parents always wanted to have an apartment in New York," Mr. Ardila said by telephone from Bogotá. "It was some sort of wish and, well, my father is 85 and my mother is 71 and I kind of figured that should be something they should have." The older Mr. Ardila is the founder and owner of the Colombian tabloid El Espacio and a former governor of the province of Santander. The family also has real estate in Florida and farmland and cattle in Colombia, his son said. The older Mr. Ardila was kidnapped by guerrillas in 1993 and held for about a month before being released.

68th floor, two bedrooms, $3.7 million. William Hall Wendel Jr. retired two years ago as chairman of Polaris Industries, a Minnesota company that manufactures snowmobiles, all-terrain vehicles and motorcycles. He continues to hold a major share of stock in the company, which reported $1.6 billion in sales last year. A dedicated mountain climber, Mr. Wendel has climbed the world's seven highest peaks. He scaled the summit of Mount Everest in 1994. Mr. Wendel could not be reached.

68th floor, a two bedroom unit for $3.9 million and a three bedroom unit for $4.7 million. These apartments were purchased by companies controlled by the Turkish sisters Sevil Sabanci Sabanci and Dilek Sabanci. The women are daughters of Sakip Sabanci, a Turkish industrialist who was considered the richest man in Turkey when he died in April at age 71. He was ranked last year at No. 123 on the Forbes list of the world's richest people, with an estimated $2.8 billion family fortune. The Sabancis did not respond to a request for an interview made through their lawyer.

67th floor, two bedroom, $3.8 million. Alan B. Miller is chief executive of Universal Health Services, one of the nation's largest for-profit hospital operators. His compensation last year was $9,315,065, according to filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission. Mr. Miller is from Brooklyn and his wife, Jill, is from Queens. The couple live in Pennsylvania, but Mr. Miller said they see their new Manhattan pied-à-terre as a kind of homecoming.

67th floor, two bedrooms, $3.9 million. Alexander M. Vik is chief executive of Xcelera, a firm based in the Cayman Islands that invests in and develops Internet-related companies. Xcelera was delisted from the American Stock Exchange last Monday because it was late in filing financial statements. The company announced the next day that its stock would begin over-the-counter trading and be quoted on the Pink Sheets, a clearinghouse for information on penny stocks. Xcelera started out several years ago as a fund specializing in Scandinavian stocks and later became an operating company running a hotel in the Canary Islands. It changed its spots again in 1999, with the announcement that it had invested in an Internet firm. Before the announcement, however, Mr. Vik's family was given options to buy one million shares of Xcelera stock at $3.25 each. The stock price subsequently soared, reaching $139.50 by the end of 1999.

Taking stock splits into account, published reports in 2000 estimated the value of the Viks' option position at $415 million. The same stock was quoted at 33 cents a share on the Pink Sheets last week. Mr. Vik could not be reached for comment.

66th floor, one bedroom, $1.5 million. Dennis Mangone, a senior vice president with the Corcoran Group, represented the buyers of eight apartments at the Time Warner Center, most notably Ricky Martin. He also bought one for himself.

65th floor, two bedrooms, $2.6 million. Elizabeth L. Sample and Brenda S. Powers are two of the leading brokers at Brown Harris Stevens. They worked on at least three transactions in the towers.

64th floor, two bedrooms, $3.8 million. C. Richard Kramlich and Pamela Kramlich. Mr. Kramlich is general partner at New Enterprise Associates, a venture capital firm that finances tech companies, and a director of the Chalone Wine Group and Zhone Technologies. The couple are known as leading collectors of video and new media art and Mrs. Kramlich is a director of the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art.


http://graphics7.nytimes.com/images/2004/11/21/realestate/re1.gif

Kris
November 29th, 2004, 12:10 AM
November 29, 2004

Hanging at Columbus Circle, a Thing of Light and Colors

By DAVID W. DUNLAP

http://graphics7.nytimes.com/images/2004/11/29/nyregion/center.184.jpg
The 150-foot tower on the 58th Street prow of the Time Warner Center is illuminated each evening from 4 to 11 p.m.

New Yorkers who do not like the color of the new environmental sculpture at the Time Warner Center have only to wait three minutes. It will change. And change again.

Known as the "Prow Sculpture," this glowing nighttime exclamation point over Columbus Circle was installed by Time Warner as part of its headquarters. Set in a 150-foot prowlike glass showcase on 58th Street, the sculpture is divided vertically into 12 groups of 36 lighting panels, looking something like a giant keyboard set on end - if keyboards came in red, orange, yellow, green, blue and purple.

