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View Full Version : The Bank of America Tower a.k.a. One Bryant Park - by Cook + Fox Architects



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michelle1
April 11th, 2006, 08:51 AM
went by the site today. took some pics with my nifty new digi cam
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

SilentPandaesq
April 11th, 2006, 10:46 AM
Hey Carlos,

What time were you over there? we might have passed each other taking photos of the corner.

lofter1
April 11th, 2006, 03:23 PM
I walked past the site today -- there is some HUGE steel going up there.

Plus lots of cross bracing (you can see it in the first two of Carlos' lastest pics), seemingly to facilitate the various facets of the tower as it rises.

CARLOS
April 12th, 2006, 02:58 AM
Hey Carlos,

What time were you over there? we might have passed each other taking photos of the corner.

I WAS THERE @ 12:30 PM.....(DURING MY LUNCH HOUR)....;)

LeCom
April 23rd, 2006, 04:02 PM
April 19, 2006

http://img69.imageshack.us/img69/5716/pict0025bofaucapr06tothenesmal1.jpg

http://img125.imageshack.us/img125/3445/pict0026bofaucapr06tothewest7x.jpg

https://extranet.emporis.com/files/transfer/6/2006/04/452928.jpg

kz1000ps
April 23rd, 2006, 04:16 PM
The way how the frame lazily bends on the 6th ave side is just a wee bit startling. Even with all the trends in design like the InterActive Corp's crazy structure, I'm still not used to seeing anything other than completely parallel lines when it comes to the skeleton. Nowhere near as alarming as the IAC's frame is, this one looks like it got into a few fender benders.

antinimby
April 23rd, 2006, 04:32 PM
Is the bend a good idea for a corner of the building where it has to support 50+ floors of weight?
Also, the depictions don't show any curves at that area:

http://www.durst.org/prop/images/1bp/hires/3.jpg

lofter1
April 23rd, 2006, 04:45 PM
The way how the frame lazily bends on the 6th ave side is just a wee bit startling ... this one looks like it got into a few fender benders.
Hence all of the additional cross-bracing in both the floors and the facade near the corner of the tower at 42nd St. / 6th.

Meanwhile ...

I've noticed that both of the cranes are set up outside of the tower area -- rather than rising up the center in the area of the elevator core (as is so often done). And they seem to be constructing a frame work within the elevator core area.

Any info on what is planned?

ablarc
April 23rd, 2006, 06:55 PM
From the dictionary:

elegant

adj. [from mathematical and engineering usage] Combining
simplicity, power, economy and a certain ineffable grace of design.

The French aviator, adventurer, and author Antoine de
Saint-Exupe'ry, probably best known for his classic children's book
"The Little Prince", was also an aircraft designer. He gave us
perhaps the best definition of engineering elegance when he said "A
designer knows he has achieved perfection not when there is nothing
left to add, but when there is nothing left to take away."

This building is not elegant.

.

Fabrizio
April 23rd, 2006, 07:21 PM
At least in the above rendering.....there´s a million things going on there...and nothing works.

kz1000ps
April 23rd, 2006, 08:15 PM
That's an amazingly real rendering, though. I remember back in 2003 when I first saw it and the other street level rendering (of the corner of 6th and 43rd) thinking of how well done they were. Three years later and it's still top notch work.

BUT, like Fabrizio touched on, what the heck is going on with the glass? There's so much glossiness on it that it's almost impossible to tell how the low rise's glass design will be different from that of the tower, or the corner section on 42nd over the main entrance. On the main body of the tower, it almost looks like the glass might go from opaque to transparent like the IAC headquarters (which, coincidentally, I brought up just a few posts above) ! That then brings up the question of just how strong the horizontals will be, an issue we've also been carefully watching with the rising of the NYTimes tower. Any kind of prominent lines (even vertical) would be detrimental to the overall "pure" crystalline form.

czsz
April 23rd, 2006, 08:23 PM
I hate the vertical overhang. I hate the instantly dated all-capital serif three-dimensional building name mounted atop it. I hate the tree row stuffed asymmetrically under the awning. I hate the weird, bizarre uncertainty that attends the dual horizontal/vertical nature of the glass. Eughhh. A nice addition to the skyline from afar, perhaps, but a blight on the corner of Bryant Park for certain.

lofter1
April 23rd, 2006, 08:35 PM
... what the heck is going on with the glass? There's so much glossiness on it that it's almost impossible to tell how the low rise's glass design will be different from that of the tower, or the corner section on 42nd over the main entrance ... the question of just how strong the horizontals will be ...
I haven't seen any renderings that show in detail how the building transiitons at the 42nd S. / 6th Ave. corner from the section with the horizontals into the mass of the tower --

But if you look at the vid you can see that corner section cuts away after 10+ floors where the "crystaline" mass of the tower takes off.

The rendering below of the 43rd St. corner doesn't clearly show how the elements of the varied sections transition into one another either.

That the Durst website doesn't show a wider shot of the building with more detail makes you think that somebody else has some concerns that these various design elements might not work so well together ...

http://www.durst.org/prop/images/1bp/hires/2.jpg

czsz
April 23rd, 2006, 08:38 PM
Oh god...that cage with the trees...make the injuries to the streetscape end!

lofter1
April 23rd, 2006, 08:40 PM
... a blight on the corner of Bryant Park for certain.
Worse than the low-rise Pronto Pizza / Taco Bell / dunkin' donuts and Deli that used to be there? Or the Verizon Building (and its appliqued stainless steel sign with the circular grind marks)? Or the HBO building with its cheesy grid + glass across the street?

kz1000ps
April 23rd, 2006, 08:43 PM
....instantly dated all-capital serif three-dimensional building name....

Combined with the horizontal detailing on the awning and you'd swear time has regressed back a good 50 years to Park Avenue's construction heyday. However, I think there's a certain dignity to this high modernism-style entrance which fits the corner better than something bland like the Time Warner Center's derivative base, even if the actual plan is a hodgepodge concoction..

lofter1
April 23rd, 2006, 08:45 PM
... I hate the instantly dated all-capital serif three-dimensional building name mounted atop it...
Not to worry -- this is probably what we'll get:

http://www.nhhc.org/images/Bank%20of%20America%20logo.jpg

JD
April 23rd, 2006, 09:19 PM
a blight on the corner of Bryant Park for certain.

If this rendering depicts a blight, NYC could use a great many of them.

macreator
April 23rd, 2006, 09:54 PM
I hated the old one story row of shops as much as anyone, and to get a over 900 foot tall skyscraper is fantastic, but can't we have at least a few stores on the 42nd street side?

I mean, at least with the old one story structure, you could grab some lunch.

Why can't we have retail? I am tired of this sterilization of the streetscape.

What is the matter with having retail on 42nd street? I even thought it was a zoning requirement. Where are these new office workers going to grab lunch?

I will give Durst that this building at least maintains the street wall to a degree unlike most 6th Avenue slabs.

Does this bother anyone else besides me?

czsz
April 23rd, 2006, 09:58 PM
I don't mean to say that the building is not an improvement, but I don't think it makes ideal use of the corner, not is as aesthetically pleasing as it could be, either.

Citytect
April 23rd, 2006, 10:06 PM
I just hope they chose nice-looking glass. If they did, I think it will turn out okay. Could definately use some retail, though.

Scruffy88
April 23rd, 2006, 10:56 PM
I would like some retail in the base. Thats one thing that sets NYC towers ahead I always thought was the awesome way towers can blend into a city street at the base. The caged up trees aren't ideal but hey, we could have ended up with the dreaded sunken plaza like GM, X,Y,Z, or Paramount Plaza

Scruffy88
April 23rd, 2006, 10:58 PM
heres an update from 4/20

http://i25.photobucket.com/albums/c81/Scruffy88/2.jpg

http://i25.photobucket.com/albums/c81/Scruffy88/9.jpg

http://i25.photobucket.com/albums/c81/Scruffy88/11.jpg

http://i25.photobucket.com/albums/c81/Scruffy88/21.jpg

http://i25.photobucket.com/albums/c81/Scruffy88/22.jpg

43rd st side
http://i25.photobucket.com/albums/c81/Scruffy88/24.jpg

http://i25.photobucket.com/albums/c81/Scruffy88/32.jpg

antinimby
April 23rd, 2006, 11:01 PM
Bank of America is from Charlotte, NC. They're not used to sharing their office towers with stores and now with the fear of terrorism, you can just forget about having retail in their buildings.

lofter1
April 23rd, 2006, 11:08 PM
Almost the entire low-rise western portion is "retail" in the sense that it will include the theatre and other publicly accessible areas:

http://www.durst.org/i_bp_amenities.asp
Public Space


3X the public circulation space of an as-of-right high-rise office building on this site
Below-grade pedestrian walkway linking the B, D and F subway lines to Times Square station
New glass-enclosed dual-stair Subway entrance at 42 nd Street and 6 th Avenue
Mid-block Subway entrance located at 42 nd Street and the through-block connection
Widened sidewalks
Public street furniture
Urban Garden Room located at 43 rd Street and 6 th Avenue, serving as an inviting extension of Bryant Park and Grace PlazaThrough-Block Pedestrian Passage

Through-block public passageway connecting 42 nd and 43 rd Streets featuring Broadway-inspired programming and attractions, with multiple, interactive information kiosks to create a uniquely animated experience
Henry Miller’s Theater Attraction anchoring the passageway’s program with a contemporary documentary style multimedia exploration of the life and times of the historical playhouse and its creator
Henry Miller’s Theater Café and Restaurant featuring a unique combination of cuisine for quick pre- and post-show meals, as well more leisurely, fine dining
Broadway and NYC information stations providing a comprehensive database of information about the entire theater district and other New York attractions and amenities
“Broadway Wall of Fame” dedicated to the best of Broadway’s past and present, along with live performances and behind-the-scenes peeks

londonlawyer
April 23rd, 2006, 11:21 PM
There's an animated rendering on www.durst.org that reveals angles of this building that are not seen in photos. I think that it's the most attractive building under construction in the US and one of the best in the world.

Scruffy88
April 23rd, 2006, 11:21 PM
Thats the first i'm hearing of the subway connection between Bryant park station and Times Sq station. That is AWESOME! Brilliant idea.

czsz
April 23rd, 2006, 11:23 PM
hey, we could have ended up with the dreaded sunken plaza like GM, X,Y,Z, or Paramount Plaza

The fact that it's better than the worst design imaginable does not make it desirable.


Bank of America is from Charlotte, NC. They're not used to sharing their office towers with stores and now with the fear of terrorism, you can just forget about having retail in their buildings.

But it's okay to use vast quantities of fragile glass?

macreator
April 23rd, 2006, 11:58 PM
While I laud Durst and BOA for including improved subway access and a restored Miller theatre, it is still not the same as having retail in the sense of restaurants and stores on the 42nd street side.

Heck, they could be picky about the kind of shops, but at least something that would keep that stretch of 42nd street from becoming an extension of corporate 6th Avenue.

Skyscrapers and good retail can work together -- we've seen it happen.

At least NY Times and Hearst will both have some real streetlevel retail interaction.

Scruffy88
April 24th, 2006, 01:06 AM
It seems to be that the lobby for this is going to be at the corner of 42nd and 6th and goes up 6th to 43rd with those caged in trees. What is planned to be along the broad expanse of 42nd street. That of all should have been the most interactive part of the tower. main lobby or whatever.

Eugenius
April 24th, 2006, 02:55 PM
Speaking of grabbing lunch, I believe that there are plenty of places to eat within a block or two of BofA. For example, there is a Chipotle Mexican Grill and a Pret a Manger on 42nd St. between 5th and 6th. There is also a Pax deli on the corner of 40th and 6th.

LeCom
April 24th, 2006, 03:06 PM
Worse than the low-rise Pronto Pizza
Hey, Pronto Pizza kicked ass

MidtownGuy
April 24th, 2006, 06:41 PM
Speaking of grabbing lunch, I believe that there are plenty of places to eat within a block or two of BofA.

I respectfully disagree. There is a real shortage of lunch picks in the area.

michelle1
April 24th, 2006, 07:07 PM
Speaking of grabbing lunch, I believe that there are plenty of places to eat within a block or two of BofA. For example, there is a Chipotle Mexican Grill and a Pret a Manger on 42nd St. between 5th and 6th. There is also a Pax deli on the corner of 40th and 6th.

Chipotle serves one of the best burrito in NYC

LeCom
April 24th, 2006, 09:14 PM
Story of a Beam

On the southeast corner...
https://extranet.emporis.com/files/transfer/6/2006/04/453343.jpg

Workers are making final preparations
https://extranet.emporis.com/files/transfer/6/2006/04/453342.jpg

Meanwhile a beam makes its way from the northeast corner
https://extranet.emporis.com/files/transfer/6/2006/04/453344.jpg

Here it goes...
https://extranet.emporis.com/files/transfer/6/2006/04/453345.jpg

The beam has almost made its way to the southeast corner destination
https://extranet.emporis.com/files/transfer/6/2006/04/453346.jpg

Backed by Times Square Tower, completed in 2004
https://extranet.emporis.com/files/transfer/6/2006/04/453347.jpg

Damnit, I'm missing out on the installation process right around the corner
https://extranet.emporis.com/files/transfer/6/2006/04/453349.jpg

Now that the beam has been installed, the guy on the left decided to put some rhymes on the mic... or whatever the hell he's doing
https://extranet.emporis.com/files/transfer/6/2006/04/453350.jpg

I love it when the workers just stare at me like that. What you gonna do about me taking pics? Chase me down?
https://extranet.emporis.com/files/transfer/6/2006/04/453352.jpg

lofter1
April 24th, 2006, 10:33 PM
Hey, Pronto Pizza kicked ass
Definitely -- the pizza is (was) great.

