PDA

View Full Version : 90 West Street - by Cass Gilbert - Post 9/11 Restoration



Jasonik
June 5th, 2003, 09:48 PM
What is the status of Cass Gilbert's finely boned West Street Building?
General info (http://www.shabazzone.com/195.html)
Designated a Landmark here (http://home.nyc.gov/html/lpc/html/designation/summaries/90westst.html), (The Garret Restaurant was the first Windows on the World (http://www.miltonglaser.com/corpids/wow.html))
After 9/11 looked like this (http://www.therothschilds.com/wtc/pics/z2612601_90_West_St_0921.html) *:(
This (http://www.greatgridlock.net/NYC/nyc1.html#4) is what I found after a quick search.
Any news about restoration firm, etc?

Jasonik
June 5th, 2003, 10:12 PM
From Skyscrapers.com (http://www.skyscrapers.com/re/en/wm/bu/114934/)

maxinmilan
June 7th, 2003, 10:08 AM
Jasonic, just strange for me to find someone quoting Leopardi (I'm from Italy). I've got a second home exactly in the town where Leopardi was born (Recanati in the center of Italy).
Just this...

TLOZ Link5
June 7th, 2003, 12:48 PM
From what I've heard, 90 West was saved from demolition by community activists (God bless 'em; sometimes they do serve a purpose); the developer is planning to convert the building into apartments.

So long as we're talking about buildings designed by Cass Gilbert, did any of you guys know that the Woolworth Building isn't an official landmark?

Merry
June 8th, 2003, 05:01 AM
The Woolworth Building was designated on April 12th, 1983

TLOZ Link5
June 8th, 2003, 07:30 PM
Bah...then whatever source I got that from is either outdated or incompetent.

emmeka
June 10th, 2003, 01:26 PM
Thank god!
I was really hoping that it wouldnt be demolished! Oh such relif!

Ptarmigan
June 10th, 2003, 06:14 PM
Tearing down 90 West Street would be a horrible thing. It would go to waste. The building should be refurbished so it can be used once again.

emmeka
June 11th, 2003, 11:48 AM
It would be a good residential building, expensive, but good.

Evan
June 11th, 2003, 03:11 PM
I hope it does get converted into apartments, along with a lot of the older office buildings that are now absolete. *This way, lower manhattan will get more residents which will bolster the night life, that so many community members complain about, and with the conversions of office space into residential, there will be less office space on the market, which will decrease the vacancy rate, and spur new construction.

Jasonik
June 11th, 2003, 09:28 PM
Ditto *;)

SunsetWorks
June 21st, 2003, 07:58 AM
Does anyone have any recent photos of 90 West street? *

There has been little media attention to this fine building in recent months. As I am not in NY finding information has been difficult.

ZippyTheChimp
June 21st, 2003, 10:38 AM
I'll get some photos over the next few days.

There is construction work going on at the building, mostly on the inside. Fires burned for at least 24 hours, and the interior is completely gutted. The last plans I heard was that the new owners are going to convert it to a residential building.

TLOZ Link5
June 21st, 2003, 03:03 PM
In that recent article on the demolition of the DB tower, they said that it was one of two buildings near Ground Zero that were still in limbo--and the other one was Fiterman Hall. *So that's a good sign for 90 West.

ZippyTheChimp
June 22nd, 2003, 06:39 PM
90 West St, June 22, 2003
http://www.pbase.com/image/18140207.jpg

http://www.pbase.com/image/18140334.jpg

From Washington St
http://www.pbase.com/image/18140348.jpg

114 Liberty St restored. Looks better than it did pre 9/11.
http://www.pbase.com/image/18140011.jpg

http://www.pbase.com/image/18140115.jpg


The Burger King has also been restored to its former tackiness.

TLOZ Link5
June 22nd, 2003, 07:01 PM
All that netting makes you wonder how many miles of thread they used to weave it.

SunsetWorks
June 22nd, 2003, 09:25 PM
Thank you for the pics! It does look very similar to my May 2002 visit, except for the mural. *

The mural is an asset to the overall appearance. Of course, the sooner the building and its intricate architectural detailing on its north face can be restored, and the mural retired, the better.

The Helen Keller Worldwide site has a collection of interior photos of their ravaged headquarters in the building. Most of their irreplaceable library was lost in the fire.

http://www.hkworld.org/news/9_11/wtc_slides1201_01.html

However, several other floors had little fire damage and companies located on them were able to retrieve their documents and contents (according to accounts on the web).

The small buildings are greatly improved over last year.

ZippyTheChimp
January 21st, 2004, 10:41 AM
About one-half of the scaffolding has been removed from 90 West. Excellent work on the facade.

ZippyTheChimp
February 13th, 2004, 10:40 AM
Now that most of the netting has been removed, the lower half of the building still has extensive damage. Large chunks of the terra cotta are missing.

RandySavage
February 13th, 2004, 01:11 PM
A closer look at the damage. http://img22.photobucket.com/albums/v65/RandySavage/100_0030.jpg

TLOZ Link5
February 13th, 2004, 01:14 PM
It's a gem of a building. I'm very glad it's being restored and converted.

Jasonik
February 13th, 2004, 01:37 PM
Wow, the damage to the terra-cotta is sustantial. Thanks for the image Macho-Man. :)

SunsetWorks
February 15th, 2004, 06:14 PM
Ouch.....

The architectural reconstruction team has a job ahead. However, the Barclay-Vesey Verizon building restoration has progressed nicely, so 90 West will certainly be placed in the hands of skilled artisans. Features on the undamaged sides of the Verizon building were used as models to recreate the detailing on the damaged sections, as I expect will also be done here.

Kris
March 5th, 2004, 02:37 AM
March 5, 2004

9/11's Miracle Survivor Sheds Bandages

By GLENN COLLINS

http://graphics7.nytimes.com/images/2004/03/05/nyregion/05WEST.xl.jpg
Just south of ground zero, the office building at 90 West Street was gouged and set on fire during the 9/11 attack.

Veiled in its 23-story shroud and braced in scaffolding for more than two years, the cherished little skyscraper at 90 West Street has been a building in mourning. To those living and working near ground zero, it has been a grimly persistent reminder of the terrorist assault on the World Trade Center.

Now the cloak is gone. The scaffolding is down. And while the horrific wounds on its northern facade are finally - and shockingly - visible, Joachim Fiebich, a construction supervisor at the site, said that "it is as if 90 West has come back to life.''

"And everyone on the street," he said, "wants to know what we're doing.''

Mr. Fiebich, a manager for the Seaboard Weatherproofing Company, is helping direct the vanguard of workers setting to right this 1907 landmark, a jauntily colored neo-Gothic office building created by the architect Cass Gilbert. Its exterior is being restored and its interior is being rebuilt as apartments.

In the days after the twin towers collapsed, 90 West Street was celebrated as a miracle building of Sept. 11, because, unlike so many others nearby, it survived. But the building was severely damaged when flaming steel debris rained on its north facade and gouged the exterior.

Out-of-control fires raged in the building for days, gutting five floors and major portions of four others. A plummeting javelin of steel demolished the kitchen at the Morton's of Chicago steakhouse on the ground floor of the building, at the corner of Albany and West Streets, which once had the highest revenues of any of the chain's restaurants.

The battered copper sheets of the sloping mansard roof - pierced, pitted and dented by hurtling projectile debris - were peeled back as if by a giant with a can opener. On the rooftop, the decorative copper balustrade was melted and twisted .

An executive secretary died in the building when she was trapped in an elevator there after the attack, and another office worker is believed to have perished with her. Recovery crews searching the roof, scaffolding and gutter pipes discovered large sections of one of the hijacked airplanes, and fragments of remains believed to have been those of people in the planes and the towers.

Given the destruction and the level of environmental contamination, most of the interior, which did not have landmark status, had to be gutted. This was done behind a ground-to-roof covering of reinforced Monarflex plastic sheeting on the north facade.

In December, this shroud was torn open in a northeaster. It sagged, then began catching the wind like a menacing sail and had to be removed. Last month, the scaffolding that had obscured so much damage was finally taken down.

A painstaking restoration has since begun. "It is a demanding job because there have been so many unknowns on the site,'' said Mr. Fiebich. "There are so many mysteries as we repair and replace."

Peter Levenson, a principal of the Kibel Companies and one of the building's owners, said that the complexity of the reconstruction required "perfect coordination,'' pointing to the teams of workers completing the interior design while others work to restore the exterior.

Engineering assessments suggest that the vintage terra cotta fireproofing materials that protected the steel structure of 90 West Street - including four-inch-thick blocks of tile around the columns and foot-thick layers of tile between the building's floors - limited the spread of fire. Only a few structural columns on the upper floors buckled in the heat.

And the Gothic facade of 90 West Street endured because of its terra cotta construction totaling more than a foot in thickness; the building's base of decorative granite blocks is, in some places, an extraordinary six feet thick.

Gilbert's skyscraper was originally conceived as a high-profile advertisement for business enterprise, and the building's main tenant was the Delaware, Lackawanna and Western Railroad Company.

Representing significant advances in early skyscraper design, 90 West Street was a prelude to Gilbert's 1913 Woolworth Building at 233 Broadway. Margaret Heilbrun, who curated a 2000 Gilbert show at the New-York Historical Society and edited "Inventing the Skyline: the Architecture of Cass Gilbert,'' said that the building represents "the epitome of Gilbert's skills.'' Not the least of his triumphs, she said, was the engineering artistry that situated the building atop deep pilings at its waterlogged site.

"Thank God it survived in the era when other Gilbert buildings were demolished,'' Ms. Heilbrun said. It won contemporary attention in the mid-1980's, when its richly encrusted upper-floor colonnades and dramatic 45-foot mansard roof were lighted at night. Its exterior became a city landmark in 1998.

Early last year Brack Capital Real Estate, which owns properties like 95 Morton Street and 150 East 85th Street in Manhattan, paid $12.25 million to buy 90 West Street.

The sum was considered by brokers at the time to be a top price for such a wounded building. But Mr. Levenson, who is spearheading the reconstruction, explained that unlike other buildings in Lower Manhattan, "it was uniquely configured for a residential conversion,'' because it has relatively small floor plates, 10- to-17-foot ceilings, abundant windows and great views.

When finished, 90 West Street - which had been a 360,000-square-foot office building - will become a high-end rental building, with 410 apartments ranging from studios to three-bedroom units. Just how high is high end? "We'll see what the market is like when we open the door,'' said another of the owners, Moshe-Dan Azogui, who heads the United States branch of Brack Capital Real Estate.