Since mid-November, the sculpture has been illuminated each evening from 4 to 11 p.m., showing off a range of patterns. The panels change color for three minutes, then hold their color for 30 seconds. The display pauses every quarter hour to tell the time, using large panels to indicate the hour and smaller panels for five-minute increments. (For example, six large panels and three smaller ones would mean 6:15.)

Equally significant is what the prow has not been doing. There have been no sightings of promotions for "Alexander" or HBO or People magazine or any other Time Warner brand or product.

George H. Ladyman Jr., a Time Warner vice president and the sculpture's executive producer, said the deal struck with the city called for no third-party commercial use of the sculpture. The company may use it from time to time to promote special events like a concert in Jazz at Lincoln Center or the premiere of a Warner Brothers movie. But Mr. Ladyman said the sculpture was meant to complement its surroundings and the architecture of the building.

"This is a piece of art," he added, "a piece of technological art."

As such, it is a vivid reminder of how color can set a mood. On a recent evening, as the palette of the sculpture changed, the images it brought to mind went from a desert sunset to ocean depths to a polar landscape to a wooded glen. Then the sculptural tower would turn briefly into a quiltwork.

"We were listening to music just to get a feel for the rhythm and evocative transition," said David Rome of RomeAntics Productions. His company designed and programmed the sculpture, which was made by Cinnabar, with systems by Scharff Weisberg Lighting.

There are strips of light-emitting diodes behind the double-sided translucent polycarbonate panels, which are 2 by 8 feet, 6 by 6 feet and 4 by 12 feet, supported by a 121-foot vertical truss. The lighting arrays would stretch 728 feet, almost to the top of Time Warner Center, if laid end to end. The entire sculpture weighs 10 tons.

Though designed as part of Columbus Circle, the sculpture may be most effective when seen from Eighth Avenue, where it appears to be floating in air, a new kind of gateway to an Upper West Side that is growing more and more like Midtown. In that sense, something big, bright and restless may be the perfect pivot.

Copyright 2004 The New York Times Company

TLOZ Link5
December 21st, 2004, 05:55 PM
The crowns are lit up tonight. The white mullions near the tops are a bright white, and the transluscent fins are a light green.

NYatKNIGHT
December 21st, 2004, 05:57 PM
Nice! Thanks.

NoyokA
December 21st, 2004, 06:21 PM
Good call TLOZ. You can see the lights on the Wired New York Webcam.

http://www.wirednewyork.com/webcam2/default.htm

krulltime
December 21st, 2004, 06:28 PM
:shock: Wow cool!! Now there is a reason to get out of my apartment!!! Thanks guys! :wink:

DougGold
December 21st, 2004, 08:12 PM
Can someone get some good nighttime photos that show the crowns lit? I'm dyin' for some ovah heah!

billyblancoNYC
December 22nd, 2004, 12:50 AM
Thank you, Bloomie.

NewYorkYankee
December 22nd, 2004, 03:05 PM
Thank you, Bloomie.

What???

BrooklynRider
December 22nd, 2004, 03:18 PM
The crowns are lit up tonight. The white mullions near the tops are a bright white, and the transluscent fins are a light green.

This must be some sort of test phase. I haven't seen it at all. I did see that Bloomberg is lit too. New York at night looks GREAT from the Brooklyn Bridge. A great view of South Mditown skyline. Is there an equally effective place to see the north Midtown skyline?


(sorry - I know I'm off topic)

NYatKNIGHT
December 22nd, 2004, 03:46 PM
^Sheep Meadow

yyy
December 22nd, 2004, 06:01 PM
And you can find an example in here: http://www.pbase.com/zippythechimp/image/32892576
at ZippytheChimp's photo gallery.

billyblancoNYC
December 22nd, 2004, 11:11 PM
Thank you, Bloomie.

What???

Just kidding. Bloomberg lit the crown within the last couple of weeks. Now TWC lights it. Comp from 2 brand new ultra luxury mixed-use developments? Who knows. Whatever works...it's about time for both!

NewYorkYankee
December 23rd, 2004, 12:38 AM
Agreed Billy.

BrooklynRider
December 23rd, 2004, 01:07 PM
I checked out the lights last night. I ws surprised that only the eastern side of the tower tops are lit. It looked nice, but I wouldn't say it was anything iconic on the skyline. Perhaps, if the entire crown of each tower was illuminated, it would be diffderent.

JMGarcia
December 23rd, 2004, 03:50 PM
I haven't got up to see it at night recently but this looks like a lot more than just the east side...

http://img158.exs.cx/img158/4166/twclit1tz.jpg

NewYorkYankee
December 23rd, 2004, 08:16 PM
Tonight at 7:15 they didnt look lit up at all. :?

