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View Full Version : Proposed - Office Tower - 1800 Park Avenue at 125th Street - by Swanke Hayden Connell



Derek2k3
March 5th, 2003, 09:00 AM
NY Post.

March 5, 2003

WEDDING and meeting planners take note: Harlem may soon get its first, full-service hotel.

The land, a vacant parcel at the southwest corner of Park Avenue and East 125th Street opposite the Metro North station, is currently owned by the abutting New York College of Podiatric Medicine.

The school is negotiating a 48-year lease with a renewal option with developer Michael Caridi, chairman of the Brooklyn-based construction company, SRC Industries.

At this point, the Marriott and Westin hotel chains have expressed interested in the site.

"We're proposing 183 to 204 rooms in a full-service hotel," said Caridi, who hopes to break ground on the 26-to-30-story project in September. "It's a godsend for Harlem. Politically, everyone seems to be on board with it."

Indeed, Kenneth J. Knuckles, the former Dinkins administration Commissioner of General Services now leading the Harlem Empowerment Zone, is eager to facilitate its construction.

"It's something we would like to see happen," Knuckles said.

The land, however, must be rezoned to allow the project to move forward and the developer is discussing that aspect with City Planning. If it comes to a vote before the City Planning Commission, Knuckles, who also sits on that board, said he might have to recuse himself.

While Caridi's company generally provides construction and construction management services, others believe he is equipped to carry out the project.

He is a partner in the Holiday Inn on West 57th Street and says he is "talking to a few different people" about coming in on the Harlem deal.

"He has the equity and wherewithal to carry this out himself," said a source who is familiar with Caridi.

Caridi started pursuing the Harlem Hotel after learning of a favorable feasibility study by Marriott.

A Marriott spokesperson for its New York City properties confirmed it is in conversations with Caridi's firm to develop a 180-room Courtyard by Marriott.

Caridi is negotiating with the major operators now to see which one gets to carry its flag north of Central Park. The eventual winner will also drive the devilish details of the $100 million-plus hotel now being designed by SCR Design.

As currently planned, the mixed-use project would also have 200,000 square feet of commercial office space, 60,000 square feet of retail shopping, 30,000 square feet of catering for banquets and meetings, a small pool and underground parking.

Additionally, the architects are toying with creating an evening dinner and jazz club on the transitional 13th or 14th floors between the lower commercial offices and upper hotel rooms.

"The area with the rich history of 125th Street could be a nice draw," said Michael Cuddy, director of architecture for SCR. "There would be a view out over the lower buildings and you could see the river and Central Park and the surrounding areas."

According to Caridi, the hotel and attendant offices and retail shopping will create somewhere between 1,800 and 2,000 permanent jobs. A spokesperson for the Podiatric College said the negotiations are ongoing.

Joseph A. Del Vecchio of Murray Hill Properties/TCN, who is representing a retail project at 71 East 125th St. across the street, said, "It's about time. That portion of 125th Street is so desolate and it would be great to see development there."

NYguy
March 5th, 2003, 09:43 AM
I like it. *Hope it passes through, Harlem needs more developments like this. *And it just looks good...

amigo32
March 5th, 2003, 09:58 AM
I hope that they get it!
I am envious.

Zoe
March 5th, 2003, 10:04 AM
That is a great location for Harlems first hotel. *I hope this building happens. *Kinda reminds me of the Bell South building in Nashville TN. *The Bell building is around the same hight and is known down there as the "Batman Building"

DominicanoNYC
March 5th, 2003, 11:03 PM
Amazing. Great. Beautiful. I hope it is accepted. Harlem really needs a building like this to restart building development. During the 1970's there where a few high rise building made in the area around Harlem.

DominicanoNYC
March 6th, 2003, 06:30 PM
It's also a great improvement over the older Hotel Theresa. By the way, where did you get that rendering.

(Edited by DominicanoNYC at 5:33 pm on Mar. 6, 2003)

Derek2k3
July 19th, 2003, 01:04 PM
From The NYPost-here it is again..
http://images3.fotki.com/v32/free/08d54/3/39399/317606/East125thStreetHotel1NYPost-vi.jpg?1058630510

Off of SCR Design's website
\http://www.scrdesign.com/
http://www.scrdesign.com/images/rndHMXextA182x215.jpg

Kris
July 19th, 2003, 01:15 PM
I guess banal provincial American is better than something from someone's armpit.

TLOZ Link5
July 19th, 2003, 01:32 PM
Kinda like a convention center hotel in San Antonio...

billyblancoNYC
July 20th, 2003, 12:29 AM
Is this happening?

TLOZ Link5
July 20th, 2003, 09:21 PM
We'll find out soon enough.

matt3303
July 22nd, 2003, 10:34 PM
Harlem has alot of culture and history and I hope if a building boom comes, they won't make it a place to dump rushed-out last-minute architecture like the Cineplex on 14th Street or Houston. (I think that's where it is)

Kris
July 22nd, 2003, 11:20 PM
That's exactly what's happening.

TLOZ Link5
July 23rd, 2003, 10:30 PM
Who else here is reminded of the Westin Peachtree Hotel in Atlanta?

Kris
October 22nd, 2003, 09:22 PM
First Hotel and Office Development in 30 Years Slated for Harlem

By Barbara Jarvie

Last updated: Oct 22, 2003 10:04AM

NEW YORK CITY-Plans will be unveiled Thursday for the first Marriot Courtyard in an inner city community and an office building in Harlem. The 585,000-sf mixed use development, which is located at 125th Street and Park Avenue and dubbed Harlem Park, marks the area's first hotel and office development in 30 years.

The model of the $190-million development, designed by Enrique Norten, principal, Ten Acquitectos/Design International, will outline a vision that the developers, 1800 Park LLC, hope will "inspire a new source of community pride in Harlem."

This is just one of a number of developments in Harlem. A groundbreaking was held earlier this week for Strivers Gardens, a $67 million residential condominium on Frederick Douglass Boulevard between West 134th and 135th streets. The building will feature 169 condominiums, 37,000 sf of retail and underground parking and is expected to be ready to go by fall 2004.

Last year, the first phase of Harlem Center, an $80-million, 300,000 sf mixed-use development was being constructed by Forest City Enterprises Inc. Located on state-owned land at 105 W. 125th St., the office building scheduled to open in early 2004 will be anchored by two state agencies. First announced in late 1999, the project falls under the auspices of the empowerment zone, a 10-year, $300-million program to stimulate economic growth through financial incentives designed to attract new private investment. The state has contributed $100 million to match the federal and New York City contributions to the program.

Robert Redicker, SVP of Forest City Ratner, had previously stated his enthusiasm for the area. He noted last year that an inventory analysis of the 125th St. Corridor shows a thriving retail area that will be attractive to future commercial tenants. "It was clear to us that this corridor is more than a retail multilevel project," says Redicker. "A class A office property could also be very successful, and we believe our building will be well situated for that use."


© GlobeSt.com, LLC.

Kris
October 23rd, 2003, 12:09 AM
October 23, 2003

Harlem Looks Up, in Plans for a 29-Story Hotel Tower

By ALAN FEUER

Harlem, which has everything from an Old Navy shop to a Disney store these days, has been without a major hotel since 1966, when the Hotel Theresa, where Fidel Castro once stayed while visiting the city, closed for good.

This morning, however, real estate developers and a group of investors that includes Gene Autry's widow and the president of Def Jam Records planned to announce the construction of a Marriott Courtyard Hotel in a parking lot near the 125th Street Metro-North station.

An artist's rendering of the building shows a soaring 29-story glass structure that will hold more than 200 hotel rooms, some 250,000 square feet of office space and another 46,000 square feet for retail businesses. It will also include a public park and a sidewalk cafe that promise to brighten a dingy central Harlem intersection where the elevated train now runs the length of upper Park Avenue.

The planned hotel is yet another sign that Harlem, which in the last 10 years has undergone a boom, is continuing its second major renaissance.

"Harlem, in my opinion, is the gateway to Manhattan," said Michael Caridi, one of the principal developers. "Eastern Harlem and western Harlem have both been developed, but between Park Avenue and Fifth Avenue there was an open space. Hopefully, this project will join the east and west."

Mr. Caridi said he envisioned executives commuting by Metro-North to their offices in the Harlem complex. He said he could also imagine the Marriott attracting major conventions and business travelers because of its proximity to La Guardia Airport on an intersection where he said about 270,000 people pass by each day.

The developers plan to break ground next spring, he said, and open the hotel and office complex by December 2005.

Interest in the project has been remarkable, the developers say. Starbucks has already signed a contract to place a coffee shop inside the complex. There have been inquiries from large financial institutions and a few national restaurant chains, which the developers said they could not yet mention by name. Several companies have also expressed interest in the office space, they said.

The project is expected to cost about $190 million. Some of that money is expected to come from the city and state and some from a group of private investors.

One of the first investors to come on board was Jackie Autry, the widow of Gene Autry, the cowboy entertainer. Ms. Autry is a friend of Raymond Caldiero, one of the principal developers, and wanted to broaden the scope of her investments from the American West to the urban heartland.

"I'm keenly interested in getting people back to work," she said. "Gene, after all, grew up as a dirt farmer to become one of the wealthiest people in America."

The developers have promised Community Board 11, which represents the neighborhood, that a share of the 1,500 to 1,800 jobs that will be created by construction and occupancy will go to local residents.

"We certainly welcome any new development on 125th Street and look forward to the jobs," said David Givens, chairman of the community board.

Harlem itself, in fact, was a major attraction to the developers.

"There is something special and unique in continuing the revitalization of this community," said Jeff Fried, who helped put together the development team.

Because Kevin Liles, the president of Def Jam Records, has invested in the project, Mr. Fried went on, it could mean that the office complex will house tenants in the music industry.

Over the years, a handful of efforts have been made to develop hotels in Harlem, but none of them so far have succeeded. What exists in the neighborhood today is a smattering of bed-and-breakfasts.

A little more than a year ago, Mr. Caridi was driving through Harlem and saw a parking lot for the New York College of Podiatric Medicine on the southwest corner of 125th Street and Park Avenue. Mr. Caridi thought that it would make a perfect place to build an office tower. He got in touch with the college, which coincidentally was looking to secure its endowment. Mr. Caridi offered to pay them for the property with a long-term lease.

He then got in touch with Mr. Caldiero, a former executive for Marriott, who suggested they put up an office building connected to a major hotel. "At that point, I contacted Marriott," Mr. Caldiero said, "and the interest became expanded. We met with Marriott and basically put together a deal."

As part of the deal, the developers have hired an architect, Enrique Norton, who has promised to make his building fit in gracefully in Harlem.

"The streets of Harlem have great energy and great intensity," Mr. Norton said. "People use the streets much more than in other neighborhoods. They sit there all day long, using urban spaces as their living rooms. We want to be able to offer that same spirit and energy back to Harlem."


Copyright 2003 The New York Times Company

DominicanoNYC
October 23rd, 2003, 08:58 PM
That's great. That makes me happy.

Kris
October 28th, 2003, 02:42 PM
http://www.ny1.com/Content/images/live/51/101469.jpg

New Marriot Hotel To Be Built In Heart Of Harlem (http://www.ny1.com/ny/TopStories/SubTopic/index.html?topicintid=1&subtopicintid=1&contentint id=34185)

TLOZ Link5
October 28th, 2003, 05:23 PM
NY Daily News

Welcome mat not quite out

125th St. nabe is split over hotel

By SONI SANGHA
DAILY NEWS WRITER

http://www.nydailynews.com/ips_rich_content/345-harlem_marriot.JPG

Next to the Tattoo Nail Salon, in the parking lot of the New York College of Podiatric Medicine at 125th St. and Park Ave., a sign informs passersby that the Harlem Renaissance continues.

It says that by December 2005, a 29-story, glass-tower Marriott Courtyard Hotel will rise, outgrowing the shadow of the elevated Metro-North tracks across the street.

Plans call for the new hotel, called Harlem Park, to house a jazz club, a rooftop deck, 208 guest rooms and 11 floors of office space.

Harlem, which hasn't had a large tourist hotel since the Hotel Theresa closed in 1966, needs this, local politicians say.

"Harlem is a main tourist attraction," said Manhattan Borough President Virginia Fields, who added that the hotel will boost commerce by keeping visitors in the area.

Locals, however, are greeting the impending change with mixed emotions.

"Tourists are invading our neighborhood," said life-long Harlem resident Maggie Lucas, 50, who says the neighborhood is looking - and costing - more like midtown every day. "That building isn't for us. It's for them."

However, other Harlemites think a hotel is long overdue.

"I wouldn't advocate putting it on Park Ave.," cautioned Carole Bunyan, 71, pointing out such nearby eyesores as a boarded-up apartment building. "But I think it will be better for the neighborhood."

The pols agree, and estimate that 2,000 jobs will be created, a share of which, they promised Harlem's Community Board 11, will go to local people.

In addition, they say, the area surrounding the downtown-style hotel will also get a new look.

"The whole neighborhood will change," said Rep. Charles Rangel (D-Manhattan). "Take a good look around, because in 10 years, it's going to look totally different."

But making the neighborhood hotel-friendly, say people who have lived there for a while, will take a lot of work.

"To me, it might be a good thing, it might not," said Tony Haynes, 50, as he swept the sidewalk in front of Guinea Hair Braiding across the street from the hotel site. "But I don't think the neighborhood's ready. In 15, 20 years, maybe."

Originally published on October 28, 2003

DominicanoNYC
October 28th, 2003, 08:45 PM
Well I hope it goes up. I saw a few billboards similar to the ones at the Milstien site, meaning that it's a sure thing that this building might go up, but I'll try and see if I can get a few pics.

NYguy
October 31st, 2003, 11:50 PM
A scan from the Daily News: (reminds me of the Lever House for some reason)


http://www.pbase.com/image/22842838/large.jpg


http://www.thecityreview.com/lever1.gif


http://www.galinsky.com/buildings/lever/lever1.jpg

TLOZ Link5
November 1st, 2003, 02:39 AM
I can see where you're coming from.

Kris
November 26th, 2003, 11:27 AM
Enrique Norton Designing Tower In Harlem

November 25, 2003

http://archrecord.construction.com/news/images/031125norton2.jpg
http://archrecord.construction.com/news/images/031125norton1.jpg
Renderings of Harlem Park, courtesy TEN Arquitectos

Enrique Norton of TEN Arquitectos is designing a 380-foot tall, 550,000 square foot mixed-use tower in Harlem. Known as Harlem Park, the project, located on 125th street and Park Avenue, includes a 200 room Marriott hotel, office spaces, conference rooms, retail spaces, a fitness center, and music clubs. It will be the tallest structure in Harlem and the area’s first major tower.

The hotel is located on the end of a block next to an elevated Metro North train stop and has a particularly sleek, modern design for a Marriott hotel. Norten says it is already being used by Marriott to “modernize” its image.

“For me it’s obviously a big mark in New York to be able to build a tower,” says Norten. “It’s especially important because it’s the first tower in the area. It designates the development of an area that has been screaming for something to happen there.”

Norton says he hopes the building will be completed by the end of 2004.

Sam Lubell

http://archrecord.construction.com/news/daily/archives/031125norton.asp

emmeka
November 26th, 2003, 02:53 PM
I like it a lot, and I like the subtle angles.

Kris
February 22nd, 2004, 08:00 AM
February 22, 2004

F.Y.I.

Gutted, Not Given Up

By MICHAEL POLLAK

Q. The Metro-North train stops in Harlem right next to a gutted and burned-out red-brick building at 125th Street and Park Avenue. Since it's been in that shape for decades, why don't they tear it down?

A. Because it's a landmark, it's in better shape than it looks, and developers have had big plans for it, even before plans for a Marriott Courtyard hotel were announced last year for the parking lot across 125th Street.

The six-story building, formerly occupied by the Corn Exchange Bank and the Mount Morris Bank, was completed in 1883, packed with ornamentation. It has been gutted since at least the early 1970's. But a year ago, the Economic Development Corporation sold the charred, roofless city-owned structure to a partnership between Full Spectrum Building and Development, a Harlem concern, and Ethel Bates and her nonprofit corporation, Resurgence Inc.

"We have fought hard for that building," Ms. Bates said. She plans a Harlem Culinary School for people interested in a restaurant career along with stores and office space to help finance the culinary school. Renovation is expected to start in late spring or early summer, Ms. Bates said, and the $11 million project should take no more than a year to complete.

E-mail: fyi@nytimes.com

Copyright 2004 The New York Times Company

TLOZ Link5
February 22nd, 2004, 02:47 PM
Forty-two stories and 550 feet? That's a Midtown-size skyscraper right there.

NoyokA
February 22nd, 2004, 04:38 PM
Not only has the height improved but so has the design.

Gulcrapek
February 22nd, 2004, 05:28 PM
This really should be interesting. It'll stick out in the skyline and be the first notworthy building in the area since the Powell... yuck.

DominicanoNYC
February 23rd, 2004, 10:51 PM
The height and floors were upped by a lot. It went from 26-28fl and 380ft to 42fl and 550ft. Let's see how this affects the development of future commercial space in Harlem.