Last month the developers were granted $106.5 million in tax-exempt Liberty Bonds to finance the $145 million project; the rest will come from Brack Capital, the Kibel Companies (which has built high-rise projects in Manhattan and the Riverdale section of the Bronx, and converted properties like 85 John Street) and a third partner, the hoteliers Richard Born and Ira Drukier, whose properties include the Mercer in SoHo and the Maritime in Chelsea.

When the new owners stripped away a fire-scorched lobby renovation, decades old, they discovered what was left of the original lobby, the northern end of which had disappeared into the trade center void.

Working from historic photographs, the owners will reconstruct a classic-looking new lobby incorporating many of the surviving original elements, including the 1907 decorative lobby frieze, its cast-iron embellishments, and plaster remnants that include the claws of decorative eagles, now missing.

If but a small band of workers is toiling now, more than 200 will soon occupy the site. "It's a privilege and an honor to be here, because we feel part of history,'' said Louis Conca, a 40-year-old construction worker who once was employed in the World Trade Center.

"The emotions are pretty intense here,'' Mr. Fiebich concurred. "The memory of Sept. 11 is constantly present."

If the developers anticipate considerable rewards, there are also undeniable risks. Mr. Levenson said that one is certainly "that we'll be open down there before everything else.'' But he knows that "many people have a commitment to be downtown.''

Will prospective tenants be worried about future construction near ground zero? "The walls of 90 West are very thick, the windows will be new, and the park next to it will separate our tenants from the construction,'' Mr. Azogui said. "Anyway, it's hard to find anywhere in this city that isn't under construction.''

http://graphics7.nytimes.com/images/2004/03/05/nyregion/05WEST.2.jpg
The north facade had the worst damage.

Copyright 2004 The New York Times Company

TLOZ Link5
March 5th, 2004, 03:40 AM
Looking much better.

billyblancoNYC
March 5th, 2004, 11:10 AM
Another day, another residential downtown converstion to rentals.

Kris
March 5th, 2004, 08:23 PM
http://graphics7.nytimes.com/images/2004/03/05/nyregion/west.450.jpg

Graphic: Two Fires, One Collapse (http://www.nytimes.com/library/national/sci_BURN_011204_01.html)

BPC
March 5th, 2004, 11:03 PM
March 5, 2004

9/11's Miracle Survivor Sheds Bandages

By GLENN COLLINS

...

Last month the developers were granted $106.5 million in tax-exempt Liberty Bonds to finance the $145 million project; the rest will come from Brack Capital, the Kibel Companies (which has built high-rise projects in Manhattan and the Riverdale section of the Bronx, and converted properties like 85 John Street) and a third partner, the hoteliers Richard Born and Ira Drukier, whose properties include the Mercer in SoHo and the Maritime in Chelsea.
...


Wait until they realize that their $145M restored historical landmark will be directly fronting a four-lane, block-long, freeway tunnel ramp.

billyblancoNYC
March 6th, 2004, 02:28 AM
Or, a beautiful new park where a road once was, 4 or 5 amazing new skyscrapers, a wonderful piece of architecture (Path hub), Hudson River Park, and so on...

Kris
March 6th, 2004, 06:42 PM
Stay on topic, BPC. We don't have to put up with your concern elsewhere than in the proper thread. This forum isn't a platform for fanatically promoting your little cause.

SunsetWorks
August 30th, 2004, 03:49 PM
Here are a few photos of the renovation by a construction worker on site.

http://www.shitewaterfalls.com/photos/90_west_street/index.html

UrbanSculptures
September 14th, 2004, 12:45 AM
I miss something on this? I thought they were restoring this building but it looks like they are tearing off all the terra cotta? to replace it with what??

What are they doing with the OLD stuff??

kibbles
September 17th, 2004, 06:21 PM
What I know the old stuff and the new stuff are being put in panels, to be reinstalled on the building.

They had to take it all down because the steel that carried the weight is twisted in places, needs to be replaced. When they replace the steel, they will put the stone back up, either the original, or replacements. They documented and numbered every piece.

(I am the wife of the guy who took the photos -- saw this URL when checking the stats on the site.)

gonzea
October 9th, 2004, 05:56 PM
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v488/gonzea/DSCF0041.jpg
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v488/gonzea/DSCF0040.jpg

NewYorkYankee
October 9th, 2004, 11:58 PM
this building is right beside of the Desuste Bank building...right?

gonzea
October 10th, 2004, 12:28 AM
Yes in back of 90 west is 130 liberty.

UrbanSculptures
October 10th, 2004, 03:50 PM
What I know the old stuff and the new stuff are being put in panels, to be reinstalled on the building.

They had to take it all down because the steel that carried the weight is twisted in places, needs to be replaced. When they replace the steel, they will put the stone back up, either the original, or replacements. They documented and numbered every piece.

(I am the wife of the guy who took the photos -- saw this URL when checking the stats on the site.)

Thanks Kibbles,
As a former architectural salvager in NYC I know from years of experience that the mortar/cement used in these later buildings (Post 1900) was much better than the pre 1900 tenements and other buildings that used sand/lime mortar.
The pre 1900 (or thereabouts) building's mortar was so poor you could literally pull bricks out of the wall by hand or with the aid of a screw driver at least to get the first one out.

The post 1900 buildings seemed to use a much better mortar because the buildings needed jackhammers to remove bricks. 242 Spring St (The old Salvation Army women's lodge)

http://www.lostnewyorkcity.com/buildingphotos/Plate-23-b.html

was built 1914 and was this way, it took all day to get half a dozen bricks out of the wall with a hammer and crowbar to remove a keystone over the window on the ground floor. Many times the terra cotta blocks would crack from the shock of hammering around it or applying lateral pressure with a crowbar on a brick next to it.



PS 27 next to the Daily News building was this way too (1906)

http://www.lostnewyorkcity.com/buildingphotos/Plate-68-b.html


But interestingly enough the old McCreery dry good store at 23rd St and 6th Ave (1884) which replaced the Edwin Booth there there had substantial walls 2 feet thick and the bricks could not be removed with anything less than a sledge hammer and crowbar;

http://www.lostnewyorkcity.com/buildingphotos/Plate-21-b.html

As an aside, the last photo on that page shows a large terra cotta portrait medallion of Edwin Booth, I was told by the demolition guys that it was going to the Brooklyn Museum along with the cast-iron plaque a few floors higher that detailed the site's history, but recently I learned the museum never received either, so anyone ever see this piece and it's plaque somewhere?
It was about 30" in diameter and featured a 3/4 deep head of Booth and his shoulders.

I was going to say the 90 West St facade would have to be dismantled using jackhammers or something, must be quite a chore trying to keep pieces intact!

NewYorkYankee
October 10th, 2004, 07:50 PM
Im confused, :oops: By the looks of the pics, this isnt the building right beside of the Deustche bank building, becuase the building im thinking of is ACROSS from 7 WTC... :? anyone got a map?

ZippyTheChimp
October 10th, 2004, 10:19 PM
You are looking north on Washington St. You can clearly see Verizon and 7 WTC across the WTC site. The Deutsche Bank building is off the photo on the right. 90 West St (the building we are talking about in this thread) is the one on the left. The "building that is right next to DB" is the one with the water tank on top.

SHBAR
October 13th, 2004, 10:15 PM
The building is well on it's way to a residential conversion ... to my dismay, they've allowed teh plumber to talk them into low end plumbing fixtures throughout. With this kind of thinking, I'd guess the rest of the interiors are going to be low end as well. ..

Having said that, I am glad that it is at least being renovated!!!

ZippyTheChimp
January 22nd, 2005, 09:41 AM
http://www.downtownexpress.com/

Damaged landmark building readies to reopen as apartments

By Ronda Kaysen

The Beaux-Arts building at 90 West St., battered and wounded on Sept. 11th, will soon be restored to its turn-of-the-century glory, with a modern twist.

The 23-story office building, dubbed the “miracle of 9/11,” took quite a beating when flaming debris scalded its north façade, pelting its sloping mansard roof with fragments of metal, glass and concrete catapulting from the burning World Trade Center. Fires raged inside, uncontrolled for days, devouring five floors and melting the decorative, copper balustrade rooftop.

This spring, after enduring a meticulous renovation, 90 West St. will re-open as a state-of-the-art rental apartment building with a 1907 façade restored to its original splendor and its interior gutted and renovated to suit 21st century tastes.

“This is one of the more important historic buildings in the city of New York,” said architect Peter Levenson, a principal of the Kibel Companies and one of the building’s owners. “The effort that was undertaken to restore this for historic reasons was fairly monumental.”

Brack Capital Real Estate bought the Cass Gilbert-designed building for $12.25 million in early 2003 and has undertaken the $145 million restoration project along with Kibel Companies and hoteliers Richard Born and Ira Drukier, the developers of the Mercer Hotel and the Robert De Niro hotel project on Greenwich St.

Financed in part with a $106.5 million infusion of Liberty Bonds and the 421g Program, a tax exemption and abatement program for rental conversions, the renovation is painstaking and unprecedented. Kibel had some experience with historic renovations before 90 West St.— the company renovated the Sloane House on W. 34th St. and converted the Underwriters Insurance Company building at 85 John St. to an upscale residential property in 1999 — but nothing could have prepared them for 90 West St. “We’ve [restored] two historic buildings, but nothing to this scale,” Levenson said in a telephone interview. “I don’t think anybody has.”

Kibel and the exterior construction team, Seaboard Weatherproofing Company, are rebuilding the granite base on the north façade, the largest undertaking of its kind in the world right now. The granite must be hand carved, and with granite carvers in short supply these days, Levenson and his team had to reach out to carvers from across the globe. “There are not a lot of carvers in the world that can carve granite in such intricate patterns and to such a complicated degree,” he said.

With carvers at work in Italy, Canada and New England, the renovation process has required precise timing. “The biggest challenges were to coordinate the very long lead time with the interior renovation and decorations… Both projects have their own unique sets of timetables and lead times and coordination,” he said. “To put it all together and to have it all finish at the same time is a very complicated task.”

Most of the building’s exterior is made of decorative terra cotta, a material not easily obtained in the United States. Seven thousand of the rare stones had to be replaced and thousands more needed to be re-glazed. According to Levenson, there are only two major manufacturers in the country capable of constructing the custom-made pieces.

