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View Full Version : The Bank of America Tower a.k.a. One Bryant Park - by Cook + Fox Architects



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Alonzo-ny
January 10th, 2005, 01:05 PM
What are the chances of an esb beater or at least one of similar height and not with use of a spire a la obp

Alonzo-ny
January 10th, 2005, 01:50 PM
I just found that by 2008 chicago will have 6 1000fters and 4 950+fters what is the big difference between chicago and NY?

aural iNK
January 10th, 2005, 02:35 PM
Has anyone created this image with the NY Times tower in the same shot? I love this angle!

I gave it a shot. I was not too sure about the height and location if you want to give me some suggestions.

*Edited picture to correct perspective.

http://www.graffitibiz.com/times_panorama.gif

NewYorkYankee
January 10th, 2005, 03:07 PM
:shock: AMAZING! :D

kliq6
January 10th, 2005, 03:13 PM
looks right to me, and maybe the PABT and Milstein will come up, really making that area look sharp

RS085
January 10th, 2005, 03:14 PM
AWESOME. BOA AND NYT WILL TRANSFORM MIDTOWN SKYLINE.

NoyokA
January 10th, 2005, 03:59 PM
The position and height are about right, however the view is wrong. You rendered the side view where the front view will be.

BrooklynRider
January 10th, 2005, 05:55 PM
Nice! The signature difference between the two midtown views (east & west) is the proximity to the water.

Deimos
January 10th, 2005, 06:25 PM
WOW... I'm definitely excited to see these completed!

Thank You for the rendering aural

Den Haag AvW
January 11th, 2005, 05:25 AM
Great job, aural iNK!

alex ballard
January 11th, 2005, 09:01 PM
What are the type of BoA jobs are gonna be in this tower? It's jobs that drive skyscraper projects and I hope these aren't the type of jobs that could easily disappear.

NoyokA
January 11th, 2005, 09:08 PM
*Edited picture to correct perspective.

Thumbs up!

NewYorkYankee
January 11th, 2005, 09:39 PM
Too bad BOA is somewhat "hiding" behind 4 TS. :?

billyblancoNYC
January 12th, 2005, 02:19 AM
Excellent job. Now, let's see you try your hand and what that view will be like when the Hudson Yards rezoning is built out...!

aural iNK
January 12th, 2005, 09:58 AM
Thanks for the kind words!

I tried my hand at one more out of boredom. The BOA is a little cheesy, so I may fix it later.

(click the image for the full panorama with the Hearst)
http://www.graffitibiz.com/boa_times.jpg (http://www.graffitibiz.com/nyc_full.jpg)

NoyokA
January 12th, 2005, 10:01 AM
*Two thumbs up!

Just Rich
January 17th, 2005, 03:34 PM
A couple of pics from an animation I did for a company vying for the
window washing machinery contract.

View part of the animation here:
http://homepage.mac.com/rigrij/iMovieTheater41.html

http://homepage.mac.com/rigrij/.Pictures/New%20York%20Stuff/one_bp_01.jpg
http://homepage.mac.com/rigrij/.Pictures/New%20York%20Stuff/one_bp_02.jpg

NoyokA
January 17th, 2005, 08:00 PM
Cool movie!

One question though, what happened to the eastern part of the crown?

Kolbster
January 17th, 2005, 11:35 PM
that is lookin sharp

Kolbster
January 17th, 2005, 11:43 PM
but um, what is that green thing that juts out from the building top....a light???

Just Rich
January 18th, 2005, 09:39 AM
Stern - the eastern part is the transparent part of the crown

Kolbster - the green thing is the window washing crane, it retracts.
Watch the movie.

Kolbster
January 18th, 2005, 11:16 AM
Can't, my comp won't let me acess the page. Good look though

NoyokA
February 2nd, 2005, 04:43 PM
Super Large Rendering:

http://specialsections.nypost.com/news/nypost/commercialre/20050120/img/e_1_p68.jpg

antinimby
February 2nd, 2005, 05:03 PM
Good close-up rendering.
I don't really like OBP though :( .
It's got too many sharp angles--not very feng shui.

NewYorkYankee
February 2nd, 2005, 08:32 PM
Gracias Stern for that image! I love this building! Nice, modern addition to the skyline!

TLOZ Link5
February 3rd, 2005, 02:23 PM
The Crystal Palace rises again, over 150 years later.

GLNY
February 3rd, 2005, 05:07 PM
The Crystal Palace rises again, over 150 years later.

The right location, too. This is one of the best posts I've seen on this board.

Jasonik
February 3rd, 2005, 05:24 PM
About The Crystal Palace (http://www.lib.umd.edu/ARCH/honr219f/1853nyci.html)

TLOZ Link5
February 3rd, 2005, 07:10 PM
The right location, too. This is one of the best posts I've seen on this board.

Awww, shucks :D

Can't take full credit for it, though. Cook & Fox already makes a reference to the Crystal Palace in their description of the project.

PHLguy
February 14th, 2005, 09:23 AM
Is 1200 feet going to be it's "official height?"

ZippyTheChimp
February 14th, 2005, 10:36 AM
Only if you sit on top of the pole.

PHLguy
February 14th, 2005, 03:35 PM
Is the spire going to count, I meant?

NoyokA
February 14th, 2005, 03:42 PM
Is the spire going to count, I meant?

I believe Zippy meant that the spire will only count if you sit on it. I hope that clears things up.

PHLguy
February 14th, 2005, 03:52 PM
*sigh*


In official height?


Spires should count, even though it doesnt look like it, you could comfortably stand atop chryslers spire, I saw a few photos taken from the spire once, it was pretty cool

ZippyTheChimp
February 14th, 2005, 04:34 PM
Beyond belief.

James Kovata
February 14th, 2005, 09:15 PM
I believe Zippy meant that the spire will only count if you sit on it. I hope that clears things up.
LOL

NoyokA
February 14th, 2005, 09:46 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stern
I believe Zippy meant that the spire will only count if you sit on it. I hope that clears things up.

LOL

Yeah, but I don’t think it did. Ill continue to talk in subtleties

PHLguy
February 14th, 2005, 10:25 PM
why is everyone trying to make this so difficult, answer my question and stop trying to piss me off and then lose your panties over it when i get mad.

BrooklynRider
February 15th, 2005, 10:33 AM
I believe the building height to roofline is 960ft and to the tip of the spire is 1200ft.

NoyokA
February 15th, 2005, 04:18 PM
New webcam link:

http://www.timelapser.com/webcam/

NewYorkYankee
February 16th, 2005, 03:18 PM
BOA's HQ are not in NY currently, correct? I may be wrong.

pianoman11686
February 16th, 2005, 03:37 PM
I believe they're based in San Francisco and Charlotte, and it's the Charlotte offices that they're going to replace by moving into NYC. I could be wrong though.

NoyokA
February 16th, 2005, 03:56 PM
I believe they're based in San Francisco and Charlotte, and it's the Charlotte offices that they're going to replace by moving into NYC. I could be wrong though.

BOFA's World Headquarters are in and will remain in Charlotte. This will be BOFA's New York headquarters as they try to break into the North East market.

Jasonik
February 16th, 2005, 06:05 PM
They changeover from Fleet to Bank of America is mostly complete, I just activated my new bank (of America) card.

1993 I open an account at BayBank.
1995 BayBank merges with Bank of Boston to become BankBoston.
2000 BankBoston is bought out by Fleet.
2004 Fleet is bought out by Bank of America.

Service went downhill with each merger, but the ATMs are everywhere.

I can't really tell about Bank of America yet; the transition isn't fully complete.

BrooklynRider
February 16th, 2005, 11:50 PM
And, alas, the Fleet neon extravaganza on the Marriott Marquis is being replaced by the nearly completed new BoA neon sign. Please let is be an "exciting" sign, like the old Canon sign.

Zoe
February 17th, 2005, 11:48 AM
Jason, I have had the same journey with only one difference:

1993 I opened my account with Bank of Boston
1995 to present, same

I have just loved getting passed around. I have noticed that BOA is having some problems with Homelink. A number of people I know, including myself, have experienced mishandling of bill payments made thru Homelink since they took that piece over. Nothing too bad... Other than that I have not noticed anything.

cypher
February 23rd, 2005, 03:49 PM
my trusty constituents can't see the damn site when the sun shines on these dirty a$$ windows...
http://www.timelapser.com/webcam/
they are really digging into the bones of the earth right now.

antinimby
March 10th, 2005, 11:58 AM
There's nothing to see anyway.
They're taking their own sweet time digging.
Besides, the webcam will all come to an end in a week. :(

Arch
March 14th, 2005, 09:41 PM
Looks like construction has started. I found a hole in the fence next to the theatre (BTW pretty cool how that is being held up) and you can see the first re-bar being installed. This is one large construction site. Much deeper than nytimes building.

NoyokA
March 14th, 2005, 09:45 PM
That's looking towards Conde Nast, I presume the foundations dont have to be as deep here as excavation continues on the east side of the site.

Arch
March 14th, 2005, 09:51 PM
That's right. The view is looking towards Conde at the southwest corner of the site. Looks like there is a ledge or shelf on the west side and they are putting the foundations above that.

From what I saw today, there was no work being done on the east side which looks to be level and complete. The excavation work was happening in the middle of the site and along 42nd street.

BrooklynRider
March 15th, 2005, 10:27 AM
Regarding the depth of the holes, I'm surprised because of the complex network of subway tunnels. I worked for Tishman when they were building 4TS and I remember Dan Tishman presenting our proposal for 745 7th (Lehman Brothers), which we won. He said, after building 4TS, constructing a building anywhere else in NY was like building something out in the country.

Is an underground pedestrian connection (tunnel), between the 6th Ave lines and Times Square IRT / BMT Station, being constructed as an infrastructure upgrade for the city, as part of this project?

ZippyTheChimp
March 15th, 2005, 12:00 PM
^
From the EIS:


a covered through-block public pedestrian corridor connection between 42nd and 43rd Streets located on the western portion of the Project site (adjacent to the existing Four Times Square building); consolidated and improved subway entrance at the northwest corner of Sixth Avenue and 42nd Street; a below-grade pedestrian connection between the 42nd Street-Sixth Avenue subway station and the 42nd Street-Times Square subway station with a new mid-block subway entrance between Sixth Avenue and Broadway;

NYguy
March 30th, 2005, 05:18 PM
Went by the site earlier today...


http://www.pbase.com/nyguy/image/41442526/medium.jpg


http://www.pbase.com/nyguy/image/41442567/medium.jpg

alex ballard
March 30th, 2005, 07:35 PM
Will this create more financial jobs for the city? Do you think BoA could eventually expand to the whole building?

NoyokA
March 30th, 2005, 07:57 PM
Will this create more financial jobs for the city? Do you think BoA could eventually expand to the whole building?

Yes. and Yes.

antinimby
March 31st, 2005, 01:16 AM
It'll be nice if they (BofA) would some day relocate their entire WORLD headquarters from Charlotte(?) to this building and reverse the trend of corporate exodus out of the city.

Kolbster
March 31st, 2005, 01:46 AM
It'll be nice if they (BofA) would some day relocate their entire WORLD headquarters from Charlotte(?) to this building and reverse the trend of corporate exodus out of the city.

That would be nice, but it doesnt look like they would make such a move quite as yet....if they were i think it would have already been made public, and they would have occupied more of the tower.

NYguy
April 3rd, 2005, 07:55 PM
Went by the site again today. This tower is still behind the NY Times tower as far as the foundation goes, but not by a whole lot:

APRIL 3, 2005

Digging deep for the main body of the tower:

http://www.pbase.com/nyguy/image/41597473/large.jpg


http://www.pbase.com/nyguy/image/41597477/large.jpg


http://www.pbase.com/nyguy/image/41597514/large.jpg


The mid-lowrise end of the tower:

http://www.pbase.com/nyguy/image/41597546/large.jpg


http://www.pbase.com/nyguy/image/41597602/large.jpg

NYguy
April 3rd, 2005, 08:02 PM
A comparison pic, work on the NY Times tower, also taken today. There are more pics in the NY Times thread....