BrooklynRider
February 24th, 2004, 01:50 PM
The Brooklyn Marriott revealed the need and untapped markets outside the Manhattan tourist zones. This will be a very successful hotel.

NewYorkYankee
April 19th, 2004, 11:36 AM
This is GREAT! Im excited to see this project rise! :) :D :D :D :)

krulltime
April 19th, 2004, 07:36 PM
:shock: WOW! I am defenetly surprice...I had my doubts at first but this is a really cool design.

Kris
May 13th, 2004, 04:11 PM
http://www.ten-arquitectos.com/images/harlem_01.gif

TallGuy
May 13th, 2004, 04:37 PM
but I would LOVE it if it had bigger breasts!

TLOZ Link5
May 13th, 2004, 09:19 PM
but I would LOVE it if it had bigger breasts!

... :?:

...Oh. :roll:

Kris
September 3rd, 2004, 11:59 AM
http://graphics7.nytimes.com/images/2004/08/29/realestate/harlem.184.2.space.650.jpg

In East Harlem, Developers Find the Next Frontier (http://www.nytimes.com/2004/08/29/realestate/29COV.html)

Ninjahedge
September 3rd, 2004, 04:06 PM
Um....

We had a similarly proportioned structure planned as an original design in Korea.

The main problem we had was with motion perception due to wind load. The aspect ratio (height to width) was so high that it was prone to being kind of wobbley.

Now these guys do something similar, with a steel frame, and it was approved on all fronts?

I would like to go to the rooftop bar one of these days in spring (gusty) and see if I feel anything.

Unless these guys put in some special dampers or the like I have a feeling they might have some sick clients on the top floors....


Looks nice though... ;)

NoyokA
September 3rd, 2004, 04:41 PM
Um....

We had a similarly proportioned structure planned as an original design in Korea.

The main problem we had was with motion perception due to wind load. The aspect ratio (height to width) was so high that it was prone to being kind of wobbley.

Now these guys do something similar, with a steel frame, and it was approved on all fronts?

I would like to go to the rooftop bar one of these days in spring (gusty) and see if I feel anything.

Unless these guys put in some special dampers or the like I have a feeling they might have some sick clients on the top floors....


Looks nice though... Wink

It seems as if your concers might just unfortunately be answered:

A 220-room glass-encased Marriott Courtyard hotel opposite the Park Avenue viaduct on 125th Street. Its initial height, 42 stories, is the subject of negotiation with the city and will most likely be reduced. It will contain 57,000 square feet of retail space, 160,000 square feet of offices and 34,000 square feet of catering facilities and a residential component, most likely rentals.

NYguy
October 27th, 2004, 08:54 AM
Well, you just knew this was going too well...

DAILY NEWS

Harlem Marriott soars;
Neighbors sore over height

By LORE CROGHAN

http://www.nydailynews.com/ips_rich_content/994-biz1027.JPG

An artist's rendering of the proposed office tower.


A mammoth skyscraper project for Marriott in Harlem may be cut down to size if an effort by a host of politicians and community groups bears fruit.

The structure, which would dominate the historic 125th Street corridor, would dwarf the highest building currently standing - the Adam Clayton Powell Jr. State Office Building at 163 W. 125th, which is less than half the proposed Marriott's height.

At 518 feet, the Marriott would be as tall as a 51-story apartment tower - heads above anything else on the Harlem skyline.

"It dwarfs anything the eye can see, north, south, east or west," city Councilman Bill Perkins (D-Manhattan) told the Daily News.

Perkins and a number of community groups have been making a last-ditch effort to get the height of the project lowered. Today, it comes before the City Council.

They object to the height of the project, called Harlem Park - which would house the neighborhood's first full-scale tourist hotel since the 1966 closing of the Hotel Theresa, where Fidel Castro once stayed.

The city council has veto power over celebrity architect Enrique Norten's design for the $200 million hotel, office and residential skyscraper. Developer Michael Caridi - whose investors include cowboy entertainer Gene Autry's widow, Jackie Autry - thinks the height of the tower makes it special.

"My point of view is the building is an iconic structure," said Caridi, who renovated the Holiday Inn on W. 57th Street. "Harlem deserves something magnificent."

Perkins also wants something special for his district - but not in a 518-foot package. He said his constituents welcome the project's 1,800 construction jobs and 986 permanent jobs, but object to such a building overshadowing their neighborhood.

"Development is past due - but that doesn't mean anything will do," Perkins said.

Caridi's publicists have already sent bulletins saying the ground-breaking is next month for the 222-unit Marriott. The project also includes about 100 apartments, 160,000 square feet of offices and 57,000 square feet of restaurants and shops.

It would be built on a parking lot at Park Avenue next to the Metro North train station. The site belongs to the New York College of Podiatric Medicine.

There's room on it for a 21-story building that would have the same floor area as the current design, and generate the same number of jobs, said architect Raymond Plumey of Civitas, a community group on the Upper East Side and East Harlem.

Civitas sent the City Council a letter of protest after learning last week the tower would soar way past what 38 stories represents in the minds of New Yorkers. Civitas members had assumed these were 10-foot floors, like in residential buildings, which would have meant 380 feet. They were wrong.

"We are in favor of the project," said Plumey, who works and lives in Harlem. "But we oppose the scale of the project."

NYguy
October 28th, 2004, 08:53 AM
DAILY NEWS

Developer clips 65 ft. from Harlem hotel plan

BY LORE CROGHAN

http://www.nydailynews.com/ips_rich_content/683-harlem_marriott.JPG

Just one day after the Daily News reported residents' concerns about the size of the planned Harlem Marriott, the developer lowered the building to 453 feet.


The developer of the Harlem Marriott slashed 65 feet off the height of the skyscraper at the last minute - then won crucial approval from two City Council committees yesterday.

Developer Michael Caridi struck a deal with the land use committee's staff to lower the design of the Marriott project at 125th St. and Park Ave. to 453 feet, hours before the City Council was set to take up the matter and after the Daily News revealed the opposition that had crystalized around the project.

Caridi had been planning a 518-foot building - an outsized design by celebrity architect Enrique Norten.

Opponents said it would be as tall as a 51-story apartment tower and dwarf the rest of the historic neighborhood.

Caridi's compromise moves the $200 million development project - which will be the first full-scale hotel in Harlem since 1966 - a step closer to ground-breaking.

The changes to the project design must be okayed by the City Planning Commission, then the full City Council will vote on it.

Caridi decided at the 11th hour to back away from his position that the building had to be very tall in order to be an "icon" for the neighborhood, and acknowledged the community's wishes for a building of a less overwhelming size.

"The City Council recommended we do so," he told The News.

Even at its reduced height, the Marriott will be taller than anything else on historic 125th St., including the Adam Clayton Powell Jr. State Office Building. Nevertheless, Caridi's gesture of goodwill convinced most of the members of the zoning subcommittee and the full land use committee to support his project.

"The developer gave something back," said land use chairwoman Melinda Katz (D-Queens). This is the project's second height reduction, she added. In the summer, Caridi had proposed a 550-foot design.

Project opponent Bill Perkins (D-Manhattan) continued to hold out against it, saying the height reduction was "a movement in the right direction - but significantly not enough."

And he called the approximately 100 luxury apartments that will also be built in the hotel tower "a smack in the face for indigenous people in the neighborhood who are desperately looking for affordable housing."

Other council members were more focused on the jobs the new Marriott would create.

"This is a good project for the entire city," Katz said.

BrandonUptown
October 28th, 2004, 03:03 PM
:evil: He shouldnt have lowered it, and the board shoulve approved it anyway!

BrooklynRider
October 28th, 2004, 03:50 PM
The community arguments about height at times are relevant, but they are rarely considered in a context of the art that architecture can be. In this case it wasn't just a "height" being considered, but rather a "whole design". I think the community loses an opportunity to have a modern landmark tower and the architect has every right to be angry for having his art butchered..

MonCapitan2002
October 28th, 2004, 11:43 PM
The community arguments about height at times are relevant, but they are rarely considered in a context of the art that architecture can be. In this case it wasn't just a "height" being considered, but rather a "whole design". I think the community loses an opportunity to have a modern landmark tower and the architect has every right to be angry for having his art butchered..

I can understand his anger at having his vision compromised. There is one plus to the compromise, however. Even though the height of the hotel has been reduced, it still creates a new scale for the neighborhood. This building could make it easier to build more ambitious projects in the future.

NYguy
November 11th, 2004, 08:43 AM
DAILY NEWS

Harlem Marriott is a go

By FRANK LOMBARDI

The City Council gave final approval yesterday to construction of a $200 million Marriott hotel complex in Harlem.

The project was approved by a 39-to-7 vote despite strong opposition from Councilman Bill Perkins (D-Harlem), who represents the district in which it will be built. One Council member abstained from voting.

Perkins maintained during the vote that the skyscraper project is too big for low-rise Harlem and represents development incompatible "with the needs of the whole community."

"I'm voting no because there's no such thing as being bad for the community and good for the city," he said.

Slated for a site at 125th St. and Park Ave., the Marriott project will include two retail floors at the ground level, followed by 15 floors of commercial space, 11 floors of hotel space and 12 floors of residential space. It will be the first hotel to be built in Harlem in nearly 40 years.

Even at its reduced height, it will be the tallest building on 125th St., including the Adam Clayton Powell Jr. State Office Building.

Approval was urged by Councilwoman Melinda Katz (D-Queens), who is chairwoman of the Land Use Committee, which reviewed and passed the project. It also was approved by the City Planning Commission, the Manhattan borough president's office and Community Board 11.

Katz noted that the developer - Michael Caridi - originally sought to build a 550-foot-high building. That was reduced to 518 feet by the Planning Commission, and then to 453 feet during negotiations with the Council, she said.

Katz said that in addition to creating jobs and driving economic development, the new hotel will become an icon for the Harlem community.

But Councilman Charles Barron (D-Brooklyn) noted that the full Council normally supports the wishes of the district Council member on such issues.

"I don't appreciate that even though the local Council member says it's not good for his district that we're going to pass it anyway," he said as he voted against the project.

debris
November 11th, 2004, 02:46 PM
Fantastic news! I still can't believe a beautiful 40 story building got approved for Harlem. Nobody could have imagined this 10 years ago. Well, it could have been 50 stories before the community intervened; so what? Its still a 40 story building, and it will set a wonderful precedent for added development in Harlem (especially on 125th street between 8th and Lex)

NewYorkYankee
November 11th, 2004, 02:58 PM
WONDERFUL! IM SO GLAD THIS IS APPROVED!

Bob
November 11th, 2004, 06:14 PM
This most certainly IS good news. I've always felt that the area immediately surrounding the 125th Street station was some of the most underdeveloped, under-appreciated real estate going. I'm amazed this area didn't blossom with office skyscrapers or upscale condos years ago. This might be the catalyst that does it. Good for NY. Good for Harlem. Good for tourism. Good for the hard hats. Way to go, Marriott!

Kris
January 7th, 2005, 01:14 PM
NYC 01 07 05

HIGH HOPES FOR HARLEM

Steve Garmhausen

http://www.theslatinreport.com/pictures/hparkwalkers.jpg
The 34-story tower will feature offices, a Marriott Courtyard and retail.

http://www.theslatinreport.com/pictures/hparksidecut2.jpg
A nearby commuter rail station is the key to filling Harlem Park's 185,000 square feet of office space.

http://www.theslatinreport.com/pictures/hparkstreetlevel.jpg
The Enrique Norten-designed building is to open in June 2006.

A group of investors is betting $220 million on a new Harlem renaissance, in the form of a new office, hotel and retail complex.

The 34-story, 550,000-square-foot project, dubbed "Harlem Park," should break ground in February at a parking lot at Park Ave. and 125th Street-towering over a key Metro-North commuter-rail station directly across the street. It will feature 185,000 square feet of office space, 57,000 of retail and a conference center for 800, all at its base. Its tower will house 80,000 square feet of luxury residential units, with 14 floors dedicated to a 204-room Marriott Courtyard hotel, says Michael Caridi, senior managing principal of 1800 Park Ave. LLC, the owner. The opening should be in June 2006. The project has been designed by star Mexican architect Enrique Norten.

Over the last few years, Harlem has had a surge of retail development, including Harlem USA, a 285,000-square-foot retail and entertainment complex developed in 1999 by Grid Properties and The Gotham Organization. The $66 million center, at 125th Street and Frederic Douglass Boulevard, includes a Magic Johnson Movie Theatre, Old Navy, HMV Record Store, Modell's Sporting Goods and New York Sports Club. A rush of retailers flocked to the complex after Disney announced that it was opening a store there, but the company closed the store as part of a national retail reorganization.

Until now, however, "there has been no real class A office space with the right amenities," says Caridi, who is also managing director of the project developer, Majic Development Group. Harlem Park's construction will cost $190 million, and the entire project is budgeted at $220 million, which includes a long-term lease of a 36,000-square-foot lot that is owned by the New York College of Podiatric Medicine, Caridi says.

Office space in Harlem has often gone to city agencies or non-profits. But the developers plan to market Harlem Park to financial services companies, playing up the convenience of the Metro North Railroad station that connects it to commuter suburbs in New York and Connecticut and is just one direct stop from Grand Central. Another major selling point will be the fact that the complex's power grid is independent of the rest of Manhattan, making it attractive as a disaster recovery space.

"A lot of financial services companies want to decentralize their operations and have a backup location in close proximity," says Shawna Menifee, associate director at Cushman & Wakefield, which is representing the project. "We offer that without having to leave the island of Manhattan."

Rents for the office space will be in the mid-$40 range, but the effective price will be much lower because the building benefits from state and federal tax incentives and other programs meant to foster job creation, said Caridi.

Being in Harlem would also "make a statement" for national firms, Caridi says.

It would be similar to the one made by former president Bill Clinton, who set up his offices in the area a couple of years ago. National retailers have done the same and posted strong sales figures. "That helped us make our decision," Caridi says.

The lineup of investors has some glitter: It includes Kevin Liles, president

of Def Jam Records, and Jacqueline Autry a philanthropist, who is president and director of the Gene Autry Foundation and an honorary president of the American League of Major League Baseball. Another major investor is SBM Certificate Co., a Bethesda, Md.-based investment company.

Having Marriott manage the first nationally branded hotel in Harlem lends credibility to the project. The company is entering the market because it holds the sort of promise that Times Square did 20 years ago when the chain set up a Marriott Marquis there, says Dave Sampson, senior vice president of diversity initiatives for the company.

Marriott (which took the leap into downtown Brooklyn in the late 1990s) also built a hotel as part of a downtown convention center in Philadelphia a few years ago when that area was struggling. "We have a track record of success in going into areas before their time, so to speak," says Sampson, who grew up not far from the Harlem project. Sampson sees Harlem beginning to gel once again, with rising real estate prices and retail thriving. "Clearly a change has been happening over the last four or five years," he says.

www.theslatinreport.com

Kolbster
January 7th, 2005, 03:00 PM
I thought the hotel looked differently

Kris
January 17th, 2005, 11:32 PM
http://www.arcspace.com/architects/ten/harlem/harlem.html

antinimby
January 18th, 2005, 09:54 AM
Beautiful.
NY needs more architecture like this.
No more SOM boxes, please!
Too bad damned NIMBY's shaved 100 ft. off the original height.

NoyokA
February 18th, 2005, 03:16 PM
MARRIOTT CHECKS IN WITH HARLEM HOTEL

Gov. Pataki and Mayor Bloomberg broke ground yesterday for a new hotel in Harlem — the neighborhood's first major hotel in 40 years.

The $236 million project will feature a 204-room Marriott Courtyard Hotel, 167,000 square feet of office space, about 100 residential units, retail stores, a health club, an outdoor swimming pool and an underground garage.

Bloomberg said the project, particularly the hotel, will add to Harlem's status as a tourist destination.

"This is a great day for Harlem and New York City," he said. "This will prove without a doubt that Harlem's economic revival is moving, and moving at full speed."

Said Pataki, "If you give this community an opportunity, give it the tools and you will see again Harlem shining bright."

A study carried out by one of the project's developers, Majic Development Group, found that about 30 percent of New York tourists visit Harlem.


The Harlem Park development will be located across the street from the Metro-North railroad station at 125th Street and Park Avenue, a few long blocks from former President Bill Clinton's office.



The hotel, scheduled to be completed by late next year, has committed to hiring Harlem residents for 25 percent of its jobs.

It will be Harlem's first major hotel since the Hotel Theresa closed in 1966. AP

Archit_K
February 19th, 2005, 08:48 PM
TEN Arquitectos
Taller de Enrique Norten Arquitectos, SC
Harlem Park
New York, NY

www.arcspace.com

Dramatically illuminated at night Harlem Park will strike a prominent profile on the northern Manhattan skyline.

Harlem Park is envisioned as the first high-profile landmark to mark the rebirth of Harlem in the 21st Century. The building, a layered silhouette of glass and masonry, will mark the gateway to Harlem at 125th Street and Park Avenue.
The design strategy was to create a memorable and timeless image that will remain a prominent landmark in Harlem as the neighborhood continues to grow and change.