When the building opens its doors this spring, 360,000 sq. ft. of office will have been transformed into a 410-unit apartment building with 22 residential floors, a gym, lounge, garage, recreation room and garden courtyard. “Fortunately this building was an ideal candidate for a conversion because of the small footprint,” said Levenson.

Turn of the century buildings, in a time long before central air conditioning, relied heavily on cross-ventilation and windows to keep their office buildings temperate. The result, said Levenson, is ideal for a 21st century apartment building. “It’s a very adaptable building with a huge courtyard in the back. It really works better as a residential building than an office building,” he said.

The lobby will be the only interior reminder of the building’s 100-year history. When the contractors removed a layer of sheetrock from a mid-century renovation, they discovered a long-lost lobby design. Beneath the walls were decorative vaults, terra cotta pilasters, arches and sculptures, features considered out of fashion when the building was renovated half a century ago. “It was just incredible what we found behind the sheetrock walls,” said Levenson.

The units, a combination of studios, one-, two- and three-bedroom apartments, have yet to be priced, said Levenson, although the New York Sun priced them at $1,595 for a studio to $3,695 for a three-bedroom.

Levenson said he did not favor the recent decision to build a three-story W.T.C. entrance ramp on Liberty St., which will obstruct the building’s sightline but is intended to improve the area immediately surrounding the proposed W.T.C. memorial. The Lower Manhattan Development Corporation’s decided to move the entrance ramp to the south side of Liberty St., allowing for two-way traffic, but requiring a 25-foot hill beneath the proposed Liberty Park. Levenson said he would have preferred a one-way Liberty St. — one of the ramp alternatives — but at this point there is little he can do. “Not everyone is going to get everything that they want,” he said. The W.T.C. redevelopment “is an enormous project and it is what it is.”

Peter Levenson will speak about the 90 West St. reconstruction on Mon., Jan 24 at the Center for Architecture, 526 LaGuardia Place at Bleecker St. $10 for A.I.A. members, $15 for non-members. Call 212-358-6111 for tickets.

Downtown Express is published by
Community Media LLC.

Email: news@downtownexpress.com

jiw40
January 22nd, 2005, 11:35 AM
Edwin Booth related to John Wilkes Booth?

ZippyTheChimp
January 22nd, 2005, 01:18 PM
They were brothers.

http://www.theatrehistory.com/american/booth001.html

ZippyTheChimp
February 1st, 2005, 07:34 PM
Southwest corner. Roof recladding is complete, and scaffolding is coming down.

Kris
February 28th, 2005, 08:09 AM
February 28, 2005

Faces at Least a City Can Love

By GLENN COLLINS (http://query.nytimes.com/search/query?ppds=bylL&v1=GLENN%20COLLINS&fdq=19960101&td=sysdate&sort=newest&ac=GLENN%20COLLINS&inline=nyt-per)

http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2005/02/28/nyregion/28west.large1.jpg
New gargoyles for 90 West Street, a 1907 building heavily damaged on Sept. 11, depict some of the principal owners and builders.

http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2005/02/28/nyregion/28west.1842.jpg
Peter Levenson, one of the building's owners, and his gargoyle likeness.

http://graphics10.nytimes.com/images/dropcap/i.gift is the season, at last, for the gargoyles to return to 90 West Street.

Many assumed they went missing when its towering neighbor, 2 World Trade Center, collapsed on Sept. 11, 2001. Though wounded, 90 West Street was celebrated as a miracle building, thanks to its triumph of survival. But after the fires cooled and the smoke lifted, an architectural inventory of the 1907 neo-Gothic building showed that the landmark had lost its gargoyles.

The truth is, some of the gargoyles may have succumbed long before: victims of age, neglect and entropy. No one knows for sure. But now it can definitively be said that as part of the $148 million rebirth of the former office building created by the architect Cass Gilbert, all those owls, goat heads, griffins, baby dragons, monkey heads, bats and other assorted creatures are coming back.

Nearing completion are a new $4 million, 45-foot mansard roof, a $5 million, three-story granite base, and $11 million worth of new terra cotta tile and decorations.

Indeed, nearly 7,000 new pieces of exterior terra cotta had to be recreated for the restoration, "since so much of the terra cotta at 90 West Street was destroyed in the attack," said Gretchen E. Krouse, a vice president at Boston Valley Terra Cotta in Orchard Park, N.Y., south of Buffalo.

The clay was shaped by computer-assisted design, but many of the new terra cotta pieces were pressed into molds, and then glazed, by hand, just as they had been in the early 1900's. "You can see workers' handprints inside, just as you could on the originals," Ms. Krouse said.

Many of the more than 100 replacement gargoyles were also made at the Boston Valley factory. And in an homage to the playful exuberance of Gilbert's 1913 Woolworth Building at 233 Broadway, the gargoyle reproductions are being augmented with seven contemporary faces.

The appropriately grotesque new caricatures include Peter Levenson, a principal of the Kibel Companies and one of the building's owners; Henry Kibel, another of the owners; Michael Y. Ahearn, president of Seaboard Weatherproofing Co., the exterior contractor; and Jeff Smith, Seaboard's on-site project manager.

"It's as if I've been living here for a year," Mr. Smith said, "so I might as well stay here as a gargoyle."

He noted that 90 West Street was a prelude to Gilbert's Woolworth Building, where the lobby sculptures famously depict F. W. Woolworth adding up nickels and Gilbert himself grasping a rendering of the building, and even celebrate the skyscraper's structural engineer, Gunvald Aus.

"Our hope," said Mr. Levenson, who is spearheading the construction for the owners, "is that Cass Gilbert would understand."

Helen Curry, one of Mr. Gilbert's great-grandchildren, who speaks for the architect's legacy before preservation groups, said "what fun," when apprised of the new gargoyles, adding: "I love it."

To Ms. Curry, the 90 West Street restoration is important nationally, because many of the classic Gilbert buildings, like the 1895 Minnesota State Capitol in St. Paul, "are in need of extensive repairs."

For more than two years, 90 West Street was shrouded in a 23-story construction veil and braced in scaffolding, a grim reminder to both passers-by and construction workers of the flaming steel debris that rained on its north facade, made great gaps in its exterior, and turned its interior into a hell of fire.

A year ago, 90 West Street's developers were granted $106.5 million in tax-exempt Liberty Bonds and other financing from the city's Housing Development Corporation for the project. The rest will come from the reconstruction partners, which include Brack Capital Real Estate, the Kibel Companies and the hoteliers Richard Born and Ira Drukier. Stone by stone and tile by tile, the skyscraper is approaching its future as a rental building with 410 apartments. A turning point in the reconstruction was reached on a recent morning, as a rigging crew toiled to install a 10-ton capstone assembly atop the arch that, 35 feet above Cedar Street, guards the north entrance of 90 West Street.

"This is a landmark day for us," said Mr. Levenson as he stood at the muddy spot where a tower once fell, carefully observing the assembly. One wrong move could have shattered $500,000 worth of crafted stone and steel.

Standing next to him was Mr. Ahearn. He watched as the capstone was fastidiously dangled into its exact spot, to a tolerance that amounted to an eighth of an inch. "It's as if the heart has started beating again," Mr. Ahearn said, suddenly smiling.

The arch is an emblem of the entire effort. As much as possible of the original heavy "cubic stone" was used to recreate the arch, but it, and many of the original building's damaged granite blocks, have been replaced by new, lightweight stone facades. In these stone "sandwiches," thick granite veneers that have been cut with computer guidance are attached to hand-welded steel armatures that precisely reproduce the shape of the original facade. From the outside, Mr. Levenson said, the panels are indistinguishable from the originals.

The depleted quarries that supplied the original granite could not furnish enough stone of the right color to permit complete replacements of the originals, said Christopher J. McConnell, president of Continental Marble Inc., who is the project's stone wrangler. There was, however, enough quarry granite to carve stone veneers.

Initially, the New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission, which declared the building's exterior a landmark in 1998 and has closely monitored the construction, had questions about the appropriateness of panelization. "But you have to be realistic, and do the best you can," said Robert B. Tierney, the preservation commission's president, "and this is more than that. It's an excellent restoration."

The reconstructors have constantly melded the old with the technologically forward. While the blasted copper sheets of the skyscraper's sloping mansard roof have been replaced with new copper, the old decorative metal balustrade at the top, which melted and twisted, is being replaced with 400 linear feet of fiberglass pieces approved by the landmarks commission.

The work at 90 West Street has been not only a task of restoration, but also of memorialization. Some of the blasted carved stone window heads are being left as they are, to bear witness to the building's grievous wounds. Even a memento from the earliest disaster days is still visible, on the west side of the north facade: the ghostly, grayish remnant of the "90 WEST" tag that had been spray-painted in orange on the building facade by the rescue workers during the early chaos at ground zero.

Now, incongruously, a suite of model apartments has taken root on the sixth floor. It is an oasis in the construction hurly-burly, with its nine-foot-high loft-style ceilings and trendy bamboo-plank floors. The builders' rental office will open in March, and, as early as May, tenants could occupy apartments that range from $1,550 a month for small studios to $5,500 for three-bedroom apartments.

But to Ms. Curry, Mr. Gilbert's descendant, "the most important thing about all of this is that 90 West Street is still standing."

"That's because," she added, "he designed this to endure."

Copyright 2005 (http://www.nytimes.com/ref/membercenter/help/copyright.html) The New York Times Company (http://www.nytco.com/)

NewYorkYankee
February 28th, 2005, 08:50 AM
This is a great building! I am glad it was able to be restored!! :)

Eugenius
February 28th, 2005, 02:38 PM
So how much are they charging for 3-bedroom apartments? $3700 or $5500?
Could be that the added publicity allowed them to up the rents on the high-end units.

BrooklynRider
February 28th, 2005, 03:32 PM
Iti s a wonderful restoration, but an absolute crap location. That section of West Street with all the BBT traffic is not residential stock.

(However, were I offered a 3 bedroom at $1500 / Month - I'd snap it up.)

gonzea
February 28th, 2005, 10:22 PM
Yea right ! a studio is $2000 a month.
It still is a good location actually there are alot of familys around here.
It's right next to a hotel where there is always something going on.
O yea buy the way it's across the street next to 130 liberty so there might be contamination dust. No one really cares though. They live there life now.

NewYorkYankee
February 28th, 2005, 10:46 PM
The dust of the bank, and the constant construction across the street would hinder me renting one of these units.