APRIL 3 2005


http://www.pbase.com/nyguy/image/41597713/large.jpg

Alonzo-ny
April 28th, 2005, 11:23 AM
This may be a obvious obwervation but the webcam on esb website will be great for watching progress of this building

NYCTowers
April 28th, 2005, 10:07 PM
more construction pics!!! :)

April 28 2005 :hug:



http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v109/nyctowers/d5103c54.jpg


notice the "wall" of the former theatre.....
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v109/nyctowers/DSC00047.jpg


like I said before its gonna be a HOT summer!! :)

NoyokA
April 28th, 2005, 10:40 PM
This one is going at a snail's pace.

NYguy
April 28th, 2005, 10:40 PM
more construction pics!!! :)

April 28 2005 :hug:


http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v109/nyctowers/DSC00046.jpg


It's not as far behind the Times' tower as you would think...

BrooklynRider
April 28th, 2005, 11:07 PM
Jeez - Look at that worker next to the far wall. It sure gives a better sense of the scale.

I don't think I've seen a deeper hole!

:: Paging Paris Hilton, Paging Paris Hilton ::

NoyokA
April 28th, 2005, 11:29 PM
Jeez - Look at that worker next to the far wall. It sure gives a better sense of the scale.

I don't think I've seen a deeper hole!

:: Paging Paris Hilton, Paging Paris Hilton ::

Ba da bum cha

macreator
April 29th, 2005, 07:48 AM
So are they keeping the theatre facade as like a bit of homage to Times Square or something? Seems a bit odd that they'd keep the facade up so late in the game if they wanted to take it down.

Eugenius
April 29th, 2005, 10:46 AM
The facade will be incorporated into the new building. It's landmarked, so they can't tear it down.

PHLguy
April 29th, 2005, 01:04 PM
Looks good, the Times tower is a bit far ahead but it is also a smaller building in height and size (about half the floorplate and 150 feet shorter) so it should top out first easily.

BrooklynRider
April 29th, 2005, 01:46 PM
So are they keeping the theatre facade as like a bit of homage to Times Square or something? Seems a bit odd that they'd keep the facade up so late in the game if they wanted to take it down.

Same thing they did with the Hilton Theater (Previously the Ford Center for the Arts). They preserved the old entrance to the Lyric Theater on 453rd Street and built a whole new theater, combining the old Apollo & Lyric Theater spaces. The interior incorporates preserved elements of each.

NYCTowers
April 30th, 2005, 09:40 AM
So are they keeping the theatre facade as like a bit of homage to Times Square or something? Seems a bit odd that they'd keep the facade up so late in the game if they wanted to take it down.

the facade will be incorporated into a new theatre !! :)

it will be the new Henry Miller's theatre

alex ballard
April 30th, 2005, 07:56 PM
I must have missed something, the theater facade is going into a new theater in the building?

Also, is there any chance BoA will end up taking the whole tower?


It would be nice if Wachovia had any operations here. Oh well, I guess you can't have them all....

BronxBoy
April 30th, 2005, 08:07 PM
The theater is going to be a part of the base complex. The origonal facade is going to be used as the entrance for the new theater. I think it's a wonderful idea really. Old school beauty on the outside, and new school technology on the inside. This is going to be one great theater.

Also, Bank of America is not going to occupy the whole building, there will be office space for rent.

NYCTowers
April 30th, 2005, 08:49 PM
READ ON


Dimensions

2,100,000 total square feet
1,100,000 square feet for Bank of America
1,000,000 square feet of office space above
50,000 square foot reconstructed Henry Miller Theater
945 feet tall, 54 stories
1,200 FEET TALL to the top of the spire

antinimby
April 30th, 2005, 10:12 PM
Here are my gripes with BofA:
1) No retail space (am I mistaken?)
2) Highest occupied floor is only around 830 ft.
3) No Times Square signage.

Deimos
April 30th, 2005, 11:26 PM
Here are my gripes with BofA:
1) No retail space (am I mistaken?)
2) Highest occupied floor is only around 830 ft.
3) No Times Square signage.

1. It will have public space on the ground level... which is just as good as retail space

2. sign of the times

3. It's a bryant park address, so why would it have signage for times square?

All in all, I'm looking forward to seeing this tower going up. It's going to be a great addition to they skyline around bryant park.

macreator
May 1st, 2005, 12:26 AM
So what exactly will be taking up the rest of the tower if occupied space stops a few hundred feet before the spire?

From the renderings I've seen the building seems to be the same width right up until the spire. Will it just be a very large mechanical room like the top of the Citigroup building?

JMGarcia
May 1st, 2005, 01:38 AM
The BOA is on very corporate and conservative 6th Ave. overlooking Bryant Park. Times Sq. signage would not be appropriate.

macreator
May 1st, 2005, 10:10 AM
The BOA is on very corporate and conservative 6th Ave. overlooking Bryant Park. Times Sq. signage would not be appropriate.

Plus the building isn't on Times Square.

antinimby
May 1st, 2005, 10:36 AM
1. It will have public space on the ground level... which is just as good as retail space My observation of public spaces is that they're used mostly during lunchtime by workers AND only during good weather (open air plazas). After hours, it becomes empty pretty fast. Would be nice if they could fit in an Apple Bee's or something.


Will it just be a very large mechanical room like the top of the Citigroup building? I'm not sure, but I don't see any other uses for it.


The BOA is on very corporate and conservative 6th Ave. overlooking Bryant Park. Times Sq. signage would not be appropriate. True, but why can't we just have a tiny, teeny, weeny little sign on either the 42nd or 43rd St. sides closer to 7th Ave. This way the building won't seem so cold and lifeless at night. ;)

NoyokA
May 1st, 2005, 11:29 AM
My observation of public spaces is that they're used mostly during lunchtime by workers AND only during good weather (open air plazas). After hours, it becomes empty pretty fast. Would be nice if they could fit in an Apple Bee's or something.

Times Square already has an Apple Bee's, I like Apple Bee's but its more appropriate for the suburbs than NYC. BOFA will however have this:

-Through-block public passageway connecting 42 nd and 43 rd Streets featuring Broadway-inspired programming and attractions, with multiple, interactive information kiosks to create a uniquely animated experience

-Henry Miller’s Theater Attraction anchoring the passageway’s program with a contemporary documentary style multimedia exploration of the life and times of the historical playhouse and its creator

-Henry Miller’s Theater Café and Restaurant featuring a unique combination of cuisine for quick pre- and post-show meals, as well more leisurely, fine dining

-Broadway and NYC information stations providing a comprehensive database of information about the entire theater district and other New York attractions and amenities

-“Broadway Wall of Fame” dedicated to the best of Broadway’s past and present, along with live performances and behind-the-scenes peeks


True, but why can't we just have a tiny, teeny, weeny little sign on either the 42nd or 43rd St. sides closer to 7th Ave. This way the building won't seem so cold and lifeless at night. ;)

Ad nauseum, thank god Bloomberg’s limiting the amount of signs in NYC, its especially important here by midtown’s only real park.

And I for one am looking forward to the urban garden room, too many people overlook these zoning incentives, but I like the exhibits shown at the building just to north of BOFA, and always enjoy visiting the free rotating exhibits at the AXA Building.

James Kovata
May 1st, 2005, 09:22 PM
Would be nice if they could fit in an Apple Bee's or something.

Just what Manhattan needs....prefab suburban food.

Kolbster
May 2nd, 2005, 03:09 PM
Apple Bee's is "the family restaurant"...be it bad as it is, it wouldn't fit in the midtown business district. Also, i think it would be home to a more exotic restaurant rather than a suburban chain

macreator
May 2nd, 2005, 05:03 PM
I don't think anyone will be eatin' good in the neighborhood anytime soon :D

cypher
May 3rd, 2005, 06:04 PM
here are some updated pics of the construction site, moving along nicely.

http://www.timelapser.com/images/archives/05-03-05/05-03-05-002o.jpg
the entire site

http://www.timelapser.com/images/archives/05-03-05/05-03-05-003o.jpg
the northeat corner of the site, 7 stories deep

http://www.timelapser.com/images/archives/05-03-05/05-03-05-009o.jpg
a different angle of the site with the back of the Henry Miller facade

i also have a couple of timelapse clips of the destruction process on my site:
http://www.timelapser.com/video/

alex ballard
May 3rd, 2005, 06:16 PM
Just curious: Where are the subway lines in that picture? Are they along the opening along the right of that picture?


I wonder how close those walls are to the tunnels...It must be a tedious job to dig that hole...

NoyokA
May 3rd, 2005, 07:12 PM
Construction is tediously slow and far away, there looks to be only a little progress from the same time last month. The subway line and underground passage is located underneath the roadway, you can see them pouring concrete and working on this from the sidewalk on the south side of the site.



Just curious: Where are the subway lines in that picture? Are they along the opening along the right of that picture?


I wonder how close those walls are to the tunnels...It must be a tedious job to dig that hole...

NYguy
May 3rd, 2005, 07:17 PM
There is a subway line down both the eastern and southern borders of the site.

Those are excellent pics.

alex ballard
May 3rd, 2005, 08:37 PM
There is a subway line down both the eastern and southern borders of the site.

Those are excellent pics.

Ummm, how about "Left, Right, Bottom, Top" please?

phillymatt
May 3rd, 2005, 08:43 PM
That is so cool!

http://live7.truelook.com/timages/live7/strends/NorthView/imgbuf/buf_2219/1115107691343598.jpg

NYguy
May 3rd, 2005, 09:35 PM
Ummm, how about "Left, Right, Bottom, Top" please?

The view from those pics is east.

TLOZ Link5
May 6th, 2005, 04:40 PM
Anything new?

If there was, it would be on here by now :P

case_architect
May 13th, 2005, 02:08 AM
i believe it is 10036

NoyokA
May 20th, 2005, 11:08 AM
Looks like BOFA's going to need the space long before this buildings complete in 2009:

NYPOST:

SOLOW TO EVICT BOFA IF SIHPOL GUILTY

By RICHARD WILNER

One Midtown landlord sees no difference between the late-night drug trade and late-day mutual fund trades.

The landlord, Solow Building Co., won the right to try to toss Bank of America Securities from its 650,000 square feet of space at 9 West 57th St. if former broker Ted Sihpol is convicted of enabling a hedge fund to late-trade in the company's mutual funds.

A Manhattan judge, while calling the landlord's request "audacious," nonetheless allowed Solow to try and use the same law legislators passed to help landlords rid themselves of drug dealers and prostitutes to chuck BofA.

BofA and Solow have had a stormy relationship, battling in more than one court over renovations and the cost of electricity charged by Solow.

BofA tried to have the suit tossed but Civil Court Judge Joan M. Kenney pushed aside that effort, saying the issue has to be determined at trial.

Kenney stayed landlord-tenant dispute until the Sihpol trial is over sometime in early June, according to the New York Law Journal, which first reported on the Solow suit yesterday.

ichibans
May 20th, 2005, 03:25 PM
Looks like BOFA's going to need the space long before this buildings complete in 2009:

NYPOST:

SOLOW TO EVICT BOFA IF SIHPOL GUILTY

By RICHARD WILNER

One Midtown landlord sees no difference between the late-night drug trade and late-day mutual fund trades.

The landlord, Solow Building Co., won the right to try to toss Bank of America Securities from its 650,000 square feet of space at 9 West 57th St. if former broker Ted Sihpol is convicted of enabling a hedge fund to late-trade in the company's mutual funds.