The composition of the above-grade construction will appear as an assemblage of distinct volumes corresponding to the multiple functions within the complex.
At street level, retail spaces will wrap around the entire site to activate the street level and encourage pedestrians to turn the corner onto Park Avenue. Signage will be integrated into the pedestrian level storefronts and facades to attract activity and further activate the pedestrian experience.
The roof area of the mid-rise office block will contain restaurants, spas, and other amenities. The Marriott Courtyard Hotel will occupy the lower portion of the tower with luxury residential units above.

Norten would like the tower building to reflect the particular colors of Harlem, reds, yellows, and greens, by applying a mosaic of colored louvers behind the curved glass windows.

Harlem Park will act as the connecting node between east and west Harlem, and establish and reinforce the standards of the 125th Street corridor as it evolves as the Main Street of the neighborhood in the years ahead. The Metro North Railroad across the street, one direct stop from Grand Central Station, connects to commuter suburbs in New York and Connecticut.

Drawing courtesy TEN Arquitectos

Total area: 550,000 square feet

Construction start: 2005
Projected completion: 2006

Developer:1800 Park Avenue, LCC.
Architects: TEN Arquitectos (Taller de Enrique Norten Arquitectos, SC)
Executive Architect: MDA Design Group International
Principal: Michael Duddy

Project Team:
Tim Dumbleton
Michel Hsiung
Yun Hsueh, Daniel Holguin
Dieter Schoellbenger
Luis Villegas
Maya Schali
Elisabeth Martin.

Structural Engineer: DeSimone Consulting Engineers, PLLC. Design

Derek2k3
March 21st, 2005, 09:11 PM
Web site launched:
http://www.harlempark.com/

http://www.ten-arquitectos.com/images/harlem_01.gif


Managed to maintain its elegance even after being NIMBYfied.

NoyokA
June 28th, 2005, 12:51 AM
Just checked out the website, very nice.

Stacking Plan:

http://www.harlempark.com/StackingPlan.pdf

Also related, the sweeping revitalization of 125th Street:

http://newyorkmetro.com/nymetro/realestate/neighborhoods/maps/11150/index.html

krulltime
September 25th, 2005, 09:03 PM
Harlem hotel gets upgrade


By Valerie Block
September 26, 2005

The highly anticipated Marriott in Harlem may be going upscale. Real estate developer Majic Development Group is in discussions with hotel executives to build a Marriott Hotels Resorts & Suites or a Renaissance Hotels & Resorts instead of a budget Marriott Courtyard, a spokeswoman for the hotel confirms.

However, it may be some time before the plan jumps off the drawing board.

Harlem Park, the $236 million project at East 125th Street and Park Avenue, which is to include the hotel, 100 residential units and retail and office space, was slated to open in December 2005. A groundbreaking ceremony was held early this year. But construction crews have yet to show up.

Meanwhile, the developer is also looking at changing its retail strategy at the site, says the source. Majic executives did not return phone calls.


©2005 Crain Communications Inc.

NoyokA
September 25th, 2005, 09:12 PM
I pass this site everyday and nothing has been done and it looks as if nothing will be done here for a while. Its disappointing.

michelle1
September 25th, 2005, 09:46 PM
I pass this site everyday and nothing has been done and it looks as if nothing will be done here for a while. Its disappointing.
Yeah this site is dead, I am wondering why it is taking so long

NoyokA
October 26th, 2005, 02:11 AM
City Review:

http://www.thecityreview.com/nortenld.jpg
View of Harlem Park mixed-use design for Park Avenue and 125th Street as it would appear from the southwest
By Carter B. Horsley

The architectural scene in New York City is becoming increasingly international and one of the brightest "new" stars is Enrique Norten, who is based in Mexico City.

Mr. Norten's firm, TEN Arquitectos, is the subject of a nice exhibition at the Museum of the City of New York from June 7 through October 30, 2005, entitled "New York Moving Forward."

The exhibition contains renderings and models of several of Mr. Norten's recent projects including three in New York City that not only will enhance his reputation but significantly move the city back into the mainstream of architecture creativity after a much too long hiatus.

The most important of these New York projects is Harlem Park, a 34-story structure now under construction on 125th Street at Park Avenue, which is certain to become Harlem's most important landmark. The building, shown above, is a bold and sophisticated design that is most notable for undulating grid of its eastern facade.

http://www.thecityreview.com/nortenh3.jpg
Design studies for Harlem Park

The tower's slab is aligned along the north/south axis. The middle of the slab is green and the top section of the eastern base of the project is blue and contains five floors of office space. The bottom of the base contains about 55,000 square feet of retail space and a terraced banquet level. The tower will contain a 204-room Marriott Courtyard hotel, 185,000 square feet of office space and the top of the tower will contain 110,000 square feet of apartments.

http://www.thecityreview.com/nortenh4.jpg
More design studies for Harlem Park

The tower is across from the 125th Street Metro-North rail station. Majic Development Group is the developer of the $220 million project. The hotel will be the first major new hotel in Harlem since the closing in 1966 of the Hotel Theresa. The project originally was planned to be about 550 feet tall but was lowered to about 453 feet.

What is perhaps most striking about the project is that Norten's design studies for the project are superb. Ideally they should all be built. Often the best design studies are overtaken by political and economic compromises and while this project has been reduced in height it still remains as a tremendously exciting design that will become a major New York City landmark.

NYguy
October 27th, 2005, 09:40 AM
NY PRESS

GOD IS GOOD, YO
Two hotels in Harlem.

By Daniel Freed

"This isn't that expensive a hotel. It's moderate," Pumpkin Lopez explained. "It's basically clean because I try to thoroughly clean it. I try not to have too much, you know, craziness going on, like people getting into problems with other customers, you know, or people running up and down and in and out, you know, and working with this guy"—Lopez indicated a large olive-skinned man with a shaved head who stood by silently. "He don't understand English and he's deaf in one ear, so it makes it harder on me."

Lopez, who earns $3.50 an hour plus tips at the Park Avenue Hotel on 124th Street, is indeed a hard worker. He appears to have several duties, including janitor, chief of security and concierge. He runs around with a mop and bucket and a set of keys, while Manuel Pena, a sixtyish Dominican man who sits behind a thick plastic window, calls out room numbers in Spanish.

Across the street, a $236 million Marriott is set to begin construction. The project is being hailed as the first major hotel to go up in Harlem since the Hotel Theresa, onetime host to Fidel Castro, closed its doors in 1966. Mexican architect Enrique Norten is working on the design, and Danny Meyer, a downtown chef whose customers would probably not blanch at the idea of reserving a month in advance to pay $15 for a cheeseburger, is reportedly negotiating to open a restaurant there.

The Park Avenue's customers are on a somewhat tighter budget. For just $40, anyone can enjoy one of the hotel's rooms for six hours. Other options are $75 for 12 hours, $300 per week, and $600 per month. There is a common bathroom off the lobby, and some of the rooms also have private bathrooms at no additional charge.

The amenities are popular, but spotty. There is no bar, though to judge from his breath, one repeat customer appeared to have done a bit of drinking before he arrived. He had a lady friend in tow. Tall and wiry, she wore a bandana on her head and hung back silently.

"Are the movies on?" the man asked Pena, plunking down 40 dollars. "Are the movies on?"

As this couple was leaving, accompanied by a shout from Pena—"Dos veinte cinco está libre"—another one entered. The second lady asked the first, somewhat conspiratorially, "Do they have air conditioning in there?" The shy response was apparently in the negative, as lady number two moaned dejectedly before climbing the stairs to her room.

Perhaps the Marriott will have a gift shop. The Park Avenue has Robert Grant, who, like many hotel gift shops, carries a range of items for sale. On this particular day, he was very interested in moving a bottle of calcium pills. He also had a book by Bill Cosby entitled I Am What I Ate and I'm Frightened.

Grant stood at the front desk hawking his wares while Genna Borrero, a transsexual and frequent hotel guest, repeatedly asked various bystanders for three dollars. She eventually walked away disappointed, as Grant shook his head pitifully.

"That cat is always begging for money," he said. "I don't like doin' it but people are very nice to me—helped me, you know? White people, black, Spanish. I get along with everybody. And I've helped people too. When I give, I give from the heart. God is good, yo. I can give you those pills for two dollars but that's as low as I can go. If you want 'em."

Apparently like the Marriott, Grant knows racism is bad business. Lopez knows this too.

"All walks of life of people come through that door and I try to tell them they're people. There's no color. The only color is green. You remember that there's no black. There's no white. There's no Chinese and there's no Jew. The only color is green money. And plastic. Plastic and money rule. They have the say," Lopez said.

The Park Avenue does not accept credit cards, but if Lopez's vision of the future proves right it will be forced to do so or be forced out of business. Credit cards are the future. Credit cards and racial tolerance.

"Sometimes the racism issue gets in the way. People get angry and they shout out other than the person's name. I step in and try to fix the problem. In the next ten years there will be no paper money circulating. If you're gonna dispute and argue over the little things you won't be ready for the future. Things are going quick-fast, and by the same token you have to be up you have to be in tune because before you know it that building will be up."


Volume 18, Issue 43

NoyokA
October 27th, 2005, 12:57 PM
I dont really understand the article. Is the author supportive of the whore-hotel?

czsz
October 27th, 2005, 05:15 PM
It seems to be just the average, run of the mill "contrasts of gentrification" human interest story.

Citytect
October 27th, 2005, 05:17 PM
Ha. I think he's just setting the scene. Fancy hotel plopped down across from hourly-rate hotel. Weird situation in an area without any other "nice" hotels and where it's not uncommon for hotel customers to pan-handle for their room rental.

ddjiii
December 5th, 2005, 12:13 AM
Ha. I think he's just setting the scene. Fancy hotel plopped down across from hourly-rate hotel. Weird situation in an area without any other "nice" hotels and where it's not uncommon for hotel customers to pan-handle for their room rental.

It's only weird if the thing actually gets built. I was going through the Times Square Plaza thread and somebody said that project had the longest lag for a groundbreaking - but I think this project has it beat. I go by on the train fairly often and there is NOTHING HAPPENING. I suppose if someone had some info it would be posted...

euphrades
December 8th, 2005, 04:28 PM
I am a former but always at heart Harlemite (born in Harlem, grew up in Grant Houses), i am very glad to see this. But I think true Harlemites would love to see The Theresa Hotel restored to its former glory. Where else is there such an historic building. Please let's get this party started and restore the Theresa Hotel. My parents honeymooned there in 1950. I can't find any pictures of the former interior. Please if you have some post them here for viewing. I'm a collector of Harlem memorablia, and my collection has no original memorablia from the Theresa Hotel. :(

Derek2k3
December 18th, 2005, 05:25 PM
Some newer renderings. The humps appear to be gone now.
http://www.ten-arquitectos.com/harlem.html

antinimby
December 18th, 2005, 10:31 PM
Oh no. Those humps were the most interesting part. Now it just looks boxy.

BrooklynRider
December 19th, 2005, 11:30 AM
I liked the "humps" but once the building was scaled down, it wasn't an effective a design feature.

krulltime
December 19th, 2005, 12:34 PM
That is a total shame. I love those "humps".

czsz
December 19th, 2005, 02:30 PM
What a waste. It's been reduced to slabtacularity. Now it'll just look like one of the more imaginative communist housing blocks surrounding Prague.

kazpmk
December 19th, 2005, 06:25 PM
Is there still no activity at the site??

MidtownGuy
December 19th, 2005, 09:55 PM
great. they've removed the most unique aspect of the design. It's not nearly so dynamic. i used to love it. now it is a big Yawn. Next they'll probably remove the colors on the facade.

Imagine how the light would have played along the undulating surfaces...

another one bites the dust.oh well, this IS new york.

antinimby
January 3rd, 2006, 02:06 PM
Here's the forlorn-looking site right now (curbed.com):
http://www.curbed.com/archives/2006_01_harlempark.jpg

Here's the waterdowned redesign:
http://www.ten-arquitectos.com/images/harlem_01.gif

krulltime
January 8th, 2006, 01:10 PM
Harlem Park hotel stalled amid doubts
Developer's viability questioned; other local projects at risk


By Lisa Fickenscher
Published on January 09, 2006

A much-ballyhooed project to build the first hotel in Harlem in 40 years is unacceptably behind schedule.

The numerous false starts are frustrating local business leaders, who have begun to call for the ouster of the developer if significant progress is not made soon. A groundbreaking ceremony with Gov. George Pataki and Mayor Michael Bloomberg took place last February, but nothing has happened since.

Harlem Park was announced in 2003 as a $236 million mixed-use project, including a 204-room Marriott hotel and 600,000 square feet of commercial and residential space. The hotel, located at Park Avenue and East 125th Street, was originally scheduled to open last month.

But no construction work has begun on the lot, which has two-year-old signs boasting that the complex is "coming soon." Many in the community believe that the developer, Majic Development Group, lacks the financing to begin work.

"People are asking why it is taking this long," says Lloyd Williams, chief executive of the Greater Harlem Chamber of Commerce. "And the question they have is about the economic viability of [Majic]."

Majic's principle executive, Michael Caridi, claims that his firm has the financial wherewithal to complete the project. He says that a big reason for the delay is oil contamination that construction crews discovered a year ago on the site, a parking lot owned by the New York College of Podiatric Medicine. Establishing a cleanup plan with city and state environmental agencies took a long time, according to Mr. Caridi; the cleanup program has yet to begin.


Other developers could take over


Nevertheless, others are losing faith in Majic, pointing to the firm's quest for additional capital. At least one early investor and supporter, music mogul Kevin Liles, is no longer involved in Harlem Park.

It's possible that well-respected developers will join the project. They could even replace Majic.

"Michael Caridi has been in active negotiation with investors, which include other developers who are very significant in the city," says Kenneth Knuckles, chief executive of the Upper Manhattan Empowerment Zone.

Mr. Caridi says that he is "not allowed to discuss anything right now" regarding other investors or developers, but he maintains that an announcement is imminent.

Marriott officials, for their part, say that they remain committed to the project.

Community leaders are worried because other projects are on hold until Harlem Park gets under way to anchor that part of upper Manhattan, they say. If construction does not begin soon, developers that have been waiting to move ahead with projects may decide to abandon them.


Community wants answers


"It's fair to say that [the community] wants to be more aggressively part of the process to determine whether this will move forward with Majic, or to recommend that another developer be considered," says Mr. Williams of the Greater Harlem Chamber.

In the meantime, local leaders want answers from Mr. Caridi. Community Board 11, which represents the neighborhood, wants a full report now on where the project stands.

"We understand that large-scale development takes time," says Javier Llano, district manager of the community board. "But after a groundbreaking, it's time for him to come back to us and say why construction hasn't started yet."

Majic angered the community in 2004 when it revealed its design plans for Harlem Park, which will make the government-approved complex the tallest building in the area.

Architectural plans were redrawn to downsize the project, but it will still tower over the rest of the neighborhood.


©2005 Crain Communications Inc.

krulltime
January 18th, 2006, 12:31 PM
Harlem Park plan revamp
Stalled project gets new partners, funds; proposal is to expand scale


By Lisa Fickenscher
Published on January 16, 2006

The stalled Harlem Park project is being dramatically reconfigured with new investors, developers and more space, according to sources close to the negotiations.

Three partners will soon announce that they have reached an agreement to replace the original developer, Majic Development Group. They are Vornado Realty Trust; community-based startup Integrated Holdings, led by Derek Johnson, a former chief executive of the Apollo Theater; and San Francisco-based and minority-owned MacFarlane Partners.


Long-awaited hotel


Harlem Park, a mixed-use development at Park Avenue and East 125th Street with residential and commercial components, is to include the first hotel in Harlem in 40 years. The new developers want to expand the project by buying the entire parcel currently occupied by the owner, the New York College of Podiatric Medicine. The school would then relocate.

The developers may also replace Marriott, which is designated as the hotel's operator.

Majic's principle executive, Michael Caridi, will continue to have a development role, according to his lawyer, Michael Bailkin. Sources close to the project say Mr. Caridi's relationship with the college and the community had soured because of the long delay in beginning construction. Earlier this month, Mr. Caridi denied that funding was a problem.

At a recent community board meeting, Mr. Caridi said he is partnering with two major investors to buy the land from the college.


©2005 Crain Communications Inc.

krulltime
January 18th, 2006, 12:32 PM
Long-awaited hotel


Harlem Park, a mixed-use development at Park Avenue and East 125th Street with residential and commercial components, is to include the first hotel in Harlem in 40 years. The new developers want to expand the project by buying the entire parcel currently occupied by the owner, the New York College of Podiatric Medicine. The school would then relocate.

The developers may also replace Marriott, which is designated as the hotel's operator.

Majic's principle executive, Michael Caridi, will continue to have a development role, according to his lawyer, Michael Bailkin. Sources close to the project say Mr. Caridi's relationship with the college and the community had soured because of the long delay in beginning construction. Earlier this month, Mr. Caridi denied that funding was a problem.

At a recent community board meeting, Mr. Caridi said he is partnering with two major investors to buy the land from the college.

Hmm... I wonder if there will be a new design for the tower.