The building, though ... zzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz

MidtownGuy
April 25th, 2006, 02:13 PM
So, is it possible for NY to achieve a compromise? I mean, can we have nice new buildings which also create street-level retail spaces that a business like Pronto Pizza can move into?

Because basically, looking at the new tower from Bryant Park will be nice, but it would be even nicer to be able to look at it while munching a delicious slice of pizza.

alibrot
April 25th, 2006, 03:13 PM
So, is it possible for NY to achieve a compromise? I mean, can we have nice new buildings which also create street-level retail spaces that a business like Pronto Pizza can move into?

Because basically, looking at the new tower from Bryant Park will be nice, but it would be even nicer to be able to look at it while munching a delicious slice of pizza.

there is restaurant space available on 43 btw 6th and bway. some places are expensive, and some places arent. putting pronto pizza in BoA is like putting affordable housing in the plaza.

MidtownGuy
April 25th, 2006, 03:29 PM
It's not the same thing at all. How do you compare the two? Business and housing aren't the same. You must have failed the analogy section of intelligence tests.

You also need to expand your range of thinking. My comment went beyond the specific corner of 6th and 42nd, and so should your analysis. I talked about a philosophical compromise for NY in general, where having shiny new towers doesn't mean excluding mid-range restaurants and retail from the streetscape. You don't have to throw a straw man into the discussion to sound clever.

antinimby
April 25th, 2006, 04:59 PM
OK, so far I'm hearing people say, well there's plenty of restaurants, pizzerias nearby and there's a cafe in this corner or there's a kiosk here.

So what?

Times Square is right there, of course there's going to dining choices in the vicinity, but that does not take away from the fact that the long stretch from 6th and 42nd to Conde Nast will be a completely corporate sterile wall of glass and offers nothing interesting to a passerby or even someone who works there. Before, it had lots of retail and was a least interesting for pedestrians.

And where does it say Pronto pizzeria or a Tad's can't occupy the empty space that will be devoted to nothing useful other than some caged trees?

LeCom
April 25th, 2006, 05:02 PM
Definitely -- the pizza is (was) great.

The building, though ... zzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz
The building was mediocre, but no worse than much lowrise crap that's still left in the area. The real loss was the old and slender Remington Building. The building I was the happiest to see go was McDonalds. Take that, Ronald!

BrooklynRider
April 28th, 2006, 10:58 AM
The lack of affordable places to grab lunch or breakfast will ultimately become liability. City zoning needs to address this more. Not only must buildings like this accommodate places so they can offer workers reasonably priced meals, but they also need to ensure that some retail space is broken into smaller spaces to maintain and facilitate small business. I agree with MidtownGuy. It's a problem.

TonyO
April 28th, 2006, 11:01 AM
Don't forget 'wichcraft, which has a couple kiosks right in Bryant Park. I've heard they are very good.

MidtownGuy
April 28th, 2006, 12:28 PM
Yes, some type of zoning laws need to be created that prevent active streetscapes from being transformed into impenetrable glass walls with nowhere for small businesses to exist.

I would like to clarify that I am not concerned simply with eateries. The abundance of smaller sized stores of all varieties are the charm and lifeblood of the city, and part of what makes it special. They are being chipped away in every single neighborhood and replaced by storeless walls, or big spaces suitable only for corporate clone stores and banks. How much of this damage do people think New York can absorb without being fundamentally changed for the worse?

Anyway, I live in Midtown and see it every day- people pile out of the huge new towers at lunchtime, and they head straight for some 5 story building that has the things they really need. For example, over on Third Ave., not far from me, there is a block of small old buildings among the towers, that I swear feed 80% of the officeworkers within walking range.

londonlawyer
April 28th, 2006, 12:35 PM
...For example, over on Third Ave., not far from me, there is a block of small old buildings among the towers, that I swear feed 80% of the officeworkers within walking range.

Are these the utterly dilapidated buildings on the west side of 3rd in the low 40's? I can't wait for them to be demolished (and am shocked that they have not been torn done already). The same holds true for another group of run-down tenaments in the 50's on the west side of 3rd which house, among other things, a Ray Bari pizza place.

MidtownGuy
April 28th, 2006, 12:53 PM
No, they're in the low 50's.

As for the group that houses Ray Bari Pizza, those buildings are important to us, who live in the area. There is an ice cream store, an arab tobacco store, a health food eaterie, a deli, among other things. If they are gone, what replaces them will have none of those things, I can guarantee.

Londonlawyer, this statement is very upsetting. Does a neighborhood exist only to please you, as you drive or walk through? Or is it important for a neighborhood to actually have the things that improve quality of life for the residents that exist there every single day? Ray Bari's will deliver a great pizza late at night, when the other places are closed. I like that, and it really comes in handy. You would like to remove it from my life by tearing down the only buildings within blocks likely to house such an establishment.

Besides, they aren't even as decrepit as you suggest. Actually, they add texture and life to an otherwise unliveable expanse.

lofter1
April 28th, 2006, 01:50 PM
I've noticed that Duane Reade (in their stores downtown) has moved the "edibles" to the front -- and greatly expanded the amount of merchandise. It's all crud, but there are shelves and shelves of it. Disgusting. But obviously that is something that customers are looking for (at least NYU students).

TallGuy
April 28th, 2006, 02:06 PM
I am originally from West haven CT and grew up spending lots of time in NY. Now I get to return several times a year, both for getaway weekends and business tradeshows. When spending a week in Manhattan those Duane Reeds are indespensible for toiletries, bottled water and other little necessities. Why are the so picked on?

lofter1
April 28th, 2006, 02:27 PM
Why ^

1. Horrible signage

2. Every 6 blocks

3. Nasty store managers

ablarc
April 28th, 2006, 02:29 PM
TallGuy, I can see your point; and Lofter1, I can see yours too.

I loathe Duane Reades because there are so many of them. Like Starbucks. Ubiquitous. They make the urban landscape uniform, dull, predictable. Makes any place in New York pretty much like every other place.

Reason there are so many: they're ultra-successful at getting people what they want --as mom and pops never were. Whenever I visit New York I'm forced into a grudging Duane Reade visit for some necessity and sundry, and I'm always astonished at their selection and their efficiency at cramming such a variety in such a small space. In the sunbelt where I live drug/convenience stores typically have three times the square footage and half the selection.

Duane Reade is just too good at what it does. Like Starbucks or McDonald's. Hate it, wish mom and pop could compete, but since they can't...got to get what you need someplace.

Now if someone started up a chain to compete head on...or three or four chains to compete head on...or if the government said quantity discounts were monopolistic practices...why, we'd be back to corner stores run by...you guessed it...mom...and pop.

czsz
April 28th, 2006, 02:45 PM
Nasty store managers

I love the manager of my local Duane Reade. He's actually a nice, helpful guy. The lazy, bitchy employees leave something desired, but their behaviour is sadly typical of most New York cashiers.

GLNY
April 28th, 2006, 03:31 PM
Why ^

1. Horrible signage

2. Every 6 blocks

3. Nasty store managers

. . . And the cats. I hate cats.

BrooklynRider
April 28th, 2006, 09:44 PM
Sorry to pull us back to the building, but I walked by this evening. I am feeling kind of bad for the employees who wond have an office by a window. The floor plates are HUGE and cavernous. To be stuck in a cubicle in the middle of one of those floors (new building or not) is going to suck.

londonlawyer
April 28th, 2006, 11:22 PM
...Londonlawyer, this statement is very upsetting. Does a neighborhood exist only to please you, as you drive or walk through? Or is it important for a neighborhood to actually have the things that improve quality of life for the residents that exist there every single day? Ray Bari's will deliver a great pizza late at night, when the other places are closed. I like that, and it really comes in handy. You would like to remove it from my life by tearing down the only buildings within blocks likely to house such an establishment....

Midtowndude, you really need a xanax. Trust me, the stores would relocate nearby if the buildings were razed, and you could get your Ray Bari pizza late at night.

lofter1
April 28th, 2006, 11:48 PM
Now if someone started up a chain to compete head on...or three or four chains to compete head on....
Watch OUt!!

The Walgreens Cometh ...

The old Astor Wines is becoming a HUGE Walgreens. Be assured that there are more to come.

Maybe we'll get some price wars with D/R!!

Walgreen Co. is the nation's largest drugstore chain with fiscal 2005 sales of $42.2 billion. The company operates 5,193 stores in 45 states and Puerto Rico.
Walgreens in NYC as of now:

http://xml.sa.mapquest.com/?transaction=mapimage&datalen=193&data=bf8e%2CfK%3AmtDjGK.%269u.S%5EyN1%3A%5Bzs%3BCq 0II%5Bz3Zm%22Iquq%2656NAB-o%7B15+Cgss3%3Aw6e8%5Fj%25rd%29%24u521mOxM3L%3CW7% 3DskxpSb%7CN%3E-eyl%21%5BG7h%2F%5F%242nXrTV%219%60ozL%7E1%2B%25g%7 Bc5af6&mapbrowse=zoom_7&rand=0.37436085673280395&mapbrowse=center&x=311&y=48&rand=0.2691721784929772&mapbrowse=center&x=248&y=180&rand=0.17899767973935937&mapbrowse=center&x=242&y=202&rand=0.5520726403718561

MidtownGuy
April 29th, 2006, 09:55 PM
I like Walgreen's. I'd like to see an element of competition restored. CVS has also been opening more stores here in recent years.

Londonlawyer, it's just not true. Those business will almost surely not be able to relocate in the kind of new spaces created..How many charming Irish taverns do you see in new glass towers? Again, I would like to emphasize again that there is nothing wrong with those buildings, on the contrary they are wonderful against the surrounding architecture and enhance this neighborhood.

James Kovata
April 29th, 2006, 10:53 PM
. . . And the cats. I hate cats.

Pardon my ignorance, but cats??

lofter1
April 30th, 2006, 01:02 AM
How many charming Irish taverns do you see in new glass towers?

How many of these taverns are "stage set" bars and how many have any connection to "authentic" Irish pubs (i.e. owned / operated by Irish or descendents)?

I recently popped into one of these taverns in midtown -- Langan's (http://www.langans.com/) on W. 47th -- lots of dark wood and green interior -- as I come from a long line of Langans who started coming over from County Wexford @1850. I was curious to see if any of the clam were involved in the restaurant. Lo and behold I was told that there wasn't a Langan to be found -- as far as the barkeep knew there never had been. Must say I was disappointed -- and wasn't so sure that the fellow behind the bar was speaking with a real Irish accent or if it was just part of the show.

I left, taking lots match boxes, but haven't been back. From the looks of their website it seems they might have revamped the interior.

czsz
April 30th, 2006, 12:18 PM
It's a well known fact that Irish pubs in Midtown are just after-hours watering holes for i-banking types. They might as well be sake bars or biergarten...

MidtownGuy
April 30th, 2006, 12:25 PM
I'm hardly Irish, never touch alchohol, and I wouldn't care if the people owning them or drinking in them are from the Purple Planet. As long as they provide charm to the streetcape with their bright and cheery exteriors and provide respite from cookie-cutter corporate signage.
I am taking pictures of this block later today, people seem to be missing the point.

More biergartens would be nice too.

ablarc
April 30th, 2006, 12:31 PM
It's a well known fact that Irish pubs in Midtown are just after-hours watering holes for i-banking types. They might as well be sake bars or biergarten...
During business hours you'll find the regulars. They may be mostly drunks but they've provided me with some memorable conversations.

BrooklynRider
April 30th, 2006, 11:54 PM
...As long as they provide charm to the streetcape with their bright and cheery exteriors and provide respite from cookie-cutter corporate signage...

I agree. That's ALOT of ground floor space and could ::gulp:: be appealing to a big box retailer. Target anyone? I have my money on them moving in. They've been eyeing Manhattan a long time.

GLNY
May 1st, 2006, 09:58 AM
Pardon my ignorance, but cats??

From its inception, there was a tradition in Duane Reades to have a house cat, although the practice, thankfully, seems to be fading (at least in Midtown and Brooklyn). The consequent " no dogs allowed" policy was an outrage to canines on their evening walk, although not enough to hinder DR's inexorable growth.

Now, back to the topic at hand . . .

James Kovata
May 1st, 2006, 10:04 AM
From its inception, there was a tradition in Duane Reades to have a house cat, although the practice, thankfully, seems to be fading (at least in Midtown and Brooklyn). The consequent " no dogs allowed" policy was an outrage to canines on their evening walk, although not enough to hinder DR's inexorable growth.

Now, back to the topic at hand . . .


Not being from New York, I appreciate the clarification.

lofter1
May 1st, 2006, 10:16 AM
The consequent " no dogs allowed" policy was an outrage to canines on their evening walk...
Doubtful that the canines themselves were outraged.

Jeez, NYers and their dogs ... clueless for the most part.

Maybe if dog-owners could understand the meaning of the words "CURB your dog" they'd get more repsect -- NOTE: if you aim them to the gutter then it gets washed away; otherwise it's rude and disgusting.

Get a Clue!

Really: why should anyone cut somebody a break who lets their animal piss where ever they want? If a person took a leak on all the spots that people let their dogs go we'd all be outraged.

BrooklynRider
May 1st, 2006, 12:34 PM
I think it is more the owners of the pip-squeak dogs as opposed to real dogs. Real dogs get walked and played with and tend to end up going to dog-runs. Pip-squeaks get displayed, cuddled and are encouraged to "do their thing" as quickly as possible and as close to the building as possible.

Are we done with th is topic.

SilentPandaesq
May 7th, 2006, 06:00 PM
Took some pics of the site on Cinco de mayo. Sorry about the over-exposed parts, the old digi cam is not so great.