Kolbster
March 1st, 2005, 12:05 PM
Hey Zippy, could you re-post the pics, becasue it says "missing image file"

NYguy
March 7th, 2005, 09:53 AM
NEWSDAY

Landmark building restored, ready for business

By ROBERT KAHN
March 6, 2005

After Cass Gilbert's copper-topped landmark at 90 West St. was pulverized by debris from the World Trade Center, debate raged over whether the 1907 tower, then a commercial property, could even be saved.

Monday morning, the apartment rental office at the converted building opens for business, conclusively answering that question, and making way for more heartening, less consequential ones: Should the track lighting in the model one-bedroom be angled to flatter the GE stainless steel oven, or adjusted to accentuate the bamboo-plank floors?

Some $150 million -- part from Liberty Bonds and tax incentives, part from owners Kibel Co., Brack Capital and BD Hotels -- has gone into replacing 7,000 pieces of terra-cotta façade, repairing the iconic roof and gutting the neo-Gothic property's scarred interior.

Move-ins at the 410-unit complex begin May 1, with full occupancy expected by late July.

Pets are welcome.

"I've worked here so long now I'm almost immune to this view," said Andrew Gordon, construction project manager for Levine Builders, as he looked out a window of Unit 6D and into the bathtub at Ground Zero.

Architects and engineers say the 24-story 90 West survived Sept. 11 partly because its northern façade was already covered in scaffolding for a two-year renovation nearing its end. They also credit the four-story granite base, heat-resistant terra-cotta paneling and marble-and-steel stairwells.

Still, the steakhouse on the ground floor was destroyed by cascading steel. On the north face, fixtures and ornamentation of lions and eagles were blown away. Copper sheets on the sloping mansard roof were peeled off like the tab on a coffee-cup lid. Inside, fire burned for three days.

In their efforts to rebuild, project executives, led by H. Thomas O'Hara Architects and Levine Builders, have far surpassed in expenditures and detail the interrupted renovation.

The top floors of 90 West are home to dozens of gargoyles -- owls, goat heads and griffins, more than 100 of which needed replacement -- but the building's most identifiable feature is the 45-foot mansard roof. The Seaboard Weatherproofing Co. reproduced every detail of Gilbert's original, spending more than $4 million in copper decoration alone. (The entire building cost $2 million to construct a century ago.)

When contractors took down the block walls and flat ceiling in the lobby, they discovered vaulted arches and dozens of decorative cast iron eagle talons, which had been covered for half a century. They are all now exposed.

Peter Levenson, a principal of Kibel, deflects questions about the emotional impact of the project and its 9/11 wounds, preferring to dwell on going forward, or looking back even further in time, to the engineering decisions master architect Gilbert made.

"It was solidly built 100 years ago," Levenson said. "Obviously, it's withstood quite a lot."


http://www.nynewsday.com/media/photo/2005-03/16574756.jpg


http://www.nynewsday.com/media/photo/2005-03/16574698.jpg


http://www.nynewsday.com/media/photo/2005-03/16574755.jpg


http://www.nynewsday.com/media/photo/2005-03/16574744.jpg


http://www.nynewsday.com/media/photo/2005-03/16574750.jpg


http://www.nynewsday.com/media/photo/2005-03/16574754.jpg

NewYorkYankee
March 7th, 2005, 03:12 PM
Whats going to be on the ground floor? Perhaps another steakhouse?

gonzea
April 17th, 2005, 05:59 PM
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v488/gonzea/760874ad.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v488/gonzea/a5c72525.jpg

Jasonik
July 20th, 2005, 12:47 PM
Posted on Fri, Jul. 01, 2005

Reborn 9-11 building gives WTC district breath of new life

BY STEVENSON SWANSON
Chicago Tribune (http://www.chicagotribune.com/)


NEW YORK - (KRT) - The graceful gem of a skyscraper at 90 West St. has no name apart from its address, but if it did, it surely would be "The Phoenix."

Like the mythical bird that rose from the ashes, this 98-year-old landmark is coming back to life after a fiery passage that left it practically a burned-out hulk, written off as one of the casualties of the worst terrorist attack in U.S. history.

Standing next to the World Trade Center, 90 West was pummeled by falling steel girders and chunks of concrete when the trade center's south tower collapsed on Sept. 11, 2001. The blaze that the flaming debris ignited inside the 23-story building burned for almost two days.

Now, nearly four years after the attack, the former office tower has been converted into an apartment building. The first tenants began to move in earlier this month, bringing new life to a part of Manhattan that witnessed the deaths of more than 2,700 people.

"It's a way to support downtown," said new resident Matt Cairns, 44, referring to lower Manhattan. "I'd rather spend my rent money in an area that's trying to come back."

In the months after the Sept. 11 attack, vacancy rates for commercial and residential space in the neighborhood shot up. Apartment buildings have since filled back up, but demand for office space has stayed low.

Security concerns about the design of Freedom Tower, the 1,776-foot centerpiece of the plan to rebuild the trade center site, have delayed construction and added to the lingering sense of uncertainty in the neighborhood.

New York Gov. George Pataki has promised to unveil the redesigned Freedom Tower by the end of the month, but in the meantime, the rebirth of 90 West St. has been a shot in the arm for the area.

"It's a morale boost for the community," said Judy Duffy, one of the managers of a citizen advisory board for lower Manhattan. "It's very symbolic, because it's such an old, cherished building."

The 1907 neo-Gothic skyscraper was designed by Cass Gilbert, the Ohio-born architect whose work includes the Woolworth Building, the U.S. Supreme Court and the Minnesota State Capitol. Like the Woolworth Building, 90 West abounds in terra-cotta ornament and also includes a medieval menagerie of fanciful creatures, including grimacing gargoyles and ferocious griffins.

Despite raging fires that burned out whole floors and raining debris from the towers, 90 West survived the tragedy of Sept. 11. Engineers found that only a few structural steel beams on the upper stories of the building had buckled. The rest appeared to have been saved by the fireproofing tiles that were used in early skyscrapers, made of the same terra-cotta material used to create the elegant ornamentation on the building's facade.

Although the building was sound, its fate was uncertain for more than a year because restoring it as an office building no longer made economic sense. Business tenants increasingly demand office space with sprawling, unobstructed floors, not the thickets of columns found in older buildings.

"It's not very competitive as an office building," said project manager Peter Levenson of the Kibel Companies, a residential developer and one of the building's owners. "This was a building that really needed a new life."

After Kibel and its partners bought 90 West in early 2003 for $12.5 million, work began to restore the exterior and to convert the interior into 410 apartments.

The building's old copper roof, which Levenson called "a mangled, charred mess," was replaced with a new $4 million roof, also of copper, and an upstate New York company supplied 7,000 new terra cotta pieces, many of which were computer-designed to match the originals.

Stone carvers in New Hampshire, Utah and Italy chiseled replacements for the damaged arches, capstones and decorative pieces on the building's three-story granite base.

Because of the intricate connections between stones, undamaged pieces had to be removed with the broken and scarred ones and then reassembled with the new stones to ensure a precise fit.

"Every building he did involved an enormous amount of decoration and sculpture," said Cass Gilbert's great-granddaughter Helen Curry, whose voice catches as she talks about the rebirth of her ancestor's building. "It makes me cry to think about the amount of time and money and effort the developers were willing to put in to save that building."

But the $150 million restoration will not erase all traces of building's brush with destruction. On one corner, a crude "90 WEST" that was spray-painted by rescue workers after Sept. 11 remains visible, its original florescent orange now faded to a light gray.

And stones that were only slightly chipped have been left in place.

"That's the original Cass Gilbert," Levenson said. "And the idea is not to make a Cass Gilbert reproduction. We were doing a restoration."

But the new owners allowed themselves a bit of artistic license in some of the replacement gargoyles that stare down on West Street from the 15th floor. The heads were carved to resemble Levenson and other principals involved in the project.

Even that touch has a precedent in Gilbert's work. A few blocks away, the lobby of the Woolworth Building features likenesses of Gilbert clutching a model of the skyscraper and dime-store magnate F.W. Woolworth counting the change that made him wealthy.

The restoration, which was financed in large part by $106 million in tax-exempt bonds aimed at speeding the recovery of lower Manhattan, is still under way, but tenants started to move into completed units in early June, drawn by the building's 10-foot ceilings and new appliances. And with studios that start at $1,600 a month, the rents are relatively cheap by Manhattan standards.

As a newcomer to New York, Paula Guedes, did not realize at first that her new home was next to ground zero. But now the fledgling investment banker sees herself as taking part in writing a new chapter in the area's history.

"I do think it's a real big thing to help bring this area back to life," said Guedes, 23, who moved here after her recent graduation from the University of Southern California. "That's a very positive thing, after so many bad things have happened here."

And Curry, Gilbert's descendant, hopes the survival of 90 West spurs the preservation of other buildings by her ancestor.

"They are worth renovating and saving," she said. "The one thing I would point to about his work that stands out more than anything else is that it's beautiful but it's also structurally sound. And that's something we tend not to honor very much in our culture anymore. We tend to cut corners. And we pay for it in the long run."

---

Jasonik
July 20th, 2005, 12:53 PM
Braced to live in shadows of 9/11

First tenants begin moving in to building next to Ground Zero

BY PAUL D. COLFORD
DAILY NEWS (http://www.nydailynews.com/news/local/story/322809p-275979c.html) STAFF WRITER

http://www.nydailynews.com/ips_rich_content/472-wtc_near.JPG
Marla Goldwasser (above) unpacks as she moves into new flat at
90 West St., an apartment with a view of Ground Zero (below).
http://www.nydailynews.com/ips_rich_content/81-wtc_view.JPG

When Marla Goldwasser first checked out the sunny apartment overlooking Ground Zero, the art dealer wasn't sure she could handle the dramatic view day after day.

"I didn't know if it would be morbid or depressing," she said.

But she returned several times to the spacious one-bedroom, and her sister suggested that renting in the doorman building might even be patriotic.

"I also thought it was important to bear witness to what happened," Goldwasser added.

With a two-year lease in hand, Goldwasser is among the first few tenants who moved this month into 90 West St., a former office building that now offers the closest housing to Ground Zero.

Rents in the century-old city landmark range from about $2,700 a month for a one-bedroom to $3,600 for a two-bedroom.

For Goldwasser and others who choose units on the north side, their new home will provide front-row seats to years of construction in what's now a 16-acre hole in the ground.