NoyokA
February 1st, 2006, 03:45 PM
Village Voice:

Harlem Shuffle

by Tom Robbins

January 31st, 2006 11:08 AM

Rookie developer Michael Caridi couldn't have asked for better press play when he first announced in 2003 that he would build a soaring new tower containing a Marriott hotel cum office complex in Harlem. Billed as the neighborhood's first major tourist lodging since the legendary Hotel Theresa closed its doors to guests in 1966, the project played big on TV and in the dailies. "Great Stay in Harlem," crowed the Amsterdam News.
Caridi, 42, told reporters how he had just been driving through the neighborhood when he spotted the big parking lot at the corner of 125th Street and Park Avenue and decided it was the perfect spot for new first-class hotel and office space.

Last February, Caridi held an elaborate groundbreaking ceremony for Harlem Park, as he dubbed his project. Present were the governor and mayor, as well as Caridi's friend, state economic development chief Charles Gargano. The 42-story, $200 million project was a turning point in Harlem's revitalization, the pols said, and as a gospel chorus sang and cameras flashed, they posed with their ceremonial shovels.

But there's a reason such groundbreakings are called symbolic. Since then, aside from some test borings to see if the soil was contaminated (it was), the ground for Harlem Park remains undented. Instead there's just the same big sign that was planted in the parking lot back in 2003, tilted toward the Metro-North commuters rushing by on the train tracks above Park Avenue. Alongside a picture of a shimmering glass tower, in the best Trump style, Caridi placed his own name, writ large.

But that was wishful thinking, Caridi acknowledged last week. Right now, the developer is fighting a felony indictment for having allegedly defrauded the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development by failing to pay prevailing wages to workers on a $2.3 million subsidized housing project in Rockland County.

"That will all be resolved," Caridi told the Voice. "I have done nothing wrong there. Life throws you curveballs. It is tough to always keep your eye on the ball."

But at the same time, the developer said he will soon sell his interest in Harlem Park—for an undisclosed amount—to a new combine led by real estate giant Vornado Realty Trust, which plans an even larger development. For a man who lost out on his Trump moment, Caridi was remarkably sanguine. "I'm going to come out OK," he said. But the sale comes as grumblings about Caridi's role in the project have grown.

Several current and former members of the board of trustees of the New York College of Podiatric Medicine on East 124th Street, which leased its parking lot to the builder in an effort to raise money for the fiscally ailing institution, told the Voice that they were troubled about how Caridi, who had never tackled such an ambitious project, became the developer in the first place.

The project had shortchanged the school, they said, while enriching Caridi, who stands to make millions on the sale of his interest even though, they claimed, he had lacked the requisite finances and experience to handle it.

"One time I appear at a meeting and he's there. He said he wanted to build a hotel," said Alfred Gerosa, a construction industry executive who stepped down from his post as chairman of the college's board after six years amid disputes with college president Louis Levine, a former state labor commissioner.

Several trustees said Caridi had quickly let them know that he was good friends with Gargano, the chairman of the Empire State Development Corporation and Pataki's key economic development adviser.

"His claim was he was friendly with Gargano," said one former trustee who also quit the board and asked not to be identified. "You are going to build a hotel, you don't pick a guy who has never built one. Why tie up property that way? Tie it up with Related, or Trump, or Ratner," he said, invoking three major development firms.

Bill Perkins, the former city councilman representing Harlem, said that Caridi had also raised Gargano's name when he came to seek council support for a rezoning of the site. "He said, 'Charlie will help me here.' He was very proud of that," recalled Perkins, who opposed the height of the project as out of scale with the community.

A former Pataki aide said the friendship was no secret: "He's good friends with Charlie."

But a spokesman for Gargano said that while Harlem Park had received preliminary approval for $5 million in low-interest state loans, that was purely business. "They are professional acquaintances," said spokesman Mark Weinberg. "Mr. Caridi is one of hundreds of businesspeople the chairman has known over the past 11 years."

Still, the two men were close enough that Caridi's wife invited the chairman to a surprise birthday party at Caridi's Greenwich, Connecticut, home in December 2003, a few weeks after the first Harlem Park announcement. That same month, the builder asked Gargano to another party at a midtown restaurant, La Maganette, owned by Caridi's family.

Caridi said Gargano didn't attend either party. The builder said he had long admired Gargano, a former ambassador in the Reagan administration and a major Republican fundraiser. "He's a top-notch guy," said Caridi. "We have gotten closer the last couple of years."

Caridi insisted that he brought plenty of experience to the table, including the renovation of the 600-room Holiday Inn on West 57th Street and the construction of a 200-unit condo in New Jersey. He said he'd won the necessary zoning changes for Harlem Park and completed a design with an acclaimed architect in a relatively short period of time. His problems were the fault of bureaucratic snags and environmental woes, he said. "In a large-scale development there are a lot of different things that occur. This was a complicated job."

Caridi also insisted that there is no merit to another concern raised by one of the trustees—his family's past brushes with organized crime. In 1998, Caridi's sister Michele, and her husband, Edward "Biff" Halloran, an alleged Genovese crime family associate, were charged in a securities swindle (Michele pleaded guilty; her husband fled). An uncle, Stephen Caridi, went to prison in 2001 after admitting to bribing labor officials who held lavish retreats at the family-owned Friar Tuck Inn in the Catskills.

"I think our conversation is over," Caridi said when first asked about the issue. But he later got back on the phone to say those problems had nothing to do with him. "I have 10 brothers and sisters. There are doctors and lawyers in my family. Problems happen in life and you figure it out and move on."

But the builder acknowledged that he had thrown his own curveball when he told reporters the story about his lucky drive-by discovery of the site. While he had often driven past the corner, it wasn't until he was sitting in Levine's college office that the subject of a possible development came up.

Caridi said he was there to try and sell a new medical device for wound dressings to the school when Levine raised the topic. "He said, 'What else do you do?' I said, 'I do some real estate development.' He said, 'Do you have any ideas for my parking lot?' I said I'd give it some thought."

Medical equipment is only one of Caridi's many sidelines. "I am an entrepreneur," he said. He also runs an import- export firm seeking to sell bottled water from an Alaskan lake, a firm that packages tours for casino high rollers, and a security guard company. In the 1990s he won a Pentagon contract to dismantle a World War II navy carrier, one of the ships later cited as an environmental danger in India, where it was salvaged for scrap. "That wasn't us. We got accolades from the navy," said Caridi.

He also got accolades from Levine, who awarded him an honorary degree of podiatric medicine at a ceremony where Pataki and Gargano were present. "I get a lot of awards," said Caridi.

[b]Levine, who served in the administrations of governors Rockefeller and Carey, declined to talk about his school or its real estate deal. According to Caridi and others, the current plan calls for selling and moving the school's entire campus. "He doesn't feel he's in a position to discuss it," said a spokesman. "It's at a sensitive point."

Located on East 124th Street since 1927, the school runs a clinic that serves many Harlem residents suffering from diabetes ailments. But it's had a rough time of it in recent years. Its student body has shrunk to less than 300, and in 2004 it agreed to pay $4 million to settle charges brought by Attorney General Eliot Spitzer's office that it had improperly allocated costs in seeking Medicaid reimbursements for its clinic.

Those financial troubles had spurred the interest in leasing the parking lot, trustees said. But they added that Levine had communicated little about his plans until Caridi suddenly appeared at board meetings.

Board members said they grew more disturbed as details of the project filtered out. In a submission seeking city economic development aid, Caridi indicated he intended to raise a whopping 90 percent of his project costs from government loans and bonds—an unusually large amount. Trustees were also alarmed about the lease Levine signed with Caridi. While the main document, dated January 2003, was a detailed 60 pages allotting the builder a 48-year term on the property, one month later the pair signed a hurriedly hand-scrawled, one-sentence agreement that gave Caridi 51 more years on the deal—with a break in rent.

"It was a last-minute negotiation," explained Caridi, who said he needed the extra term to make the project more attractive for bank financing.

krulltime
August 8th, 2006, 07:15 PM
Harlem real estate project takes a new shape


Published on August 07, 2006

A plan for a hotel on 125th Street in Harlem has been scrapped, and the incoming developers of the three-year-old project are making new plans. Vornado Realty, Integrated Holdings and MacFarlane Partners, which are in the process of purchasing the property from Majic Development Group and the New York College of Podiatric Medicine, plan to build a tower with retail and Class A office space. The deal, worked out over the past two weeks, requires approval by the state attorney general's office.


©2006 Crain Communications Inc.

ablarc
August 14th, 2006, 08:43 PM
^ The Harlem Shuffle.

krulltime
September 6th, 2006, 12:39 PM
Long-Delayed Tower Scrapped
Marriott Would Have Been First New Hotel in Harlem in 40 Years


Sara Vogel
Posted: 9/6/06

Columbia students will still have to lodge their parents and friends downtown when they come to town.

Plans to build a Marriott hotel on 125th Street-the first hotel slated for construction in Harlem in 40 years**-quietly dissolved this August, leaving the site as vacant as it was before the project's 2003 groundbreaking ceremony.

"As of right now, the issue [of the hotel] is dead," said Christopher Bell of Community Board 11.

New York real estate giant Majic Development plans to sell the property to another string of developers, Vorando Realty, Integrated Holdings, and MacFarlane Partners, to build office and retail towers, according to an article in Crain's New York Business.

But community members and leaders are hearing rumors about what the vacant lot near Lexington Avenue will become, and when the construction workers will come back on the scene.

"Now anyone can come in there to build what they want," said Bill Perkins, a former city council member in Harlem and a candidate for state senate this year.

Perkins was one of only seven council members to vote against the project. Last week, he said the venture was "never properly financed to begin with."

The developers of the project made use of a clause in city law which allowed the council to decide to allow high-rise development on just one "spot" of the development, rather than the whole area, Perkins said.

Majic Development was not contacted upon the printing of this article.

Now that the plot of land has been re-zoned for high-rises, the developer can sell it with this more lucrative capacity included.

"They made profit doing nothing," Perkins said. The compromises reached between the developer and the community**-such as bargaining for low-income housing and jobs-may have also gotten lost in the shuffle.


© Copyright 2006 Columbia Daily Spectator

NoyokA
October 7th, 2006, 05:00 PM
Probably an old design (hopefully) by the old developers, Majic Development.

The Harlem Hotel
Project Overview
The 1800 Park Avenue project is a mixed-use, Hotel/Catering/Commercial Office/Retail facility with belowground parking located in the heart of Harlem, New York City. The project will have a massive, positive impact on the Harlem community in both the short and the long term.

Until recently, most development in the area was centered on the West side of Harlem. Harlem Center, H&M, Harlem USA, and the renovation of the Apollo Theater are all examples of great developments in the 125th Street Corridor that are West of 5th Avenue. This project, in conjunction with other commercial, entertainment and retail developments both planned and built nearby, is leading the way in transforming Harlem into a true Gateway to the City of New York and moving the East side of Harlem into the forefront of investment and development.

The first component of the development is a two hundred - four room Nationally Flagged hotel. The Harlem Hotel will include all of the facilities and amenities that are necessary for both business travelers and tourists. In addition, when one considers the density of higher education and medical institutions in northern Manhattan (Columbia University, Harlem Hospital, New York-Presbyterian Health Care Network, St. Lukes Roosevelt Hospital, etc.) the Hotel will be able to provide lodging for guest lecturers, prospective students and visiting staff nearby – as opposed to the current process of sending guests to the 52nd Street Sheraton or other hotels in midtown.

The Hotel will create tremendous opportunities for the community. The Harlem Hotel will generate hundreds of jobs in the Hotel itself while increasing tourist activity and the dollars it will bring to the local businesses. In addition, this Hotel will have a Diversity Program that will work with local businesses, government organizations and individuals to grow both the community as well as the hotel business.

The second main component of the project is two hundred fifty thousand square feet (250,000 SF) of Class-A office space. This commercial office “anchor” in East Harlem will bring at least a thousand employees to the neighborhood to work, and shop. By patronizing the local neighborhood businesses, employees of the companies who take tenancy will create tremendous economic growth for the small businesses, restaurants and stores in the neighborhood.

Thirdly, the facility will have a thirty-five thousand square foot (35,000 SF) Event and Catering facility. This is something that is desperately needed to service the Harlem community. There is a limited amount of event/catering space above 96th Street and what little there is available is not capable of handling large-scale affairs. The Catering and restaurant facility will alleviate the current practice of having to go to midtown for events like weddings, sales meetings, press conferences, awards dinners, etc. In addition, the Catering facility will also act as a revenue generator for the Hotel.

The fourth aspect of the project is fifty thousand (50,000) square feet of retail space with frontage on 125th Street. The developer is currently negotiating with a number of high-end retailers and financial institutions to attract quality tenants that want access to the uptown customer base.

In addition to the above, the development will have parking for nearly 300 cars below ground. This parking will service the Hotel, Office and commuter.

http://www.majicdev.com/images/pic3.jpg

http://www.majicdev.com/images/pic1.jpg

http://www.majicdev.com/images/pic2.jpg

Derek2k3
October 7th, 2006, 08:32 PM
Yea, that looks like the original design. I still remember the comments on SP when this was unveiled in an article from the Post (March 5, 2003). Looks like something out of Shenzen and that sort. Fast-forward three and a half years later and it's still a parking lot, too often the story of ambitious nyc developments

ablarc
October 8th, 2006, 05:21 PM
three and a half years later and it's still a parking lot, too often the story of ambitious nyc developments
You find this all over New York, but it seems especially hard to get a major project built in Harlem. Why?

pianoman11686
October 8th, 2006, 06:02 PM
Short answer: perceived riskiness by the investors. Need a lot of capital to get a project like that out of the ground.

It's not that Harlem was asleep at the wheel during the real estate boom. New developments are all over the area. It's just that most of them are relatively small.

Derek2k3
October 8th, 2006, 06:40 PM
I'd say mostly to zoning. Large market-rate towers are probably seen as instant gentrification and zoning pretty much prevents them. Instead Harlem is slowly gentrifying in a piecemeal fashion through a plethora of small, as-of-right, luxury developments dispersed throughout blocks.

I only know of a few large developments in Harlem, this project, Uptown NY, East River Plaza, and Columbia's Manhattanville Plan, and they all require(d) city approvals. Affordable housing or some kind of community job provision seem to be a necessity for approval, thus resulting in a time consuming process, that's only marginally profitable in the end.

111 CPN is the largest as of right, luxury project I know of and notice the uproar it's creating, its saving grace is that it's on CPN.

http://static.flickr.com/91/264273132_0d432cacca.jpg

http://static.flickr.com/119/264273133_a7f9577b0e.jpg

Kroy Wen
October 17th, 2006, 10:15 PM
This from a friend......I notice it was also posted at Curbed, but without the firm responsible;

-----Original Message-----
From: Klein, Roger
Sent: Monday, October 02, 2006 4:51 PM
To: The NY Office
Subject: new project in Harlem


http://img138.imageshack.us/img138/5287/harlemtowerku4.jpg

start the schematic design of the tallest building in Harlem. Located at 125th street and Park Ave, the 22 story building (2 retail flrs, 20 office flrs) will be approx. 330' tall. Ground breaking is set for May 2007.

Be sure to congratulate the team and stop over to the 6th flr studio pin-up area for a viewing of the concept design drawings and finished model (temporary viewing).

The concept design team is as follows:

Richard Hayden, Consulting Principal
Joe Aliotta, Managing Principal
Roger Klein, Design Principal
Doug Streeter, Consulting Principal
Guy Saint Arnaud, Senior Designer
Dominic Walbridge
Joe Boyle
Elena Ranjeva
John Davis
Dustin Furseth
Sun Ju Valenta, consulting planner




Swanke Hayden Connell Ltd. http://www.shca.com

Kroy Wen
October 17th, 2006, 10:25 PM
What Curbed had to say:
http://www.curbed.com/archives/2006/10/11/harlem_park_update_22_stories_of_this.php

Kroy Wen
October 17th, 2006, 10:46 PM
Oddly, all the text from the email didn't transfer, it says in full:

"(sic) start the schematic design of the tallest building in Harlem. Located at 125th street and Park Ave, the 22 story building (2 retail flrs, 20 office flrs) will be approx. 330' tall. Ground breaking is set for May 2007.
Be sure to congratulate the team and stop over to the 6th flr studio pin-up area for a viewing of the concept design drawings and finished model (temporary viewing)."

"The design team is as follows:"

and then the blue text of names posted above

Derek2k3
October 21st, 2006, 12:33 PM
Looks ok so far. It will always have that baggage of what could have been though. We went from an elegant 550 foot tower to 22 stories of bulk. I wouldn't be surprised if it became 8 stories of low-income housing. Stay tuned..

antinimby
December 8th, 2006, 12:36 AM
Things appear to be finally moving forward for this site.

New plans are announced (I going to post only relevant excerpts from a very lengthy NY Sun article):


The Fourth Harlem: Commercial Development


http://www.nysun.com/pics/44736_main_large.jpg
Construction on a joint venture at 1800 Park Ave.
between 124th and 125th streets in East Harlem,
headed by Vornado Realty Trust, is expected to begin
in April. The new tower, to be built on a parking lot
owned by the New York College of Podiatric Medicine,
foreground, will include an office and retail center.