Peteynyc1
May 8th, 2006, 09:32 AM
Could a building like this be built out of cement? Forgive my ignorance, but what is the main reason they go the steel route? From a cost perspective with both steel and cement prices rising, which is cheaper these days?

kliq6
May 8th, 2006, 10:21 AM
office buildings are historically built with steel and residential with concrete

NoyokA
May 8th, 2006, 01:50 PM
Could a building like this be built out of cement? Forgive my ignorance, but what is the main reason they go the steel route? From a cost perspective with both steel and cement prices rising, which is cheaper these days?

Office buildings are built of steel because of the wiring and other connections sometimes required between floors. Making the neccesary holes for these connections would jeopardize the structural integrity of a concrete structure.

MidtownGuy
May 8th, 2006, 03:11 PM
I'm admittedly ignorant of this subject, but how then is it done in buildings like the Petronas Towers, which are concrete and have lots of wiring?

alibrot
May 8th, 2006, 04:40 PM
Could a building like this be built out of cement? Forgive my ignorance, but what is the main reason they go the steel route? From a cost perspective with both steel and cement prices rising, which is cheaper these days?

my understanding is that office buildings need large open spaces on massive floorplates that cannot be created with the strength of (or relative lack of) concrete. the heavier a building, the more support needed, and with concrete there would be way too many supports. offices need to be flexible in terms of interior design, whereas apartment building layouts are pretty much fixed. there may be other reasons, but this is the main one.

i assume this means concrete is cheaper than steel, maybe not as much in materials, but in it's creation. with concrete, it all arrives at the building sites in the same form - in the cement truck. With steel, each beam is custom made, tagged, and then must be installed in a certain order in its correct place.

all this is based on logic...anyone in constructions that could comment?

Ninjahedge
May 9th, 2006, 10:09 AM
The primary concern is cost.

It costs more to do Concrete than Steel because labor is more expensive than material here in the states. Concrete is MUCH more popular in China and other areas where labor is cheaper.


Also, as mentioned before, the open span is another consideration. Long-span structures, such as office buildings, are cheaper and easier to build from steel than concrete. You can get a rectangular gridded plan out of steel much easier than concrete. Odd shapes are generally more easily (but a biatch to calculate) with concrete.

Other considerations are things like height. The higher you go, the more factors start to lplay, such as load-creep (concrete) and just GETTING the materials up there to build with (pump the concrete all the way up 60 stories?).

I was just wondering what that building was when I was walking by it this morning with a co-worker. I could not remember. Nice to know where I can always look to find out.. ;)

Ninjahedge
May 10th, 2006, 09:02 AM
Oh, going by today I noticed something...

On the south east facade, what the HECK is that HUGE set of beams for?

It looks like the cantelever from hell! I am wondering where they are going to attach it and why......

lofter1
May 10th, 2006, 09:47 AM
I saw that the other day and wondered the same thing.

It sure doesn't correspond with anything in this rendereing (the beams in discussion cantiliever out above the overhang seen below at the lower left)...

http://www.durst.org/prop/images/1bp/hires/2.jpg

Ninjahedge
May 10th, 2006, 10:21 AM
They really need to fuzz/blend the people a little better on Photoshop!!!

Those edges are STRONG!!!!

Anyway, I think they are using the awning to just hold them for now, but they are very deep and very short. I can't think of anything that would be heavy enough to require 48" deep beams over such a small span (they looked to be maybe 20 feet long).

It looks like some sort of projection, but I did not see anything else it could really attach to. You put a 48" deep beam up there, it is either carrying something VERY heavy, or it is carrying a heavy cantelever/transition.......

I will have to keep my eyes open, or tackle a foreman on my way to work...

lofter1
May 10th, 2006, 08:47 PM
I checked out that cantiliever again today: perhaps it is temporary and part of an enclosure for another crane to be erected at that spot?

The steel in the vertical supports below it clearly are not of the same size / structure as other steel in that part of the building. And those same vertical supports from the street level up to the cantilever would pretty much run smack dab against the subway entrance planned for that corner.

ZippyTheChimp
May 15th, 2006, 12:16 AM
http://img63.imageshack.us/img63/1355/boa04c6vd.th.jpg (http://img63.imageshack.us/my.php?image=boa04c6vd.jpg) http://img167.imageshack.us/img167/9064/boa05c9yi.th.jpg (http://img167.imageshack.us/my.php?image=boa05c9yi.jpg)

I think those beams are a platform for a crane, but not for the building. The supports rest on the edge of a huge hole in the street - the subway.

http://img63.imageshack.us/img63/3103/boa06c3wx.th.jpg (http://img63.imageshack.us/my.php?image=boa06c3wx.jpg) http://img63.imageshack.us/img63/2697/boa07c0zc.th.jpg (http://img63.imageshack.us/my.php?image=boa07c0zc.jpg) http://img63.imageshack.us/img63/8447/boa08c7zf.th.jpg (http://img63.imageshack.us/my.php?image=boa08c7zf.jpg)

lofter1
May 15th, 2006, 12:40 AM
Nice pics, Zip ...

Good to see those diagonal supports going in -- we should start to see the facets of the facade soon.

Ninjahedge
May 15th, 2006, 09:03 AM
Yeah, I took another shot at it today...

Something looked temporary about it from teh start, but it was just so much bigger than your typical temporary structure....

This might be teh only way to get teh support they need for the crane without doing something radical to the subterranian subway tunnels.....

Kris
May 22nd, 2006, 11:12 AM
http://static.flickr.com/46/148560624_7ebaaed22a_b.jpg

Original Size (http://static.flickr.com/46/148560624_7ebaaed22a_o.jpg)

http://www.flickr.com/photos/geneko/

TallGuy
May 22nd, 2006, 11:15 AM
That's going to be one big building :)

pianoman11686
May 22nd, 2006, 02:28 PM
Keep in mind that the rear portion of the building (the part abutting Conde Nast) will only rise about 6 stories (correct me if I'm wrong), leaving the tower portion to be much more slender. We should see the building split into lowrise and highrise within a few weeks.

lofter1
May 22nd, 2006, 06:57 PM
You can alredy see where it will rise out of the base -- slender isn't exactly a word I'd use -- although there will be a good distance between the CN tower and the BA tower, I was surprised to see how far into the block the west facade of the BA tower will be.

ramvid01
May 22nd, 2006, 07:30 PM
judging from the last picture posted, and the date it was posted (the 17th), there probably is already more steel up at the site, i could be wrong though.

antinimby
May 22nd, 2006, 10:55 PM
I suspect this thing is going to go up slower than NY Times. One floor at a time versus two @ the Times.

nyc_rocks_2006
May 22nd, 2006, 11:33 PM
I'm gonna be working for Bank of America's Global Corporate and Investment Banking next month, hopefully I'll stay there long enough to move into the new Tower! Bofa's investment banking division currently works from the Solow Building (9 West 57th), which is still very nice, probably the best office of all the major investment banks in NYC.

JCMAN320
May 23rd, 2006, 07:18 AM
Goodluck NYCrocks, wish you all the best. As for the building, I can't wait. The design is insane and watching the frame rise as I go by there every week will be exciting. I just wish it wasn't taking so long. :(

PHLguy
May 28th, 2006, 07:42 PM
I'm gonna be working for Bank of America's Global Corporate and Investment Banking next month, hopefully I'll stay there long enough to move into the new Tower! Bofa's investment banking division currently works from the Solow Building (9 West 57th), which is still very nice, probably the best office of all the major investment banks in NYC.



Good luck, If you work in Boa remember to take pictures ;)

CARLOS
May 29th, 2006, 09:07 PM
As of today May 29, 2006

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v109/nyctowers/2006/DSC01535.jpg

MidtownGuy
June 1st, 2006, 07:06 PM
http://static.flickr.com/71/158289215_3f22ca7fa0_b.jpg

ablarc
June 1st, 2006, 07:08 PM
Wow, that corner sure needed plugging. Nice. And soon even nicer.

londonlawyer
June 1st, 2006, 07:50 PM
Wow, that corner sure needed plugging. Nice. And soon even nicer.

I agree. That corner was horrible, but it will be spectacular.

kurokevin
June 1st, 2006, 08:26 PM
While we're on the topic of Bryan Lake corners, what is up with the parking lot on 41st St., just South of the Library? This is some primo real estate for a condo or hotel. I'm shocked it has not been mentioned, especially with the residential boom of the past few years.

Would seem a shame for this site to lay fallow for much longer.

Sorry to be off topic.

ablarc
June 1st, 2006, 09:01 PM
Great opportunity for a nice streetwall building like the 16-story beaux-arts skyscrapers that surround this lot.

GLNY
June 2nd, 2006, 09:49 AM
While we're on the topic of Bryan Lake corners, what is up with the parking lot on 41st St., just South of the Library? This is some primo real estate for a condo or hotel. I'm shocked it has not been mentioned, especially with the residential boom of the past few years.

Would seem a shame for this site to lay fallow for much longer.

Sorry to be off topic.

There was an approved proposal for this lot in the late 1980s. A new stone and masonry structure was designed to house expansion space for Safra's adjacent Republic Bank. Not sure if the market decline or Safra's murder killed this project.

lofter1
June 2nd, 2006, 01:11 PM
Safra's adjacent Republic Bank...
The addition to the Republic Bank that went up in the 80's on the SW corner of 5th / 40th is IMO one of the worst juxtapositions around.

CARLOS
June 3rd, 2006, 06:25 AM
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v109/nyctowers/2006/CIMG0031.jpg


http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v109/nyctowers/2006/CIMG0029.jpg

stache
June 3rd, 2006, 02:55 PM
Carlos is doing fantastic work! Hug!

ZippyTheChimp
June 6th, 2006, 06:39 PM
http://img427.imageshack.us/img427/1466/boa09c5ps.th.jpg (http://img427.imageshack.us/my.php?image=boa09c5ps.jpg)

kurokevin
June 6th, 2006, 06:54 PM
For shame! Now we'll loose our view of the Marriott Marquis! I'm outraged! (sarcasm)

finnman69
June 12th, 2006, 12:50 PM
They really need to fuzz/blend the people a little better on Photoshop!!!

Those edges are STRONG!!!!

Anyway, I think they are using the awning to just hold them for now, but they are very deep and very short. I can't think of anything that would be heavy enough to require 48" deep beams over such a small span (they looked to be maybe 20 feet long).

It looks like some sort of projection, but I did not see anything else it could really attach to. You put a 48" deep beam up there, it is either carrying something VERY heavy, or it is carrying a heavy cantelever/transition.......

I will have to keep my eyes open, or tackle a foreman on my way to work...


another tower crane, I have seen this done before, allows another tower crane without closing a street lane.

LeCom
June 20th, 2006, 05:06 PM
View from Bryant Park across 6th and 42nd

http://img394.imageshack.us/img394/1489/dsc01747bofaucjun06tothenw4676.jpg

http://img352.imageshack.us/img352/9476/dsc01748bofaucjun06tothenw42nd.jpg

A new contender is rising

http://img63.imageshack.us/img63/4986/dsc01750bofaucjun06tothenwlook.jpg

Base on 6th

http://img340.imageshack.us/img340/4866/dsc01753bofaucjun06tothewestba.jpg

http://img437.imageshack.us/img437/9092/dsc01754bofaucjun06tothewest46.jpg

Competing for air space

http://img226.imageshack.us/img226/5190/dsc01755bofaucjun06tothewestlo1.jpg

Looking down 6th Avenue toward Verizon Building

http://img437.imageshack.us/img437/7884/dsc01762bofaucjun06tothesw4676.jpg

Concrete mixers on 43rd

http://img437.imageshack.us/img437/6902/dsc01763bofaucjun0643rdconcret.jpg

Facade of the old theater with temporary support

http://img437.imageshack.us/img437/1684/dsc01765bofaucjun06oldfacade46.jpg

lofter1
June 20th, 2006, 05:44 PM
Going up fast now :)

pianoman11686
June 20th, 2006, 09:51 PM
I walked by around 5:15 today as they were lifting some pipes up into the air. Was I wrong to think that construction work usually ended around 3? I don't recall work going on at the NY Times Tower that late in the afternoon.

lesterp4
June 20th, 2006, 09:59 PM
They are usually done by 3:30. However, it seems that if something has to be done on a given day, they stay later.

LeCom
June 21st, 2006, 12:27 AM
Why does it end so early? It would make perfect sense to extend construction hours into the cooler evening time, easing demands placed by heat on the workers and speeding up the rate of construction.

lesterp4
June 21st, 2006, 12:39 AM
I am sure these are union negotiated hours. Also, if these guys work overtime they get time and a half which I would think would put most of these guys in the $80.00 per hour region. Also, they start at 7am or even earlier.

Ninjahedge
June 21st, 2006, 08:51 AM
They usually try to get in early, work 8 hours with a half hour lunch, and egt out. Anything more usually involves eitehr a second shift or OT or both, so it is avoided if possible ($$).

Does anyone have any clue what that belt truss is for? I have been trying to figure it out but it does not seem to be conncted to anything.....

lofter1
June 21st, 2006, 10:29 AM
It seems that the area above the belt truss that is shown / now constructed is where the "faceting" of the building will begin -- perhaps it relates to the distribution of the load where the tower goes from lower box facade > upper faceted facade.

kliq6
June 21st, 2006, 11:21 AM
union hours are strict, they dont do anything beyond there time unless they get alot in return. this project is on schedule as per a friend at Tishman

Ninjahedge
June 21st, 2006, 11:36 AM
Union only asks for time and a half, so it does cost more to rush it.

But that is time and a half for salaries, not for charged fees. So if a construction company wants to finish something quickly, for whatever reason, they can take the hit on the workers OT.