After the planes hit the twin towers on Sept. 11, 2001, most workers managed to flee 90 West St., except for two who died in a broken elevator.

Despite heavy damage from fire and falling debris, the 23-story Gothic beauty remained standing, mainly because of its old-world design.

Thick terra cotta shielded its steel columns, and a dense layer of tile between floors is believed to have prevented even worse ruin from the blazes.

A $145 million restoration of renowned architect Cass Gilbert's design has transformed the office space into 410 apartments.

"I love the architecture of the building - that's what appealed to me in the first place," Goldwasser said while taking in her 10th-floor panorama.

Another newcomer, Matthew Cairns, a Web developer with Standard & Poor's who took an apartment on the building's southwest corner, said he considered a unit facing Ground Zero.

"But I was a little concerned about looking out at a construction site for the duration of my lease," said Cairns, who moved from nearby Broadway, where he was frustrated by the nighttime noise of jackhammers.

About 175 of the 410 units have been leased, but not all the new tenants have moved in, according to David Tannenbaum, leasing manager for the building, which BCRE 90 West St. LLC purchased in 2003.

The rebirth of 90 West St. is part of a trend that has turned lower Manhattan into "the most rapidly expanding residential area in New York City," according to a recent report from the Alliance for Downtown New York.

Besides the 18,810 existing housing units south of Chambers St., an additional 3,115 are under construction and 4,000 more are proposed.

Goldwasser, who moved to New York from Atlanta in 1990 and started her own fine art consultancy five years ago, had been living in nearby Tribeca.

After settling in to 90 West St., Goldwasser hung a friend's painting of the World Trade Center between two windows that frame where the twin towers stood.

"I also think I have the best view in the whole city," she said. "The sunrise and the sunset are beautiful from up here.

"It doesn't trouble me to be here. It really doesn't. I'm going to stay here as long as I can."
Originally published on June 27, 2005

Jasonik
July 20th, 2005, 01:03 PM
Beauty, Strength in the Details at 90 West Street
www.lowermanhattan.info (http://www.lowermanhattan.info/construction/rebuilding_spotlight/beauty_strength_in_the_31307.asp)
June 27, 2005

The best part about 90 West Street is that it is getting the attention it deserves. A classic example of "they don't build them like that anymore," the 1907, Cass Gilbert-designed building has the elements that make it not only rare among skyscrapers, but extraordinary even among the modern marvels of New York City.

Think 23 stories of century-old carved limestone, with smooth swaths of the façade adorned with the faces of lions, eagles, American Indian chiefs, and other symbolic Americana (all favorites of Gilbert). Look up to around the 18th floor to see colonnade finials and the undersides of arched windows, where yellow, green, blue, and red terra cotta pieces are patterned like bouquets. Above them is the copper mansard roof that conjures images of classic Parisian walk-ups.

In other words, it is clear why the exterior of 90 West Street was designated a historic landmark in 1998. And still, there is so much more to the structure, which sits between Cedar and Albany Streets, due south of the World Trade Center site.

The building's innovative design, along with Gilbert's super-solid structural sense, prompted owners Kibel Companies, Brack Capital Real Estate, and BD Hotels to invest $150 million in its restoration after September 11, 2001. With the help of Liberty Bonds, tax incentives, and other downtown rebuilding benefits, the owners pulled together financing that lets them re-piece the structure's battered façade and restore its interior.
*
"We crawled across and raked around every stone in the building for structural stability," says Peter Levenson, a principal of the Kibel Companies and the architect who is overseeing the restoration. He explains that at the time of the attack, 90 West Street was about 90 percent done with a two-year renovation, and its north side was covered in scaffolding that, fortunately, protected much of its stonework from falling debris.

The roof, however, took the brunt of the damage, with most of its copper sheets torn and melted beyond repair. But being one of the building's most distinct features -- even emulated by Cesar Pelli's firm, who designed One World Financial Center's lower copper rooftop in its image -- Levenson and the exterior-construction team at Seaboard Weatherproofing Company have worked to reproduce every original detail.

"The exterior work is being done with materials that aren't used much today," Levenson says. "We've put in $4 million in copper for the roof -- just the decorative parts, not the flat top -- while the entire building cost $2 million to build originally."

Every fixture and ornament of 90 West Street is a testament to both the Beaux-Arts-style training and engineering skill of Gilbert, whom Levenson calls "one of the more important fathers of the skyscraper." The artful elaborations and structural precautions Gilbert would later take to the hilt in creating the Woolworth Building (completed in 1913) are everywhere in 90 West Street.
*
Two stand-out elements of Gilbert's design schemes include handcrafted, interlocking terra-cotta bricks between floors and marble-and-steel stairwells -- both fireproofing measures. The events of September 11, 2001, revealed that they work even in extreme circumstances.

Another reason the building withstood the blow of the collapsed towers was its reinforced steel and massive, solid-granite base, which suffered dents and chips, but nothing that threatened the building's foundation. Rather, it was the extensive façade damage -- coupled with the landmark status that requires the exterior be restored to its original appearance -- that put 90 West Street on the brink of demolition.

"The costs are huge," Levenson explains. "And even though the restoration is hugely gratifying and exciting, at the end of the day it's a business." Which is why, he says, the owners are converting the former office building into 410 state-of-the-art apartments -- a plan that perfectly suits the building's modest footprint and Hudson River views.

Inside, the foyer's restored Gothic-arched ceiling and carved-stone pillars will welcome tenants, who will have access to a garden courtyard, gym, recreation room, and all the modern amenities -- from central air and heating to high-speed Internet access and a large underground garage. "It will be 1907 on the outside, 2005 on the inside," says Levenson.

And while 90 West Street is no longer a waterfront property (as it was when constructed in 1907, six decades before Battery Park City was built), Levenson is confident that tenants will enjoy the building itself, as well as the growing residential neighborhood.

"West Street was a busy transportation and shipping hub, and this was a highly commercial area when this building went up," says Levenson, adding that the parks and promenades of Battery Park City are a huge draw for new downtown residents. "And the more residents who move down here the better, because it creates a neighborhood," he says.
------------------------------------------------------------------------
©2005 Company 39, Inc.

jbuntain
July 20th, 2005, 01:37 PM
I just wanted to say hello to the thread and to let you know that my wife and I are one of the proud renters of 90 West Street. The building is beautiful inside, and out. The lobby's gothic arches and marble accents are some of the reasons that we picked such an amazing place. If you haven't been in the lobby yet, I recommend that you stop in when you get a chance - Even just to say hello.



We're extremely proud to be in this building, as it signifies resilience, and the continuation of life and living. To be witness to a part of history and to help rebuild what Lower Manhattan had lost makes it all worthwhile.



We did question whether our hearts and minds could take the constant reminder just outside our doors? But when the work day’s troubles weigh heavy on your shoulders and mind, seeing the WTC site on a daily basis will put all work-related issues into perspective. Instead of coming home and complaining to your spouse about "Henry in accounting" again, you won't even think about it. You'll hug your wife or husband a little extra, take more walks, and live each day to its fullest. We'll live our lives knowing that over 3000 innocent people can't - And through their spirit, the love of NY, and our own determination...we'll stay at 90 West Street as long as possible.



Cheers, Jordan Buntain

jordan_buntain@hotmail.com

Alonzo-ny
July 20th, 2005, 08:23 PM
I love that they have used copper on the roof without preoxidising it whatever its called and it will go green naturally. Kind of makes you think your back in the day when all buildings were like that. Im really glad this building has been saved and rejuvanated, i remember seeing it a year or two ago and i remember thinking of it as a haunted building im glad its no longer like that.

expose05
July 21st, 2005, 06:17 PM
I just wanted to say hello to the thread and to let you know that my wife and I are one of the proud renters of 90 West Street. The building is beautiful inside, and out. The lobby's gothic arches and marble accents are some of the reasons that we picked such an amazing place. If you haven't been in the lobby yet, I recommend that you stop in when you get a chance - Even just to say hello.



We're extremely proud to be in this building, as it signifies resilience, and the continuation of life and living. To be witness to a part of history and to help rebuild what Lower Manhattan had lost makes it all worthwhile.



We did question whether our hearts and minds could take the constant reminder just outside our doors? But when the work day’s troubles weigh heavy on your shoulders and mind, seeing the WTC site on a daily basis will put all work-related issues into perspective. Instead of coming home and complaining to your spouse about "Henry in accounting" again, you won't even think about it. You'll hug your wife or husband a little extra, take more walks, and live each day to its fullest. We'll live our lives knowing that over 3000 innocent people can't - And through their spirit, the love of NY, and our own determination...we'll stay at 90 West Street as long as possible.



Cheers, Jordan Buntain

jordan_buntain@hotmail.com







Do you have any pictures of the lobby? :)

MidtownGuy
March 11th, 2006, 06:50 PM
I think I remember a thread for this building but I can't find it, so I'll post these 3 photos from yesterday here. What a gorgeous hunk.

http://static.flickr.com/37/111043675_cdf03bfa28_b.jpg

http://static.flickr.com/42/111039080_1083007ec9_b.jpg

http://static.flickr.com/40/111039078_5478a39856_b.jpg

ablarc
March 11th, 2006, 06:55 PM
The last photo: Cass Gilbert converses with...Cass Gilbert.

Language: Terra-cotta.

MidtownGuy
March 11th, 2006, 07:32 PM
Yes, this dialog was striking to behold. The roof and top of the building were really restored with love and respect.

"The top floors of 90 West are home to dozens of gargoyles - owls, goat heads and griffins, more than 100 of which needed replacement - but the building's most identifiable feature is the 45-foot mansard roof. The Seaboard Weatherproofing Co. reproduced every detail of Gilbert's original, spending more than $4 million in copper decoration alone. (The entire building cost $2 million to construct a century ago.)" from http://home.netcom.com/~speaker8/jimsplayground/comeback_groundzero.htm

ablarc
March 11th, 2006, 07:46 PM
Need some gargoyle close-ups; unpack your hi-power telephoto.

MidtownGuy
March 11th, 2006, 08:24 PM
lol, I really wish I could oblige you, you'll have to wait 'till I get a better camera for that! Oh, the fun I would have!

ablarc
March 11th, 2006, 08:44 PM
^ Then go for it! The camera's quality needs to match the photographer's.

lofter1
March 11th, 2006, 10:15 PM
The last photo is great.