A Manhattan judge, while calling the landlord's request "audacious," nonetheless allowed Solow to try and use the same law legislators passed to help landlords rid themselves of drug dealers and prostitutes to chuck BofA.

BofA and Solow have had a stormy relationship, battling in more than one court over renovations and the cost of electricity charged by Solow.

BofA tried to have the suit tossed but Civil Court Judge Joan M. Kenney pushed aside that effort, saying the issue has to be determined at trial.

Kenney stayed landlord-tenant dispute until the Sihpol trial is over sometime in early June, according to the New York Law Journal, which first reported on the Solow suit yesterday.

If the Landlord wins the case, he gets to toss Bank of America BOFA out, and BOFA has to pay the lease until 2008. Evil.. Evil..

Bank of America spend few million dollars to convert storage space in 9 West into a million dollar trading floor. I dont know what is wrong with this SOLOW guy.

NoyokA
June 12th, 2005, 12:02 PM
In this picture taken today from the ESB tower cams it looks like progress has actually gone backwards instead of forwards. What the hell is taking them so long?

phillymatt
June 12th, 2005, 12:22 PM
In this picture taken today from the ESB tower cams it looks like progress has actually gone backwards instead of forwards. What the hell is taking them so long?
Yeah, this picture is from 6/10/05

http://www.mattg.us/bofa-06-10-05-2.jpg

and then later on the day is this picture

http://www.mattg.us/bofa-06-10-05-3.jpg

That mound of dirt is new.

NoyokA
June 12th, 2005, 12:39 PM
Coneventional logic would be to remove the dirt pile not to add to it.

macreator
June 12th, 2005, 12:58 PM
Coneventional logic would be to remove the dirt pile not to add to it.

Conventional logic doesn't seem to exist at the BOA site. Hopefully they know something we don't.

Arch
June 12th, 2005, 05:53 PM
Looks like they are just moving the ramp around so they can excavate the middle of the block which was the staging area before. They poured the foundation walls on the east side and will fill in with 'new dirt' for a new ramp/platform in that area.

Actually this is progress. It means they have completed excavation/walls over most of the site and need access to the last part.

This is a tremendous excavation and unusually deep. It's going to take them some time to fill it back in. Bet we don't see steel out of the ground for several more months - maybe october.

michelle1
June 12th, 2005, 07:36 PM
Yeah, excavation is always tedious and not interesting job, but once it will be done, it will be moving nicely I guess,,

phillymatt
June 12th, 2005, 08:18 PM
We need someone to get pictures of the whole site. We can only see a sliver of this huge site from the ESB cam.

mkeit
June 27th, 2005, 02:35 PM
They have to relocate the ramps in order to move the equipment around and build all of the foundation walls. This is normal for foundation construction-at least in NYC.

Gulcrapek
June 27th, 2005, 08:46 PM
Walking by the site today reminded me of how huge the place is. Seriously, this is a ginormous plot.

bmwisfast
June 30th, 2005, 02:13 AM
hey guys, I hope you enjoy these !! :D :D

I had to shrink the photos. if you want them in the original larger view, PM me. later...

-s

lofter1
June 30th, 2005, 02:16 AM
bmwisfast: Thanks for the great pictures!

Looks like there is still a lot of rock to move, but about 1/3 of the perimeter wall seems to be in.

Eugenius
June 30th, 2005, 05:17 PM
Great pictures. Is that concrete being poured in the southwest corner?

NYguy
June 30th, 2005, 07:04 PM
Excellent photos of the site. This will be New York's second tallest for a year or so...

NYatKNIGHT
July 1st, 2005, 01:49 PM
Thanks for the great photos bmwisfast, and that's a fine vantage point you have there.

bmwisfast
July 1st, 2005, 02:02 PM
Thanks guys. :) I was amazed when I started seeing the construction site. I actually saw when they were taking everything down, including my favorite Dunkin Donuts. Oh well, take it down, instead we're getting a nice tower. I'm actually in the Grace Building, so that's how I have this view.
The pictures are about a week old. I'll try to take them at a certain time interval and see the progress.

-s

krulltime
July 1st, 2005, 06:10 PM
oh yeah thanks for the update photos! I wanna to see what was going on...

Fabrizio
July 2nd, 2005, 09:34 AM
Does anyone know if there will be retail along the 42nd street side of this building? That´s a long block and this building connects to the Conde Nast creating an all new modern street front..... will it be a nice walking experience?

pianoman11686
July 2nd, 2005, 07:11 PM
Fab: If memory serves me correctly, I don't think there will be any retail on the exterior of the building. You'd have to go inside to find some kind of retail. Also, is anyone else having trouble using the Cook + Fox site? I can't seem to get past the home page.

Fabrizio
July 3rd, 2005, 07:11 AM
I hope you´re wrong.

We´re often fooled by these beautiful renderings... and this building does look exceptionally beautiful. We make our own projections of what the building will be like in the end. We imagine an improved and interesting street life down below... a building that sustains the city´s street life....

But what will we the people actually be getting here.... a sterile Chinese wall from 6th to 7th? On 42nd?? If that´s the case, I´d rather have the junky shops and pizza-by-the-slice...

pianoman11686
July 3rd, 2005, 05:17 PM
Some images from Cook + Fox's website that I happened to come by somewhere else:

http://www.nyc-architecture.com/MID/157-3.jpg
http://www.nyc-architecture.com/MID/157-2.jpg

As you can see, the images don't suggest any kind of retail on the exterior of the building. I found this brief description of some of the building's public amenities from nyc-architecture.com:

With approximately three times the public circulation space required by an as-of-right high-rise office building, the Bank of America Tower will accommodate and contribute to the surrounding pedestrian and transit circulation. Public amenities will include widened sidewalks, public street furniture and an urban garden room located at 43rd Street and Sixth Avenue, which serves as an inviting extension of Bryant Park.

The design also incorporates a new glass-enclosed subway entrance with wider stairs and an elevator at 42nd Street on the southeast corner of Sixth Avenue. An underground pedestrian walkway on the north side of 42nd Street will link the B, D and F subway lines to the Times Square station and a new mid-block subway entrance on 42nd Street will connect to the below-grade walkway, in addition to a special through-block passageway featuring a "Broadway Wall of Fame" with interactive information kiosks.

And these are the reported dimensions of the building:

2,100,000 total square feet
1,100,000 square feet for Bank of America
1,000,000 square feet of office space above
50,000 square foot reconstructed Henry Miller Theater
945 feet tall, 54 stories

So, as you can pretty much tell from this, there won't be any retail in the building. I would never trade this, however, for what was there before. Pizza, McDonalds, Dunkin' Donuts, Peep Shows - all of those are available in the surrounding blocks. This still is a great building, and it's promising that they'll enhance some of the pedestrian infrastructure. And, most importantly, there will be some public access to the building. There's even talk of a possible rooftop garden, but nothing more specific than that - just talk. I hope this clarified some things.

Fabrizio
July 3rd, 2005, 06:01 PM
I can understand the 6th avenue side with out retail... serving as an entrance... but the 42nd street side is a long, long stretch. BTW, I´m skeptical about the public gardens thing... this stuff always starts out nicely but we´ll see how it evolves over the years.

No honestly it will be an improvement, but still, if you get enough of these buildings sitting side-by-side it can really deaden an area if there is no consideration for the street. Talk a walk down 52nd between 7th and 6th to see what I mean.

Anyway thanks for the renderings.

NoyokA
July 4th, 2005, 07:13 PM
There will be retail and restaurants located inside the building ala Citicorp which also has no outside retail. You can take my word for it or you can go back a number of pages where I already established this.

michelle1
July 4th, 2005, 09:30 PM
Stern, no doubt about that!

Alonzo-ny
July 21st, 2005, 08:19 PM
Wow this building is going so slow the thread was on the second page man! Anyway walked by the site today and saw some concrete being pumped over the wall, anyone with a view know how the foundation is coming. Man i wish this one would hurry up and get some steel!!!

BrooklynRider
July 22nd, 2005, 10:49 AM
There is going to be a entire cross block arcade between BoA and Conde Nast that with have retail. The Henry Miller Theater will eat up a portion of ground floor interior space, but one can oly guess at what the orientation and configuration will be there. The Sixth Ave facade in those renderings seems consistent with Sixth Avenue facades - cold "all-business" presence (lush vegetation or not). I'm sure Durst will build a solid retail strip on 43rd as well, both for the building tenants and to draw from the 43rd Street theaters.

kliq6
July 22nd, 2005, 04:17 PM
Steel will rise second week of August, from a source that is the know

NYguy
July 22nd, 2005, 08:30 PM
Steel will rise second week of August, from a source that is the know

I don't doubt it.

ablarc
July 23rd, 2005, 06:19 PM
I can understand the 6th avenue side with out retail... serving as an entrance... but the 42nd street side is a long, long stretch. BTW, I´m skeptical about the public gardens thing... this stuff always starts out nicely but we´ll see how it evolves over the years.

No honestly it will be an improvement, but still, if you get enough of these buildings sitting side-by-side it can really deaden an area if there is no consideration for the street. Talk a walk down 52nd between 7th and 6th to see what I mean.
Corporate architecture: often better than what it replaces, but rarely really good enough.

Fabrizio
July 24th, 2005, 05:11 AM
Corporate architecture: is the idea of street friendly corporate architecture a thing of the past? Will considerations for terrorism mean barriers and blank walls? Public gardens and retail arcades that are open to the public but soon become accessable only with a pass? Who knows.... just general musing here (perhaps more appropriate to another thread).... but maybe someday we will miss those small tumble-down buildings...

lofter1
July 24th, 2005, 06:08 AM
Corporate architecture: is the idea of street friendly corporate architecture a thing of the past? Will considerations for terrorism mean barriers and blank walls? Public gardens and retail arcades that are open to the public but soon become accessable only with a pass?
Say "Hello" to the New-Brutalism.

kz1000ps
July 24th, 2005, 02:56 PM
Today designers keep talking about transparency and glassiness while current events tell us to, well, build 200ft. high fortress walls to keep our investments safe. I said this before and I'll say it again, a lot of these new buildings look like slightly more stylized versions of what was built in the 1950s. The Bank of America tower's base is very open and airy, but something tells me, like Fabrizio said two posts above, access will not be granted to all who'd like to enter the building. So where does that leave us? With fairly pretty (if you like glass, metal and nothing else) designs that engage you from a safe distance only...pretty much the same damn thing that's been going on for at least half a century now. It's too bad that the point when we start trying to create truly permeable buildings AGAIN is the same point in time when we must also defend ourselves from God-knows-what. It seems Brutalism as a functioning element will be around for a while to come.

lofter1
July 24th, 2005, 03:20 PM
Today designers keep talking about transparency and glassiness while current events tell us to, well, build 200ft. high fortress walls to keep our investments safe.

Now it's all about the ILLUSION of openness.

Transparency becomes a facade that really separates and blocks what is within.

Access is only for those who have been cleared and entered into the data base.

NewYorkYankee
July 24th, 2005, 03:29 PM
I walked by this site yesterday morning. I really like the area.

kz1000ps
July 24th, 2005, 03:53 PM
Now it's all about the ILLUSION of openness.

That fits in very well with another adjective that we've been hearing a lot in recent years - ephemeral. Is it there or sorta not? Can we approach it or must we let it sit aloof on its figurative hill as if some foreboding mystical world lay behind all those layers of glass and metal?

Despite potential faults, I like the BOA Tower. I think it'll be quite striking, if rather massive.

lofter1
July 24th, 2005, 05:55 PM
Despite potential faults, I like the BOA Tower. I think it'll be quite striking, if rather massive.
I like the design of BofA...and think it will be great catty-corner from Bryant Park.