(Say the company gets a bonus for finishing ahead of schedule. If you figure you will get more by finishing a month ahead than what you would spend on getting it done by then, you would bite th ebullet and do it, if it was feasable that you would be able to finish ahead of schedule...)

antinimby
June 21st, 2006, 02:39 PM
Do all these construction guys only like to drive pick-up trucks? I've never seen this many p/u trucks in the city in my life. The streets look like they could be anywhere in Dallas, Houston or other red-state cities.

Bob
June 21st, 2006, 03:21 PM
Heaven forbid we have "red state" pickup trucks in New York City. Why, everyone knows these people should each be driving a Toyota Prius or a 1983 Volvo station wagon festooned with 25+ bumper stickers. <sorry...just had to tweak!>

Ninjahedge
June 21st, 2006, 03:59 PM
Do all these construction guys only like to drive pick-up trucks? I've never seen this many p/u trucks in the city in my life. The streets look like they could be anywhere in Dallas, Houston or other red-state cities.

Most do.

My father (hint hint) drives a standard generic van. Most like pickups because it can haul all their crap around in the back. You can haul oversized pieces and it is just a more durable versitile work vehicle.

What I don't understand, as Bob so eloquently pointed out, are the people who insist on driving SUV's to and around the conjested city, or worse yet, a premium luxury or sports car.

NYC roads are not very car-friendly, and they are also too crowded to comfortably accomodate your SUV.....

lofter1
June 22nd, 2006, 12:59 AM
Trucks are also a good tax write-off if used for business purposes.

antinimby
June 22nd, 2006, 03:54 AM
The Ford F-150's and Dodge Rams these guys drive aren't exactly tiny either.

Citytect
June 22nd, 2006, 03:53 PM
"There's just something women like about a pickup man."

MidtownGuy
June 22nd, 2006, 04:45 PM
union hours are strict, they dont do anything beyond there time unless they get alot in return.

As it should be. Just like most professionals. Certainly just like the capitalists who employ them.

TonyO
June 30th, 2006, 10:41 AM
From Curbed:

http://www.curbed.com/archives/2006_06_crane.jpg

jeffpark
June 30th, 2006, 01:56 PM
is Durst marketing the remaining space yet.?

LeCom
July 4th, 2006, 07:32 PM
Showing its presence on 6th Avenue
http://img213.imageshack.us/img213/9547/pict0094bofaucjun066thtothenor.jpg

http://img142.imageshack.us/img142/3688/pict0095bofaucjun06tothenw4714.jpg

http://img142.imageshack.us/img142/6281/pict0096bofaucjun06tothenwtopc.jpg

42nd Street side
http://img213.imageshack.us/img213/3522/pict0097bofaucjun06tothenw42nd.jpg

6th Avenue side
http://img213.imageshack.us/img213/856/pict0098bofaucjun06tothenw6th4.jpg

View to the north
http://img142.imageshack.us/img142/6648/pict0091bofaucjun06tothenorth4.jpg

http://img213.imageshack.us/img213/5937/pict0093bofaucjun06tothenorthf.jpg

http://img104.imageshack.us/img104/7499/pict0100bofaucjun06topsteelbea.jpg

kz1000ps
July 4th, 2006, 07:43 PM
Thanks for the update, Lecom. That first pic is great. BOA's floor count is officially in the double digits -- hooorayyyyyyy..!

James Kovata
July 4th, 2006, 08:18 PM
Based on my visit over the weekend, BoA is pushing this building (as it should). Its ads tout all of the "green" features of the building while harkening to NYC's skyscraper golden age through the use of old construction pics.

kliq6
July 5th, 2006, 10:44 AM
Yes Jeff he is

lofter1
July 5th, 2006, 11:42 AM
The large belt truss that has been erected can be seen through the glass at the higher floors of the base portion at the SE corner (1st image).

From the looks of the slanted beams at the top-most floors so-far constructed it looks as though the building is reaching the point where the facade will transition from base to the faceted tower (2nd image).

***

ZippyTheChimp
July 13th, 2006, 09:04 PM
http://img135.imageshack.us/img135/2799/boa10c5wv.th.jpg (http://img135.imageshack.us/my.php?image=boa10c5wv.jpg)

pianoman11686
July 13th, 2006, 09:15 PM
I think they're really trying to speed up the construction of this tower. I passed by at 6 this afternoon and the site was still buzzing with activity.

krulltime
July 13th, 2006, 09:48 PM
I can't wait to see some glass! :)

BrooklynRider
July 14th, 2006, 11:13 AM
Is this building as massive as I perceive it or is it an illusion of the site? He just seems HUGE when compared with something like NYTimes Tower.

kz1000ps
July 14th, 2006, 11:56 AM
NYTimes Tower's width/length proportions are roughly 2 to 3, with its long side facing the avenue ( ~200 ft). BOA has about those same proportions too, but obviously with the long side to the streets. So yes, in perception and reality, it really is that massive.

Also, at least from the view Zippy posted, steel has not risen one bit since LeCom's pictures from 9 days before, although fireproofing had moved up two floors. Is steel still rising, just on the other side?

SilentPandaesq
July 14th, 2006, 12:25 PM
^^There seams to be work going on inside the structure. Some sort of core. I don't know, but you used to be able to look clear across the floors to the other side, now there are massive walls forming a box inside the building. elevator shafts???

lesterp4
July 14th, 2006, 01:00 PM
I walk past there regularly and I don't think the cranes have moved since last weeks strike. So yes, no steel has been erected this week.

lesterp4
July 17th, 2006, 02:01 PM
I went by the site and the cranes still not moving and no steel on the street. I wonder what's going on?

Ninjahedge
July 17th, 2006, 02:06 PM
You did not go by at the right time then. Steel deliveries come in all the time, but I usually see them on the road on the morning commute/walk in.

I heard a lot of steelwork (probably cutting deck) this morning as I went by. Things are still moving, but there may be a production line hichough, or a gap between construction and materials that we do not know about...

pianoman11686
July 17th, 2006, 02:30 PM
I walked by this morning and saw a lot of activity on the upper floors, but no crane movement or steel on the street. I think the workers were concentrating on fireproofing. I have a couple of pictures that I'll upload later.

pianoman11686
July 17th, 2006, 11:50 PM
Here they are:

http://images1.snapfish.com/34763%3C948%7Ffp345%3Enu%3D3247%3E4%3A5%3E9%3A%3B% 3EWSNRCG%3D323394%3B45%3B7%3A5nu0mrj

http://images1.snapfish.com/34763%3C948%7Ffp33%3B%3Enu%3D3247%3E4%3A5%3E9%3A%3 B%3EWSNRCG%3D323394%3B478%3A63nu0mrj

http://images1.snapfish.com/34763%3C948%7Ffp345%3Enu%3D3247%3E4%3A5%3E9%3A%3B% 3EWSNRCG%3D323394%3B478%3A64nu0mrj

http://images1.snapfish.com/34763%3C948%7Ffp339%3Enu%3D3247%3E4%3A5%3E9%3A%3B% 3EWSNRCG%3D323394%3B45%3B7%3A8nu0mrj

Ninjahedge
July 18th, 2006, 08:38 AM
Concrete trucks out on 42nd I believe. They are doing slab pours.....

londonlawyer
July 18th, 2006, 09:14 AM
This building seems to be rising quite slowly.

lesterp4
July 18th, 2006, 09:18 AM
I walked past there and the cranes are not in use and no steel on the street.

Ninjahedge
July 18th, 2006, 10:17 AM
So every day has to have everything going at the same time?

Tell me, where are they going to put the steel if they have 4 concrete mixer trucks parked there?

Relax on the doomsday forecasts here guys until we know a bit more about what is going on and what their construction schedule is like.

lesterp4
July 18th, 2006, 11:49 AM
I am interested in what is going on because nothing (steel) has happened since the crane operators strike. I thought the strike was settled but they have not been working at BOA.

TallGuy
July 18th, 2006, 12:00 PM
I am interested in what is going on because nothing (steel) has happened since the crane operators strike. I thought the strike was settled but they have not been working at BOA.

Well, it's not like they are just going to abandon the project and leave it there as-is.

Jaffster
July 18th, 2006, 06:09 PM
I was walking past the site today and they had a smaller crane lifting packs of glass panels to the roof of the lowrise part. Maybe this is part of the facade?

lofter1
July 18th, 2006, 06:23 PM
... a smaller crane lifting packs of glass panels ... part of the facade?


Oh Yeah :) :D :)

pianoman11686
July 20th, 2006, 08:59 PM
Walked by this morning, and I can assure everyone, there's no reason to worry. The site is buzzing with activity in virtually every section of the thus-far constructed building. The lack of crane movement/steel assembly must be part of the complicated schedule, and not a sign of a lack of progress. As Ninja mentioned earlier, they can't be doing everything all the time. Today, there was a lot of glass delivered (two flatbeds' worth):

http://images1.snapfish.com/347667776%7Ffp343%3Enu%3D3247%3E4%3A5%3E9%3A%3B%3E WSNRCG%3D323396536434%3Anu0mrj


http://images1.snapfish.com/347667776%7Ffp343%3Enu%3D3247%3E4%3A5%3E9%3A%3B%3E WSNRCG%3D3233965348%3A76nu0mrj


As well as interior infrastructure work and fireproofing:

http://images1.snapfish.com/347667776%7Ffp343%3Enu%3D3247%3E4%3A5%3E9%3A%3B%3E WSNRCG%3D323396536434%3Cnu0mrj


http://images1.snapfish.com/347667776%7Ffp339%3Enu%3D3247%3E4%3A5%3E9%3A%3B%3E WSNRCG%3D3233965348%3A77nu0mrj


For those who've never visited the site, I can't stress enough just how massive this project is. It's not like one of those slim residentials that top out after 6 months. This will take some time, and I'm sure we'll see some steel arriving in the coming weeks.

lofter1
July 20th, 2006, 09:28 PM
Good to see the glass arriving ... the cleats are in place on the low-rise portion for installation of the facade panels.

Yesterday they were working full-time on building the massive concrete elevator core which so far has risen to the second floor of the tower.

Citytect
July 20th, 2006, 11:05 PM
I'm really interested in seeing some of the glass installed. The quality and look of the glass will make or break this tower. I'm hoping for something good-looking and not too reflective.

TREPYE
July 21st, 2006, 01:39 AM
^ The design of this scraper itself is so good that the glass could not ruin its quality. If they stick with the design showed on the renderings it will be one awesome looking tower regardless of the type of glass.

I can't wait to see it wedged between the Conde Nast tower and the Empire State Building in the views from the Brooklyn Bridge and the Brooklyn Heights promenade ;).


Check out this cool view of midtown from the bridge. For some reason the picture did not come up on the post.
http://static.flickr.com/48/148676744_b579babc73.jpg?v=0

Citytect
July 21st, 2006, 05:41 PM
^ The design of this scraper itself is so good that the glass could not ruin its quality. If they stick with the design showed on the renderings it will be one awesome looking tower regardless of the type of glass.

The design is good, but its not THAT good. Even the best designs can look like crap if the material choices are bad or low-quality. Likewise, the type of glass chosen for this tower will obviously greatly impact how good it looks. How could it not? The facade is essentially all glass. If they apply wavy green glass, it won't look so good.

TREPYE
July 21st, 2006, 05:51 PM
Even the best designs can look like crap if the material choices are bad or low-quality.

Example?

londonlawyer
July 21st, 2006, 06:54 PM
^ The design of this scraper itself is so good that the glass could not ruin its quality....

I agree. This building will be stunning. Have you guys checked out the animated model on www.durst.org? It shows the magnificent angles of this tower. It's amazing to think what a filthy and disgusting corner this was a year ago. What a transformation!

Citytect
July 21st, 2006, 06:59 PM
I don't have specific examples off the top of my head. And that specific statement wasn't the point of my post. Isolated from the rest of what I said, the statement seems to address a large issue with a generalization. My point wasn't that bad material choices ruin great designs - material choice IS design (at least, it's a large part of design). The point I was making is that ugly glass on a tower with an all-glass facade won't look good no matter the shape of the building and other design elements. Is that hard to understand? Do I really need to provide specific examples? There are numerouse building around NYC with cheap-looking wavy glass and even more with cheap-looking prefab brick panels. The materials you use on a building's facade affect the building's outward appearance. Simple.

I didn't expect this to be something I'd have to explain, but I'm still looking forward to seeing what kind of glass they're going to put up. I expect it will be of good quality. It would be a shame if it's not.

TREPYE
July 21st, 2006, 07:03 PM
I don't have specific examples off the top of my head. And that specific statement wasn't the point of my post. Isolated from the rest of what I said, the statement seems to address a large issue with a generalization. My point wasn't that bad material choices ruin great designs - material choice IS design (at least, it's a large part of design). The point I was making is that ugly glass on a tower with an all-glass facade won't look good no matter the shape of the building and other design elements. Is that hard to understand? Do I really need to provide specific examples? There are numerouse building around NYC with cheap-looking wavy glass and even more with cheap-looking prefab brick panels. The materials you use on a building's facade affect the building's outward appearance. Simple.

I didn't expect this to be something I'd have to explain, but I'm still looking forward to seeing what kind of glass they're going to put up. I expect it will be of good quality. It would be a shame if it's not.

Hey dude Im not trying to grill you. I just wanted to get a better idea of your prespective via an example so I could relate to it a lil better than I do now. :)

lofter1
July 21st, 2006, 10:14 PM
Any info on what company is doing the glass here?

LeCom
July 21st, 2006, 10:56 PM
Thanks for the update Pianoman. You also got a point about it taking time as it's such a massive project. 10 Barclay shoots up in the sky at a crazy speed, yet it's very cookie-cutter.

pianoman11686
July 21st, 2006, 11:44 PM
Any info on what company is doing the glass here?