We best enjoy that conversation while we can -- as it's soon to be interrupted by the thing rising at 12 Barclay Street :mad:

lofter1
March 11th, 2006, 10:29 PM
Some images of 90 West through the years ...


http://www.aiany.org/eOCULUS/2005/images/0204/90westsketch.jpg
http://www.aiany.org/eOCULUS/2005/images/0204/90westsketch.jpg


"View North of 90 West Street and WTC Towers", 1970

http://www.nyhistory.org/vergara/90west60s.jpg
(c) Camilo J. Vergara
http://www.nyhistory.org/vergara/1970.html (http://www.nyhistory.org/vergara/1970.html)


"View North of 90 West Street and WTC Towers", 1988


http://www.nyhistory.org/vergara/90west88.jpg
(c) Camilo J. Vergara
http://www.nyhistory.org/vergara/1988.html

UrbanSculptures
June 25th, 2006, 03:46 AM
Need some gargoyle close-ups; unpack your hi-power telephoto.

Would be cool to see more details

I plan to make a model of one of the sitting griffins in clay at some point

Luca
June 26th, 2006, 03:59 AM
It's so encouraging to see such a beautiful building being restored. Thanks for the great pics.

BrooklynRider
June 26th, 2006, 12:25 PM
:: clap, clap, clap::

kz1000ps
June 26th, 2006, 01:24 PM
Looks gorgeous. But the way how the roof has new copper (bronze color) while the spandrels a few floors beneath still have their patina is a little awkward.

pianoman11686
June 26th, 2006, 01:50 PM
I was inside the building a year ago while they were still renovating certain sections. We saw two or three different units. Very nice finishes and layouts. And compared to BPC, a relative bargain. The cons? Lack of light (it was downright dark in one of them), and depressing views.

Luca
June 27th, 2006, 04:02 AM
I was inside the building a year ago while they were still renovating certain sections. We saw two or three different units. Very nice finishes and layouts. And compared to BPC, a relative bargain. The cons? Lack of light (it was downright dark in one of them), and depressing views.

The views will get better. I must say that for a non-New Yorker and (very) putative American, I was strongly affected by my first visti to 'ground zero'. I suppsoe if you lived right there you'd get used to it pretty soon (unless, of course, you knew someone...)

pianoman11686
June 27th, 2006, 10:18 AM
It wasn't so much ground zero. It was mainly the abutting Deutsche Bank tower next door. That and the fact that if you moved in now, it'd be 5 or 6 years of non-stop construction next door.

infoshare
June 27th, 2006, 11:10 AM
The cons? Lack of light (it was downright dark in one of them), and depressing views.

A thick curtain wall and standard (traditional) windows sizes. Even where an apartment has unobstructed southern exposure: the interiors are somewhat dark inside.

The great quantities of natural light that enters into a buildings' interior spaces is one of the best aspects of 'modernist' architecture. Thin curtain walls and large windows are essential for providing the interior spaces with 'good light'.

The large windows for sunlight is obvious enough; but less obvious is that the thickness of the curtain wall is a major factor in the amount of sun rays that enter the interiors.

The architects on 15CPW (http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showpost.php?p=102344&postcount=219) building - traditional design/masonry curtain wall - have come up with an elegant solution for that problem.

The 90 West street building is one of my favorite in NYC: its great to see it being restored.

ZippyTheChimp
June 27th, 2006, 11:38 AM
The problem was solved a long time ago.

http://images.google.com/imgres?imgurl=http://www.theloftbroker.com/lofts/woosteroffgrand/interior1.jpg&imgrefurl=http://www.theloftbroker.com/lofts/woosteroffgrand/&h=300&w=400&sz=44&hl=en&start=40&tbnid=aO2XTXq5pOsi0M:&tbnh=90&tbnw=120&prev=/images%3Fq%3Dsoho%2522cast%2Biron%2522%26start%3D3 6%26ndsp%3D18%26svnum%3D10%26hl%3Den%26lr%3D%26new window%3D1%26safe%3Doff%26rls%3DGGGL,GGGL:2006-18,GGGL:en%26sa%3DN

pianoman11686
June 27th, 2006, 11:45 AM
Nice, but $3900/month for a 1BR? That's a little steep.

UrbanSculptures
June 28th, 2006, 12:01 AM
Looks gorgeous. But the way how the roof has new copper (bronze color) while the spandrels a few floors beneath still have their patina is a little awkward.


It takes about 5 years and the copper will turn color, I saw it happen on ST George's Ukranian Church on Hall Place near Cooper Union- it was built in the old style and with a shiney copper clad dome, I kept watch on it and it quickly turned brownish and about 5 years later it started turning green.

infoshare
June 28th, 2006, 01:35 AM
The problem was solved a long time ago.


What I was referring to is that 15CPW did 'new construction' that is a classical/traditional/masonry design; yet it has a very thin curtain curtain wall.

I personally have not seen that done before in NYC. I hope to see more of this: my attitude is that way too much new construction in this town is 'modern architecture' - a few more 'new' buildings in this style would be great to see.

ablarc
June 28th, 2006, 08:12 AM
way too much new construction in this town is 'modern architecture' - a few more 'new' buildings in this style would be great to see.
Zippy's got the answer: bring back cast iron architecture.

ZippyTheChimp
June 28th, 2006, 08:36 AM
The architects on 15CPW (http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showpost.php?p=102344&postcount=219) building - traditional design/masonry curtain wall - have come up with an elegant solution for that problem.
I meant that there was no problem that needed a design solution. Factory precast panels have been around for quite a while. The only reason you don't see much of it is high cost vs glass. The solution at 15 CPW was setting a higher price for apartments.

You may see more of this if other developers use 15 CPW as an example that high-end buyers are willing to pay the price, not because a cost-cutting breakthrough has been achieved.

Self-correction: Actually, you do see a lot of precast masonry panels around the city - brick veneers. The results are less appealing. The factory panels lack the slight variation that is achieved with individually laid brick, something the eye picks up.

ZippyTheChimp
June 28th, 2006, 08:44 AM
Zippy's got the answer: bring back cast iron architecture.I'll email Gehry.

Luca
June 28th, 2006, 11:58 AM
I'll email Gehry.

:D :D :D

Then again...don't, unless you fancy seeing a tangle of twisted cast iron corinthian columns and dentelletad corniches paitned pink and electric blue next to your houde!!! :p

Derek2k3
October 10th, 2007, 12:10 AM
If you stare at it long enough it could put a lump in your throat.

http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2142/1528538022_4b774acce0_o.jpg


http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2147/1528537974_7e7b7dce71_o.jpg


http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2378/1528538006_1e6166322e_o.jpg


http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2147/1528538014_3f16843b65_o.jpg


http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2170/1528538030_33a110a839_o.jpg

TREPYE
October 10th, 2007, 12:21 AM
Hypnotic:eek:......









http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2147/1528538014_3f16843b65_o.jpg

Tectonic
October 10th, 2007, 12:48 AM
Nice Building, lots of detail.

RandySavage
October 10th, 2007, 01:12 AM
Nice shots. 90 West is an ornament to the City... and come 2012 what a place it will be to call home.

Laura KC
November 26th, 2007, 11:20 PM
It is a beautiful building. Hopefully it won't float away. The garage in the basement perpetually floods during periods of moderate to heavy rainfall, but today's flooding tops it all.


----

Downtown parking garage under water; residents evacuated

Dozens of cars ruined; electricity shut off

http://a.abclocal.go.com/graphics/v3/global/stockgraphics/icons/wabc_byline.gif Eyewitness News

(Lower Manhattan - WABC, November 26, 2007)

More than 40 cars are under water and dozens of residents displaced Monday after construction crews working on a sewer line near Ground Zero ran into trouble.

Eyewitness News reporter Kemberly Richardson has details from Lower Manhattan.


Officials have shut off the gas, water and electric in the area and a mandatory evacuation of the building has been issued for 90 West Street. But the bigger problem, workers say, is pumping out the remaining 7 feet of water that is now sitting below the high-rise building. At it's peak, there was 14 feet of water.

"We were working downstairs, parking all the cars," one worker said. "And all of a sudden, water started coming in." It poured in at such a fast rate that workers at the underground parking garage had to scramble to get away.

The tops of SUVs could be seen peeking out over the top of the water, and officials say those vehicles are just the beginning. They say about 40 other cars are now under water.

Richie O'Keefe is a construction worker at Ground Zero. He dropped off his Buick at the garage at 6:40 a.m. "They're telling me just wait, to wait and see if they can pump it out," he said. "It probably won't be today."

More than 70 firefighters rushed to the high-rise to try and pump out the water and stop any more from getting in. No one was trapped below, but officials are concerned about high levels of carbon monoxide.

They say all of this started as construction crews worked on a new sewer line on the north side of the building. "Due to the large amount of runoff rainwater, and also at the time when we have a high tide, which shuts a diverter valve so no water can flow in from the river, there's an area of the pipe that was cut out and the water is flowing into the building," FDNY Deputy Chief James Daly said.

Residents have been shuttled to the Ritz-Carlton, where OEM reps are helping them out.


----

Here's the link to the article and the accompanying news video:
http://abclocal.go.com/wabc/story?section=local&id=5784823.

Residents are being told it may be 2-3 days before they will be able to move back into their apartments.

lofter1
November 27th, 2007, 12:46 AM
TV news reports tonight stated that the 40 "luxury" cars that are still under water are basically totaled -- as the water contains not only sewage but also oil & gas.

TriHobo
November 27th, 2007, 09:44 PM
Residents are now being told it will be 2 weeks!

lofter1
November 27th, 2007, 10:29 PM
And who, pray tell, will be paying the relocation bill (not to mention the other costs) for victims of this very expensive "accident"?

Laura KC
November 27th, 2007, 11:06 PM
Apparently the flooding took out the electrical system for the building and everything in the electrical room will need to be completely replaced.

Building management is pointing to the Port Authority as being at fault, but, as of now, nobody has assumed any financial responsibility (presumably because the scope of the problem is still unfolding).

In the interim, management is asking residents to contact their insurance companies to cover temporary relocation costs. The building is planning on reimbursing for the first two nights of hotel stay and refunding double the rent for the unusable period.

Front_Porch
November 28th, 2007, 10:37 AM
As someone who has a house that sits right on (if not in) the water table on the beach, I know what a PITA flooding can be. You have to dry everything out, get the mold guys in, and then take steps so the space doesn't re-flood. Gotta feel sorry for these people.

ali r.
{downtown broker}

BrooklynRider
November 29th, 2007, 01:06 AM
They are having a very "New Orleans" experience.:(

TriHobo
November 29th, 2007, 08:57 AM
They are having a very "New Orleans" experience.:(

As a resident of the building, let's slow down and not be insulting to the many people who were in NO during Katrina...