Maybe once BofA is finished the owner of the HBO building on the NE corner of 6th & 42nd will re-clad that sorry excuse for a building and transform it from a cheesy reflective box into something dymanic and interesting (about the only good thing it has going for it is that it creates a good reflection of the Grace Building on the 43rd St. side):

http://www.nyc-architecture.com/MID/MID78A.jpg

http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/attachment.php?attachmentid=935

Fabrizio
July 24th, 2005, 06:22 PM
That green glass IS a reclad. This was a perfectly fine, New Yorky looking, brick building with limestone detailing. Like other buildings in the area (Commodore hotel, Ambercrombie & Fitch building) it was "updated" with reflective glass. This re-clad says "poverty" to me.

ablarc
July 24th, 2005, 06:49 PM
That green glass IS a reclad. This was a perfectly fine, New Yorky looking, brick building with limestone detailing. Like other buildings in the area (Commodore hotel, Ambercrombie & Fitch building) it was "updated" with reflective glass. This re-clad says "poverty" to me.
Amen.

The trend goes back to recladding the Beaux-Arts New York Times Tower in Times Square in the insipid, "modern" marble clothes it has worn since the mid-Sixties. Thank God it's mostly covered with signs.

Alonzo-ny
July 24th, 2005, 10:50 PM
Thats great news by the look of the site i didnt expect steel for months but it will be rising before i leave YEA!

lofter1
July 24th, 2005, 11:38 PM
Amen.

The trend goes back to recladding the Beaux-Arts New York Times Tower in Times Square in the insipid, "modern" marble clothes it has worn since the mid-Sixties. Thank God it's mostly covered with signs.
This is probably the wrong thread, but whatever happened to the proposals to re-work the NY Times Tower? Now it seems that she is the ugly duckling in the middle of the party, dressed only in tattered rags (save for the great zipper sign).

michelle1
July 25th, 2005, 09:20 AM
Cover Story

Casting a Long Shadow
One of Manhattan's great family-owned commercial development firm is greening the city's skyline, making environmentally intelligent building strategies a competitive requirement.

by Phil Storey

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

One of the best-known landmarks of Times Square was installed in 1989: the National Debt Clock. The billboard-sized display shows passers-by the fast-growing national debt total, as well as "your family share." Seymour Durst, second-generation leader of the family real estate business known as the Durst Organization, installed the Debt Clock to point out that, in his words, "We have mortgaged our future and the future of our country because we refuse to face our fiscal responsibilities."

The Debt Clock was retired in 2000, when the federal government began paying down the national debt and the clock started running backwards (creating puzzlement more than awareness). But in July 2002, with the return of large federal budget deficits, Durst Organization co-presidents Douglas and Jonathan (Jody) Durst (Seymour's son and nephew, respectively) restarted the Debt Clock.

The mindfulness symbolized by the National Debt Clock is very much a part of how the Durst family of developers does business. The family's real estate legacy began in 1915 when Joseph Durst, the grandfather of Douglas and Jody, purchased an office building on 34th Street in Manhattan. In the decades that followed, the Durst Organization grew its holdings, eventually focused on commercial properties, and built a reputation for prudent management, stability and exceptional responsiveness to its tenants.

Greening the Skyline
During the past few years, in addition to managing its current properties, the Durst Organization has been leading the greening of New York City's skyline. The company's environmental leadership has been recognized by awards from the Natural Resources Defense Council (Forces for Nature Award, 2001), U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (Region 2 Environmental Quality Award, 2004) and Global Green (Design Award, 2004), among others.

The Durst Organization made its first big environmental splash in the mid 1990s, when they developed the first green-designed skyscraper in the United States: Four Times Square. The 48-story, 1.6-million-square-foot building was designed by Fox & Fowle Architects and built by Tishman Construction Corporation, and opened its doors in 2000. From its very inception, Four Times Square was an icon of environmentally intelligent design, with abundant fresh air and daylight throughout the building, fuel cells and photovoltaic (solar-energy-generating) panels, variable-speed drives for the pumps and fans, occupancy sensors and efficient lighting systems.

Success was far from obvious at the outset. It was the first commercial high-rise built in Midtown Manhattan in a decade. The $500-million project was speculative when the Durst Organization announced it in August 1996, with no "anchor tenant" lined up in advance. (Condé Nast quickly filled that role.) Then construction was marred by two fires and a scaffolding collapse. But the building has been a success, with satisfied tenants and high occupancy rates.

One of the original tenants is Innovest Strategic Value Advisors, an independent research firm specializing in non-traditional sources of investment risk and performance, including environmental and social factors. So moving into Four Times Square—and outfitting it with environmentally superior interior design and furnishings—was important to the company. "We wanted to walk the talk," says Hewson Baltzell, president of Innovest. And they've been pleased with the results. "People like the space. They like working here."

Advanced environmental design strategies are now part of all new Durst Organization projects. On Manhattan's west side, the Dursts are building a 37-story, 580-unit residential tower called the Helena, scheduled for completion later this year. The building was designed by Fox & Fowle, the architects of Four Times Square, to achieve a Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Gold rating from the US Green Building Council. The Helena's sustainable design features include photovoltaic panels, on-site wastewater treatment and reuse, plant-covered roofs to manage storm water and provide insulation, an efficient micro-turbine co-generation energy system, and the use of renewable materials such as bamboo and certified wood.

The few Durst activities outside Manhattan address ecological sustainability in a rural environment. The Durst Organization is developing a 975-home community and country club in Dutchess County, about 100 miles north of New York City, called the Hudson Valley Club. While the project is still in the planning and approval stage, the Durst Organization has hired the Rocky Mountain Institute's Green Development Services to advise the developers on issues of habitat, storm water, wastewater treatment and green building. And just a few miles away is New York state's largest organic farm, 500-acre McEnroe Organic Farm, which Douglas Durst has co-owned since 1987.

A New Icon
The Durst Organization's latest project, the Bank of America Tower at One Bryant Park, is by far its most ambitious, and raises the bar once again for high-rise commercial development. The project broke ground last year and is expected to open for occupancy in 2008. It is a 54-story crystalline structure designed by Cook+Fox Architects, on the same block as Four Times Square and overlooking both Times Square and Bryant Park. As the next generation of intelligent high-rise design, One Bryant Park includes a dazzling array of cutting-edge environmental features and strategies—the building will clean the air, treat and reuse storm water, and generate its energy on-site with an efficient CO-generation plant, among other things. (See inset, One Bryant Park.)

In addition to its environmental innovations, One Bryant Park will be a visual icon in the Midtown skyline. The design was inspired by elements of New York City's classic skyscrapers and by the New York Crystal Palace, the first glass-and-iron building in America, erected in Bryant Park in 1853. One Bryant Park's crystalline form spirals from its base to its highest tower, with glass curtain walls forming sculptural facets animated throughout the day and night by the movements of the sun and moon. And at the street level, the building engages with the pedestrian and traffic patterns of Times Square, offering attractive and convenient public spaces.

Constructing a Legacy
So what does all this add up to in New York City's cultural and commercial hotbed? Despite the Dursts' disappointment that Four Times Square was not emulated immediately, Manhattan's high-profile new development projects are now going green. (The Freedom Tower designed for the World Trade Center, new headquarters for both The New York Times and the Hearst Corporation, and Seven World Trade Center all have environmental design elements and LEED aspirations.) Architectural Record gives the Durst Organization much of the credit for this trend. It was the pioneering Four Times Square project, quickly followed by the US Green Building Council's release of LEED and the establishment of environmental guidelines for residential construction in lower Manhattan's Battery Park City, that convinced other developers to follow. According to one developer quoted in Architectural Record, "Before that, we said, 'Why bother?' No one understood green design of what its advantages were. But after Four Times Square, everyone thought, 'We can do that too.'"

Leading by example is exactly what the Dursts want to do, according to architect Bob Fox, whose work with the Dursts has included Four Times Square and the Helena as principal of Fox & Fowle, and One Bryant Park as principal of Cook+Fox. For the Dursts, Fox says, "this is about sharing and learning and allowing others to learn from what the Dursts spent a lot of money doing research on. They'd like other people to say, 'Hey, this is pretty good. Let me do it too.'" And now (finally) many of the Dursts' peers are doing it too.

green@work recently visited the Durst Organization and spoke with Douglas and Jody about their firm's leadership and their aspirations for the family business.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

green@work: Is there an inherent relationship between your concern for the environment and the fact that you are a family business?

Douglas Durst: We think so. We think that as a family business you're thinking about the future, and future generations. And that's what the environment is all about. It's thinking about saving resources for the future.

Jody Durst: And in addition to that, if you're looking back, we believe that our environmental consciousness came from our grandparents, so that they influenced our respective fathers, and in that way we share the common interest.

What were your first initiatives that really started to put this into practice?

JD: In the early 1990s we looked at the demand-side management aspects of our existing buildings, and we realized that there were a lot of products coming on the market that would help with energy consumption, and some of those retrofits that we did were energy-saving lamps and ballasts in the buildings, and energy-saving electric motors, and then those high-efficiency electric motors where appropriate were connected to variable-frequency motors running pumps and fans in the building. And then after that was accomplished, we looked at the building-management systems and retrofitted those.

So we were just finishing up on those demand-side management retrofitting programs when we had the opportunity to start designing Four Times Square, and we realized that we had just touched upon the energy aspects of our existing buildings, because in terms of designing the buildings for the actual occupants, that was a lost opportunity in an existing building. But we knew we had the opportunity with Four Times Square to consider the actual user in the space and to make that as environmentally friendly as possible.

Did you understand at that point what some of the inherent opportunities were?

DD: From an energy side we understood. But when we built Four Times Square we were really building a different type of building. We looked at all the systems, all the materials that go into buildings, trying to see what would be the best way to build it to make it as efficient as possible to the occupants.

When this building was built, the one we're in now (Durst Organization headquarters), back in 1984, we had just come through the oil shortage and the big push was energy efficiency. So they reduced the amount of outside air to the absolute minimum in the buildings of that generation (for more efficient heating and cooling). We've changed that since then. But the buildings built around this period were made very efficient energy-wise, but not efficient from the occupants' side. So we looked at the buildings not just from an energy point of view, but from the occupants' point of view.

When we started, we said, "How will we make this building different from others? How will we make it an efficient building for occupants and for the environment?" And so we had to examine everything that went into it.

JD: And the other two major team players-the architect and the construction manager-we were all very much aligned on the desire to do something that was sort of a quantum leap better than the conventional wisdom that goes into a building. And so it was really a great relationship and a great team.

DD: You really need that to do this. You need everybody on the team on board. The easiest way to build the building and the easiest way for the engineers to design it is to do what they did last time, because they know what works and they know how to do it. And the hardest thing and the most expensive part of the environmental building is the time and effort you have to put into designing it. Because each building is different. It serves a different client, a different location.

What kind of a payback horizon are you looking for when you put up something like Four Times Square or One Bryant Park, if there are going to be some higher initial costs?

DD: There are two types of extra things that we do. One is where we do something that's a demonstration. Like at Four Times Square and at the Helena we have photovoltaics (PVs). At One Bryant Park we're not going to have PVs. And with PVs, the payback today at Four Times Square is about 25-30 years and about a 20-year life expectancy on the products. The payback wasn't exactly there. But we wanted to demonstrate that it was a feasible technology, so there was absolutely no payback whatsoever. For the CO-generation plant at One Bryant Park, we have about a four- to five-year payback, which is about what we look for in a major investment.

Has Four Times Square lived up to your hopes?

DD: Absolutely. It's lived up to what we hoped it would be and it's been more efficient than we had anticipated. So we're very pleased with the way it's turned out.

JD: We're very pleased with how the building turned out, but we had anticipated that others would be faster to come along and embrace that technology.

DD: We thought that once we'd shown what could be done that others would naturally follow, but the next few buildings had very few environmental features. Now it's finally caught on. So it took a lot longer than we anticipated.