Viracon. They've done some high-profile projects in their past, including Taipei 101. In New York, they've supplied glass for the Westin Times Square, and 300 Madison. A press release from their website:

Viracon Awarded Glass Contract for New York City’s New “Green” Bank of America Tower

OWATONNA, MINN. (May 18, 2005)--Viracon has been named glass supplier for Midtown Manhattan’s new $1 billion dollar Bank of America Tower slated for completion in 2008. The 2.1 million sq. ft., 54-story skyscraper will require 700,000 sq. ft. of Viracon glass. Its crystal-like, spired tower and its outer glass “curtain” will create stunning visual drama while providing the most advanced technology in energy efficiency. In fact, this is the first skyscraper to strive for a Platinum LEED (Leadership in Energy & Environmental Design) designation. Its innovative design and technologies will cut energy and potable water consumption by 50 percent, and storm water waste by 95 percent.

According to Brad Austin, Senior Vice President Sales and Marketing, “This is one of the most complex projects—involving innovative architecture, leading edge technology and energy efficiency—that we have ever worked on. One Bryant Park (Bank of America Tower) is destined to make history in energy efficient design. The Durst Organization, owner/developer, had the goal and vision to design the very first Platinum LEED project of this magnitude. We are pleased that Cook + Fox Architects specified Viracon glass, which meets the energy efficiency requirements outlined by Durst, and that Permasteelisa Cladding Technologies, the curtain wall contractor, selected Viracon as their supplier.

The famed New York Crystal Palace, the first glass and steel building in America, erected in Bryant Park in 1853, inspired the design by Cook + Fox Architects. At ground-breaking on Aug. 2, 2004, Gov. George Pataki said, “We look forward to creating not just a spectacular visual experience, but also the most environmentally responsible building possible.”

To meet LEED’s stringent requirements, the Tower will feature Viracon insulated coated glass to reduce solar heat gain. The manufacturer will supply an Insulating Unit consisting of SolarscreenTM VE-2M coating and an intricate custom silk-screen pattern: low iron glass with VE-2M coating and custom silk-screen on the #2 surface. The building will also include areas with Viracon’s Insulating Laminated glass. Glazing contractor for the project is Permasteelisa Cladding Industries. Initial delivery is anticipated to begin in December 2005.

Visit the following URLS for photography and more details: www.cookplusfox.com, www.durst.org; and www.viracon.com.

Viracon, based in Owatonna, Minn., with a second plant in Statesboro, Ga., is an international company of Apogee Enterprises, Inc. Viracon produces high-performance glass products, including tempered, laminated, insulating, silkscreened and high-performance coatings. Apogee Enterprises, Inc. is a leading fabricator, distributor and installer of value-added glass products and systems. Headquartered in Minneapolis, the company’s stock is traded on the NASDAQ Stock Market under the symbol APOG.

&#169;2005 Viracon, Inc.

pianoman11686
July 21st, 2006, 11:55 PM
Judging by what I could see being unloaded from those flatbeds the other day, and from the renderings, I think the glass will be fairly transparent, and not reflective at all. It will also probably be the type of glass whose appearance will vary widely depending on the type of light. I think it'll sparkle in bright, sunny conditions, as well as when it's lit up at night. When it's cloudy, or when the sun is low, it might look a little dull. Don't take my word for it though, it's just a hunch.

As for glass making or breaking a building: it definitely can, especially if it's a building that relies entirely on glass for its facade, like this one. Many people raised the issue that Time Warner Center's glass came out much darker and more reflective than the renderings depicted; a lighter-colored, more transparent (or maybe somewhat glazed, and translucent) glass curtain wall would have made those buildings truly spectacular.

Or, look at Gehry's IAC Building. The glass definitely makes that building stunning. The angles play a role too, but the glass is what draws attention to it.

Or, look at One Astor Place - another example of glass "breaking" the building. Too reflective, makes the building look more out of place than it would have otherwise.

As a final example: is there any doubt, in anyone's mind, that the outcome of the glass curtain wall on the Freedom Tower will make or break that tower?

ZippyTheChimp
July 22nd, 2006, 09:16 AM
This building seems to be rising quite slowly.

I walked past there and the cranes are not in use and no steel on the street.The tower has a concrete core that lags steel by several floors.

lofter1
July 22nd, 2006, 11:13 AM
Viracon Awarded Glass Contract for New York City’s New “Green” Bank of America Tower

... To meet LEED’s stringent requirements, the Tower will feature Viracon insulated coated glass to reduce solar heat gain. The manufacturer will supply an Insulating Unit consisting of SolarscreenTM VE-2M coating and an intricate custom silk-screen pattern: low iron glass with VE-2M coating and custom silk-screen on the #2 surface. The building will also include areas with Viracon’s Insulating Laminated glass.

Decorative Silk-Screened Glass for Vision Areas

http://www.viracon.com/silkscreened.html

Silk-screening ceramic frit onto glass lets a designer create a subtle or bold look for a building-using patterns and color. silk-screened glass also improves solar control performance.

Using the same technology as Viraspan spandrel glass, you can incorporate standard or custom colors into a specific design element. Or, you can use one of Viracon's three standard silk-screen patterns (see chart below).

In the past, white ceramic frit has been the predominant color used in decorative applications. However, there has been an increase in the use of dark ceramic frits, such as neutral gray and black for a more subtle, less noticeable look. These colors also help reduce reflection and offer alternative design options without adversely affecting performance.

http://www.viracon.com/images/monolithic.gif

The first step in silk-screening involves washing the annealed glass. Then, the ceramic frit paint is applied to one side of the glass (see Figure). Next, it is fired within a tempering furnace to create a permanent coating. The glass is always either heat strengthened or fully tempered to prevent glass breakage due to thermal stresses under sunlit applications.

Viracon's silk-screened decorative patterns can be combined with clear or tinted glass substrates, as well as with high-performance coatings to reduce glare and decrease solar transmission.

Silk-screen Patterns

http://www.viracon.com/images/silkscreenPatters.gif

http://www.viracon.com/images/insSilkscreened.gif

For an insulating glass unit, Viracon recommends applying the silk-screen pattern to the second surface for optimum solar performance. The sealed air space protects the ceramic frit for easy maintenance, as well as meeting Viracon's long-term durability architectural glass product requirements (see figure above).

http://www.viracon.com/images/lamSilkscreen.gif

Viracon can also apply the silk-screen pattern to the third or fourth surface of an insulating or laminated glass unit. The results are an increase in solar absorption on the interior glass ply and a higher shading coefficient. silk-screening on these two surfaces becomes more apparent from the interior during nighttime conditions, which complements indirect interior lighting.

http://www.viracon.com/images/inslam.gif

Furthermore, silk-screened ceramic frit can also be applied to the second, third, or fourth glass surface in a laminated vision glass application (see Figure 1). If you combine laminated glass with other types of glass to form an insulating glass unit, the ceramic frit must be protected within the air space or be applied to the roomside of an insulating glass unit (see figure).

Moiré Pattern

When using silk-screen patterns in architectural building applications, there may be a potential to see a Moiré pattern develop in the glass when viewed in certain light conditions and at specific solar angles. Coupled with these are the inherent dynamics of the construction process.

Moiré is an optical phenomenon that presents itself as a "wavy, rippled or circular" pattern under some conditions. The Moiré image is a pattern formed when two regularly spaced patterns "overlap," but are not aligned. Common examples may be woven fabric and window screens. In this case, the Moiré pattern appears to "shimmer" when light is reflected from the surface.

Architectural float glass will reflect light from each of its surfaces. When silk-screen patterns are applied to the #2 surface of an insulating glass unit, the image is reflected off of the #3 glass surface. It's the interference of the reflected image from the #3 surface, by the silk-screen pattern applied to the #2 surface, that causes the

Moiré pattern. The condition may be further pronounced by the air contained in the air space of the insulating glass unit. Air will expand when heated and contract when cooled. This is known as the Ideal Gas Law. Glass deflection may create the condition necessary for the Moiré pattern to occur, or may further distort the reflected image of the silk-screen pattern. With large glass sizes there is more potential for movement that can create a possible condition for the Moiré pattern effect to occur. Buildings under construction may have a higher potential to exhibit Moiré patterns because the glass temperatures have not been stabilized by controlled temperatures.

While it may be impossible to identify when the potential for Moiré pattern may occur, the following general recommendations may be helpful:

1. Line patterns closely spaced, or two glass surfaces having a silk-screen pattern applied (insulting glass) may be more prone to exhibiting a Moiré pattern.

2. To a lesser degree, silk-screened patterns using dots and holes, closely spaced may also be susceptible.

3. Insulating glass units used in spandrel areas may also be more prone to this phenomenon.

4. Large glass sizes with an aspect ratio (length to width ratio) of less than 2:1.

5. Highly transparent glass (clear, low-e coating).

6. Shadow box applications.

Viracon recommends that a full size mock-up be evaluated on all projects considering the use of silk-screen patterns. The mock-up should be installed at the building site and viewed under a variety of lighting and temperature conditions.

http://www.viracon.com/images/viraspanPic.jpg

Moscone Convention Center (http://www.viracon.com/gallerydetail.php?id=21)
SAN FRANCISCO, CA

Products Used
Insulating, Silk-Screened

Glass Type
VE1-2M

lofter1
July 22nd, 2006, 11:20 AM
NYC Projects by Viracon (seemingly none of these projects used the VE-2M glass that is described for the B/A Tower):

http://www.viracon.com/gallerysearchresults.php?field=stateCountry&data=NY%2CUSA

http://www.viracon.com/photos/WestinHotel.jpg
Westin Hotel
270 West 43rd Street at 8th Avenue, SE corner
New York, NY 10036 USA
View Project Details (http://www.viracon.com/gallerydetail.php?field=stateCountry&data=NY,USA&project=0)

http://www.viracon.com/photos/Canadian_Imperial_Bank.jpg
PricewaterhouseCoopers Center
300 Madison Avenue at 42nd Street, SW Corner
New York, NY 10017 USA
View Project Details (http://www.viracon.com/gallerydetail.php?field=stateCountry&data=NY,USA&project=1)

http://www.viracon.com/photos/Bloomberg_Tower.jpg
Bloomberg Tower
731 Lexington, 151 East 58th Street
New York, NY 10022 USA
View Project Details (http://www.viracon.com/gallerydetail.php?field=stateCountry&data=NY,USA&project=2)

http://www.viracon.com/photos/1_Times_Square.jpg
1 Times Square
1 Times Square
New York, NY 10022 USA
View Project Details (http://www.viracon.com/gallerydetail.php?field=stateCountry&data=NY,USA&project=3)

http://www.viracon.com/photos/Trump_World_Tower.jpg
Trump World Tower
725 5th Avenue, 1 East 56th Street, NE Corner
New York, NY 10017 USA
View Project Details (http://www.viracon.com/gallerydetail.php?field=stateCountry&data=NY,USA&project=4)

http://www.viracon.com/images/dotted.gif

TREPYE
July 22nd, 2006, 11:58 AM
I love the glass that was used for the Bloomy Tower. I wonder if BOA tower's glass will look as good??

pianoman11686
July 22nd, 2006, 01:39 PM
Trump World Tower
725 5th Avenue, 1 East 56th Street, NE Corner
New York, NY 10017 USA
View Project Details (http://www.viracon.com/gallerydetail.php?field=stateCountry&data=NY,USA&project=4)

http://www.viracon.com/images/dotted.gif

^Wrong address. In fact, wrong Trump Tower.

lofter1
July 22nd, 2006, 04:55 PM
I just cut + paste ...

Don't blame me ;)

Blame Viracon :D

btw: Doessn't that rendering show what was originally proposed for that Trump tower (bronze-y glass) -- when in fact the glass used is much darker??

macreator
July 22nd, 2006, 11:21 PM
btw: Doessn't that rendering show what was originally proposed for that Trump tower (bronze-y glass) -- when in fact the glass used is much darker??

Yes, they changed the glass at the last minute to a much darker hue than the one used in renderings.

Personally, I would have preferred the bronze glass over the current black glass which makes the tower very dull and uninteresting from afar. Admittedly the glass is pretty sleak and modern up close.

finnman69
July 24th, 2006, 10:40 PM
Judging by what I could see being unloaded from those flatbeds the other day, and from the renderings, I think the glass will be fairly transparent, and not reflective at all.

It's basically the exact same glass used at WTC7. A low iron glass w/ a 70% transmission low-E coating, plus a frit to control glare. I love the WTC7 curtainwall. Maybe the best curtainwall in NYC in 10 years.

It does not have a reflective coating, but it will reflect due to the low_e coating.

pianoman11686
July 24th, 2006, 10:56 PM
I'm sure it will be reflective at least somewhat due to the fact that it's glass, but there's a difference between mirror-reflective (where you can see other buildings in the glass) versus shimmering-reflective (where only light is reflected). I think these two buildings illustrate the difference pretty well:

The Centria (http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showpost.php?p=110065&postcount=74)

505 Fifth (http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showpost.php?p=111065&postcount=280)

I think we'll see something closer to the latter, judging by the renderings and how clear the glass looked when it was on the truck.

finnman69
July 24th, 2006, 11:14 PM
he full on correct spec from Viracon would be VE15-2M. The VE-2M is just the low-e coating. The 15 coade stands for ultrawhite. Its almost exactly the same glass as at WTC 7. It even has the internal shading frit. I assume they will laminate the glass for blast protection, just like at WTC 7. In summary the glass will look exactly like the WTC7 glass which I think is gorgeous.