1. The flood was in the basement of the building which ruined many cars and of course the electrical system. No resident had any damage to our personal apartments.

2. Although caused by incompetence, there was no 'warning' and no chance to 'escape' as in NO.

3. Yes, we're all displaced, and the hotels are in Newark or the Hotel Pennsylvania, which unless you're looking for a hooker is pretty useless, but we're not living in trailers, a stadium, or on the street.

The story here should be two-fold - one, that lots of people have been displaced and inconvenienced and stressed because of an accident. Two, that this probably could have been avoided if the Port Authority had not struck a stupid deal with Silverstein that penalized the PA if the WTC site isn't ready by Jan 1. Resident's around the WTC have had to endure 24/7 construction, and noise levels well above what a private company/developer/builder would be allowed because the PA made a deal that they had no hope of making.

In August two firefighters died in the DB building next door (we were all displaced albeit for a few hours). I will not pretend to know all the events that led to the tragic loss of life, but once again, an unrealistic schedule, no oversight and carlessness were probably major causes.

I am with every other New Yorker in wanting to see more progress at the WTC. After 6 1/2 years, it's fair for us to expect this. But years of incompetence, in-fighting and politicing, that delayed anything from happening should not mean construction should be rushed to the point that more problems are caused and more importantly, more lives, are lost.

BrooklynRider, I'm sure you meant no insult with your "New Orleans" comparison, it just gave me a nice opportunity to rant...and now back to your regularily scheduled programming...

NYatKNIGHT
November 29th, 2007, 12:10 PM
The hotels are in Newark? What the.....???

mkeit
November 29th, 2007, 02:17 PM
Newspaper reports blamed the contractor-Felix-that is relocating a sewer for the WTC Visitors Center Bus Parking project.

Laura KC
November 29th, 2007, 09:26 PM
The hotels are in Newark? What the.....???

The building management was in a pickle, because they needed to find both a large block of hotel rooms AND a hotel that was pet friendly since so many residents do have animals. So I think the first one that they were able to lock in that fit the bill was in Newark. Now they've been able to secure space at Hotel Pennsylvania and are offering to transfer people back across the Hudson if they wish.

I do give building mangement credit - first, for saving the building at all; and second, for dealing with this the best they can.

TriHobo, I'm also a resident of the building. Nice to meet you :cool:

lofter1
November 29th, 2007, 10:45 PM
I certainly hope that the problem gets worked out for TriHobo, Laura KC and the other residents of 90 West -- who are (were?) all very fortunate to live in one of the great buildings in NYC.

I can only imagine, having lived through construction of a new building across from my bedroom windows a few years back, what a pain it must be to deal with the on-going noise as the contractors race to meet Silverstein's deadline.

But, honestly, I'm a tad envious ... even with the current problems :cool:

Laura KC
November 29th, 2007, 10:53 PM
It is a beatiful building and I do feel lucky (even with the noise!). But I'm trying to enjoy it now, knowing that when the WTC site is complete, 90 West will once again disappear into the shadows (both literally and figuratively).

brianac
December 3rd, 2007, 06:02 AM
Tenants Angry In Aftermath Of Flood

By Nick Pinto
POSTED DECEMBER 1, 2007

http://www.tribecatrib.com/photos/news/dec07/FloodCars.jpg
http://www.tribecatrib.com/photos/news/dec07/Captions/FloodCarCaption.gif
Two days after being forced out of their luxury apartments when basement flooding cut power, gas and water service to their building, the tenants of 90 West Street gathered in a high school auditorium on Trinity Place. It was a meeting with the building’s owner, Peter Levinson, and they didn’t like what he had to say: It would be as long as two weeks before they could return home.

At the Nov. 28 meeting, Levinson told the assembled residents that he was doing all he could to hasten their return and that all reasonable accommodation expenses in the meantime would be refunded. But many tenants asked questions he couldn’t answer. What was the maximum amount they could spend on hotel rooms and still be fully compensated? How quickly would the compensation come? Why hadn’t the owner planned for something like this?

“Even if you couldn’t have prepared for a flood, your building is located right next to the World Trade Center site,” one resident called out from the audience. “You should have been prepared for some kind of disaster.”

http://www.tribecatrib.com/photos/news/dec07/FloodHoses.jpg

“Unacceptable!” tenants repeatedly called out throughout the information session.
Other residents felt Levinson was doing his best. “This was an act of God,” said Michael Williams, who had spent the past three nights in hotel rooms and with friends. “Besides, we’re not talking about Section 8 housing here.

Everyone is financially stable. There are real people who actually don’t have homes—I can’t believe the fuss some of the other residents are making.”

The flooding began Nov. 26 when workers at the trade center site cut a sewer line to relocate an electrical transformer vault. Because the line was not capped, rain and high tide combined to send water rushing back through the pipe, flooding the two-level basement at 90 West Street. Sixteen feet of water completely submerged many of the cars.

A spokesman for Icon Parking said most of the water had been pumped out by the next day, but he called the submerged vehicles “a total loss.”

The flooding also destroyed the Landmark building’s electrical infrastructure, critical equipment that could take weeks to replace.

Levinson and his staff were working to find hotel rooms for residents, and though rent came due at the end of last month, he told those gathered in the auditorium that he won’t expect them to pay until they move back in. Port Authority officials announced a 24-hour help desk and phone line for residents who need their claims reimbursed immediately.

http://www.tribecatrib.com/photos/news/dec07/FloodFamily.jpg

But for some tenants, the flood is one disruption too many in a building that is surrounded by construction.

“It’s a little bit upsetting,” said Paulina Espinoza, who moved to the building’s 12th floor less than two years ago. “We’re already all fed up with the noise from the construction at the World Trade Center and the highway. Then this summer we had the Deutsche Bank fire. And now this?”

Sitting in a conference room at the Ritz Carlton on the afternoon of the flooding, Espinoza waited for assembled Red Cross and Office of Emergency Management officials to provide information and assistance.

“I don’t want to move from there,” she said. “The management has been great. But I have to admit I’m already thinking about it.”

Copyright 2007 The Tribeca Trib.

Alonzo-ny
December 3rd, 2007, 11:13 AM
“I don’t want to move from there,” she said. “The management has been great. But I have to admit I’m already thinking about it.”



Good god one thing happens, she knew about the construction beforehand. This was an accident and she said herself the management was great. so bloody melodramatic.

lofter1
December 3rd, 2007, 12:00 PM
When the s**t really hits the fan I don't want to be near any of these kind of folks.

Another case of "Get a grip" -- quit whining and deal with it.

Optimus Prime
December 3rd, 2007, 01:08 PM
“It’s a little bit upsetting,” said Paulina Espinoza, who moved to the building’s 12th floor less than two years ago. “We’re already all fed up with the noise from the construction at the World Trade Center and the highway. Then this summer we had the Deutsche Bank fire. And now this?”


Okay, the flood and DB fire were crappy and unexpected, but how can one be fed up with WTC construction and West Street noise? Did you not realize you moved in next to a highway and the largest construction site in the city? :rolleyes:

Laura KC
December 3rd, 2007, 01:37 PM
My goodness, aren't you three ^ ^ ^ cranky? You'd think it was you guys who have been homeless for a week :cool:.

She just said she'd been "thinking about" moving. I'm guessing there's not a single New Yorker who hasn't thought about leaving their building for one reason or another.

As the late great Erma Bombeck once said, the grass is always greener on the other side of the septic tank ;).

lofter1
December 3rd, 2007, 01:49 PM
Cranky? Us???

Maybe you'd like to share this with some of your neighbors at 90 West ...

http://www.complaintschoir.org/ (http://www.complaintschoir.org/)

This is the Complaint Choir sharing web-site. Here you can find information about all complaints choirs that have been initiated around the world ...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2w84qzHdEms (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2w84qzHdEms)

The Complaints Choir invites people to complain as much as they want and to sing their complaints out loud together with fellow complainers. The first choir was organised in Birmingham followed by the Complaints Choir of Helsinki and Hamburg. The lyrics were written by the Choir, Music by Mike Hurley. Project by Tellervo Kalleinen and Oliver Kochta-Kalleinen. Produced by Springhill Institute.

If you plan to organize a Complaints Choir in your town, please contact us first:

http://www.complaintschoir.org/images/buttons/mmm.gif

We can announce your plan on this web-site. We would like to ask from you to credit us appropriately and to place a link to this site. Thanks a lot! If your are a producer or a representative of a media company, a festival, a museum or any other private or public institution, organisation or association, please do not start to organize a complaints choir without talking to us first. Thank you for your understanding.

some useful tips on how to organize a complaints choir (http://www.complaintschoir.org/doityourself.html) in 9 easy steps!

The Complaints Choir of Chicago (http://www.complaintschoir.org/chicago) performed for all Chicagoans on Sunday November 4 at the Cloud Gate aka The Bean at Millenium Park in the heart of Chicago. On Saturday November 3 the Choir was the biggest band ever to have performed at the legendary Empty Bottle Club. The Chicago Complaint Choir was conducted by Jeremy Jacobson aka the lonesome organist (http://lonesomeorganist.com/) and organized by Frank and Lisa Mauceri of Smog Veill Records (http://www.smogveil.com/) (in collaboration with MCA and SAIC and Humanities Festival). All photos by Clare Britt. (http://photography.clarebritt.com/)

Check lyrics and live footage (http://www.complaintschoir.org/chicago) from the Chicago Complaints Choir.

ZippyTheChimp
December 3rd, 2007, 01:55 PM
It seems we all complain about everything...even complain about people who complain.

Laura KC
December 3rd, 2007, 02:07 PM
Cranky? Us???

Maybe you'd like to share this with some of your neighbors at 90 West ...



I'm not sure if you're being self-deprecating ("yes, we are cranky") or accusatory ("you 90 West people call us cranky??").

But since I don't know, I will just make an unrelated comment about how proud I am to be a part of 90 West, where, out of 300 apartments, at most a handful of residents have been "whiny" and "complaining".

Note, I do not include the woman in the article as being one of them. Your (plural) reaction to her legitimate, and rather offhanded, query was just over the top. You all acknowledged that there are hassles when one lives next to a construction site for a future WTC. Why isn't she allowed to just wonder if those hassles are, in fact, worth it? Jeesh . . .