When you built Four Times Square LEED wasn't around. Has LEED changed the way you look at designing the building?

JD: I think it's really complimentary. To the extent that you have to fit a specific aspect of the building into one of their neat cubbyholes, there has to be a little bit of interpretation and back-and-forth with LEED in an effort to make sure that your design intent will qualify (for LEED points) if you do it in a certain manner.

What is the business case for developers to build green high-rise buildings?

DD: I think the business case is there in the sense that if they don't build—I like to call them intelligent buildings—their buildings will be obsolete before they're complete. So I think that's the choice.

JD: When you're going through the time, effort, energy and expense of building a new building, you absolutely want to build the best building you can at the time, because the next one that comes along has the advantage of time over the one that you just completed. So you absolutely have to build the best building you can with what you know at the time.

What would you like to see as your contribution to the commercial development industry?

DD: We'd like to think that we're setting an example that others will be forced to follow if they want to build a non-obsolete building.

JD: With the construction of Four Times Square, it became apparent that the energy-efficiency aspects in a building are only really four or five percent important to tenants in terms of bottom line. Eighty percent of their costs are in their personnel. Eighty percent versus four or five percent on the energy side. So if you can make personnel more productive and efficient, that goes directly to tenants' bottom lines. And while there may not be a complete or sincere understanding of that issue right now, I think that major corporations are becoming sensitive to employees wanting a healthy environment to work in and gaining an awareness that reducing absenteeism and improving productivity goes right to their bottom lines.

What do you hope the legacy of your generation will be to your children and grandchildren, in terms of the Durst Organization?

DD: A fully leased portfolio. And also innovations in the green building area.

JD: When Douglas and I started assuming more responsibility in taking over where the second generation left off, I think their legacy to us was a reputation of fair dealing and treating tenants with the realization that they're our bread and butter and we have to do what we can to accommodate them. That really was invaluable to Douglas and me in having a leg up on credibility, due to the second generation's reputation. We'd like to extend that to the following generation and perhaps improve on that reputation in the environmental world.


One Bryant Park
The latest and most ambitious project of the Durst Organization, a partnership with Bank of America, is the new Bank of America Tower at One Bryant Park. Located on the largest development site in Midtown Manhattan, on the west side of Sixth Avenue between 42nd and 43rd streets, the 2.2-million-square-foot building is scheduled to open in 2008. The Durst Organization and Bank of America's project team are led by Cook+Fox Architects and Tishman Construction Corporation.

Once it is completed, the Bank of America Tower will be the world's most environmentally responsible high-rise office building, and the first to strive for the US Green Building Council's Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Platinum designation.

Water and Air
Gray-water system will capture and re-use all rainwater and wastewater, saving millions of gallons of water annually.
Waterless urinals and low-flow fixtures will reduce the use of water resources.
Air filtration will remove 95 percent of particulates from outdoor air.
A pioneering filtered under-floor displacement air ventilation system and floor-by-floor air handling units will allow for individual floor control and more even, efficient and healthy heating and cooling.
Carbon dioxide monitors will automatically adjust the amount of fresh air when necessary.
Energy
High ceilings and translucent insulating glass in floor-to-ceiling windows will permit maximum daylight in interior spaces, optimal views and energy efficiency.
Advanced double-wall technology will provide remarkable views in and out of building, while dissipating the sun's heat .
A thermal storage system at cellar level will produce ice in the evening when electricity rates are lowest, to reduce peak daytime demand loads on the city.
Daylight dimming and LED lights will reduce electricity demand.
Green roofs will reduce urban heat island effect.
A state-of-the-art, on-site 5.1-megawatt combined-cycle CO-generation plant will provide clean, efficient power for the building's energy requirements.
Community
Approximately three times the required public circulation space will accommodate pedestrian and transit circulation.
There will be widened sidewalks, public street furniture and an urban garden room located at 43rd Street and Sixth Avenue.
An underground pedestrian walkway on the north side of 42nd Street will link the B, D and F subway lines to the Times Square station, and a new mid-block subway entrance on 42nd Street will connect to the below-grade walkway.
Cook+Fox Architects will restore and reconstruct the historic Henry Miller Theater on the site, to create a state-of-the-art Broadway playhouse with the intimacy and proportions of the original 1918 Allen, Ingalls & Hoffman Theater.

Alonzo-ny
July 25th, 2005, 08:54 PM
Am I right in thinking this is the tallest building u/c in new york since the world trade center

Alonzo-ny
July 25th, 2005, 09:32 PM
Also im a little confused about what the official height will be. Emporis gives the 945ft fugure but also says the 1200ft spire is architectural meaning its official height should be 1200ft ala petronas towers and would mean new york finally getting another 1000fter

BrooklynRider
July 26th, 2005, 11:10 AM
Am I right in thinking this is the tallest building u/c in new york since the world trade center

Yes.

Johnnyboy
July 27th, 2005, 10:57 PM
yesterday i was walking to grand central from time square when i passed by the site and saw a guy looking into the site though an area where a piece of board was missing. i walked to see inside and had a clear view of a very active extremely deep site. i never realized how deep it was. it was as deep as the twin tower footprints. from what i saw, the wall of the underground area is if not finished, very close to finish. i was surplise to see the activity on the site. this area is truly under construction.

Arch
August 8th, 2005, 08:55 PM
I walked by the site of BoA this morning and there was a crane in the hole. looks like a street crane was put in the hole over the weekend and I could see large segments of what appears to be a tower crane being moved onto the site.

Looks like this is going to start moving very shortly.

Sorry no pictures.

Gulcrapek
August 8th, 2005, 10:05 PM
I saw them too. I have a picture of a crane... tomorrow.

ld876
August 9th, 2005, 11:51 AM
I actually work in 1500 broadway (the RCA building one block north of the conde nast building) on the 26th floor. we have the whole floor, so one of the walls of windows overlooking the BoA site. the pit is really deep, like stated before. some concrete work is done for about half the floor of the site, with the other half still dirt, with the huge pile of rubble/rock/dirt in the eastern corner. A few of the support feet have been placed, but nothing more vertical than a foot or two. They've applied some steal supports up against the eastern wall...I assume they just supporting it until the concrete groundwork gets all the way over to that wall. I'll take some pics on my phone, see if they come out, otherwise, I will try to remember to bring the digi cam tomorrow.

Alonzo-ny
August 9th, 2005, 09:04 PM
Almost time for this to start moving, cant wait!

ld876
August 10th, 2005, 12:50 PM
Ok, my bad, I don't pay for Sprint Vision service, so I can't get the pics of my phone without ridiculous charges, but heres an update nonetheless...there is a moveable crane down there now today and pieces for the 'climbing' cranes for vertical contruction (like on the Orion & NY Times tower). They've really cranked out a lot in the last few days.

NoyokA
August 10th, 2005, 12:52 PM
Ok, my bad, I don't pay for Sprint Vision service, so I can't get the pics of my phone without ridiculous charges, but heres an update nonetheless...there is a moveable crane down there now today and pieces for the 'climbing' cranes for vertical contruction (like on the Orion & NY Times tower). They've really cranked out a lot in the last few days.

I could come up and take pictures....

Arch
August 10th, 2005, 09:59 PM
got a couple shots today. No need to come up stern.

NYguy
August 11th, 2005, 08:51 AM
I knew this tower would start rising sooner rather than later. I put it just months behind the Times Tower....

ld876
August 11th, 2005, 02:04 PM
Good timing with the pics, I was just getting ready to post that the have the crane up now, cab and everything.

NoyokA
August 12th, 2005, 12:34 PM
I absolutely love the look of exposed concrete that shows the texture of the wood boards that shored it up. I’m glad it’ll be covered up but I wish more architects would institute the technique that Le Corbusier began.

jp1
August 12th, 2005, 02:58 PM
THis is totally off topic, but.....

http://www.snowbird.com/lodging/clifflodge/details.html
The Cliff Lodge at Snowbid Ski resort in Utah is almost completely constructed using wood-formed concrete, as you mentioned. just FYI.

sfenn1117
August 20th, 2005, 10:14 PM
Taken today, can't wait to see it rise, midtowns second tallest tower (Or first, if you'd like it to be), it's gearing up, the crane is huge!

http://tinypic.com/avmtli.jpg
http://tinypic.com/avmu6b.jpg
http://tinypic.com/avmvqo.jpg

Just think....it'll rise WELL over (nearly 150 feet) Conde Nast!
http://tinypic.com/avmw46.jpg

macreator
August 20th, 2005, 11:30 PM
I can't wait to see this baby rise! That crane does look spectacularly big. I do feel bad though for all of the poor Conde Nast people who are about to lose their views but I suppose that's the price of progress. Will there be a glass enclosed atrium between the two buildings. I figure there will probably be some connection considering the BoA building is another Durst property.

Jake
August 20th, 2005, 11:38 PM
Hehe, the value of that billboard just went down 90% since noone will see it now.

Finally some buildings without the erectile dysfunctions of dowtown.

lofter1
August 21st, 2005, 01:45 AM
Hehe, the value of that billboard just went down 90% since noone will see it now.
The only thing being advertised on that side is 4 Times Square -- the Conde Nast building itself. (And I don't know that anything else has ever been advertised on the east sign.)

Does anyone know the distance between the closest point of the Conde Nast tower and the BofA tower? It is a huge block, so the effect from inside the buildings could be the same as looking from one tower to another across a fairly wide avenue.

pianoman11686
August 21st, 2005, 02:05 AM
All I could find about the space between the buildings is this: (from the Durst website)

Through-block public passageway connecting 42 nd and 43 rd Streets featuring Broadway-inspired programming and attractions, with multiple, interactive information kiosks to create a uniquely animated experience

As you can tell from this image, the two buildings will be nearly touching each other, at least for the lower levels. The space won't be nearly as wide as a one-way cross street, not to mention an avenue:

http://www.durst.org/prop/images/1bp/hires/3.jpg

lofter1
August 21st, 2005, 02:19 AM
It appears that the buildings actually join only up to the first six floors (the "through-block passageway" area and other associated uses).

As to the towers: It looks to me like approximately the middle 1/3 of the block will not be occupied by towers, so the distance between the two will be quite substantial.

macreator
August 21st, 2005, 01:31 PM
The distance between the towers will indeed be subtantial enough not to block anyone's views, and to give us two distinctly different towers rather than a full block wall, which I was afraid might happen.

What appears to be the first six floors of One Bryant Park will abut the 4 Times Square (The Conde Nast Building) with what I believe will be the thru-block public walkway/atrium. Above the 6 floor "pedestal"/"base" will rise the tower portion of the building leaving the far west portion of the BoA site empty above the 6th floor.

This is great news for me as I am happy we will still be able to see the Eastern-face of 4 Times Square, and that from the south and the north, the two buildings will clearly be different and unique rather than one large monolith like 1 Penn Plaza.

Here are some images to illustrate the distance between 4 Times Square and One Bryant Park.

http://www.nycityscape.com/images/onebryantpark/northward.jpg

A look northward at the two buildings

http://www.nycityscape.com/images/onebryantpark/southeast.jpg

Looking southeast

http://www.nycityscape.com/images/onebryantpark/thesouth.jpg

Looking South

http://www.nycityscape.com/images/onebryantpark/alone.jpg

The tower alone with its base

Fabrizio
August 21st, 2005, 01:40 PM
It´s going to be interesting to see the spires of the two buildings "against" one another from various view points... they should have a beautiful interplay.

pianoman11686
August 21st, 2005, 03:01 PM
Don't get me wrong, I absolutely love the building, and can't wait to see its effect on the skyline. But does anyone else think the street level entrance and signage are a little too, uh, Park Avenue retro?

RJW
August 21st, 2005, 03:29 PM
Don't get me wrong, I absolutely love the building, and can't wait to see its effect on the skyline. But does anyone else think the street level entrance and signage are a little too, uh, Park Avenue retro?