NYC Projects by Viracon (seemingly none of these projects used the VE-2M glass that is described for the B/A Tower):

http://www.viracon.com/gallerysearchresults.php?field=stateCountry&data=NY%2CUSA

http://www.viracon.com/photos/WestinHotel.jpg
Westin Hotel
270 West 43rd Street at 8th Avenue, SE corner
New York, NY 10036 USA
View Project Details (http://www.viracon.com/gallerydetail.php?field=stateCountry&data=NY,USA&project=0)

http://www.viracon.com/photos/Canadian_Imperial_Bank.jpg
PricewaterhouseCoopers Center
300 Madison Avenue at 42nd Street, SW Corner
New York, NY 10017 USA
View Project Details (http://www.viracon.com/gallerydetail.php?field=stateCountry&data=NY,USA&project=1)

http://www.viracon.com/photos/Bloomberg_Tower.jpg
Bloomberg Tower
731 Lexington, 151 East 58th Street
New York, NY 10022 USA
View Project Details (http://www.viracon.com/gallerydetail.php?field=stateCountry&data=NY,USA&project=2)

http://www.viracon.com/photos/1_Times_Square.jpg
1 Times Square
1 Times Square
New York, NY 10022 USA
View Project Details (http://www.viracon.com/gallerydetail.php?field=stateCountry&data=NY,USA&project=3)

http://www.viracon.com/photos/Trump_World_Tower.jpg
Trump World Tower
725 5th Avenue, 1 East 56th Street, NE Corner
New York, NY 10017 USA
View Project Details (http://www.viracon.com/gallerydetail.php?field=stateCountry&data=NY,USA&project=4)

http://www.viracon.com/images/dotted.gif

finnman69
July 24th, 2006, 11:17 PM
Normally a reflective coating would then be on #2 surface and the low E on thr #3 surface.

I wish Gehry had used this WTC7/BOA glass at IAC.


I'm sure it will be reflective at least somewhat due to the fact that it's glass, but there's a difference between mirror-reflective (where you can see other buildings in the glass) versus shimmering-reflective (where only light is reflected). I think these two buildings illustrate the difference pretty well:

The Centria (http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showpost.php?p=110065&postcount=74)

505 Fifth (http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showpost.php?p=111065&postcount=280)

I think we'll see something closer to the latter, judging by the renderings and how clear the glass looked when it was on the truck.

Jaffster
July 25th, 2006, 06:51 PM
Some glass panels are up on the 42nd street side. It seems like you cannot see through it. It was behind the scaffolding, so i cannot tell if it is reflective.

finnman69
July 25th, 2006, 11:50 PM
Some glass panels are up on the 42nd street side. It seems like you cannot see through it. It was behind the scaffolding, so i cannot tell if it is reflective.

About 40' feet of spandrel panels are up at the 2nd floor spandrel on 42nd st. It's non reflective glass. Neutral grey frit.

Ninjahedge
July 26th, 2006, 09:06 AM
And they seem to be pouring the 3rd floor slab on the north side today, all the trucks are lined up and the pump arm is in position......

pianoman11686
July 26th, 2006, 09:48 AM
The glass definitely is neutral, almost grey-colored, as finnman mentioned. I'll try to snap some pics on the way home later today. I know it's way too early to make predictions, but I don't see this building having the green tint that the renderings show.

pianoman11686
July 28th, 2006, 09:47 PM
More glass was delivered today, and concrete pourers were at work on the 43rd street side. I managed to snap some pics of the panels of glass that have been installed on the 2nd floor. Kind of hard to tell what they'll look like without the scaffolding, and in full light, but my impression is that they're very high-quality.

http://images1.snapfish.com/347736%3A3%3A%7Ffp354%3Enu%3D3247%3E4%3A5%3E9%3A%3 B%3EWSNRCG%3D323399%3C68376%3Bnu0mrj


http://images1.snapfish.com/347736%3A3%3A%7Ffp347%3Enu%3D3247%3E4%3A5%3E9%3A%3 B%3EWSNRCG%3D323399%3C682%3B45nu0mrj

RS085
July 28th, 2006, 10:22 PM
I like how it looks so far. Hopefully the whole building is clad in that. It should have a nice shimmering effect.

LeCom
August 4th, 2006, 09:40 AM
evening of June 31, 2006

http://extranet.emporis.com/files/transfer/6/2006/08/477813.jpg

http://extranet.emporis.com/files/transfer/6/2006/08/478000.jpg

http://extranet.emporis.com/files/transfer/6/2006/08/478001.jpg

http://extranet.emporis.com/files/transfer/6/2006/08/478002.jpg

kz1000ps
August 4th, 2006, 01:13 PM
^ http://www.emporis.com/en/il/pc/?id=201684&aid=19&sro=1&yr=2006&mt=7

Steel has still yet to rise past its current plateau.

RS085
August 4th, 2006, 01:32 PM
evening of June 31, 2006

http://extranet.emporis.com/files/transfer/6/2006/08/477813.jpg

http://extranet.emporis.com/files/transfer/6/2006/08/478000.jpg

http://extranet.emporis.com/files/transfer/6/2006/08/478001.jpg

http://extranet.emporis.com/files/transfer/6/2006/08/478002.jpg

i was there then. i think i saw you no joke.

Derek2k3
August 7th, 2006, 12:17 AM
http://static.flickr.com/98/208724096_697673c37d_o.jpg

http://static.flickr.com/92/208724092_f84f380837_o.jpg

http://static.flickr.com/70/208724093_d306afabd2_o.jpg

http://static.flickr.com/96/208724095_746fb5bbb2_o.jpg

http://static.flickr.com/61/208724094_5133d3572b_o.jpg
6/8/06

Ninjahedge
August 7th, 2006, 09:09 AM
http://static.flickr.com/92/208724092_f84f380837_o.jpg

AH!!!

So those HUGE beams WERE for a temporary crane support!

More than a few people were wondering about that!!!

lofter1
August 7th, 2006, 12:06 PM
Aha -- They must have erected that new crane over the weekend ...

LeCom
August 7th, 2006, 12:53 PM
i was there then. i think i saw you no joke.
Where were you? On the field?

RS085
August 7th, 2006, 01:40 PM
walkin up 42nd towards BOA, to show her.

we stopped at the newspaper stand right in front of the park, and saw the shit going on. it was between 7-8 that day. i stopped to get me some candy but all the chocolate was melted. boooo

finnman69
August 7th, 2006, 05:50 PM
I wonder if the spandels are going to be fritted all white all the way up the tower, like at the base.

That look lwill be closer to this:
http://graphics10.nytimes.com/images/2006/07/12/business/liberty.190.1.650.jpg

than to this:

http://img160.imageshack.us/img160/9686/pict00227wtclookinguptothenwco.jpg



http://static.flickr.com/70/208724093_d306afabd2_o.jpg

http://static.flickr.com/96/208724095_746fb5bbb2_o.jpg

http://static.flickr.com/61/208724094_5133d3572b_o.jpg
6/8/06

alibrot
August 8th, 2006, 11:35 AM
the steel doth rise again!

pianoman11686
August 8th, 2006, 01:42 PM
I think the new Gehry building is absolutely perfect, and I wouldn't mind if all of One Bryant Park was clad in a similar kind of frosted glass. It makes for a really classy look, and when the lights go on at night, I think it'll look magical. Not to sound like I'm disappointed, but how come all the renderings so far have depicted a crystalline, clear-glass tower?

pianoman11686
August 8th, 2006, 02:58 PM
More good news on the leasing front from GlobeSt.com (http://www.globest.com/news/665_665/newyork/148020-1.html)

Last updated: August 8, 2006 12:53pm

Akin Gump Takes 200,000 SF at BofA Tower

By John Salustri

NEW YORK CITY-Another 200,000 sf has been claimed at Bank of America Tower, the $1-billion asset the Durst Organization is putting up at One Bryant Park in a joint venture with BofA. International law firm Akin Gump Strauss Hauer & Feld LLP, will take a total of six floors in the building, bringing the 2.1-million-sf structure to 90% occupancy. An Akin Gump spokesperson says that the new space will house all of the staff currently housed in its 590 Madison Ave. offices.

In terms of further deal details, the Durst Organization was typically mum. However, sources familiar with the transaction tell GlobeSt.com that estimates of roughly $100 per foot for the 15-year deal "are not inaccurate."

The source adds that the remaining upper-floor space at the 51-story tower will also hover at north of $100 per foot. The deal--and the lease rate--satisfies the wish list of Durst co-president Douglas Durst, who previously called the ball: “I don’t think we’ll have any trouble getting $100 per sf at the top of the building. By the time we finish, we’ll have most of the space leased.”

Durst was represented by the in-house team of SVP Tom Bow and VP Eric Engelhardt and Gary Rosenberg of Rosenberg & Estis PC. Akin Gump was represented by Eric Berson of Washington Realty Group.

Traffic has been busy at the tower, which will serve as the headquarters for Bank of America’s New York City operations as well as such functions as global corporate and investment banking, wealth and investment management and consumer and commercial banking businesses. (Durst will also move there from it's current 1155 Ave. of the Americas offices.)

As GlobeSt.com reported in March, BofA itself hiked its presence in the building when it increased its lease by 522,000 sf, giving it a total of 1.6 million ft. on 13 floors. Eventually, the plan is to be sole occupant.

Copyright © 2006 ALM Properties, Inc.

finnman69
August 8th, 2006, 06:35 PM
I think the new Gehry building is absolutely perfect, and I wouldn't mind if all of One Bryant Park was clad in a similar kind of frosted glass. It makes for a really classy look, and when the lights go on at night, I think it'll look magical. Not to sound like I'm disappointed, but how come all the renderings so far have depicted a crystalline, clear-glass tower?

I disagree. I think it's ahrd to tell that the white frit is in fact not metal, as opposed to glass. the white frit tends to reduce the reflections on the glass which is what would really animate Gehry's building.

lofter1
August 8th, 2006, 07:45 PM
all will change with the lighting ...

Citytect
August 8th, 2006, 07:52 PM
I like the look of the glass going up on BoA. The clear glass is very clear and colorless. Looks high-quality. Now, let's hope the window blinds/shades look as good because they'll probably be quite visible from the outside.

pianoman11686
August 8th, 2006, 10:14 PM
I disagree. I think it's ahrd to tell that the white frit is in fact not metal, as opposed to glass. the white frit tends to reduce the reflections on the glass which is what would really animate Gehry's building.

I'm sorry, but I'm having a hard time believing that the white frit could be metal. First of all, it looks nothing like metal from up close. Second of all, after checking Durst's website, the building is in fact supposed to be completely clad in floor-to-ceiling translucent glass, which is one of its green/energy-saving features. I think the translucent, white portions that are near the tops of the windows will minimize the direct sunlight coming in from straight overhead, while the clearer portions will still allow the inside to be bright. I think this picture illustrates the effect pretty clearly:

http://www.durst.org/prop/images/1bp/hires/4.jpg

Notice how you can still somewhat see through the upper portions of the windows. They've got to be glass.

NoyokA
August 8th, 2006, 10:21 PM
I'm sorry, but I'm having a hard time believing that the white frit could be metal. First of all, it looks nothing like metal from up close. Second of all, after checking Durst's website, the building is in fact supposed to be completely clad in floor-to-ceiling translucent glass, which is one of its green/energy-saving features. I think the translucent, white portions that are near the tops of the windows will minimize the direct sunlight coming in from straight overhead, while the clearer portions will still allow the inside to be bright. I think this picture illustrates the effect pretty clearly:

http://www.durst.org/prop/images/1bp/hires/4.jpg

Notice how you can still somewhat see through the upper portions of the windows. They've got to be glass.

Its a ceramic frit, much like the glass at the LVMH Tower:

http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showpost.php?p=110616&postcount=1420

http://www.masslogue.com/archives/img/ny224.jpg

LeCom
August 8th, 2006, 10:28 PM
Is it just me or do the windows seem too narrow?

I'm not liking the facade too much at this point, at least it's not what I imagined it would be, but this may just be the first impression.

pianoman11686
August 8th, 2006, 10:59 PM
You definitely know your stuff, Stern. At first you had me confused, because I thought you were talking about some kind of ceramic panelling being used. It turns out that they just use it to produce a kind of sandblasted, or frosted, effect, by coating the glass to make it translucent. Ultimately, the entire curtain wall will be glass, some of it will be transparent, and the fritted sections will be translucent.

Further information from Viracon (http://www.viracon.com/downloads/spandrel/ViraspanColorCard.pdf)

NoyokA
August 8th, 2006, 11:25 PM
You definitely know your stuff, Stern. At first you had me confused, because I thought you were talking about some kind of ceramic panelling being used. It turns out that they just use it to produce a kind of sandblasted, or frosted, effect, by coating the glass to make it translucent. Ultimately, the entire curtain wall will be glass, some of it will be transparent, and the fritted sections will be translucent.

Further information from Viracon (http://www.viracon.com/downloads/spandrel/ViraspanColorCard.pdf)

Its called a ceramic frit although I've always reffered to it as etched glass. It is my favorite technique for a curtain wall and I am glad to see it applied here although it looks best on more abstract buildings like the cubist LVMH Tower. I don't know how the technique will look on a very geometric BOFA Tower and with a uniform up and down shading. What would be great is if certain panels had etched angles in accordance with the fascades folds like the LVMH Tower since BOFA is so geometric. We all know this isn't part of the design program, its sad because this would have put the building over the top!

lofter1
August 9th, 2006, 12:02 AM
Is it just me or do the windows seem too narrow?

I'm not liking the facade too much at this point, at least it's not what I imagined it would be, but this may just be the first impression.
It seems that the window sizes / design are to be different on the low mid-block section from what will be used on the actual tower (as there will be a difference on the lower floors of the tower along 6th Ave and wrapping around 42nd / 43rd from the faceted part of the tower rising above).