FRED
December 23rd, 2004, 08:25 PM
http://units.blogs.com/tt/files/rimg0054.jpg

NewYorkYankee
December 23rd, 2004, 08:31 PM
These are my fav buildings in New York.

yyy
December 24th, 2004, 09:24 AM
I also like those :D Great design in a beautiful location :shock:

Edward
December 24th, 2004, 06:59 PM
Time Warner Center (http://www.wirednewyork.com/aol/) at night.

http://www.wirednewyork.com/aol/images/time_warner_center_crown.jpg (http://www.wirednewyork.com/aol/)

yyy
December 24th, 2004, 07:15 PM
Nice - that's the same view that the webcam shows :D

DougGold
December 25th, 2004, 05:59 PM
beautiful! bravo!

NewYorkYankee
December 25th, 2004, 10:03 PM
I hope they are lit when I get up there.

TLOZ Link5
December 25th, 2004, 11:07 PM
I hope they are lit when I get up there.

They've been there for a few nights in a row. I think they're here to stay.

NewYorkYankee
December 26th, 2004, 12:21 PM
Wonderful!

BrooklynRider
December 28th, 2004, 02:39 PM
The fully lit crowns look great. It definitely was not lit like that when I saw it - only the east side was lit.

TLOZ Link5
December 28th, 2004, 04:15 PM
That view alone would be a respectable city skyline in itself.

NyC MaNiAc
December 30th, 2004, 02:00 AM
I just read in the New York Times (12/29/04) about a Sushi place called Masa, which is located inside the Time Warner building.

The Times gave it 4 stars, despite the $350 (!) price tag of a meal.

BrooklynRider
December 30th, 2004, 11:29 AM
$350 per person, exclusive of drinks.

alex ballard
December 30th, 2004, 12:14 PM
Is this building really 80 floors or 55?

NoyokA
December 30th, 2004, 01:12 PM
Is this building really 80 floors or 55?

55 storeys.

ZippyTheChimp
December 30th, 2004, 01:51 PM
$350 per person, exclusive of drinks.
A newspaper review of the restaurant said it is $500 during blowfish season.

(I'm not making this up).

BrooklynRider
December 30th, 2004, 01:58 PM
That's some expensive air (they're blowing up our *sses).

PHLguy
December 30th, 2004, 03:01 PM
Is this building really 80 floors or 55?

55 storeys.



It is 55 floors but they call it 80, Like the hotel bar is on the 17th floor but they call it the 35th.


I have no idea why.

hella good
December 31st, 2004, 08:11 AM
because they have estimated the amount of floors to the residential floor heights of a normal condo (where the ceilings are much lower than offices.) this building has normal office ceiling heights even in the condos.

NoyokA
December 31st, 2004, 10:22 AM
because they have estimated the amount of floors to the residential floor heights of a normal condo (where the ceilings are much lower than offices.) this building has normal office ceiling heights even in the condos.

Still I'm yet to find a 750 foot, 80 storey building.

And they can't have it both ways, advertising it as an 80 storey building, one with high ceilings. If the building had high ceilings it would have, oh, say, 55 storeys.

NewYorkYankee
January 3rd, 2005, 09:20 PM
The crowns havnt been lit up lately. :(

ZippyTheChimp
January 3rd, 2005, 10:04 PM
They were unlit all weekend. I had to settle for the prow, bowsprit, pointy-end-of-the-boat, Whatever you call it.

http://www.pbase.com/zippythechimp/image/38243942/original.jpg

antinimby
January 5th, 2005, 07:51 PM
Does anybody know why the light is gone?
Was it just a tease?
ILUVNYC: sounds like you're in the city now.

Kolbster
January 5th, 2005, 08:15 PM
Hey has anyone been inside of the building? IT is niiiiiiiiiiice

Gulcrapek
January 5th, 2005, 08:32 PM
Yeah. Only the mall, J@LC, and the hotel atrium though. I can't even imagine the apartments (even a few photos of them only show bits).

NoyokA
January 5th, 2005, 08:45 PM
Hey has anyone been inside of the building? IT is niiiiiiiiiiice

In addition to what Gulcrapek said, I've gone on a tour at CNN studios. Its a tad pricey, I forget how-much, but it's a good tour and well worth it. Go now to get a unique view of the Hearst Tower rising. I would suggest passing on the Samsung Expierence, I don't understand why it got rave reviews.

NewYorkYankee
January 5th, 2005, 09:34 PM
Does anybody know why the light is gone?
Was it just a tease?
ILUVNYC: sounds like you're in the city now.

I miss the lights :(

I wish I was already in the city. I have 1 semester left here. I see TWC every night on the webcame on this site.