I agree it looks retro but like it all the same. Its clean, sleek modernistic tendencies make me think of Lever House.

sfenn1117
August 21st, 2005, 03:31 PM
Wow, never saw those renderings before, this thing really will be a peak on the skyline.....finally! I really underestimated the height of a 945 foot tall building.

Gulcrapek
August 21st, 2005, 07:24 PM
Another tower crane is on its way up...

BrooklynRider
August 21st, 2005, 07:44 PM
But does anyone else think the street level entrance and signage are a little too, uh, Park Avenue retro?

I think it maintains the Sixth Ave corporate aesthetic.

Bravo to Durst for bringing another great building to fruition.

kliq6
August 22nd, 2005, 11:51 AM
This completes Sixth Ave from 42nd to 59th street in a great way

Clarknt67
August 23rd, 2005, 04:47 PM
Don't get me wrong, I absolutely love the building, and can't wait to see its effect on the skyline. But does anyone else think the street level entrance and signage are a little too, uh, Park Avenue retro?


Park Avenue retro? Do you mean like "That Girl" era New York? I see it, it doesn't bother me though. It is kinda mod. I hope they play Burt Bacharach in the lobby.

londonlawyer
August 23rd, 2005, 04:55 PM
This completes Sixth Ave from 42nd to 59th street in a great way

By and large, but there's still one or two small crap buildings on the east side of 6th near 47th Street.

BrooklynRider
August 23rd, 2005, 05:10 PM
My current view of the world is: If it has a Duane Reade, it is a crap building.

TLOZ Link5
August 23rd, 2005, 05:15 PM
My current view of the world is: If it has a Duane Reade, it is a crap building.

The Helmsley Building has a Duane Reade in it :P

londonlawyer
August 23rd, 2005, 05:22 PM
By the way, the re-skin of the Hippodrome is a MASSIVE improvement over the tired, ragged, old facade.

Fabrizio
August 23rd, 2005, 05:54 PM
If we want to get technical: the horizontal ribbed canopy and free-standing signage of this building is a homage to the "moderne" style.... late art-deco... late 30's to early 50's. Over at the Time Warner you'll also see a free-standing metal sign ( theTWC base is sort of moderne revisited ). Rockefeller Center had a lot of those ribbed canopies...some were removed in the 70's... Radio City just up the street from the Bryant Park building still has it's ribbed canopy (outlined in neon.) So, if anything, I think the idea here is to have us make a connection with the Rockefeller Center complex.

pianoman11686
August 23rd, 2005, 06:56 PM
Park Avenue retro? Do you mean like "That Girl" era New York? I see it, it doesn't bother me though. It is kinda mod. I hope they play Burt Bacharach in the lobby.

No, actually, that's probably way before I was born. I just recognized a less modern look in the building's entrance, something like an homage to the corporate headquarters built along Park Avenue in the 50's and 60's. I think Fabrizio summed it up pretty well.

Londonlawyer: I know exactly which buildings you're talking about. They're right at the end of the Diamond District (47th between 5th & 6th), which has its share of trash buildings too. I think 47th in general has been somewhat lagging in high-quality development. It's also dreadful as you walk west towards Times Square. As for the Hippodrome facade, I took a pic today and will post it in the appropriate thread. Look for an update later tonight.

BrooklynRider: I think your comment effectively classifies one-third of all buildings in New York as crap. While obviously not entirely true, there are a lot, too many in fact, buildings below ten stories that are awfully maintained and house a Duane Reade. The one that most readily comes to mind is the L-shaped building at the northwest corner of 42nd & 8th.
In addition to the Helmsley, I believe there is a Duane Reade in the Woolworth Building as well, though I may be wrong on that one.

londonlawyer
August 23rd, 2005, 07:49 PM
Re: Pianoman's reply regarding crappy buildings on 47th and 6th.

I agree, Mr. Joel. (I assume Pianoman refers to Christie's ex-husband, Billy.) Those buildings, like a lot of other crap in the city, will improve one day.

pianoman11686
August 23rd, 2005, 09:56 PM
Hi, Londonlawyer. You make the assumption about my name that most people make. While the term "pianoman" is almost inseparable from Billy Joel, it is relevant toward me. I started taking piano lessons when I was 5, and got pretty advanced until high school, when I stopped for a while. I'm back into it now for the time being. So, there you go.

To all other forumers: Sorry for getting off topic. Here are fresh construction pics from today (8/23). Two cranes are up, and the site is very busy. There are a few pretty nice views of the site where boarding has been taken down. I talked to a construction worker, and he told me so far that only "a few pieces" of steel have arrived. He said he didn't know when the first big shipment was scheduled to come in. Now, the exciting part:

http://images.snapfish.com/3447%3A66723232%7Ffp63%3Dot%3E234%3A%3D937%3D37%3B %3DXROQDF%3E2323%3A59827%3B4%3Bot1lsi

http://images.snapfish.com/3447%3A66723232%7Ffp63%3Dot%3E234%3A%3D937%3D37%3B %3DXROQDF%3E2323%3A5982724%3Bot1lsi

http://images.snapfish.com/3447%3A66723232%7Ffp63%3Dot%3E234%3A%3D937%3D37%3B %3DXROQDF%3E2323%3A59827%3B55ot1lsi

http://images.snapfish.com/3447%3A66723232%7Ffp63%3Dot%3E234%3A%3D937%3D37%3B %3DXROQDF%3E2323%3A59827%3B5%3Aot1lsi

http://images.snapfish.com/3447%3A66723232%7Ffp54%3Dot%3E234%3A%3D937%3D37%3B %3DXROQDF%3E2323%3A59827%3B66ot1lsi

lofter1
August 26th, 2005, 02:59 AM
This might want to be in the "news" forum, but here it is anyways:

Bank of America Becomes Fourth Bank to Admit Ties to Slavery

released on 08/25/05 at 08:37:03

Saadiq Mance
Emerging Minds News

Chicago (emergingminds.org) - In a report released Wednesday, the Charlotte, N.C.-based Bank of America (NYSE: BAC) became the fourth bank in the United States to disclose links to slavery. The admission comes as a result of a 2002 Chicago law that any company doing business with the city must reveal past slavery ties.

However, according to the Chicago Sun Times, Bank of America claims that its predecessor banks never held slaves and they could not find a case where they made any profits from slaves.

As a result, Bank of America pledged only $5 million over a three-year period for institutions and programs involved in preserving African-American history. In addition, Bank of America said that the $5 million offer will build on existing commitments, inferring that no new initiates will be started.

Kenneth D. Lewis, the Chairman and CEO of Bank of America, makes an annual salary of $7.21 million. Additionally, as of June 30 2005 Bank of America reported assets of $1.25 trillion and a quarterly net income of $4.30 billion. With Bank of America's extraordinary income statement and balance sheet that would never have been possible without the forced servitude of Africans, Bank of America’s $5 million dollar pledge has been received by the Black community as insulting and pathetic.

The Chicago Sun Times reports that Alderwoman Dorothy Tillman of Chicago, who introduced the Chicago legislation for companies to disclose ties to slavery, said that the report was "disingenuous" and that she had evidence that Bank of America predecessor Providence Bank engaged in the slave trade, including the manufacture of leg irons. Tillman also said that the bank lied about past ties to slavery in an affidavit submitted in connection with its role as senior manager of a $500 million city refinancing deal.

Bank of America’s admission of guilt to ties with slavery comes in the wake of Wachovia Corporations admission of guilt for building its company from money made from the forced servitude of Africans that were brutally brainwashed after they were kidnapped from their native lands. Wachovia reported assets of $511.8 billion as of June 30 2005 and in 2004 made $25 billion in community loans and investments to revitalize neighborhoods, and donated more than $82 million to charities.

As a result of Wachovia’s admission of guilt for slavery the company told the press that it plans to distribute only $10 million over a five year period through a string of new and enhanced partnerships with at least two of the "good ol’ boys" of civil rights pacifiers, the United Negro College Fund and the NAACP.

Wachovia and now Bank of America’s “greasing” of the hands of the “safe” Black organizations without any accountability are just the latest in a string of corporations who have dictated to the Black community how they will distribute money pledged in the name of repairing past wrongs due to slavery in the United States of America. Within the last 2 years, there have been more than half a billion dollars promised by private corporations without any accountability.

Other similar admissions and / or monetary pledges have been made by J.P. Morgan Chase Bank, American General, Nationwide Life Insurance, and Lehman Brothers. None of which have been taken to task by America’s Black Community.

ablarc
August 26th, 2005, 09:09 AM
Interesting read, Lofter, though...


This might want to be in the "news" forum, but here it is anyways:
...is this a news story or an editorial?

TonyO
August 26th, 2005, 02:05 PM
The article doesnt belong in this thread. Go back far enough and every entity or person has embarrassing ties.

sfenn1117
August 26th, 2005, 02:43 PM
Give me a freakin break. I'm sorry, I mean slavery was/is a terrible thing in our history, but GET OVER IT! It was common practice at the time, no matter how wrong it was. It's ridiculous to have to pay reparations.

TallGuy
August 26th, 2005, 03:06 PM
The banks ties to slavery are ridiculously tenous. Bank of America was founded by an Italian immigrant in San Francisco after the Civil War. They are aplogizing for the actions of another bank they later aquired.

BrooklynRider
August 26th, 2005, 03:11 PM
And yet, aren't we really all enslaved by the banking and financial institutions of the world?

Now, back to the building....

NYatKNIGHT
August 26th, 2005, 03:27 PM
If they had slaves building the tower...now that would be a story.

ZippyTheChimp
August 26th, 2005, 03:41 PM
Funny how so many people get their short hairs twisted when this stuff comes out. I immediately thought about the latest run of BoA Tv ads, the friendly bank ones where they manage to get in the word America as many times as possible.


It was common practice at the time,Exactly where was it common practice in the 19th century.

TallGuy
August 26th, 2005, 03:52 PM
Funny how so many people get their short hairs twisted when this stuff comes out. I immediately thought about the latest run of BoA Tv ads, the friendly bank ones where they manage to get in the word America as many times as possible.

Exactly where was it common practice in the 19th century.

Russia until the 1850's, Africa, the Southern U.S., Cuba and other Caribbean Islands, parts of Asia, Africa......

ZippyTheChimp
August 26th, 2005, 03:57 PM
The Southern US?

No such country.

Now what is different about 19th century America as compared to Russia, and the countries in the other places you mentioned?

TallGuy
August 26th, 2005, 04:16 PM
The Southern US?

No such country.

Now what is different about 19th century America as compared to Russia, and the countries in the other places you mentioned?


The Confederate States of America were as valid a functioning 'country' as were the 13 colonies from 1776 until the treaty ending the Revolutionary War with Britain. They lost the war, that's all. But the fact that the states had to be readmitted to the Union is defacto recognition of their brief independance. Slave holding Texas was also briefly an independant republic. (I majored in Antebellum History and minored in Russian history, so yes, I understand the differences)

BTW, I am a CT native, live in the Confederate capital of Richmond, and spent yesterday in Manhattan, part of thetime which I visited the BOA site and NYT site.

Sorry to get off topic. This era is fascinates me as do skyscapers and architecture and they just happened to intersect.

ZippyTheChimp
August 26th, 2005, 04:32 PM
At the time of the formation of the U.S. government as a republic, slavery was not a common practice among other "so enlightened" world governments. Many people today are surprised that slavery was not government policy in the U.K. - hence statements like "it was commion practice."

TallGuy
August 26th, 2005, 04:39 PM
At the time of the formation of the U.S. government as a republic, slavery was not a common practice among other "so enlightened" world governments. Many people today are surprised that slavery was not government policy in the U.K. - hence statements like "it was commion practice."