Derek2k3
August 9th, 2006, 12:24 AM
There seems to be more horizontal mullions on the low mid-block section.

pianoman11686
August 9th, 2006, 09:25 AM
Here's a rendering that depicts how much the facade will change at the lower portion of the building:

http://www.durst.org/prop/images/1bp/hires/2.jpg

Also, in this one, notice how different the low-rise base (extending eastward from the wall of Conde Nast) is, compared to the rest of the tower (both above it, and the portion near the corner of 6th & 42nd):

http://www.durst.org/prop/images/1bp/hires/3.jpg

I can't believe I missed so many details when these renderings first came out. The more I try to envision the entire tower based on what's there now, the more I'm liking it.

kliq6
August 9th, 2006, 09:39 AM
Firm inks big One Bryant Park lease
A lease by an international law firm has brought One Bryant Park to 90 percent occupancy. Akin Gump Strauss Hauer & Feld have leased 200,000 square feet on six floors of the 2.1-million-square-foot tower. The tower's landlord, the Durst Organization, was represented in-house on the deal, and Washington Realty Group represented the law firm. more [GlobeSt]

finnman69
August 9th, 2006, 05:55 PM
I'm sorry, but I'm having a hard time believing that the white frit could be metal. First of all, it looks nothing like metal from up close. Second of all, after checking Durst's website, the building is in fact supposed to be completely clad in floor-to-ceiling translucent glass, which is one of its green/energy-saving features. I think the translucent, white portions that are near the tops of the windows will minimize the direct sunlight coming in from straight overhead, while the clearer portions will still allow the inside to be bright. I think this picture illustrates the effect pretty clearly:

http://www.durst.org/prop/images/1bp/hires/4.jpg

Notice how you can still somewhat see through the upper portions of the windows. They've got to be glass.


I think the white frit on gehry's IAC building looks like white metal at times. Not the gradated pattern, but the solid opaque areas.

The BOA building looks a little more subtle (especially in the frit gradation from spandrel to vision areas) and with a greater proportion of visible glass to obscured glazing. However the photos of the glass so far, compared to the renderings that portray the glass as highly transparent, I think is inaccurate as far as the actual effect. The white frit contrasts heavily with the vision lights. By nature of the contrast bewtween interiors and exteriors, the vision lights will tend to appear as dark bands(unless there is a high level of interior uplighting) between white hirizontal stripes. As

finnman69
August 9th, 2006, 06:01 PM
Its a ceramic frit, much like the glass at the LVMH Tower:

http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showpost.php?p=110616&postcount=1420

http://www.masslogue.com/archives/img/ny224.jpg

My observation is the solid white frit spandrels ay the IAC building looks like metal when the there is no obvious reflection in the glass.

We will all have to wait for multiple floors of the glass to go up to get the effect. Overall, the vision glass will be pretty transparent and highly reflective. However, the spandrel glass will not reflect that much becasue the frit is so so light in nature, thus the reflections portrayed in the beautiful Screampoint renderings are not entirely accurate, and not what will be the final result. Accurately rendering reflections and glass in general is the hardest effect to achieve.


update: just went by 42nd. Interesting off set canted curtainwall on 42nd. The frit is more subtle than at IAC and I think it's not as white, more of a light grey. Lots of mullion detailing. Maybe fussy, maybe very cool. I now see the 42nd street base curtainwall is very different than the tower detailing (going from the rendering)

lofter1
August 9th, 2006, 08:29 PM
update: just went by 42nd. Interesting off set canted curtainwall on 42nd. The frit is more subtle than at IAC and I think it's not as white, more of a light grey. Lots of mullion detailing. Maybe fussy, maybe very cool.

Walking by earlier today I noticed that canted placement of the windows as they move up the 42nd St. facade. Like glass clapboards.

It's hardly noticeable in the photos / renderings that have been posted, but now that 4 floors of glass are up it is much more apparent.

At the west end of the lower section near the loading dock the window detail shifts from horizontal to vertical -- breaks up that expanse in a good way.

finnman69
August 10th, 2006, 04:03 PM
I wonder if there are any shadow boxes left . The section rendering and the perspectives seem to indicate a lot of depth via cast shadows at the spandrels, but clearly they got eliminated. Looks like there are a lot of different facade types.

http://static.flickr.com/96/208724095_746fb5bbb2_o.jpg
http://www.durst.org/prop/images/1bp/hires/3.jpg

Jaffster
August 10th, 2006, 08:15 PM
I was walking past the site today, and saw 2 flatbeds of steel delivered. We should see this rise pretty soon.

BrooklynRider
August 11th, 2006, 12:46 AM
Looking at the size of that structure so far, it would seem that two flatbeds hardly raise it one story more.

michelle1
August 11th, 2006, 07:29 AM
Oh yeah that structure is huge!

pianoman11686
August 12th, 2006, 04:24 PM
These were taken Thursday, August 10:

http://images1.snapfish.com/34786499%3A%7Ffp355%3Enu%3D3247%3E4%3A5%3E9%3A%3B% 3EWSNRCG%3D3233%3A4%3A387565nu0mrj


http://images1.snapfish.com/34786499%3A%7Ffp34%3A%3Enu%3D3247%3E4%3A5%3E9%3A%3 B%3EWSNRCG%3D3233%3A4%3A389%3B46nu0mrj


More window delivery. Here you can clearly see the difference between the clear glass windows and the ones with the ceramic frit.

http://images1.snapfish.com/34786499%3A%7Ffp353%3Enu%3D3247%3E4%3A5%3E9%3A%3B% 3EWSNRCG%3D3233%3A4%3A389%3B47nu0mrj


They're almost done with the low-rise portion:

http://images1.snapfish.com/34786499%3A%7Ffp347%3Enu%3D3247%3E4%3A5%3E9%3A%3B% 3EWSNRCG%3D3233%3A4%3A387567nu0mrj


http://images1.snapfish.com/34786499%3A%7Ffp352%3Enu%3D3247%3E4%3A5%3E9%3A%3B% 3EWSNRCG%3D3233%3A4%3A389%3B48nu0mrj

kz1000ps
August 12th, 2006, 08:06 PM
I'll resist making any judgements until I see the other glass that will be used on the tower portion, but so far it looks like the two biggest towers going up in Midtown right now are turning out to be much more grey than was shown in renderings.

evil_synth
August 12th, 2006, 09:14 PM
I think the BofA tower's glass looks awesome, especially in that last picture.

pianoman11686
August 12th, 2006, 10:17 PM
I'll resist making any judgements until I see the other glass that will be used on the tower portion, but so far it looks like the two biggest towers going up in Midtown right now are turning out to be much more grey than was shown in renderings.

Well, we knew the Times building would be gray, but I'd reserve judgment on it until I see it fully lit up. As for this one: the light conditions are a little deceptive. I took those pictures fairly early in the morning, and I think the sun wasn't high enough in the sky to light up that south-facing facade. Plus, you have to realize that all those windows are very dirty right now. Once they clean off all that dust, this building will sparkle. I can't wait to see the finished product.

sfenn1117
August 22nd, 2006, 10:53 PM
This building has risen 2 stories since the last photo update. I remembered my camera today, but did not remember to charge the batteries. :mad:

RS085
August 23rd, 2006, 01:19 AM
glad to hear its back on track. didnt know it had a concrete core. should be full steam ahead now. the spotlight now shifts from NYTimes to BOA.

ZippyTheChimp
August 23rd, 2006, 05:13 AM
Concrete core construction.
http://img242.imageshack.us/img242/2929/boa11cep3.th.jpg (http://img242.imageshack.us/my.php?image=boa11cep3.jpg)

Ninjahedge
August 23rd, 2006, 09:40 AM
They had the "Putzmeister" pumpers out and at least 4 mixers line up this morning on the North Face...

Nobody knows how to pump quite like the PutzMeister!

mdw46
August 27th, 2006, 11:17 AM
In a few weeks they will be placing a concrete pump in the building

ablarc
September 5th, 2006, 09:33 PM
Sunday, September 3:

http://66.230.220.70/images/post/bank/01.jpg

This building has too big a footprint. Certainly it's better from a distance than the crap that preceded it, but the street level experience of walking by on the uptown sidewalk will be dull; we might actually wish for the seedy little businesses to be back.

http://66.230.220.70/images/post/bank/02.jpg

Vengineer
September 5th, 2006, 10:22 PM
Massive.

ablarc
September 5th, 2006, 10:47 PM
Massive.
That's right.

kz1000ps
September 6th, 2006, 12:58 AM
Certainly it's better from a distance than the crap that preceded it, but the street level experience of walking by on the uptown sidewalk will be dull; we might actually wish for the seedy little businesses to be back.

Nail on the head. Although this will make quite the impact way up high on the skyline, down on human level it will be quite stifling, and I'm curious to see just how much better it'll be down there than the average 1960s tower. So far the walk along 42nd St. on the north side looks to be pretty damn dull.

And Ablarc, since when did you start taking your own photos of NY? Just recently visiting?

sfenn1117
September 6th, 2006, 01:07 AM
True, but this building is such an asset to New York, bringing trading floors and one of the largest banks in the world to the heart of New York, when they could have easily caved and headed to JC or Stamford.

So this being said, how do we still have the massive, but necessary base, and still create a lively streetfront for pedestrians? It's not easy.

ablarc
September 6th, 2006, 01:18 AM
And Ablarc, since when did you start taking your own photos of NY? Just recently visiting?
I try to get by and take some shots a couple of times a year. Some photo threads in "Photos of New York" subforum.

kz1000ps
September 6th, 2006, 12:48 PM
Ah, ok. This forum eats up so much of my time that I outright avoid certain sub-forums, the photos section being one of them.


So this being said, how do we still have the massive, but necessary base, and still create a lively streetfront for pedestrians? It's not easy.

A retail section along 42nd Street should have been part of the program from the beginning (this is 42nd between 6th and 7th we're talking about here). The first floor is already so cut up by various necessary components (lobby, loading docks, theatre, ect.) that a trading floor would have never been placed there either way. So why couldn't they have carved out some frontage that's perhaps 40-50 feet deep? That still leaves 150 feet for internal operations. And with the shallow depth of retail space, that would force the tenant to take up more street frontage to get the same square footage, thus ensuring Durst/BOA can charge an exorbitant amount and get a tenant that would fit in with the prestigious image of the place.

ablarc
September 6th, 2006, 01:18 PM
A retail section along 42nd Street should have been part of the program from the beginning (this is 42nd between 6th and 7th we're talking about here). The first floor is already so cut up by various necessary components (lobby, loading docks, theatre, ect.) that a trading floor would have never been placed there either way. So why couldn't they have carved out some frontage that's perhaps 40-50 feet deep? That still leaves 150 feet for internal operations. And with the shallow depth of retail space, that would force the tenant to take up more street frontage to get the same square footage, thus ensuring Durst/BOA can charge an exorbitant amount and get a tenant that would fit in with the prestigious image of the place.
42nd Street frontage will be mostly bank, right?

kz1000ps
September 6th, 2006, 01:23 PM
Probably, but I don't know for a fact. In which case a bank is almost as dead as a blank wall, unless BOA makes a specatacle of the place..

ablarc
September 6th, 2006, 01:41 PM
Another dead corner.

pianoman11686
September 6th, 2006, 05:20 PM
I agree that the footprint is too big. I think the tower would have been much better without the 6-story base extension towards Conde Nast. Although, what would have gone there instead? A plaza? We all know how well that worked across the street, next to Verizon. A sliver building? Not out of the question, but it would've blocked a lot of windows, that's for sure.

To the best of my knowledge, there will be no retail in this building. That includes a bank. The low-rise base will have a public through-block passageway, while the tower's base will have a public atrium on the 6th Avenue side. Here's a refresher on how the base will look:

http://www.durst.org/prop/images/1bp/hires/3.jpg

And, here are some tidbits from Durst's website concerning the street-level features:

Public Space

3X the public circulation space of an as-of-right high-rise office building on this site

Below-grade pedestrian walkway linking the B, D and F subway lines to Times Square station

New glass-enclosed dual-stair Subway entrance at 42 nd Street and 6 th Avenue

Mid-block Subway entrance located at 42 nd Street and the through-block connection

Widened sidewalks

Public street furniture

Urban Garden Room located at 43 rd Street and 6 th Avenue, serving as an inviting extension of Bryant Park and Grace Plaza

Through-Block Pedestrian Passage

Through-block public passageway connecting 42 nd and 43 rd Streets featuring Broadway-inspired programming and attractions, with multiple, interactive information kiosks to create a uniquely animated experience

Henry Miller’s Theater Attraction anchoring the passageway’s program with a contemporary documentary style multimedia exploration of the life and times of the historical playhouse and its creator

Henry Miller’s Theater Caf&#233; and Restaurant featuring a unique combination of cuisine for quick pre- and post-show meals, as well more leisurely, fine dining

Broadway and NYC information stations providing a comprehensive database of information about the entire theater district and other New York attractions and amenities

“Broadway Wall of Fame” dedicated to the best of Broadway’s past and present, along with live performances and behind-the-scenes peeks

lofter1
September 6th, 2006, 06:25 PM
I think the tower would have been much better without the 6-story base extension towards Conde Nast.

The vast majority of that part of the building houses the stage, auditorium, dressing rooms, lobby and fly-space for the re-built Henry Miller's Theatre -- which opened (http://cinematreasures.org/theater/2969/) on this site in 1918. The 43rd St. facade (now undergoing restoration) :

http://www.bridgeandtunnelclub.com/bigmap/manhattan/midtown/boa/henry.jpg

Before you get too nostalgic for what that stretch of 42nd St. used to be like you might want to visit HERE (http://www.bridgeandtunnelclub.com/bigmap/manhattan/midtown/boa/index.htm)

lofter1
September 6th, 2006, 07:37 PM
Some tidbits on Henry Miller's Theatre ...