By MICHAEL STOLER
December 7, 2006 (http://www.nysun.com/article/44736?page_no=1)


Call it the Fourth Harlem: the Harlem of commercial real estate. If you want to know how lively it is, ask Vornado Realty Trust, one of the largest owners, managers, and developers of commercial real estate — and, The New York Sun has learned, the entity heading a joint venture scheduled to build Class A office space north of 96th Street.

Earlier this week, I wrote about the Three Harlems — east, west, and central — and what is happening in residential real estate. The story of the Fourth Harlem is also full of action.

Construction on the joint venture project headed by Vornado Realty Trust is scheduled to begin in April. It involves a mixed-use Class A office and retail center in East Harlem. The Vornado real estate portfolio in New York City comprises 18.3 million square feet of office space in 42 office buildings.

The new tower in East Harlem will be on a parking lot owned by the New York College of Podiatric Medicine at 1800 Park Ave. between 124th and 125th streets. The site is directly across the street from the 125th Street Metro-North rail station and one block from the Lexington Avenue subway station.

According to title records, the joint venture of Vornado Realty Trust, Integrated Holdings, and MacFarlane Partners paid $20 million to the leaseholder that had entered into an agreement with the college in 2003. The joint venture will pay an undisclosed sum to acquire the land before closing.

Industry leaders estimate that the price will be approximately $40 million; therefore, the total cost of the land is $60 million.

In January 2003, the college entered into a 48-year land lease with 1800 Park Avenue LLC, an entity controlled by Michael Caridi that had planned to develop Harlem Park, a mixed-use complex that would have featured 250,000 square feet of office space, a 204-room Marriott Courtyard Hotel, a spa, restaurants, a 35,000-square-foot event facility, 62,000 square feet of retail space, 100 residential units, and a parking garage.

Speaking at my class at the New York University Real Estate Institute this week, the president of Vornado Office, David Greenbaum, said: "We are planning to build a mixed-use, 600,000 square building, comprised of approximately 500,000 square of Class A office, 100,000 square of retail, and underground parking." He added that "rents in the tower will be approximately 40% less expensive than any new office tower in Midtown Manhattan."

"This tower will provide a benefit package which is very attractive to our company and tenants, which will aid in the reduction of our costs and of the rents paid by our tenants. The net rent for a new tenant after credits and abatement of taxes is in the range of $43 per square foot as compared to $80 to $100 for similar property in Midtown," Mr. Greenbaum said.

These credits and exemption programs include an Industrial and Commercial Incentive Program abatement of property taxes for up to 25 years, which reduces the cost of operation by about $25 a square foot for the first 16 years; a Relocation and Employment Assistance Program, a savings of about $10 to $12 a square foot for tenants, and a Brownfield redevelopment tax credit available for the cleanup and redevelopment of a qualified Brownfield site.

"The building would the tallest building in Harlem, and can offer a tenant a branding opportunity," Mr. Greenbaum said. "We have been talking to a number of tenants who are interested in branding the location as their corporate headquarters." Over the years, a number of companies have considered relocation to Harlem, including Black Entertainment Television. A number of government agencies and nonprofits have also expressed interest in relocating its offices to the tower.

Major retailers are interested in the retail component of the building, which may include a Nike store, a Starbucks, and a food component to serve both office tenants and the community.

"We made a great mistake that we did not go to Harlem five years ago for commercial and residential development," the managing partner of Apollo Real Estate Advisors, Richard Mack, said. "It is a natural extension of the Upper West and Upper East Side."

"Harlem is an excellent alternative to a company relocating to Jersey City or Long Island City, excellent transportation and infrastructure," the president and chief executive of Cushman & Wakefield, Bruce Mosler, said.

© 2006 The New York Sun, One SL, LLC.

antinimby
December 8th, 2006, 12:38 AM
In light of the new plans and since it will no longer be a hotel, a moderator might want to change the title of this thread to something like, Harlem office tower - 1800 Park Ave.

antinimby
January 11th, 2007, 03:23 AM
^ I guess moderators don't read this thread.

Anyway, here's the latest from the Post:



'LOT' OF HOPE FOR NEW LIFE AT SITE IN HARLEM


http://www.nypost.com/img/cols/loisweiss_btb.jpg

January 10, 2007 (http://www.nypost.com/seven/01102007/business/lot_of_hope_for_new_life_at_site_in_harlem_busines s_lois_weiss.htm) -- THERE are stirrings and rumblings that Harlem's long-dormant 1800 Park Ave. site is springing to life.

Sources say Vornado Realty Trust - led by the dynamic Steve Roth and Michael Fascitelli - is in the middle of several tenancy agreements.

One would have Time Warner Cable relocate its headquarters from Stamford and take the office space in the base of the building.

The retail team, led in-house by Sendeep Mathrani, is also directly working with Nike Town and Bed Bath & Beyond to become the retail anchors of the proposed building.

No one from Vornado returned our calls.

As we advised last year, Vornado Realty Trust completed its agreements with previous developer Michael Caridi and his group, as well as agreements with the College of Podiatric Medicine, which owns the site and has leased it to the developers to 2051.

The 36,289-foot development site is on the west side of the Park Avenue block front from 124th to 125th Streets.

It can produce a 500,000-foot office building, and includes 126,281 feet of air rights from an adjacent property also owned by the college.

This will become the largest development in Harlem and could change the area's dynamics.

Be aware, however, that no new building plans have yet been filed with the Department of Buildings.

Copyright 2007 NYP Holdings, Inc.

Fahzee
January 11th, 2007, 12:13 PM
interesting - Time Warner Cable has been trying to get out of Stamford for years (or so I've been told) - I remember hearing a plan a few years ago to move the bulk of the Stamford employees to Charolette.

antinimby
January 11th, 2007, 09:52 PM
Why are they trying to get out of Stamford?

krulltime
January 14th, 2007, 02:49 AM
From skyscrapercity...



Here's one of the designs for the competition of the Harlem Park Tower located in the corner of 125th street and Park Ave, right next to the train station. It contain spaces for offices, residences, retail, and mainly a Marriott hotel. The concept was to basically make various different vertical pieces that make up the different spaces in the program and connect each other with a central vertical tower. By doing this, the people of Harlem can distinguish the different uses of the tower just by looking at the building, specially since the low-density site allows the tower to be seen from almost anywhere in the area.
Here is a rendering of the tower facing 125th street...I will try to find some more renderings and floor plans to post in here.
http://img125.imageshack.us/img125/3586/1ei5.jpg


Yes you're right, it is about 40 stories tall making a height of 600ft. This could maybe set the pace for skyscrapers in the future for uptown Manhattan.
http://img148.imageshack.us/img148/2439/17fm9.jpg
http://img300.imageshack.us/img300/8430/15jo0.jpg


http://img128.imageshack.us/img128/7633/1rn6.jpg

http://img158.imageshack.us/img158/9708/1stfloorplandl3.jpg

antinimby
January 14th, 2007, 03:09 AM
Bleh. This looks like straight out of 1990 or thereabouts.

We can do better than that.

Derek2k3
January 14th, 2007, 03:45 AM
It looks Arquitectonica-ish

ablarc
January 14th, 2007, 11:51 AM
I think it's rather good.

Xemu
January 14th, 2007, 12:54 PM
I think the massing looks good. It's the blue and beige I have a problem with.

kliq6
January 17th, 2007, 01:11 PM
Why are they trying to get out of Stamford?

Stamford is very very expensive. they have lost two fortune 500 firms out of the four they had in the last year and UBS is having second thoughts as well now about how many people they have up there

MidtownGuy
January 17th, 2007, 02:19 PM
The design is a bit fussy for my taste. Something more "sexy" would be great there. The base leaves one a bit cold, doesn't it?

BrooklynRider
January 17th, 2007, 03:05 PM
I think our perspective suffers from a lousy, simplistic rendering.

antinimby
January 17th, 2007, 06:14 PM
Stamford is very very expensive. they have lost two fortune 500 firms out of the four they had in the last year and UBS is having second thoughts as well now about how many people they have up thereWhere did the two F500 firms that left, went?

kliq6
January 17th, 2007, 06:19 PM
Meadwestvaco to Richmond Virginia
International paper to Memphis, TN

Interseting fact is both relocated from NYC to Stamford first

antinimby
March 23rd, 2007, 11:36 PM
From curbed.com:

570k sf commercial
2009 completion
Vornado

http://www.curbed.com/2007_03_hpark.jpg

NoyokA
March 23rd, 2007, 11:44 PM
I actually think it has potential...

antinimby
March 23rd, 2007, 11:47 PM
...the potential to bore someone to death.

NoyokA
March 23rd, 2007, 11:48 PM
...the potential to bore someone to death.

Don't forget there was a height limit for the site.

ablarc
March 23rd, 2007, 11:50 PM
Fat, ugly thing. Must be NIMBYs.

antinimby
March 23rd, 2007, 11:50 PM
It does look a lot shorter than the now defunct sexy, wavy hotel design.

ablarc
March 23rd, 2007, 11:59 PM
interesting - Time Warner Cable has been trying to get out of Stamford for years (or so I've been told) - I remember hearing a plan a few years ago to move the bulk of the Stamford employees to Charolette.
But deep inside my heart
I know I cant escape.
Oh, mama, can this really be the end,
To be stuck inside of Stamford
With the Charlotte blues again.

kliq6
March 26th, 2007, 10:30 AM
If this project gets Time Warner Cable, which recently spun off from Time Warner and will be a newFortune 500 firm, to move out of Stamford and into NYC and with it about 1500 jobs, this will make this design fine by me

antinimby
March 26th, 2007, 06:32 PM
Yeah but couldn't we get the jobs and a nice design as well or is that waaaay too much to ask for in this city?

kliq6
March 27th, 2007, 02:43 PM
Yeah but couldn't we get the jobs and a nice design as well or is that waaaay too much to ask for in this city?

I agree but as a broker, i care more about jobs and leasing space, byt thats me. I understand design is imprtant to many but todays architects are really not that creative

ablarc
March 27th, 2007, 07:49 PM
I understand design is imprtant to many but todays architects are really not that creative
Now there's a thesis that could be discussed at length.

Derek2k3
March 27th, 2007, 10:43 PM
I agree but as a broker, i care more about jobs and leasing space, byt thats me. I understand design is imprtant to many but todays architects are really not that creative

No, today's developers are very bottom-line driven.

antinimby
March 28th, 2007, 01:26 AM
...and add in an imbecile like Gene Kaufman and you get McSams.

MidtownGuy
March 28th, 2007, 10:22 AM
Money is all they care about. They're devils. Horns and all.

kliq6
March 28th, 2007, 11:53 AM
Maybe true but without them nothing would get built. Architects wont be funding anything, there fees to design these things are almost laughable

MidtownGuy
March 28th, 2007, 12:59 PM
I think all over the world, and here in New York sometimes, things do get built which are both profitable and aesthetic plusses to their city. Some developers do have more conscience than others. I was mainly referring to
those who don't care what it looks like, as long as their own pockets get lined nicely. That seems to be the case among today's (New York) developers.

You can build beautiful things and have a prospering city(even moreso in the long run, as the city becomes more beautiful/inspiring instead of more ugly and common); they're not mutually exclusive.

Developers think in terms of their own lifetime. They're mortals. Sometimes they need a little pushing to do the right thing. The bastards I called devils,
people like Sam Chang, are getting to build whatever they want and profit off of Gotham's cachet , (ironically) despoiling it as they go along.

Tectonic
July 16th, 2007, 10:44 AM
From The Architectural Record:http://archrecord.construction.com/news/daily/archives/070713harlem.asp

Harlem Office Tower Will Be the First in Decades

July 13, 2007

by Jenna M. McKnight
Harlem has seen a flurry of residential and retail developments in recent years. Now the northern Manhattan neighborhood is slated to get its first major office building in three decades—a striking glass tower designed by Swanke Hayden Connell Architects (SHCA). Prosaically named the Harlem Tower, the 340-foot-tall, 21-story building will be the neighborhood’s tallest.
http://archrecord.construction.com/news/images/070713harlem1.jpg
Photo: Courtesy Crystal CG Renderers
Swanke Hayden Connell Architects have designed a 340-foot-tall office tower that will rise at the corner of Park Avenue and 125th Street—the first major new office building in Harlem since 1973.
http://archrecord.construction.com/news/images/070713harlem3.jpg
An illuminated volume at the building’s southwest corner acts like a lantern.
http://archrecord.construction.com/news/images/070713harlem2.jpg
The tower takes the form of an irregular composition of stacked boxes, which helps mitigate its stature.
The tower replaces a parking lot located at Park Avenue and 125th Street, a gritty corner that has yet to be significantly impacted by gentrification. The site is ripe for development: situated on a street regarded as Harlem’s key economic artery, it’s also adjacent to a stop on a major commuter rail line.
Vornado Realty Trust purchased the lot last year. The development firm owns more than 20 million square feet of space in Manhattan but this will be its first project north of Central Park. It aims to attract financial service and media companies.
“We hope they are successful in getting tenants,” says Curtis Archer, president of the Harlem Community Development Corporation (HCDC), a state agency that facilitates revitalization initiatives in the neighborhood. “Harlem is primarily a residential community. It’s never been marketed as a business district until recently.”
The last major office tower constructed in the neighborhood was the 19-story Harlem State Office Building, completed in 1973. SHCA, which designed the Trump Tower on Fifth Avenue, was hired last August to design Harlem Tower after developer Michael Caridi’s plan to erect a mammoth Marriott Hotel, designed by Enrique Norten, fizzled. Critics of that project, which would have occupied the same site, felt that its 51-story height clashed with the neighborhood’s aesthetic of five- and six-story brick buildings.
Roger Klein, SHCA design principal, says that his firm was mindful of those sentiments. “Instead of trying to do what architects typically do with an office tower, which is to express the verticality of the buildings, we embraced the squat and masculine forms of the Harlem neighborhood,” he explains.
The 600,000-square-foot Harlem Tower takes the form of an irregular composition of stacked boxes—like Jenga blocks—that temper the building’s stature. These boxes are lined with vertical terra cotta fins that add texture to the glass curtain wall and reference the masonry of surrounding buildings. A cubic volume rises 14 feet above the roofline at the southwest corner. This apex will be illuminated at night, like a lantern gesturing south toward Central Park and the rest of Manhattan. “The goal was to create an iconic branding moment within the building,” Klein says.
The architects have also created green moments—Harlem Tower aims for LEED Silver certification. Daylight penetrates throughout nearly 75 percent of the occupied space, for instance, and a low-flow plumbing system will conserve water.
Construction could begin as early as next month and is scheduled to finish in 2009. In addition to its office tenants, the building will contain 82,000 square feet of retail shops located at street level and below grade.
Harlem Tower joins other recently announced projects including a 230,000-square-foot mixed-use building at the corner of Lenox Avenue and West 125th Street, and an $80-million tower on Fifth Avenue at 110th Street that will contain the Museum for African Art as well as luxury condominiums. Rejuvenation at the Park Avenue and 125th Street site had lagged. A former hub for prostitution and drug treatment clinics, homeless people still loiter there. “If Vornado moves forward,” says Thomas Lunke, HCDC’s director of planning, “a lot more attention will be paid to that corridor.”

kliq6
July 16th, 2007, 10:55 AM
They are specifically looking at a media firm to take space there, on ethat has space in the region but not in the city as of now

NoyokA
July 16th, 2007, 01:45 PM
I take back what I originally thought, that this building might have potential based on the glossy night rendering. This building is bulky, ungainly, and ill-proportioned, it has no grace whatsoever.

Tectonic
July 16th, 2007, 03:41 PM
Don't think it's too bad just don't like the brown color on it.

macreator
July 16th, 2007, 07:21 PM
In my opinion it's just as bad as the Adam Clayton Powell office tower in Harlem (pictured below)

http://static.flickr.com/70/195573245_cb025d2cec.jpg

Kliq, what happened with Time Warner Cable? I thought they were planning on taking space in this building.

elfgam
July 16th, 2007, 09:31 PM
thanks in advance... and i don't know how to do this -- but can anyone post an image of the original norten proposal next to this new proposal... i'm curious to compare the two...

but let's call a spade a spade... and a dog a dog.
this is a dog.

but a much better looking dog than a lot of the other 'contextual' (i.e. squat brick boxes with concrete 'accents' made to look like capitals) crap going up on 125th...

outlying neighborhoods like this have yet to warm up to the potentials of good design... they just want everything smaller because they fear what the results of big might be... because they just don't believe it will be good (witness the fight against Piano's columbia expansion, arguably the best urban development in the city in decades)...

in the end... they get what they asked for.

Bob
July 16th, 2007, 09:37 PM
Perhaps somebody would like to move the Yale Art and Architecture building to Harlem. That would be an improvement over this proposal AND the Adam Clayton Powell office tower. It would also spruce up New Haven.

And for those of you who think I really don't like the Yale Art and Architecture building, I have a short statement just for you: you are correct!!

kliq6
July 17th, 2007, 10:13 AM
In my opinion it's just as bad as the Adam Clayton Powell office tower in Harlem (pictured below)

http://static.flickr.com/70/195573245_cb025d2cec.jpg

Kliq, what happened with Time Warner Cable? I thought they were planning on taking space in this building.