The British only abolished it in the 1820's, not even 40 years before the end of the Civil War. Many (relatively) enlightened civilizations had slaves: The Romans, The Greeks, etc. Since women only got the right to vote in the 1920's should 50.5% of our population sue the other 49.5%? The term enlightened is relevent. Come back in 200 years and see how much of our behavior we take for granted today will seem savage.

sfenn1117
August 26th, 2005, 04:44 PM
Exactly where was it common practice in the 19th century.

The southern half of the United States, the part then controlled by Democrats. Yet somehow blacks kiss Democrats ass in todays world

Sorry to get so off topic this is my last post on this issue.

NYatKNIGHT
August 26th, 2005, 04:47 PM
Because Democrats were the ones who eventually embraced civil rights.

The building should be at street level before long, no?

ZippyTheChimp
August 26th, 2005, 04:54 PM
The southern half of the United States, the part then controlled by Democrats. Yet somehow blacks kiss Democrats ass in todays worldNow I understand why your short hairs are twisted.

sfenn1117
August 26th, 2005, 05:17 PM
Because Democrats were the ones who eventually embraced civil rights.

The building should be at street level before long, no?

Should be, it wasn't long after the crane arrived at NY Times that it rose above the street.

kliq6
August 26th, 2005, 05:45 PM
Yes I forgot the area on 47th, where the Mcd's is correct?

BrooklynRider
August 26th, 2005, 06:55 PM
A want a little Republican slave. A wench. One wearing a peach colored Chanel suit and a string of pearls. I want her in whore red lip stick with a tight little bun. I want to torture her by making her shop at Payless shoes and drink cheap Georgi Vodka martinis. I want to hold onto her for a year or to, then I'll trade her in, at cost, for a house-broken Democrat.

Jake
August 26th, 2005, 07:36 PM
So they'll probably halt the construction now that this "news" is out? Stuff always gets delayed over these retarded things. And BTW, I do believe that the current political parties were completely different from the ones back then and the terms Republican and Democrat hold no specific idea in themselves when applied to the history of the whole party.

lofter1
August 26th, 2005, 09:40 PM
A want a little Republican slave. A wench ... I'll trade her in, at cost, for a house-broken Democrat.
LMAO. Thank you for that, BR.

I kind of hoped that my off-topic post would get a few people riled up. But who knew it would work this well??

BTW: I walked by today and those cranes look great. BofA will be rising soon.

RJW
August 26th, 2005, 11:07 PM
So they'll probably halt the construction now that this "news" is out? Stuff always gets delayed over these retarded things. And BTW, I do believe that the current political parties were completely different from the ones back then and the terms Republican and Democrat hold no specific idea in themselves when applied to the history of the whole party.

Exactly so, - in fact, one could argue they are nearly the mirror opposites of themselves today.

RJW
August 26th, 2005, 11:20 PM
The southern half of the United States, the part then controlled by Democrats. Yet somehow blacks kiss Democrats ass in todays world

The Democrats are not the party whose ass they kiss but rather the party in which they hold real power - the party in which they have taken a seat at the table - the party which is open to their concerns - the party which does not grudgingly only welcome those African Americans that have crossed the threshold of top 5%.

redhot00
August 27th, 2005, 12:20 AM
And BTW, I do believe that the current political parties were completely different from the ones back then and the terms Republican and Democrat hold no specific idea in themselves when applied to the history of the whole party.

To be perfectly honest is there really much of a difference between the two parties today? These days the Bushes are buddies with the Clintons so called conservatives latching on to liberal ideas. The only difference between a Repbublican politician and a Democrat one is that one wears a blue tie and one wears a red one. In the end they are all slimy, cheating and lying lowlifes, aren't they?

Anyway, this is way off topic for this thread. Tomorrow I'm going to go into the Verizon building at 41st and Sixth and head up to a high floor to get some pics of the BoA site. I know where I can get my hands on a Verizon employee ID, so getting past security shouldn't be a problem.

Jake
August 27th, 2005, 11:32 AM
I know where I can get my hands on a Verizon employee ID, so getting past security shouldn't be a problem. August 26th, 2005 10:20 PM
lol, that sounds kinda scary but I know exaclty what you mean. At the risk of going a little off topic again I have to say that some buildings in NY have ridiculous security. Some of them any idiot can walk in as long as they have a "reason" which can be bs. I have to say 55 Water Str has the strictest security I have ever seen in NYC.

NYguy
August 28th, 2005, 11:56 AM
NY skyscraper history in the making (I don't remember a more exciting time for New York skyscraper watchers)...

August 27, 2005


http://www.pbase.com/nyguy/image/48327631/large.jpg


http://www.pbase.com/nyguy/image/48327634/large.jpg


http://www.pbase.com/nyguy/image/48327645/large.jpg


http://www.pbase.com/nyguy/image/48327649/large.jpg


http://www.pbase.com/nyguy/image/48327650/large.jpg


http://www.pbase.com/nyguy/image/48327655/large.jpg


Just keep in mind that this new skyscraper will tower beyond the Conde Naste and its antenna...

http://www.pbase.com/nyguy/image/48327680/large.jpg


http://www.pbase.com/nyguy/image/48327693/large.jpg


http://www.pbase.com/nyguy/image/48327699/large.jpg

Johnnyboy
August 28th, 2005, 12:24 PM
this is going to be the second tallest in NYC right?

NYguy
August 28th, 2005, 12:33 PM
this is going to be the second tallest in NYC right?


At least until Freedom Tower passes either the ESB or the BOA...

TomAuch
August 28th, 2005, 03:46 PM
The southern half of the United States, the part then controlled by Democrats. Yet somehow blacks kiss Democrats ass in todays world

Sorry to get so off topic this is my last post on this issue.

Many of those Democrats defected to the GOP after the Civil Rights Act was signed. Strom Thurmond, Trent Lott, and Jesse Helms, just to name a few. Outside of their heroic stand for the Union and for Abolitionists during the Civil War, the Republicans sold blacks out after the 1876 election. Rutherford Hayes ended up winning electoral votes of Florida, South Carolina, and Louisiana after striking a deal with Southern Democrats (who could have supported Samuel Tilden, who won the popular vote.) The Southern Dems would support Hayes' right to have those state's Electoral Votes, on the condition that Hayes withdraw the last remaining Union troops in the South and end Reconstruction, as well as adopt a laissez-faire stance towards civil rights for blacks.

Edward
August 29th, 2005, 12:30 AM
The construction site of the Bank of America Tower (http://www.wirednewyork.com/1bryant_park.htm). 27 August 2005.

http://www.wirednewyork.com/real_estate/one_bryant/one_bryant_park1.jpg (http://www.wirednewyork.com/1bryant_park.htm)



http://www.wirednewyork.com/real_estate/one_bryant/one_bryant_park2.jpg (http://www.wirednewyork.com/1bryant_park.htm)



http://www.wirednewyork.com/real_estate/one_bryant/one_bryant_park3.jpg (http://www.wirednewyork.com/1bryant_park.htm)

lofter1
August 29th, 2005, 02:04 AM
Hmmmm ... I though BofA was going to do something with the subway entrance at this corner. But in these photos the foundation looks like solid concrete all the way around. So much for public amenites.

ZippyTheChimp
August 29th, 2005, 08:09 AM
^
The subway stairs at 42nd and 6th are outside the property (foundation)line. As described earlier in this thread, there will be a glass entry pavilion within the property line at the northwest corner of Sixth and 42ndStreet. That would be at street level within the property line. It would be nice if the stairs were removed from the sidewalk, but it was also mentioned that the 42nd st sidewalk is to be widened by 5 feet.

The new underground passageway connecting 6th Ave and TS subways will get a new stairway entrance at midblock, at the arcade connecting to W43rd. Earlier photos showed digging outside the foundation at this area.

lugdus
September 2nd, 2005, 09:42 AM
^
The subway stairs at 42nd and 6th are outside the property (foundation)line. As described earlier in this thread, there will be a glass entry pavilion within the property line at the northwest corner of Sixth and 42ndStreet. That would be at street level within the property line. It would be nice if the stairs were removed from the sidewalk, but it was also mentioned that the 42nd st sidewalk is to be widened by 5 feet.

The new underground passageway connecting 6th Ave and TS subways will get a new stairway entrance at midblock, at the arcade connecting to W43rd. Earlier photos showed digging outside the foundation at this area.

The stairs are within the property line and the lobby extends past them to the north

ZippyTheChimp
September 2nd, 2005, 09:37 PM
^
It's difficult to tell from the two renderings...
http://durst.org/prop/images/1bp/print/2.jpg
http://durst.org/prop/images/1bp/print/3.jpg
but is the stairway shed within the building overhang?

If it is, how is the stairway going to get past the foundation wall, which appears complete to street level in this photo. (http://www.wirednewyork.com/real_estate/one_bryant/one_bryant_park2.jpg)

lofter1
September 2nd, 2005, 09:50 PM
... is the stairway shed within the building overhang?

If it is, how is the stairway going to get past the foundation wall, which appears complete to street level in this photo. (http://www.wirednewyork.com/real_estate/one_bryant/one_bryant_park2.jpg)
That "stairway shed" looks like it will be in the same place as before: in the middle of the sidewalk (and that foundation wall is definitely solid concrete with no access to the subway station at the corner of 6th & 42nd).

Seems crazy that part of the deal for the BofA tower didn't include a more accessible entrance on this corner (ala the new entrances at 42nd / 7th that are incorporated into the new buildings).

It has been mentioned that there will be an stairway and entrance at mid-block. Does anyone know if this will give access to the Times Square station as well as the Bryant Park / 6th Ave. station?

ZippyTheChimp
September 3rd, 2005, 08:32 AM
The midblock stairway connects to the passageway, so it should also connect to the TS subway. That would be logical, but wait - the MTA is involved here.

Assuming there will be some sort of perimeter security, the sidewalk stairway might be a good idea - a "natural" barrier between the street and the building.

lugdus
September 3rd, 2005, 09:58 AM
The building at 42nd/7 is built to the property line. 1BP sets back from Sixth Avenue thus if the building were built full, the entrance would be with in the building. The subway connection does go from Sixth to Seventh Avenue Subway Stations with an entrance at the through block passage way. The through block passage way connects the streets between 42nd and 43rd.

macreator
September 3rd, 2005, 11:34 AM
I think BoA, for security reasons of being a financial firm and therefore a possible target, probably would prefer to have the sidewalk shed entrance rather than an entrance built into the building either at the corner or within the new thru-block passageway they're building.

lofter1
September 3rd, 2005, 12:36 PM
lugdus: thanks for that info and image.

Do you have a link where that image and other info is available?

lofter1
September 3rd, 2005, 12:39 PM
I found this at http://www.bankofamerica.com/newsroom/press/press.cfm?PressID=press.20040802.01.htm

Public Amenities

With approximately three times the public circulation space required by an as-of-right high-rise office building, the Bank of America Tower will accommodate and contribute to the surrounding pedestrian and transit circulation. Public amenities will include widened sidewalks, public street furniture and an urban garden room located at 43rd Street and Sixth Avenue, which serves as an inviting extension of Bryant Park.

The design also incorporates a new glass-enclosed subway entrance with wider stairs and an elevator at 42nd Street on the southeast corner of Sixth Avenue. An underground pedestrian walkway on the north side of 42nd Street will link the B, D and F subway lines to the Times Square station and a new mid-block subway entrance on 42nd Street will connect to the below-grade walkway, in addition to a special through-block passageway featuring a "Broadway Wall of Fame" with interactive information kiosks.

Dagrecco82
September 10th, 2005, 09:54 PM
Hey guys. I found this at emporis.com
I apologize if it's been posted before, anyhow, it's interesting
to look at anyway.

macreator
September 11th, 2005, 01:40 AM
Those sketeches almost make it looks like the old Libeskind World Trade Center design.