Federico Fellini's film "La Dolce Vita" had it's American Premiere at this theatre on April 19, 1961 (see an ad for the Opening Night below).

http://www.roma-o-matic.com/imgmonumento/15-2.jpg

http://www.activitaly.it/immaginicinema/fellini/la_dolce_vita/la_dolce_vita_fellini_anita.jpg

http://www.dvdfrombrazil.com/FFELLDV_Image1_400_800.jpg
Anita Ekberg in the Trevi Fountain

Bosley Crowther of the New York TImes gave it a RAVE (http://movies2.nytimes.com/mem/movies/review.html?_r=1&res=EE05E7DF173EE367BC4851DFB266838A679EDE&oref=slogin) :


Federico Fellini's La Dolce Vita (The Sweet Life), which has been a tremendous hit abroad since its initial presentation in Rome early last year, finally got to its American premiere at Henry Miller's Theatre last night and proved to deserve all the hurrahs and the impressive honors it has received.

For this sensational representation of certain aspects of life in contemporary Rome, as revealed in the clamorous experience of a free-wheeling newspaper man, is a brilliantly graphic estimation of a whole swath of society in sad decay and, eventually, a withering commentary upon the tragedy of the overcivilized.

The critic is faced with a dilemma in attempting to assess and convey all the weird observations and intimations that abound in this titanic film. For Signor Fellini is nothing if not fertile, fierce, and urbane in calculating the social scene around him and packing it onto the screen.

He has an uncanny eye for finding the offbeat and grotesque incident, the gross and bizarre occurrence that exposes a glaring irony. He has, too, a splendid sense of balance and a deliciously sardonic wit that not only guided his cameras but also affected the writing of his script. As a consequence there are scores of piercing ideas that pop out in the picture's nigh three hours and leave one shocked, amused, revolted, and possibly stunned and bewildered at the end.

Perhaps the best way to give the reader a hint as to the flavor of this work is to describe its amazing beginning. A helicopter is seen flying toward Rome with an uncertain object dangling beneath it by a rope. As the machine comes closer, we see the object is a statue of Jesus, arms outstretched as if in blessing, a sweet, sad expression on its face.

Casually, the whirring "chopper" flies past an ancient aqueduct, the modern machine and its strange burden looking incongruous against the ruin. On it goes past piles of buildings, the ugly postwar apartment houses on the fringe of Rome, and over the heads of a bevy of voluptuous females sunbathing in bikinis on a penthouse roof. Then alongside it comes a second helicopter bearing our young newspaper man and his persistent photographer recording the bizarre scene.

Here is the flavor of the picture and, in a fast glimpse, its theme. Dignity is transmuted into the sensational. Old values, old disciplines are discarded for the modern, the synthetic, the quick by a society that is past sophistication and is sated with pleasure and itself. All of its straining for sensations is exploited for the picture magazines and the scandal sheets that merchandise excitement and vicarious thrills for the mob.

This is Signor Fellini's comment, not put into words, of course, but fully illuminated in his accumulation of startling episodes ...

In sum, it is an awesome picture, licentious in content but moral and vastly sophisticated in its attitude and what it says ...


On June 7, 1978 the disco XENON opened at Henry Miller's Theatre, trying to cash in on the success of STUDIO 54 on the other side of TImes Square.

http://web.wireimage.com/images/Thumbnail/1265418.jpg (http://previews3.wireimage.com/PreviewImgPopUp400.asp?ItemI=1265418)
Ron Galella
Arnold Schwarzenegger & Maria Shriver
at the party for "Timbuktu", XENON (http://www.wireimage.com/GalleryListing.asp?navtyp=SRH&logsrch=1&sfld=&nbc1=1) Disco,
New York City, NY, 07/27/78

http://www.trashfiction.co.uk/disco_inside5.jpg (http://www.trashfiction.co.uk/disco_fever_cover.html)
Earth Kitt at Xenon

http://www.sohoweeklynews.com/Book/Nightlife/xenon_village_people_valerie_std.jpg
The Village People party down at XENON

Opening night photos at XENON HERE (http://www.wireimage.com/GalleryListing.asp?nbc1=1&navtyp=CAL====93041&ym=197806)

TONS of Great Photos of New York Nightlife in the'70s HERE (http://www.sohoweeklynews.com/Book/Nightlife/index.htm?size=1&exif=&page=all) , including ...

Andy Warhol and Divine arrive at a party in Andy's honor at the re-opening of the Copacabana nightclub :

http://www.sohoweeklynews.com/Book/Nightlife/andy_warhol_divine_std.jpg (http://www.sohoweeklynews.com/Book/Nightlife/index.htm?page=1)
&#169; Allan Tannenbaum


Halston, Roy Cohn, and Steve Rubell, all dead of AIDS, at a
Victor Hugo performance at The Mudd Club, NYC, 7/17/79 :

http://www.sohoweeklynews.com/Book/Nightlife/halston%20cohn%20rubell%20mudd_std.jpg (http://www.sohoweeklynews.com/Book/Nightlife/index.htm?page=1)
&#169; Allan Tannenbaum


Klaus Nomi performs at XENON :

http://www.sohoweeklynews.com/Book/Nightlife/klaus_nomi_xenon_std.jpg (http://www.sohoweeklynews.com/Book/Nightlife/index.htm?page=1)
&#169; Allan Tannenbaum


The light towers descend from the ceiling to the dance floor and rise up again at Studio 54 :

http://www.sohoweeklynews.com/Book/Nightlife/s54_light_view_dj_std.jpg (http://www.sohoweeklynews.com/Book/Nightlife/index.htm?page=2)
&#169; Allan Tannenbaum


***

lofter1
September 6th, 2006, 07:39 PM
oooops ^^^ I got carried away

Arch
September 6th, 2006, 07:40 PM
What makes everyone think there won't be retail along 42nd street at least? There's a huge space there to deal with and great retail opportunity. I'd imagine Bank of America would put a flagship retail branch there considering retail is a huge part of their busines... They couldn't get a better site and I'm sure they could negotiate a decent rent with themselves.

Also haven't they said that the open air passage between 42nd and 43rd would be animated by retail/restaurant... with the theater at the north side (walk on 43rd street and you can see how close the theater is to the passageway), that only leaves the area on 42nd to the east of the passage for retail.

It does look like 43rd street east of the theater is going to be killed by what appears to be a massive loading dock, and 6th avenue has the lobby but 42nd looks wide open. The rendering even shows what looks to be some sort of storefront under that shingle-like curtainwall area.

lofter1
September 6th, 2006, 08:00 PM
Henry Miller's Theatre when it was XENON (http://www.disco-disco.com/clubs/identify-clubs.shtml):

http://www.hotdiscomix.de/media/clubs/club11_g.jpg

pianoman11686
September 6th, 2006, 08:00 PM
The reasoning behind that is, mainly, that the project description on Durst's website doesn't allot any amount of space to retail. There's only mention of the office space, and the space to be occupied by the reconstructed theater. Usually, the developer leasing a building will specify if and how much space will be taken up by retail.

Also, amid all of the leasing updates that we've gotten so far, I think there would have been some mention of a prospective retail tenant (there hasn't been any).

More info from Durst's website on the theater:

Henry Miller Theater

50,000 square foot reconstructed theater

Neo-Georgian land-marked façade of original 1918 Allen, Ingalls & Hoffman-designed Theater preserved and restored

Restoration and reconstruction of the historic oval reception room, doors and decorative plasterwork, and incorporation of salvaged elements into the new design

Increased seating capacity to almost 1,000

Fully ADA accessible, including approximately 20 wheelchair viewing positions, a spacious box office lobby, and improved toilet facilities

Incorporation of a large lobby bar at the orchestra level, a bar/café on the ground floor level, and a restaurant at an upper mezzanine within one building

A fully functional fly-tower and scenic loading facilities

Upgraded capacity and standards of lighting and electrical systems

jeffpark
September 6th, 2006, 10:31 PM
will Sam's Building across the street have retail.?

lofter1
September 6th, 2006, 11:11 PM
All of the public portions of the theatre front onto the 43rd St. side. The loading dock for the theatre seems to be incorporated into the main loading dock just east of the Conde Nast building. When they were building the fly space above the stage it appeared to be 2/3 to 3/4 of the way across the building towards 42nd St. and the southernmost part of the backstage area comes close to 42nd St. An expanded backstage area is always useful -- so it would make sense from a production point of view if some of that space at the 42nd St. side were made a useable part of the theatre.

There still might be room for some retail at street level along 42nd St. at that end of the building.

stache
September 7th, 2006, 03:44 AM
Maybe they'll open a small disco...

smackfu
September 8th, 2006, 10:38 AM
Well, the trees are nice, and break things up a bit. I wonder how that'll work in real life.

Fabrizio
September 8th, 2006, 11:10 AM
Lofter thanks soooo much for posting all of that.

jeffpark
September 8th, 2006, 12:02 PM
Douglas's building's on 3rd & 6th in general are Not retail friendlybuildings.

mgp
September 8th, 2006, 01:03 PM
I have not seen ground floor plans for One Bryant, so I am not sure what the precise layout is. But, I have talked to some folks with knowledge of the project, and Durst has been talking to a few high profile restrauteur's. Again, not sure where exactly the retail is (I assume 42nd), but there will be some sort of retail.

lofter1
September 8th, 2006, 04:40 PM
I took some looks from just outside the various gates along 42nd St. today ...

The southernmost wall of the theatre pretty much lines up with the southernmost wall of the concrete core -- that wouthern line appears to be about 2/3 of the way across the building from the northern edge , leaving ~ 60' of space between the 42nd St. facade and the area within. Taking away another 10' for interior hallway, etc. that would seem to leave a 50' deep space available for retail -- or what ever other use is chosen.

Another observation: fire-proofing is now complete on the lower floors throughout the building, but the rust-colored uprights in the area at the corner of 6th Ave. / 43rd St. have NOT been coated with fire-proofing (all of the other girders and beams surrounding them have been coated). Which leads me to wonder if these uprights are not temporary (much like the uprights in the north / south "bump-outs at the Times Tower -- all of which were recently removed, leaving those bump-outs as cantilievers and which are just now receiving the glass curtain wall which is essentially suspended from the floor above and also attached to the foundation). Currently that area of B/A looks very crowded with uprights -- if these are indeed temporary and will be removed that entire area will be much more open than it now appears.

Additionally: on the floors above along 6th Ave. there are similar rust-colored uprights placed at the perimeter of the floors, some of which are now being removed as the building moves higher, leaving the edges of those floor plates cantilevering out from the main steel of the tower. Similarly those rust-colored uprights on the upper floors have NOT been fire-coated, while all of the other steel around them has been coated.

If this is so then it seems that the structure -- at least this level along 6th Ave. -- will have a cantilievered facade.

Also: fretted glass very similar to that used on Gehry's IAC building has been installed on the floors above the loading dock area just between the B / A low-rise section and the Conde Nast building. The same fretted glass has been installed at the top-most floor over the theatre on W 43rd St. This glass transitions very well to the milky glass panels on the 42nd St. side.

jeffpark
September 8th, 2006, 06:23 PM
according to the "NY Law Journal" Douglas got $125.00 a foot or the Akim Gump..LLP lease of 203,218 s.f.

and if anyone want some space in the building there is 7 floors left Totaling 236,000 Square Feet.

pianoman11686
September 9th, 2006, 02:48 PM
From a New York Times article on building codes (full article here (http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showpost.php?p=119288&postcount=3323)):

http://graphics10.nytimes.com/images/2006/09/09/nyregion/06codesspan.jpg
Ángel Franco/The New York Times
At the Bank of America tower in Midtown, stairwells exceed city code standards. They are reinforced concrete and are wider than required.


Developers of some planned buildings, like the Freedom Tower at ground zero and the Bank of America tower in Midtown, are voluntarily meeting higher standards than those required by the code, in part because anxious tenants now seek them. It is unclear, however, whether such efforts will continue as market conditions evolve.

[...]

For example, many features of the 54-story Bank of America tower, now under construction at 42nd Street and Avenue of the Americas, will reflect the concerns of a post-9/11 world: bollards to block bombs, shatterproof glass, extra-thick steel and wider staircases encased in thick concrete. Many were not required under the code but were sought by the bank, as anchor tenant, or the developer, the Durst Organization.

Copyright 2006 The New York Times Company

ramvid01
September 9th, 2006, 02:55 PM
That is one thick wall, im thinking about 2 feet or so?

It's good to see that they are taking extra steps in safety.

ablarc
September 9th, 2006, 06:28 PM
It's good to see that they are taking extra steps in safety.
Yeah, though it costs plenty.

Derek2k3
September 10th, 2006, 12:08 AM
Here's a model of the building from Radii's website. Notice the sign saying "signage continuous band of retail."
http://www.radiiinc.com/images/26/Radii-BryantPark.pdf

NoyokA
September 10th, 2006, 12:19 AM
In that model it looks like the ceiling is higher and there isn't as much visibility of the screen. I hope this is the case because the appearance is much improved.

Citytect
September 10th, 2006, 12:20 AM
^Is that the NE corner of the building? I can't tell. SW maybe?

lofter1
September 10th, 2006, 01:03 AM
That model shows a very different plan at the base than the renderings -- particularly the SE corner -- which show an overhang and the glass enclosed subway entrance there.

Citytect
September 10th, 2006, 01:28 AM
Wonder if the model's configuration is older or newer than the renderings on the Durst website. I suspect older, but I don't know.

Also, do any renderings exist showing how the restored Henry Miller facade will relate to the rest of the BoA building?

lofter1
September 10th, 2006, 01:40 AM
I haven't seen renderings of that ^^ but they have started to install fretted glass similar to that used at Gehry's IAC building on the top-most floor above the Henry Miller facade on W. 43rd -- but there is space between the top of the theatre and the newly-installed glass -- and that space has not yet received glass or whatever it is that will go there. That transition will be tricky -- I'm thinking that they will use a different material to butt up to the existing theatre facade. But we'll just have to wait and be surprised ...

I think the model is older than the renderings.