Thats the firm im talking about, currently hq in Stamford, CT

krulltime
July 17th, 2007, 01:34 PM
I think it looks great. Although I would it like that first hotel rendering version at first.


Bigger rendering...


http://www.curbed.com/2007_07_harlemful.jpg

BrooklynRider
July 17th, 2007, 02:52 PM
It reminds me of the New Museum of Contemporary Art on the Bowery.

macreator
July 17th, 2007, 04:15 PM
Thats the firm im talking about, currently hq in Stamford, CT

That would be a nice coup for the City, and for Harlem.

TonyO
July 21st, 2007, 11:06 AM
This is a great looking building. With the rezoning of 125th st., it won't be out of place for long.

antinimby
August 28th, 2007, 06:23 PM
Harlem Park plans worry residents


http://www.newsday.com/media/photo/2007-08/32150073.jpg
Construction of Harlem Park, a 21-story office building, is slated to begin at the site of an
empty lot at the corner of 125th St. and Park Avenue.
(Photo by Dave Sanders / August 27, 2007)



By David Freedlander, amNewYork Staff Writer
August 28, 2007 (http://www.amny.com/news/local/am-harl0828,0,910388.story)

There was much to be excited about in February 2005 when then-Governor George Pataki and Mayor Michael Bloomberg grabbed ceremonial shovels at a groundbreaking for the new Harlem Park.

The $236 million project on 125th Street and Park Avenue promised to bring 2,500 jobs and the first new major tourist hotel to Harlem since the Hotel Theresa closed its doors in 1966.

Now 2½ years later, the lot where the hip designs of internationally known architect Enrique Norton were supposed to take root is still an empty parking lot behind the New York College of Podiatric Medicine, and some worry that the promises of new jobs will never materialize.


"We have a dynamic cultural vibrancy but we haven't seen that translate into the local economy," said Robert Rodriguez, chairman of Community Board 11. "This could be a real opportunity to improve the community and change some of the perceptions about East Harlem."

The envisioned Marriott, and the community-benefits agreement that came with it, fell through when the developer, Michael Caridi, sold his interest later in 2005 to Vornado Realty Trust, a real estate giant that controls 22 million square feet of space in Manhattan. Instead, a 21-story, 640,000 square foot office tower is planned and scheduled for completion sometime in 2009.

Neither Caridi nor Vornado would comment.

Some lawmakers, though, worry that the new development is moving forward without the kind of community oversight that the original agreement had.

"It was the old bait and switch," said state Sen. Bill Perkins (D-Manhattan), who opposed the project when he was in the City Council. "These projects have to come through us to get the authority to build a certain height. Once we give them the authority and the project doesn't go through, the owner, without doing anything, has increased the value of the property, and they can sell it without going back to the council for approval."

Since the deal for the Marriott fell though, two new luxury hotels have been slated for the Harlem market: A W hotel for 124th Street and Frederick Douglass Boulevard, and a 19-story hotel being developed by Paul Reisman properties on Fifth Avenue and 125th Street.

"I think the Marriott project was a little ahead of its time," said Councilwoman Inez Dickens, who now holds Perkins' seat. "Harlem is different today than it was even five years ago. We are getting all the services now that the rest of New York had and Harlem was denied for so long."

The area around the planned development has been the site of much interest by the Bloomberg administration and community activists. In 2003 the Department of City Planning began looking into a River-to-River rezoning plan for 125th Street. Another proposal to develop the blocks east of Harlem Park called "Uptown New York" faltered when residents organized against it.

It was that effort that East Harlem preservationist Marina Ortiz believes made Vornado take notice. The company has made several presentations to the community board and has promised to be a good neighbor.

"You have seen in East Harlem in the past few years people are much more outspoken," Ortiz said. said. "Developers are doing their homework as to what the community prefers."

Still, many longtime residents can't help but fear the worst.

"They've been saying that white people were going to take back Harlem for 20 years," said Ernest Holmes, 60, an area resident. "I guess now they are."

NewYorkDoc
August 31st, 2007, 02:22 PM
"They've been saying that white people were going to take back Harlem for 20 years," said Ernest Holmes, 60, an area resident. "I guess now they are."

God forbid white people move back, "take over", and live in a diverse area. I understand concerns for price inflations, but give it a rest.

Tectonic
September 1st, 2007, 05:53 AM
"They've been saying that white people were going to take back Harlem for 20 years," said Ernest Holmes, 60, an area resident. "I guess now they are."

With that rumor I hope he bought some property and waited.

Baskervilles
September 3rd, 2007, 06:31 PM
My wife and I are moving to a renovated brownstone on 126th between Park and Madison, which is one block from where Harlem Park will be when built.

We will be the first white family on the block and our future neighbors have been very nice to us.

We are dying to see Harlem Park get built. 1800 Park (125th and Park) is really vile right now.

Baskervilles
September 21st, 2007, 06:47 PM
The new Harlem Park site is active:

http://www.harlempark.com

Tectonic
September 21st, 2007, 07:52 PM
Nice website.

Mayor of Brooklyn
October 3rd, 2007, 02:55 AM
God forbid white people move back, "take over", and live in a diverse area. I understand concerns for price inflations, but give it a rest.Diverse at the expense of who? Who cares about being diverse if it's going to force out people who families grew up in the area for generations. Why should people in Harlem or Bedstuy have to suffer because the other areas if NY are now overpriced? As if the people in Harlem shouldn't be shown respect.

czsz
October 3rd, 2007, 11:18 AM
That argument cuts both ways.

Why should the rest of the city have to suffer from even greater price inflation because long-suffering neighborhoods that could use the investment refuse to allow new residents?

antinimby
October 3rd, 2007, 01:17 PM
Gotta agree with czsz.

Mayor of Brooklyn
October 3rd, 2007, 01:43 PM
That argument cuts both ways.

Why should the rest of the city have to suffer from even greater price inflation because long-suffering neighborhoods that could use the investment refuse to allow new residents?
Because it's not investment for the people already in the community. Only the residents with higher economic status would see some slight chance of improvement. Everybody on the lower economic latter will be forced to move, so who really benefits? Most of the new people moving into these neighborhoods have nothing to do with neighborhood expect for sleeping. Kids don't go the the local schools(so no increase funding), they damn sure don't play with the other kids, parents dont shop in area etc. Its not Harlem fault that lower Manhattan over priced itself, deal with the issues down there.

Not to mention the slap in the face that anybody can just come in and build whatever they want. I remember when i worked for a big retail store in the NY area, at the headquarters they told us that certain neighborhoods wont allow them to build stores if it didn't match the neighborhood. Thats why you see in some areas a store like McDonald's wouldn't have the big Yellow M and red billboard but instead everything is engraved in stone. Why people can't respect the citizen of Harlem or any similar neighborhood the same way?

SilentPandaesq
October 3rd, 2007, 02:38 PM
^^
I'am sorry, but that is crap.

Where is it written that you have to be part of the hood? So what if new residents don't shop at C-town? Nobody but the market gets to dictate where people live, not me, not you, not anyone.

To argue that it is some sort of "downtown" problem is short sighted. The same kind of short sightedness that got Harlem in to a position of "no respect" in the first place.

Mayor of Brooklyn
October 3rd, 2007, 06:22 PM
^^
I'am sorry, but that is crap.

Where is it written that you have to be part of the hood? So what if new residents don't shop at C-town? Nobody but the market gets to dictate where people live, not me, not you, not anyone.

To argue that it is some sort of "downtown" problem is short sighted. The same kind of short sightedness that got Harlem in to a position of "no respect" in the first place.
I personally could care less where anybody shop but im just saying the whole "benefit Harlem" nonsense is crap. The only people who benefit are those moving in. If you didn't give a damn about Harlem or Bedstuy before then why care now? Those neighborhoods were abandoned through the tough times but now that it's making a comeback its everybody else who's gonna benefit? NY is already overpriced we don't need every area to shoot up in price like the village or Brooklyn heights.

TonyO
October 3rd, 2007, 06:49 PM
I personally could care less where anybody shop but im just saying the whole "benefit Harlem" nonsense is crap. The only people who benefit are those moving in. If you didn't give a damn about Harlem or Bedstuy before then why care now? Those neighborhoods were abandoned through the tough times but now that it's making a comeback its everybody else who's gonna benefit? NY is already overpriced we don't need every area to shoot up in price like the village or Brooklyn heights.

Harlem had a long history before it became an African American center of culture. The things you are concerned about now were the same things the original landowners felt about the Jewish influx in the early 1900's.

Fighting Harlem's resurgence and gentrification is a losing battle. The only thing that would reverse it, would also bring it's downfall - violent crime.

czsz
October 3rd, 2007, 06:54 PM
The irony is when residents of neighborhoods like Harlem complain about lack of investment, and then whine when anything above the quality of the preexisting C-Town gets built. The market isn't going to solve for improvements without incentives; there was little chance such investments were going to be made before gentrification began creeping north.

If you think the circa 1995 state of 125th Street was perfectly fine, though, I guess it doesn't matter. Judging from the number of longtime Harlemites who now shop at the local H&M, though, and who visit the cinema, you may be in the minority.

Alonzo-ny
October 3rd, 2007, 08:14 PM
Diverse at the expense of who? Who cares about being diverse if it's going to force out people who families grew up in the area for generations. Why should people in Harlem or Bedstuy have to suffer because the other areas if NY are now overpriced? As if the people in Harlem shouldn't be shown respect.

Im sick of this baseless arguement. No one has the right to live anywhere, just because earlier generations lived there doesnt mean they have the right to stay if they cant afford it. Should the new people in the LES be forced out, what about soho so the artists can move back?

Mayor of Brooklyn
October 3rd, 2007, 08:43 PM
Harlem had a long history before it became an African American center of culture. The things you are concerned about now were the same things the original landowners felt about the Jewish influx in the early 1900's.

Fighting Harlem's resurgence and gentrification is a losing battle. The only thing that would reverse it, would also bring it's downfall - violent crime.Yes but the Harlem we know today was created during the Harlem rennisance. Also the big difference is when black or brown people move in a area the value of the area drops but when white people move the value sky rocket as if black/brown people are worthlist. All these big time investers should have moved when crack was a huge problem.


The irony is when residents of neighborhoods like Harlem complain about lack of investment, and then whine when anything above the quality of the preexisting C-Town gets built. The market isn't going to solve for improvements without incentives; there was little chance such investments were going to be made before gentrification began creeping north.

If you think the circa 1995 state of 125th Street was perfectly fine, though, I guess it doesn't matter. Judging from the number of longtime Harlemites who now shop at the local H&M, though, and who visit the cinema, you may be in the minority.Who gives a shit about c-town? Do people in Brooklyn Heights complain if the character of the neighborhood is jeopardize by new development? YES thats why you wont see some of these ugly designs plans for Harlem in Brooklyn Heights, The village, Upper West side etc. I have no problem with building from within if it's done right, theres a lot of people of higher economic status being produce in Harlem, Bedstuy etc. I dont want to see these areas lost before the next generation had a chance to make improvement.

Magic Johonson theater= Good
Starbux= Bandwagon




Im sick of this baseless arguement. No one has the right to live anywhere, just because earlier generations lived there doesnt mean they have the right to stay if they cant afford it. Should the new people in the LES be forced out, what about soho so the artists can move back?Order through chaos? Hmm. I agree with you in principle but im bias on this matter. You don't think its a problem that if tons of people of higher pigmentation moved in a area say the village, that the value of the area would drop? But if people of much lighter hue move to say up Harlem, the value jump and out price everybody else? What if everybody in Soho now was forced out would the sentiment be the same?

Alonzo-ny
October 3rd, 2007, 09:34 PM
Its poor people that would bring down the price of a neighbourhood not necessarily the colour. Im sure there are afluent people of colour in every upmarket neighbourhood of this city. Sounds like your on a rant with no chance of changing your mind.

TonyO
October 3rd, 2007, 11:04 PM
Yes but the Harlem we know today was created during the Harlem rennisance. Also the big difference is when black or brown people move in a area the value of the area drops but when white people move the value sky rocket as if black/brown people are worthlist. All these big time investers should have moved when crack was a huge problem.


Actually, the original Harlem landowners were concerned that the Jewish influx would lower property values.

Of course money is going to come when crack is not a problem...why is that surprising?

Alonzo-ny
October 4th, 2007, 12:05 AM
Hey now crack has been there for generations it has a right to be there.

Mayor of Brooklyn
October 4th, 2007, 03:19 AM
Its poor people that would bring down the price of a neighbourhood not necessarily the colour. Im sure there are afluent people of colour in every upmarket neighbourhood of this city. Sounds like your on a rant with no chance of changing your mind.
Yes affluent people of color live in all types of neighborhoods, but they're not the majority for the most part. It there was a influx the value would drop(unless its a influx in a poor area)And yes my mind is made up.

Tony: Im just saying why no investments when crack was huge or just starting? Maybe that would have helped but nope. Now its just leechers

TonyO
October 4th, 2007, 11:28 AM
Tony: Im just saying why no investments when crack was huge or just starting? Maybe that would have helped but nope. Now its just leechers

I hear what you are saying, it's difficult to not be resentful when newcomers flow into a place and you were a long-time resident or pioneer there. But it's like getting angry about the wind. The nature of money and investing is that they're risk averse.

Alonzo-ny
October 4th, 2007, 12:54 PM
Yes affluent people of color live in all types of neighborhoods, but they're not the majority for the most part. It there was a influx the value would drop

Even if it was an influx of affluent people of colour?

NoyokA
October 4th, 2007, 01:41 PM
Even if it was an influx of affluent people of colour?

Yes, hence the process of "steering", which is now illegal but real estate agents still engage in it nevertheless.

Baskervilles
October 11th, 2007, 11:06 AM
There are a lot of abandoned buildings on 126th Street close to 1800 Park.

Most of the people complaining about the new influx of development and white families seem to be people who lived in Harlem during it's heyday. That was a long time ago.

Homeowners who live there now, black and white, seem eager to welcome new residents that will take care of their buildings and the block.

Harlem isn't what it was, just like the East Village, the Lower East Side, Hell's Kitchen and Williamsburg aren't what they were.

Who wants to live in a run down, bombed out area? That's what Harlem has been for years.

ASchwarz
October 11th, 2007, 12:28 PM
There are a lot of abandoned buildings on 126th Street close to 1800 Park.

Most of the people complaining about the new influx of development and white families seem to be people who lived in Harlem during it's heyday. That was a long time ago.

Homeowners who live there now, black and white, seem eager to welcome new residents that will take care of their buildings and the block.

Harlem isn't what it was, just like the East Village, the Lower East Side, Hell's Kitchen and Williamsburg aren't what they were.

Who wants to live in a run down, bombed out area? That's what Harlem has been for years.

Those rundown buildings on East 125th aren't abandoned. They are part of a massive property assemblage.

They are sitting like that because of delays on the Uptown NY project, which is a huge mixed-use development that has been altered somewhat because of NIMBYism and community activists.

There will be activity on these sites within a year.

Baskervilles
October 11th, 2007, 02:43 PM
Those rundown buildings on East 125th aren't abandoned. They are part of a massive property assemblage.

They are sitting like that because of delays on the Uptown NY project, which is a huge mixed-use development that has been altered somewhat because of NIMBYism and community activists.

There will be activity on these sites within a year.

ah, I said 126th Street and not 125th street. 125th is mostly occupied.

ASchwarz
October 11th, 2007, 03:48 PM
Yeah, this project stretches from 124th to 127th, and encompasses most of the vacant land and empty buildings in that area. You will see extensive new retail, commercial and residential space.

Baskervilles
October 11th, 2007, 04:03 PM
Sounds good! Stay away Duane Reade...

antinimby
October 11th, 2007, 04:46 PM
There will be activity on these sites within a year.Waterdowned, I'd bet.

Baskervilles
January 31st, 2008, 11:43 AM
I'd like to know exactly what the community board needs to approve to get this project going.

http://www.nytimes.com/2008/01/31/nyregion/31harlem.html?ex=1359435600&en=22d558c769c91dc3&ei=5088&partner=rssnyt&emc=rss

antinimby
January 31st, 2008, 12:15 PM
What I don't get is that is proposal has been out for awhile now. That interlocking design has been out for...what...a year now?

If they'd just start construction, then the rezoning and height limits wouldn't apply to them as they would meet the current zoning regs, which do not have those height limits.

The rezoning is only just a proposal at this point and if they start now, wouldn't affect them.

NoyokA
January 31st, 2008, 01:41 PM
The foundations would have to be complete for it not to affect them. Vornado actually did this with the Bloomberg Tower. With the difficulty of finding lending I don't think Vornado or his lenders wants to start construction without atleast half the tower leased though.

antinimby
January 31st, 2008, 01:48 PM
I understand they don't want to get started without a signed tenant but my problem with them is that they've had to have known about the proposed rezoning for awhile now. Heck, I'm not in this business and I've known about it for nearly a year now.

Knowing that there's a possibility that there might be a height cap and that it could affect their project, you'd think they would have at least tried to put in a foundation. Even if their plans should change, eventually the site is going to get redeveloped somehow and a foundation would be needed anyway.

I'm just surprised that a company as large as that wouldn't use common business sense.