Kolbster
January 5th, 2005, 09:37 PM
Now what is this "samsung experience"?
Did you go on it?

yyy
January 6th, 2005, 03:30 AM
They were unlit all weekend. I had to settle for the prow, bowsprit, pointy-end-of-the-boat, Whatever you call it.

http://www.pbase.com/zippythechimp/image/38243942/original.jpg

Great photo :!: I like those lights - it is a great way to decorate the buildings.

Zoe
January 6th, 2005, 09:44 AM
If your interested, CNN is now offering tours of the building and their facilities for $15 a person. Below is the link that will get you all the info you need....

http://www.cnn.com/insidecnn/

ZippyTheChimp
January 13th, 2005, 01:14 PM
Time Warner Center must need cash as they immediately began tours of their CNN Studios at $15 a head. I would go there if they had an observation deck; after all they must have superb views of Central Park and Times Square. The towers must block the great view that the Trump International Hotel and Tower once had. The buildings are awkward looking as they are slanted. Hopefully we New Yorkers will get used to it just as Londoners got to love "The Gherkin", which looks like a pickle.

FRED
January 18th, 2005, 07:31 PM
http://skyscraperpage.com/gallery/data/532/1856img_1051c.jpg

http://skyscraperpage.com/gallery/data/532/1856img_1046c.jpg

http://skyscraperpage.com/gallery/data/532/1856img_1048c.jpg

yyy
January 28th, 2005, 07:48 AM
Here you can find many high resolution images of the TWC: http://www.mandarinoriental.com/hotel/520000076.asp

alex ballard
January 28th, 2005, 08:57 AM
Is this really the headquarters for the entire Time Warner operation?

billyblancoNYC
January 28th, 2005, 11:31 AM
Is this really the headquarters for the entire Time Warner operation?

Why do you ask?

http://www.timewarner.com/corp/contacts_support.html

ZippyTheChimp
January 28th, 2005, 11:34 AM
Time Warner Corporate History:

1918: The four Warner Brothers open a California studio.

1923: Warner Brothers Pictures is incorporated.

1923: Henery Luce launches Time Magazine.

1934: Luce launches Architectural Forum.

1936: Life Magazine.

1940: Bugs Bunny is introduced in a Warner Brothers short A Wild Hare.

1944: Leon Schlesinger sells the cartoon studio Looney Tunes to Warner Bros'.

1954: Sports Illustrated is launched (no swimsuit issue).

1958: Warner Brothers Records is founded. (Warner/Elektra/Atlantic).

1961: Time-Life Inc (book division) is formed.

1963: Warner Brothers animation division is closed.

1967: Seven Arts Ltd buys Warner Brothers, renaming it Warner-Seven Arts.

1969: A funeral parlor conglomerate, Kinney National Company, buys Warner-Seven Arts and renames it Warner Communications Inc.

1972: Time Inc buys HBO from Charles Dolan, and first broadcast is made in Wilkes-Barre PA to 365 subscribers.

1989: Time Inc merges with Warner Communications, forming Time-Warner Inc.

1991: Quantum Computer Services changes name to America Online.

1996: Telecommunicatios Act. Time Warner Inc acquires Turner Broadcasting System.

2000: Time Warner Inc and AOL agree to a $183 billion merger - the largest corporate merger in history. The new company, AOL Time Warner, is the largest media and entertainment company in the world.

2002: AOL Time Warner buys AT&T stake in Warner Entertainment, and creates its own cable division.

2003: AOL Time Warner reports $54 billion quarterly loss, and changes name back to Time Warner.

2004: Time Warner Center opens, world headquarters for the conglomerate. Time Warner occupies about 1/3 of the complex.



I'm just waiting for the temperature to get into the teens.

alex ballard
January 28th, 2005, 02:10 PM
Is this really the headquarters for the entire Time Warner operation?

Why do you ask?

http://www.timewarner.com/corp/contacts_support.html

Becasue personally, I take pride in buildings that are global headquarters as it confirms NY's status in the world. Also, these developments spur more developments in the long run.

yyy
January 30th, 2005, 05:10 AM
Does anybody know sites where I can get more pictures of the Time Warner Center? It looks so cool.

ZippyTheChimp
January 30th, 2005, 10:36 AM
http://206.130.101.24/mt/mt-search.cgi?search=time+warner&IncludeBlogs=1&x=9&y=2

http://search.pbase.com/search?q=time+warner&b=Search+Photos&c=sp

http://images.google.com/images?q=time%20warner%20center&hl=en&lr=&newwindow=1&safe=off&sa=N&tab=wi

yyy
January 30th, 2005, 11:02 AM
Thanks Zippy - rion.nu is a really nice site.