PHLguy
September 11th, 2005, 02:22 AM
Yes please never insult BOA like that again! Ever! ;)

Jake
September 11th, 2005, 01:05 PM
It even has a wind turbine....I see a lawsuit.

December 2005 --->
"Liebeskind wins case over stolen BOA tower design, construction halts"

lofter1
September 11th, 2005, 01:24 PM
The subway connection does go from Sixth to Seventh Avenue Subway Stations with an entrance at the through block passage way. The through block passage way connects the streets between 42nd and 43rd.

lugdus: Do you have a link to where the original of this image can be found...

http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/attachment.php?attachmentid=1116

lofter1
September 17th, 2005, 10:34 PM
I walked by this site today and the first steel has risen above the street level at the far northwest corner (between the Henry Miller Theatre facade and the Conde Nast building).

I wouldn't be surprised if by the end of September that whole end of the building is rising above the street.

The eastern half of the site is still in the process of having the first concrete pad poured. The area that abuts Sixth Avenue is still dirt.

Arch
September 23rd, 2005, 09:08 PM
lofter1 - you may be right. I stuck my head thru a door on 42nd street yesterday and got this shot before being kicked out.

lofter1
September 23rd, 2005, 09:50 PM
^ I might have been too optimistic when I said the end of September. There's only one week to go and your photo pretty much shows what I saw last week.

But maybe these guys will kick butt this week and get some hard steel up in the air.

michelle1
September 23rd, 2005, 09:57 PM
Yeah, good shot, but only one worker there

NoyokA
September 23rd, 2005, 10:03 PM
They should've taken the approach the NYTIMES Tower did. Where they finished excavations on the tower portion first so that the tower could rise which logically takes longer to finish and they could build the lowrise section later.

Phentente
September 28th, 2005, 03:22 PM
Hi there,

I haven't posted in a while, but I've been hoping for update pics on this thread and I haven't seen too many recent ones. Believe it or not my mom has reported more on the progress of this building than this site has (she works in Times Sq. Tower, but knows nothing about contruction). I would post myself but I'm at college in Pittsburgh.

Full-time New Yorkers get out there! Supposedly there is quite a bit more steel activity than before.
Thanx

lofter1
September 28th, 2005, 07:42 PM
No pics, but I walked by the site late this afternoon and indeed steel has risen above street level (albeit just a foot or two above) on pretty much the entire western end of the building. The concrete is still being poured for the slab on the eastern end of the site, so it's be a while before steel starts to rise there.

lofter1
October 1st, 2005, 10:47 PM
LAte this Saturday afternoon I was able to get inside the construction fence and get a closer look at the progress on the west end of the site (in the area behind the facade of the Henry Miller Theatre).

Steel columns have risen above street level and are now to the top of the 2nd floor abutting the Conde Nast Tower. Steel columns have also started to rise just "inside" the Miller facade.

The major work has been the steel for the new theatre space. The floor plan can be seen in the center of this drawing (the arcs and small "x"s):

http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/attachment.php?attachmentid=1116

The entire superstructure for the sloping orchestra seating level is in. The audience will enter on street level through the orignal Miller doorways. Upon entering the auditorium the arc-shaped space slopes down towards the stage. It looks like the orchestra pit might sit just above the first basement level. The fly space (shown above as the small "x" filled rectangle) will presumable rise through to the top of this area of the building.

Here is a photo (undated) of the interior of the late deceased Henry Miller Theatre:

http://www.ibdb.com/files/VenueImages/1197-3L.jpg

If we're lucky this grand old space might be coming back for a revival. According to the B of A website ( http://www.bankofamerica.com/newsroom/press/press.cfm?PressID=press.20040802.01.htm ) :


Reconstructed Henry Miller's Theater


At the direction of Bank of America and The Durst Organization, Cook+Fox Architects will restore and reconstruct the historic Henry Miller's Theater, with the goal of creating a state-of-the-art Broadway playhouse that captures the intimacy and proportions of the original 1918 Allen, Ingalls & Hoffman Theater. The Georgian-style land marked façade will be preserved and restored, the oval reception room, doors and decorative plasterwork, including the iconic urns marking the 43rd Street entrance, will be salvaged and incorporated into the new design.

The seating will be increased to 1,000, the majority of which will have a prime location at orchestra level. A sophisticated acoustics system will be integrated, as well as a larger orchestra pit and a fully functional fly-tower and scenic loading facilities. Other new amenities will include improved public circulation, box office and concessions areas, with a spacious lobby bar at the orchestra level, a bar and café at the ground level, a restaurant on the upper mezzanine and a significant increase in women's restrooms. The new theater also will be fully handicapped accessible with 20 wheelchair-viewing positions. In addition, the theater will have an auxiliary exhibition space - an adjacent through-block pedestrian passageway that provides views into the theater and includes a special documentary style multimedia presentation exploring the life and times of the historical Henry Miller playhouse.

lofter1
October 1st, 2005, 11:12 PM
This shot shows the proposed "green" area on the roof above the Henry Miller (at bottom center):

http://www.nycityscape.com/images/onebryantpark/thesouth.jpg

NYguy
October 3rd, 2005, 07:36 PM
Sunday OCTOBER 2, 2005

The Bank of America tower makes an inconspicuous appearance
on the cityscape to unsuspecting New Yorkers...


http://www.pbase.com/nyguy/image/50226999/large.jpg


http://www.pbase.com/nyguy/image/50227005/large.jpg

Jake
October 3rd, 2005, 08:58 PM
Look at those TOWERING steel beams! It just inspires awe! lol. Maybe tehy can cancel the project now and make it a one story supermarket with a big basement. Lol, glad to see this one "rising"

Thanks for the update

lofter1
October 6th, 2005, 09:53 PM
I got a look inside the shed walls today (another open gate :D ):

The final gravel has been laid for the tower's bottom slab, so that should be poured and finished before too long.

The pits (four huge ones) for the tower's elevators have been poured and the base of the core portion of the tower seems to be ready to start going up -- all the re-bar is poking up and waiting to be added to (just to the right of the big crane in the foreground seen above).

Is this tower going to have a concrete core? Or all steel?

Also I was wrong in a previous post about the lay out of the theatre space: It is now apparent that when one enters from street level through the old Henry Miller doorways then one will be at the balcony level. The steeply sloping area I previously described is actually the platform for the balcony seats (much like it appears in the old photo). The main level seating area will be accessed at a floor below street level, seemingly part of the improved circulation that is described on the BofA website. In essence it appears they are recreating the old Henry Miller but at a deeper level.

vc10
October 7th, 2005, 08:45 AM
Post 9/11 don't all highrise steel buildings in NYC have to have a concrete core?

In London, all the steel commercial buildings have a concrete core.

lofter1
October 7th, 2005, 10:05 AM
Post 9/11 don't all highrise steel buildings in NYC have to have a concrete core?

NY Times Tower looks to be all steel.

Arch
October 7th, 2005, 05:04 PM
there is no requirement that NY buildings have concrete cores post 9/11. I think egress stair construction has to be more than just a 2 hour rated sheet rock wall though. No one is going to build that way again in this city.

Outside NYC and around the world, many buildings have a concrete core that is built first followed by the steel floor framing. The ironworkers in NYC won't work below the concrete trades, so in NYC you have build steel first then concrete. For obvious reasons this is pretty tricky to do and costly.

So far the only large building built that way I know of is 7wtc. One Bryant Park looks to be the second. Goldman Sachs will probably be third followed by FT.

NoyokA
October 10th, 2005, 02:40 PM
http://img407.imageshack.us/img407/5751/bofa1br.th.jpg (http://img407.imageshack.us/my.php?image=bofa1br.jpg)

http://img407.imageshack.us/img407/5303/bofa23yb.th.jpg (http://img407.imageshack.us/my.php?image=bofa23yb.jpg)

http://img407.imageshack.us/img407/1243/bofa32am.th.jpg (http://img407.imageshack.us/my.php?image=bofa32am.jpg)

http://img407.imageshack.us/img407/2593/bofa47ke.th.jpg (http://img407.imageshack.us/my.php?image=bofa47ke.jpg)

http://img407.imageshack.us/img407/6267/bofa57qx.th.jpg (http://img407.imageshack.us/my.php?image=bofa57qx.jpg)

lofter1
October 10th, 2005, 03:08 PM
Nice, Stern ^^^ looks like you found that open gate :)

NoyokA
October 10th, 2005, 03:09 PM
Nice, Stern ^^^ looks like you found that open gate :)

Yeah. And as you said they are still pouring the foundation walls on part of the site.

Alonzo-ny
October 11th, 2005, 09:47 AM
Why are they putting steel on the low rise part first. Id have thought they'd start the tower first like nyt

lofter1
October 11th, 2005, 11:27 AM
My guess would be: more extensive excavation work was required at the tower portion of the site.

And perhaps they want to get the "public" portion of the building (Miller Theatre, etc.) completed and up & running prior to the completion of the tower.

mikeee
October 11th, 2005, 11:09 PM
nice pictures keep them coming "look at the size of that hole" Damm:eek: this is gonna be some building

NYguy
October 17th, 2005, 07:36 PM
OCTOBER 15, 2005


http://www.pbase.com/nyguy/image/50865659/large.jpg


http://www.pbase.com/nyguy/image/50865662/large.jpg


http://www.pbase.com/nyguy/image/50892893/large.jpg

Jake
October 17th, 2005, 09:36 PM
lol, is it me or will this building be about 5 inches from the windows of that adjacent building?!

hmmm...buy a place for a great view of the city...end up with a great view of BOA ATM machines

evil_synth
October 17th, 2005, 09:41 PM
lol, I noticed that too. I assume that other building is being torn down, right? or is that going to be where the interns work?

lofter1
October 17th, 2005, 11:18 PM
The part of B/A that butts up against CondeNast only rises 6 floors -- but renderings show that the B/A sixth floor is as high as the first set back on the CondeNast building. Apparently a whole slew of windows are going to have to go. (Kind of hilarious when you see the "lot-line" window problem in a situation involving two biggies like these! :D )

http://img407.imageshack.us/img407/5751/bofa1br.jpg


http://www.nyc-architecture.com/MID/157-3.jpg


http://www.nycityscape.com/images/onebryantpark/thesouth.jpg

NoyokA
October 17th, 2005, 11:23 PM
I'm a little unimpressed by the base of the BOFA Tower. The same could also be said about the Empire State Building's base I suppose. The tower in both instances more than makes up for it.

lofter1
October 17th, 2005, 11:30 PM
I just took another look at the 360 degree rending (http://www.durst.org/i_prop.asp?propertyid=12) and it appears that where B/A meets CondeNast that the B/A is not the full six floors, so it could be that the only windows that have to go are those dinky ones below the stone facade.

Eugenius
October 19th, 2005, 11:03 AM
You have to remember that the Dursts will own both buildings. Certainly, they wouldn't be stupid enough to damage their own prize property at 4TS by blocking some of its windows with their new building.

TLOZ Link5
October 20th, 2005, 11:21 PM
Emporis now officially lists 1BP as being 1,200 feet tall. Happy day.

BrooklynRider
October 21st, 2005, 01:50 AM
It's such a big fat building. It should be called Lane Bryant.

ablarc
October 21st, 2005, 10:23 AM
Fat, and perhaps shapeless. I've never been able to wrap my mind around this building's form. Why is it shaped as it is?

Dagrecco82
October 21st, 2005, 02:23 PM
There is only one thing that perplexes me. If Emporis lists the height of BOA as 1200 with the spire, why does the site list the height of ESB as 1250? Shouldn't they list the height as 1472 since they are counting the spire when listing BOA's height? I'm a bit confuddled :confused:

I guess you can never trust Emporis to report anything accurate.