NoyokA
January 31st, 2008, 06:01 PM
You can't do anything without money. As I said since the subprime mortgage crisis most lenders will not lend unless you have substancial pre-leasing.

antinimby
February 1st, 2008, 09:12 AM
It doesn't take much money to dig a hole and fill it with cement and if that kind of business maneuvering is required then that is what a successful company has to do. It's not like that hole wouldn't ever be required down the road.

I'd bet Vornado spent more money hiring lobbyists for the Hotel Pennsylvania project than it would take to dig a hole here.

NoyokA
February 1st, 2008, 09:30 AM
Actually it costs 10's of millions.

antinimby
February 1st, 2008, 09:54 AM
Obviously. But in the overall scheme of things, that's very little for them.

All I can say is that it's no one's fault but theirs if they don't get their height exemption, although, I don't know why the City wouldn't give it to them.

It's not like that 40 feet is going to make that much of a difference anyway. I'd be that 290 foot figure was arbitrarily chosen by Planning anyway as a way of making the rezoning more palatable to the community.

Alonzo-ny
February 1st, 2008, 11:49 AM
The foundation is one of the most costly components.

ASchwarz
February 1st, 2008, 11:49 AM
This project is already approved and permitted. The city won't backtrack and change the zoning on this site.

kliq6
February 26th, 2008, 11:18 AM
NYC IDA has a public hearing thursday about financing for Vornado for this tower as well as for MLB asking for subsidies to rent out 150,000 sf of the office space in this tower

antinimby
February 26th, 2008, 07:54 PM
Let us know what the outcome is once you hear it.

brianac
April 23rd, 2008, 06:20 AM
Updated On 04/22/08 at 06:13PM

Macy's shopping for Harlem site


http://s3.amazonaws.com/trd_three/images/32540/Harlem_Park_articlebox.jpg (http://ny.therealdeal.com/assets/32540)
Harlem Park


By David Jones

Department store giant Macy's is in talks with Vornado Realty Trust to open a new store at the developer's proposed Harlem Park office complex on 125th Street, according to brokers with knowledge of the negotiations.

The Macy's store could rise up to the third floor of the 21-story building, however the amount of available space hinges on how big a lease Major League Baseball takes for the new television network it is launching.

The 640,000 square-foot office building is close to signing a lease with the new network and with Inner City Broadcasting, which owns the WBLS radio station, to be the two anchor tenants.

Robin Abrams, executive vice president at Lansco Corp, which is representing several potential retail tenants in Harlem, said Macy's has been in talks with Vornado for a couple of months. She and others said asking retail rents in the area are about $100 per square foot.

"I do think this is an area that's got a lot of potential," she said. "Not only because of all of the activity along the 125th street corridor, but if you look at the residential you're looking at an increasing demographic."

Jones Lang LaSalle, which is representing Vornado on its office leasing, declined comment and referred calls directly to the company. Vornado also declined comment. And, Macy's officials were not immediately available.

The store is one of several major department chains and retail outlets reportedly scouting locations on 125th Street, which is expected to be rezoned now that the Bloomberg administration and City Council have come to a compromise agreement on the amount of affordable housing to set aside and other height restrictions for the new buildings.

The modified plan — which passed through a key council committee and is expected to be rubberstamped by the full body — limits new development to 195 feet. But it allows the Harlem Park project to reach 330 feet to accommodate satellite equipment that needs to go on the rooftop.

© 2008 The Real Deal

BrooklynLove
April 23rd, 2008, 07:18 AM
macy's has done well with their bk fulton mall location for years, so i can see their interest in the 125 corridor. somewhat similar demographic now and similar expectation of future progression.

antinimby
July 12th, 2008, 05:22 PM
Developer Cuts Back on Plans for Tower to House Baseball’s Cable Network



By CHARLES V. BAGLI
Published: July 12, 2008 (http://www.nytimes.com/2008/07/12/nyregion/12mlb.html)

A 21-story office building planned in East Harlem for Major League Baseball is shrinking.

The tower’s developer, Vornado Realty Trust, had planned to begin construction in April on what would be the home for professional baseball’s newly created cable network, which is scheduled to make its debut in January with 50 million subscribers.

But, according to real estate executives and city officials, Vornado’s inability to finance the $435 million project, known as Harlem Park, has delayed construction and is doing what critics who had complained about the tower’s size could not: reduce its height by about a third. That is in part because the developer seems to have had problems signing up other tenants for the building.

Vornado is now considering a revised plan for a 14-story building at 125th Street and Park Avenue and renegotiating its lease with Major League Baseball, the executives and officials said.

The developer did not return calls requesting comment, and officials at Major League Baseball said they were too busy organizing the festivities surrounding the All-Star Game to be held on Tuesday at Yankee Stadium to look at the newly proposed lease.

It is the latest example of the difficulty developers have had in trying to borrow money for projects amid the national debt crisis, even projects that only a few months ago seemed to be on the fast track. After completing the excavation for his Beekman Tower project downtown, the developer Bruce Ratner had to stop work for three months while his company went from bank to bank putting together the construction financing.

Still, the Bloomberg administration and the developer are intent on trying to move the baseball project forward. To that end, Vornado and Major League Baseball intend to use a raft of tax breaks, as well as tax-exempt financing.

“Notwithstanding a very complicated financing environment, the private sector continues to push forward with major economic development projects in Harlem and across the city,” said Seth W. Pinsky, president of the city’s Economic Development Corporation. “We think this project will serve as an important symbol of the rebirth of the commercial market along 125th Street.”

Nevertheless, some critics of the project were amused by the turnabout. “It’s like chickens coming home to roost,” said Assemblyman Keith L. T. Wright of Harlem. “What the political forces couldn’t do, economic reality has forced upon them. Nobody wanted towering office buildings on 125th Street. We wanted it to reflect Harlem architecture.”

Vornado’s Major League Baseball project surfaced with a great deal of fanfare in January at the same time that the city was rezoning 125th Street, Harlem’s main shopping boulevard. The 21-story tower would have been the tallest in the neighborhood and the first major office building in Harlem since 1973, when the 19-story Harlem State Office Building opened.

Vornado, one of the city’s largest commercial landlords, replaced another developer who, at a press conference three years earlier, announced with then Gov. George E. Pataki and Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg that he was building an even taller hotel on the site, a parking lot.

Vornado hired Swanke Hayden Connell Architects to design a glamorous-looking tower of stacked glass cubes. Instead of government offices, Major League Baseball’s new cable network planned to take about one-fifth — 132,000 square feet — of the space, including studios on the second and third floors and executives’ offices on the top two floors. The network is temporarily situated in New Jersey.

In January, Vornado said that Inner City Broadcasting, which owns the radio station WBLS, was close to signing a lease and moving to 125th Street from Midtown. Later, retail brokers said that Macy’s was interested.

But some residents and elected officials said that the building was too tall for the area and that commercial gentrification was forcing many small businesses that had suffered through the hard times on 125th Street to leave. Under the rezoning, Vornado would have had to build a shorter building.

Vornado and Major League Baseball lobbied for an exception, and in April, the Bloomberg administration was able to get a zoning compromise with the City Council that allowed for the 21-story tower.

The city also provided Vornado with up to $17 million in mortgage-recording and sales tax breaks for the project and an additional $5 million in sales tax exemptions for Major League Baseball’s network, for creating 250 new jobs. Although the site is close to public transportation, the city and Vornado argued that it, unlike other stretches of 125th Street, was hardscrabble and difficult to develop.

Despite asking for subsidies, baseball officials said they expected that the start-up of their cable network would be the most successful in television history.

Vornado planned to invest $127.5 million, about 30 percent of the project’s cost, and borrow the rest, according to project documents submitted to the city.

But the rents for office space have softened in recent months, and lenders have grown increasingly wary of providing financing for real estate projects because of the mortgage crisis. Real estate executives said that banks are now demanding that developers provide equity equal to 35 percent or more of the project cost, up from 20 percent or less two years ago.

And the “imminent lease” with Inner City Broadcasting has not materialized.

As a result, Vornado is now talking about a smaller building, perhaps 350,000 square feet instead of 600,000.

The city’s tax breaks would decline with a smaller building. But Vornado has applied to the Upper Manhattan Empowerment Zone Development Corporation for a $25 million loan and for tax-exempt financing, which the developer, not the city, is obligated to repay. The project would also qualify for a property tax abatement and income tax credits from both the city and the federal government.

“It’s a project we want to see happen after so many false starts on that site,” said Kenneth J. Knuckles, president of the empowerment zone. “We think an office building will work.”

But critics have always questioned the level of subsidies for the project and the difficulty in determining the full extent of public assistance for Vornado and Major League Baseball. “It seemed like they were getting extra-special treatment,” said Bettina Damiani, director of an advocacy group, Good Jobs New York.

Copyright 2008 The New York Times Company

antinimby
July 12th, 2008, 05:38 PM
Vornado, it's incredibly shortsighted and a waste of a developable site to build only 14 stories because you can't find other tenants to occupy the rest of the building.

The wise and obvious choice would be to hold off on building on this site until the economy gets better. This site has been vacant for decades now so going a few more years undeveloped wouldn't make much of a difference anyway.

Let MLB rent somewhere else if they need space so badly. Office vacancies is rising in Manhattan so finding space shouldn't be too difficult now.

(Now, why does a huge corporation like Vornado with big-shot, (presumably) Ivy-league educated executives need some poor schmuck like me to give them perfectly reasonable and sensible advice in the first place?) :confused:

Derek2k3
July 12th, 2008, 08:25 PM
This has been one of saddest projects to watch unfold. An iconic 40 story hotel whittled down to a generic 14 story office building.

Vornado is such a pussyfoot developer. They own 2 sites on 34th & 7th that could support millions of sq. ft. of office space and instead they keep a 1 story Footaction and build a new 2 story H&M. To expect them to get an office building out of the ground in Harlem must seem outlandish.

In the next article I expect them to cancel the project entirely. Then they'll propose it again during the height of the next boom (only to miss the boom again by the time construction starts), demanding more subsidies to offset the higher construction costs of course.

The nerve of them for even bidding on Hudson Yards. Kudos to the developers like Extell & Durst who actually assemble sites, buy air-rights, and usually build what they propose.

I'd be happy if Vornado just sold all their development sites.

Tectonic
July 15th, 2008, 07:37 AM
Maybe the could build something expandable like the Blue Cross Blue Shield building in Chicago or that building next to the the Citicorp Building in Queens, forgot the official name.

antinimby
August 23rd, 2008, 01:16 AM
Harlem Plan for a TV Base Deteriorates



By CHARLES V. BAGLI
Published: August 22, 2008 (http://www.nytimes.com/2008/08/23/nyregion/23harlem.html)

The grand plan to bring the headquarters for Major League Baseball’s new cable television network to East Harlem is unraveling, real estate executives and government officials said on Friday.

The MLB Network, which is scheduled to begin broadcasting to 50 million subscribers in January, was to be the anchor tenant in what was originally to be a new 21-story office building at 125th Street and Park Avenue, a short distance from Yankee Stadium and players who would be among its guests.

Now baseball executives are balking at new lease terms proposed by the developer, Vornado Realty Trust, that would have required them to take additional space and pay $2 million a year more in rent, said real estate executives and government officials who spoke on the condition of anonymity because they are involved in the negotiations.

That has placed the future of the entire building, which was to be the first office tower built on 125th Street in three decades, in jeopardy.

The MLB Network, in turn, is reconsidering its own plans. It is operating out of temporary quarters in the old MSNBC studios in Secaucus, N.J., not far from Giants Stadium and the National Basketball Association’s network studios. The baseball network is now assessing whether to stay in Secaucus, rather than moving to Harlem in a couple of years.

The $435 million project began running into trouble virtually from the time it was announced in January. Unable to obtain financing or additional tenants, Vornado scaled down its plans earlier this summer, proposing a 14-story building and a new lease with Major League Baseball.

Both sides in the negotiations, as well as city and state officials, are hoping to salvage the deal, which they had hailed as an important commercial catalyst for the Harlem renaissance. With or without Major League Baseball, some officials say, the tower may still be built.

“We’re working hard to put this back on track as an important project for our city and this area,” said Steven Roth, Vornado’s chairman.

Seth W. Pinsky, president of the city’s Economic Development Corporation, said, “We remain committed to working with all the parties and seeing development at the site and along 125th Street in the near future.”

Matt Bourne, a spokesman for Major League Baseball, declined to comment, except to say, “Any negotiations we have are and remain a private matter.”

During the recent real estate boom, developers have pushed into Harlem with new residential projects and retail malls. Two hotels are in the planning stages, and earlier this year the city rezoned 125th Street for development, with an emphasis on arts and entertainment.

City and state officials have been eager to help Vornado build the office tower, called Harlem Park, and lure the MLB Network to it, offering a package of tax breaks, tax-free financing and loans. “This would catalyze 125th Street as a major corridor,” said Kenneth J. Knuckles, chief executive of the Upper Manhattan Empowerment Zone Development Corporation. “Over time, certainly when the economy turns around, you could see other kindred uses coming to 125th Street.”

An earlier version of the plan announced by Gov. George E. Pataki and Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg in 2005 called for a different developer to build a $236 million hotel on the site. But that project stalled, and Vornado, one of the city’s biggest commercial landlords, took it over last year.

In January, Vornado said it would build a 21-story luminescent tower of glass cubes, with the MLB Network taking about 20 percent of the space as the anchor tenant. Vornado lobbied hard for an exception to the proposed rezoning that would have forced it to reduce the height of the building. After protests and months of tough negotiations with the City Council, Vornado got its way.

Work on the tower was supposed to begin in April. In the meantime, the MLB Network leased the old MSNBC studios in Secaucus and began installing high-definition digital broadcasting equipment.

The city provided Vornado with up to $17 million in mortgage-recording and sales tax breaks for the Harlem project and an additional $5 million in sales tax breaks for the MLB Network. The Empowerment Zone agreed to give the developer a $25 million low-interest loan, tax-exempt financing, a property tax abatement and income tax credits from the state and federal governments. But Vornado, like many other developers in the current credit crisis, was unable to obtain financing, despite plans to invest $127.5 million, or 30 percent of the building’s cost.

To keep the project alive, Vornado offered to sell the land to the MLB Network at cost, or to build it a five-story building for its exclusive use.

But it focused on a third option: slicing off about one-third of the building’s height, to cut the overall cost of the building by $100 million.

The developer also sought additional subsidies from the state as well as a higher rent, about $15 more per square foot, or $2 million a year. But that infuriated baseball officials, who thought that Vornado was changing the terms of their agreed-upon deal, according to three people who were involved in the discussions.

The MLB Network had also wanted to be in a marquee tower on 125th Street, not a generic office building.

MLB Network executives, who had expected to move to Harlem in the spring of 2010, now expect to remain in Secaucus, at least until the start of the baseball season in 2011. They are considering whether it makes sense to build expensive high-definition studios first in Secaucus and then in Harlem, real estate executives said.

Copyright 2008 The New York Times Company

Derek2k3
September 21st, 2008, 03:03 AM
Putting the Pieces Together: Harlem Park

http://www.aia.org/aiarchitect/thisweek07/0907/0907d_harlembldg.cfm

http://www.aia.org/aiarchitect/thisweek07/0907/0907d_harlembldg1_b.jpg


http://www.aia.org/aiarchitect/thisweek07/0907/0907d_harlembldg3_b.jpg

brianac
December 10th, 2008, 05:28 PM
Vornado Exec: 125th Street MLB Project ‘Shut Down’

by Eliot Brown (http://www.observer.com/2007/author/eliot-brown)
3:42 PM December 10, 2008

http://www.observer.com/files/imagecache/vertical/files/harlemMLB_3.jpg
The tower that might have been.

Another new development project canceled.

Speaking at an investor conference yesterday, Vornado CFO Joseph Macnow gave word that the company’s troubled plans (http://www.nytimes.com/2008/07/12/nyregion/12mlb.html) for Harlem Park, an office tower on 125th Street, have been officially scuttled.

“We’ve shut down a couple of development projects,” Mr. Macnow said.

“We were going to build the first office building in Harlem in 50 years on 125th Street and Park Avenue. We’ve shut that project down. The economics are not warranted today to do that job.”

Vornado had once wanted to build a 630,000-square-foot office building as a home for a Major League Baseball television network (http://www.nytimes.com/2008/01/31/nyregion/31harlem.html). The developers said they had tentative leases on only about one-third of the space, and thus Vornado couldn’t find financing to build the tower.

In preparation for the tower, Vornado had even gone to the community board and negotiated a concession package (http://www.observer.com/2008/gaining-approval-harlem-tower-vornado-gave-concessions) in order to gain an exemption (http://www.observer.com/2008/city-expected-give-green-light-vornado-and-mlb-harlem-tower) from a planned rezoning that would have limited the height.

http://www.observer.com/2008/real-estate/vornado-exec-125th-street-mlb-project-shut-down

© 2008 Observer Media Group,

lofter1
December 10th, 2008, 07:01 PM
The least lucky development site in NYC.

NoyokA
December 10th, 2008, 07:50 PM
One positive of the recession.

JCMAN320
December 11th, 2008, 04:58 PM
They moved here to Secaucus, in Hudson County,, next town West of Jersey City. http://wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?t=19283

Secaucus is already home to NBA TV, now it will be home to MLB TV!!! MLB says no thanks to Harlem and says Hello to Secaucus

-------------------------------------------------------------------
TV SPORTS
A Network to Satisfy the Appetite of Baseball-Hungry Fans

By RICHARD SANDOMIR
Published: October 2, 2008

http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2008/10/03/sports/tv190.jpg
Aaron Houston for The New York Times
Tony Petitti, the president of the new MLB Network, in its master control room in Secaucus, N.J. Opening day is set for Jan. 1.

Major League Baseball does not believe there is enough baseball on television.

It wants ubiquity, a 24/7 home, so it is building its own cable channel, the MLB Network, in Secaucus, N.J., with opening day scheduled for Jan. 1. The idea behind a league-owned network is not new. The N.F.L., the N.B.A. and the N.H.L. preceded baseball, but all share a goal: to feed a rabid fan base and to relentlessly promote their sport.

“We want to be the authentic home of baseball,” said Tony Petitti, the president of the new network and the former No. 2 executive at CBS Sports behind Sean McManus. Petitti has never worked professionally in baseball, but he was a catcher at Haverford College (class of 1983).

His coach, Greg Kannerstein, who is now the college’s dean, said Friday that Petitti was “a good catcher with a rifle arm” who, “if he had hit a little better, he’d have played major league baseball instead of televising it.”

Unsuccessful talks between CBS and baseball two years ago led Petitti to the MLB Network. “He was incredibly thoughtful and honest in our discussions,” said Tim Brosnan, baseball’s executive vice president for business. “He’s uniquely qualified.”

The shift to running a baseball network, rather than overseeing production of all of CBS’s sports, means focusing on a sport whose fans have local appetites.

They follow their teams on local outlets or on Fox, ESPN or TBS.

“We want to be the next choice for baseball fans,” Petitti said. “We want them to know that we’re here, and we can get you caught up. We’re another tool to enjoy the game.”

Petitti spoke during a tour of the network’s building in an industrial park, the former MSNBC studio where Keith Olbermann fulminated and tossed crumpled paper. Baseball had expected to make Secaucus a temporary stop until a proposed building in Harlem was ready. But the real estate deal in Harlem is dormant, if not altogether dead.

And baseball’s conversion of what MSNBC left behind into an all-high-definition facility augurs for a lengthy stay. The project is costing about $54 million, an investment that led New Jersey last month to approve an $8 million employment incentive grant. “This is likely to be our permanent place,” Petitti said.

The architectural plans for the facility look lavish, with two enormous studios (one is designed to look like a ballpark). But the network will be judged by its programming, including the centerpiece “MLB Tonight” studio program, which during the season will offer updates, live game look-ins and wrap-ups from 7 p.m. until at least 1 a.m. Eastern.

The network will install two robotic cameras at each stadium to enhance its studio programming. “There’s enough interest in what we’ll do,” Petitti said. “We’re selling the accumulation of everything. It’s not about access to one club; it’s about access to all 30.”

One live regular-season game will be seen on the network on either Thursday or Saturday night. But it will be a simulcasted version of a game produced in one of the teams’ local markets, and the MLB Network feed will be seen only outside that area.

There will also be archival, hot stove, reality, youth and spring training programming, as well as World Baseball Classic, minor league and Caribbean World Series games.

The roster of commentators is expected to include Harold Reynolds and Al Leiter, but one of Petitti’s tasks will be to hire someone to be the undisputed voice of the network.

If the MLB Network wants to be the fan’s second choice, as Petitti said, then must it convert devotees of ESPN’s “Baseball Tonight” or regional networks to its side?

Petitti said the MLB channel’s all-baseball format would rope in enough viewers to make the venture succeed. Len DeLuca, an ESPN senior vice president, said, “We feel the MLB Network will draw more fans to the set, which can only benefit our franchises, ‘Baseball Tonight’ and Sunday night and Monday and Wednesday night baseball.”

Still, Tom Werner, a Red Sox owner, said: “If you create a channel for baseball, you’re competing with ESPN because ESPN is the place where you’d find information about baseball. Hopefully, we’ll be the source if you want to know what’s going on.”

Thanks to negotiations, some bizarre and some fractious, the MLB Network will begin with an endowment of more than 50 million subscribers, which will provide the channel with a level of cash that Werner said would make it break even immediately.

Baseball is swapping one-third ownership of its channel with DirecTV, Comcast, Time Warner and Cox for wide distribution, thus avoiding the kind of ongoing distribution turf war that the NFL Network is having with Big Cable.

“Anybody with 50 million or more in distribution has a salable, working business model,” said Neal Pilson, an industry consultant. “Tony’s challenge will be to have provocative, interesting and stimulating programming.”

E-mail: sportsbiz@nytimes.com

http://www.nytimes.com/2008/10/03/sports/baseball/03sandomir.html?_r=2&ref=baseball&oref=slogin&oref=slogin

mariab
July 22nd, 2013, 10:50 PM
All pics accessed by bottom link.

Touted redevelopment of Taystee Bakery, Corn Exchange sites are delayed again

The dilapidated iconic sites, both pegged for mixed-use commercial-retail space, have been tied up by zoning snafus and snags with Landmarks Preservation Commission. Harlem residents say they've seen it before.

By Laignee Barron (http://wirednewyork.com/authors?author=Laignee Barron) / NEW YORK DAILY NEWS

Monday, July 22, 2013, 8:54 PM

RONALD CHAVEZ FOR NEWS
The Corn Exchange building on E. 125th St. is supposed to be redeveloped into a new commercial and retail space -- and six floors will be added, but the $16 million rebuild by Artimus and Danois Architects stalled at the drawing board. Plans to convert the 1883 Queen Anne Revival structure into commercial and retail space failed to secure the Landmarks Preservation Commission’s approval at the April 2012 hearing.


Harlem residents have been hearing the same news for years, now: Two dilapidated brick-and-mortar icons along the 125th St. corridor are still awaiting long-promised facelifts.
The plans to renovate the landmarked Corn Exchange Building and former Taystee Bakery have been dragging on for years. Developers have been touting the projects, and both were slated to have been underway by now.
But, they’ve been delayed again.


The Corn Exchange — formerly the Mount Morris Bank Building at E. 125th St. and Park Ave. — was supposed to be well into its renovation by now, with construction starting last fall.
Instead, the $16 million rebuild by Artimus and Danois Architects stalled at the drawing board.
RELATED: MINING ANOTHER JEWEL ALONG 125TH STREET (http://www.nydailynews.com/new-york/uptown/125th-st-commercial-corridor-adds-star-developing-taystee-bakery-sites-article-1.1082187)
http://assets.nydailynews.com/polopoly_fs/1.1406189.1374540838!/img/httpImage/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_635/landmarks23u-6-web.jpgRONALD CHAVEZ FOR NEWS

More than 40 years since the Taystee Bakery shut its doors, the vacant multibuilding complex between W. 125th and 126th Sts. still isn’t seeing much action.


Plans to convert the 1883 Queen Anne Revival structure into commercial and retail space failed to secure the Landmarks Preservation Commission’s approval at the April 2012 hearing.
“The commissioners asked for revisions because the original design was inappropriate to the character of and history of the bank building,” said Landmarks spokeswoman Elisabeth de Bourbon. “They said the proposed addition was too contemporary (and) incorporated too few historic features. . . ”
Renderings for the iconic red-brick and brownstone building, which has been vacant since the city took control of the rundown property for back taxes, in 1972, were approved at the September 2012 hearing, but final renderings were only recently submitted and a building permit issued last week. Artimus developers did not respond to multiple phone calls, and the reason for the delay was unclear.
There isn’t much cooking over on Amsterdam Ave., either.
More than 40 years since the Taystee Bakery shut its doors, the vacant multibuilding complex between W. 125th and 126th Sts. still isn’t seeing much action.
RELATED: BAKERY KNEADS TO ADD JOBS (http://www.nydailynews.com/archives/boroughs/bakery-kneads-add-jobs-article-1.724275)
http://assets.nydailynews.com/polopoly_fs/1.1406192.1374540227!/img/httpImage/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_635/landmarks23u-1-web.jpgNYC Economic Development Corp.

Rendering of redevelopment plan of former Taystee Bakery shows grand plans which have been stalled at the drawing board. Below, the landmarked Corn Exchange Building remains untouched and boarded up.


In 2012, the city Economic Development Corp. selected a pair of developers, Janus Partners and Monadnock Construction, to rebuild the site for commercial and retail use.



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Read more: http://www.nydailynews.com/new-york/uptown/harlem-familiar-refrain-delayed-article-1.1406194#ixzz2ZpTSFCwH

Derek2k3
January 9th, 2014, 07:26 PM
East Harlem Leaders Want More Affordable Housing at 125th St. Development
By Jeff Mays on January 9, 2014 5:10pm

http://www.dnainfo.com/new-york/20140109/east-harlem/east-harlem-leaders-want-more-affordable-housing-at-125th-st-development

http://assets.dnainfo.com/generated/photo/2014/01/continuum-companys-32-story-east-harlem-towers-13892899289008.JPG/extralarge.jpg

babybackribs2314
January 9th, 2014, 07:41 PM
Ugh. Harlem is such a dump. They should raze everything along 125th Street and start fresh -- even the new developments need to go, as most are uglier than what was there before. All the retail is tacky, low-slung, and unattractive -- despite the excellent transit access.

All of the public housing needs to be re-developed at the same time, as well. Creating a neighborhood that is visually attractive, aesthetically cohesive, and that -- above all -- exists as a suitable home to the *significant* density that can be accommodated should be the ultimate goal for all of Harlem, aside from the historic blocks of brownstones.

Instead, leaders kow-tow to demographics that are reliable votes, and nothing more, while not actually doing anything to improve their lives. Ignorance sucks!

Gulcrapek
January 9th, 2014, 08:49 PM
^Watch yourself when generalizing and insulting an entire neighborhood.

I agree the new retail on 125th is inappropriate - squat, single-use boxes have no place on such a busy and transit-adjacent street. At least this proposal on 125th and Park is dense and mixed use. It's unfortunately grey though... kind of instills a sense of melancholy upon viewing, at least in the renderings.

antinimby
January 9th, 2014, 11:35 PM
That won't age well.

BStyles
January 10th, 2014, 11:05 AM
No, but I predict in 50 years Midtown will begin to expand its borders yet again, and Harlem might very well become a CBD, at least along 125th.

stache
January 11th, 2014, 07:21 AM
It kind of is already.

antinimby
January 11th, 2014, 12:50 PM
^ I think he is referring to a cluster of new commercial office buildings.

Anyway, like all things in this city, it all depends on what the zoning allows for.

Merry
February 20th, 2014, 08:59 AM
Very nice.


East Harlem Community Board signs off on towers that would be tallest

OKs parking waiver that will allow Continuum Co. to build 32-story complex that will include 682 apartments, 63,000 square feet of retail space.

By Michael J. Feeney

http://assets.nydailynews.com/polopoly_fs/1.1619176.1392776352%21/img/httpImage/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_635/towers-1-web.jpg
ODA/ODA
Rendering of 1800 Park Ave., the planned 32-story retail-residential complex that will be Harlem’s tallest structures.

Build it and they will shop.

An East Harlem community board voted unanimously Tuesday to approve a zoning variance that will allot more retail space and less parking to what could become Harlem’s tallest buildings.

“We think the trade-off between parking and retail is beneficial to the neighborhood,” said George Sarkissian, district manager of Community Board 11, of the massive mixed-use project at 1800 Park Ave. at E. 125th St.

The additional retail, which will be expanded to include 63,200 square-feet of ground floor and second-story space, will slash available parking to just 123 spots for 682 residential units at the 32-story complex, community board members said. Originally, 304 spaces were slated for residents at the two buildings.

Under an original plan, the second floor would have been used as a parking garage for residents of the buildings.

When they’re completed in 2017, the two buildings will stand as Harlem’s tallest structures, officials said.

Whatever fears arise from the limited parking, community leaders cheered the potential for neighborhood employment.

“Those additional jobs are important to a community that is struggling with 17% unemployment,” Sarkissian said.

The existing zoning had mandated that building developer Continuum Co. provide parking spaces for 40% of all residential units. That means the developer would have made parking available in underground space and on the second floor.

http://www.nydailynews.com/new-york/uptown/tallest-towers-nod-e-harlem-board-article-1.1619177

antinimby
February 20th, 2014, 09:59 AM
Why is there even a parking requirement to begin with, especially when there's a subway line running right next to it?

This city is retarded.

stache
February 20th, 2014, 10:55 AM
Yup.

EastMillinocket
June 28th, 2014, 11:22 PM
The old corn exchange (NW corner of Park Avenue and East 125th Street)

http://s7.postimg.org/mvt58hnff/DSCF7145.jpg

http://s7.postimg.org/k2zxogn2z/DSCF7144.jpg

BStyles
June 29th, 2014, 11:38 PM
I think that deserves a thread. I followed the link to their website, and although it's missing a standard Mansard roof the renovation looks adequate, and leaves space for a rooftop expansion.

nykid17
July 23rd, 2014, 09:38 PM
https://farm3.staticflickr.com/2915/14749293303_b837d13834_c.jpg

https://farm6.staticflickr.com/5588/14729147802_cddb4cd922_c.jpg

https://farm4.staticflickr.com/3836/14542763890_95c9f27823_c.jpg

They've really been moving lately.
This building deserves it.

EastMillinocket
October 4th, 2014, 04:11 AM
Corn Exchange update

http://harlembespoke.blogspot.com/2014/09/revive-new-brick-at-corn-exchange.html

Merry
October 4th, 2014, 11:00 PM
The Corn Exchange is covered in the Endangered NYC - Lost & Threatened Treasures (http://wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?t=5880&p=450556&viewfull=1#post450556) thread.

nykid17
November 5th, 2014, 12:45 AM
https://farm6.staticflickr.com/5603/15712581111_a4924b1d12_c.jpg

They're doing a great job staying faithful to the original colors/materials.

londonlawyer
November 5th, 2014, 08:19 AM
That looks great!

Merry
February 18th, 2015, 10:50 AM
Harlem's Tallest Tower Won't Be as Tall as Originally Planned

February 17, 2015, by Jeremiah Budin

http://cdn.cstatic.net/images/gridfs/54e34c04f92ea1120f024832/Park_View_.jpg (http://cdn.cstatic.net/images/gridfs/54e34c05f92ea1120f024835/Park_View_.jpg)

Permits for developer Ian Bruce Eichner's 32-story East Harlem tower at 1800 Park Avenue (http://ny.curbed.com/archives/2014/10/07/1800_park_avenue_is_definitely_going_to_stand_out_ in_harlem.php) were disapproved back in July, and now new permits have been filed (http://commercialobserver.com/2015/02/continuum-seeks-permit-for-shorter-harlem-tower/) for a 24-story building at the site. Even with the significant (25 percent) height reduction it will still be the tallest building in Harlem, overtaking the 19-story Adam Clayton Powell Jr. State Office Building (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adam_Clayton_Powell_Jr._State_Office_Building). Oddly, old permits that called for a 24-story building listed the height as 525 feet, which doesn't seem right since the 32-story version was supposed to be 352 feet (and also because that would make for some very high ceilings). Something in the 250-300 range is more likely.

http://cdn.cstatic.net/images/gridfs/54e34c06f92ea1120f02483c/1800PARK_05.jpg (http://cdn.cstatic.net/images/gridfs/54e34c06f92ea1120f02483f/1800PARK_05.jpg)

http://cdn.cstatic.net/images/gridfs/54e34c07f92ea1120f024846/1800PARK_04.jpg (http://cdn.cstatic.net/images/gridfs/54e34c08f92ea1120f024849/1800PARK_04.jpg)

http://cdn.cstatic.net/images/gridfs/54e34c09f92ea1120f024850/1800PARK_03.jpg (http://cdn.cstatic.net/images/gridfs/54e34c0af92ea1120f024853/1800PARK_03.jpg)

http://cdn.cstatic.net/images/gridfs/54e34c0bf92ea1120f02485a/1800PARK_01.jpg (http://cdn.cstatic.net/images/gridfs/54e34c0cf92ea1120f02485d/1800PARK_01.jpg)

http://cdn.cstatic.net/images/gridfs/54e34c0df92ea1120f024864/West.jpg (http://cdn.cstatic.net/images/gridfs/54e34c0ef92ea1120f024867/West.jpg)

Continuum Seeks Permit for Shorter Harlem Tower (http://commercialobserver.com/2015/02/continuum-seeks-permit-for-shorter-harlem-tower/) [CO]
1800 Park Avenue coverage (http://ny.curbed.com/tags/1800-park-avenue) [Curbed]

http://ny.curbed.com/archives/2015/02/17/harlems_tallest_tower_wont_be_as_tall_as_originall y_planned.php

EastMillinocket
June 22nd, 2015, 01:37 AM
http://s12.postimg.org/j5quoaizx/IMG_00001136.jpg

http://s12.postimg.org/kjdw5usvh/IMG_00001137.jpg