(I would've ended with a frownie face, but I will not let you people bring me down! :cool:)

lofter1
December 3rd, 2007, 02:10 PM
You'll get used to the fact that we're often cranky here (some of us anyway).

Some are effusively cranky. Which can be mistaken for skewed optimism.

And as Zip points out, many of us love to complain about those who complain.

We point out each others -- and our own -- foibles.

Cheerleading tends to bum us out -- and can send us on a rant :cool:

Laura KC
December 3rd, 2007, 02:13 PM
Then get ready to rant until I find something more productive to do with my time :cool:

lofter1
December 3rd, 2007, 02:17 PM
lol ^

I didn't mean to say that you are a cheerleader ;) (but maybe you are :confused: )

brianac
December 4th, 2007, 03:48 AM
You've heard the saying, "Show your true colours".

Well I think we have seeen a bit of that here.

These people are victims, and now they are being victimised again for complaining.

Who knows their individual circumstances, kids, old people, illness.

I'm sure that their complaints are mostly out of frustration.

Live and let live.

ablarc
December 4th, 2007, 05:23 PM
I'm not sure if you're being self-deprecating ("yes, we are cranky") or accusatory ("you 90 West people call us cranky??").
lofter1 is the Self-Deprecator-in-Chief.

lofter1
December 4th, 2007, 06:16 PM
Too much praise ^ :o

BrooklynRider
December 6th, 2007, 10:50 PM
Can the 90 West residents post some pics for us of the building interior and photos of the new construction project sites around the property from the roof?

lofter1
December 13th, 2007, 09:54 AM
90 West Street Residents Wary of Waivers

TRIBECA TRIB (http://www.tribecatrib.com/news/newsjan08/FloodUpdate.html)
By Nick Pinto
DECEMBER 12, 2007

Residents of the 410 apartments at 90 West Street are back in their building (http://www.tribecatrib.com/news/newsdec07/Flood2.html), and the Port Authority is offering them no-questions-asked $6,000 reimbursements for their expenses during the week that flooding on Nov. 26 forced them out of their homes.

But many are dismayed. To get the money, they must sign a waiver that protects the authority and its “agents, contractors and subcontractors” against further claims.

“I definitely felt pressured to sign,” said Tiffany Graeff, one of several residents who appeared before Community Board 1’s World Trade Center Redevelopment Committee on Dec. 10. “We were being told that if we didn’t sign the release by last 5 p.m. last Saturday, our claims wouldn’t be expedited.”

Graeff said she couldn’t afford to wait a long time to have her thousands of dollars in expenses repaid, and worried that a non-expedited repayment process could take a long time. “Anyone who has worked with a large company or an insurance provider knows that if they want it not to be expedited, they can make it take forever,” she said. “It felt like it was almost a threat.”

Port Authority spokesman Glenn Guzi told the committee that his agency, which owns the World Trade Center site where the flooding began, has already issued 185 checks amounting to $1,350,000, and 40 more claims are pending.

But more than 200 have yet to sign it, according to Jennifer Jones, one of the leaders of those who live in the building. And many of those who have signed the waiver, she said, wish they had not.

Guzi appeared surprised to learn that residents were being told of a deadline to file their claims.

“We are not setting a deadline,” he said. “You can’t wait forever, but the expiration for cash settlement isn’t until January 26th, 2008.”

Several days earlier, however, the Web site of John Riddle and Associates, the law firm handling claims for the Port Authority, announced, “Our final day for immediate reimbursement of the streamlined $6,000.00 settlement is Saturday, December 8, 2007.”

Guzi said the waiver was not the Port Authority’s idea, but was a requirement of the insurance companies that are backing the payouts.

“It’s not that we’re all so eager to sue the Port Authority, but the residents don’t know yet if there are going to be long-term consequences to this flooding,” said Brian Olson, another 90 West resident.

Committee member Bill Love, a lawyer, said he was troubled by the broad language of the release, and urged the Port Authority to change it.

“You’ve said at this meeting that that language only applies to the out-of-pocket expenses,” he told Guzi. “If you’re willing to say it in public, you should be able to put it in writing.”

It isn’t just the waiver that has residents angry with the Port Authority. Some are also put off by what they described as the Port Authority’s overall high-handed manner and failure to keep residents informed.

“It seems like this was the result of tides, which are predictable, and a pipe that wasn’t capped, which seems like a mistake,” Graeff said. “But all of a sudden now that we’re back in the building it’s all very ‘case closed.’ So how do we know mistakes like this aren’t going to happen again?”

The flooding began when workers at the World Trade Center site cut a sewer line to relocate an electrical transformer vault. Because the line was not capped, rain and high tide combined to send water rushing back through the pipe, flooding the two-level basement at 90 West Street.

Guzi replied that the Port Authority is still waiting for the city to complete its investigation of what caused the flood, and does not know when the investigation will be complete.

“The investigation will prove whether the cap was installed properly or not,” he said.

90 West residents had to wait through more than two hours of other Community Board business before the committee took up their issue, but those who stayed for the duration said they appreciated the board’s involvement.

“They definitely made us earn it, but I’m really glad the board was willing to take it on,” Graeff said. “I had no idea they existed before. But if we can make any progress on getting the wording of the waiver changed, and if they can make it retroactive, that will be a tremendous accomplishment.”

(c) The Tribeca Trib

GVNY
February 3rd, 2008, 04:37 AM
Photograph of 90 West, here (http://aycu04.webshots.com/image/42363/2002324571787846209_rs.jpg).

lofter1
February 3rd, 2008, 11:58 AM
Terrific photo ^

Especially interesting are seeing the buildings that surrounded 90 West in 1907 -- none of which remain.

UrbanSculptures
February 3rd, 2008, 03:33 PM
From that article;

“It’s a little bit upsetting,” said Paulina Espinoza, who moved to the building’s 12th floor less than two years ago. “We’re already all fed up with the noise from the construction at the World Trade Center and the highway. ”

Let me see here, these folks moved into apartments opposite a vacant lot where the WTC was, knowing full well that at some soon point CONSTRUCTION would inevitably begin on this very expensive valuable land, and now they complain about construction noise???


“Even if you couldn’t have prepared for a flood, your building is located right next to the World Trade Center site,” one resident called out from the audience. “You should have been prepared for some kind of disaster."

How could ANYONE foresee something like this, and exactly how would a landlord prepare for THIS?
Seems to me the contractor who cut the sewer line at the WTC site is 100% responsible for this.

UrbanSculptures
February 3rd, 2008, 03:43 PM
Hi friends, I haven't been around for ages- too busy! but I kept the site bookmarked and occasionally looked in.
I was always following the 90 West thread so I took a look in here today to see what's new, I'll have to wander around.

I have been busy making new models, one of which I will post here as it relates to 90 West. I found some great photos taken from the scaffolding and from a hotel across the street, some on flickr.com and decided to make a clay model of one of the corner griffins- the ones that have these cute dog-like ears and expression.
I made my version a little smaller- about 28" tall than the extant sculptures which I scaled out to be around 36" tall.

http://i23.photobucket.com/albums/b375/Randall2/90-r-done9.jpg

http://i23.photobucket.com/albums/b375/Randall2/90-R-done-7.jpg

Jim856796
February 16th, 2008, 01:27 AM
What is the 12-story building that is located to the east of 90 West street? It is the building which is covered in black netting? What is the building's current condition?

GreenwichBoy
February 16th, 2008, 06:45 AM
^^^

130 Cedar Street
http://www.lowermanhattan.info/images/construction/project_updates/082307_130_Cedar_PU.jpg

After several months of careful coordination with the Environmental Protection Agency (http://www.lowermanhattan.info/construction/global/contact/#us) (EPA), preparations for the 130 Cedar Street building conversion began in summer 2007. After a short hiatus, abatement of the existing 12-story former office building resumed in November 2007, starting from the top down using a four-floor "buffer zone" between the clean floors and deconstruction areas. Next, deconstruction will strip the building down to its concrete superstructure, with eight air monitors in place throughout.
Construction will commence following abatement. Contractor Laval Construction will add seven new stories to the existing 12 stories (including a penthouse floor). The new, 19-story tower will house a new hotel with retail and restaurants.


Daily Activities

The following information was last updated on February 15, 2008.

Decontamination/abatement of the existing 12-story structure resumed November 1, 2007 and will continue through approximately June 2008
Air monitoring is active at the site. To view weekly reports, clck here (http://www.rjlg.com/qualifications/projectreports/projectreport1.html).From Lowermanhattan.info

Jim856796
February 21st, 2008, 05:08 AM
This building gets damaged on 9/11. Then it gets covered up in netting. Now it gets renovated into a hotel and expanding to 19 floors? I feared the building was slated for demolition, but its life is to be saved. When was it built?

Fahzee
February 21st, 2008, 02:06 PM
^ well, "life" might be a relative term

the building is getting completely stripped down to it's bones. When this project is finished, the hotel will look VERY different from the original structure

Derek2k3
January 14th, 2010, 05:51 PM
http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2743/4270944676_76b9148502_b.jpg
bostoncitywalk (http://www.flickr.com/photos/bostoncitywalk/4270944676/in/pool-curbed)

RandySavage
January 14th, 2010, 06:24 PM
A gargoyle seems to have been decapitated. Wonder what could have caused that...

ZippyTheChimp
January 27th, 2010, 08:32 PM
http://img97.imageshack.us/img97/5914/westst11c.th.jpg (http://img97.imageshack.us/i/westst11c.jpg/)

Good news: Ridiculously narrow sidewalk is being widened. About triple width in front of the hotel and 90 West, with a loading lane.

Bad news: That's a tower under wraps, to support an overhead truss spanning the roadway.

Signs
Electronic message board
Cameras
Photon torpedoes?

HoveringCheesecake
January 27th, 2010, 08:39 PM
http://img97.imageshack.us/img97/5914/westst11c.th.jpg (http://img97.imageshack.us/i/westst11c.jpg/)

Good news: Ridiculously narrow sidewalk is being widened. About triple width in front of the hotel and 90 West, with a loading lane.

Bad news: That's a tower under wraps, to support an overhead truss spanning the roadway.

Signs
Electronic message board
Cameras
Photon torpedoes?

Is the tower permanent?

NYatKNIGHT
February 2nd, 2010, 10:01 AM
That tower is for an elevator for the new "temporary" pedestrian bridge. They are going to create an opening in the 4th or 5th window from the end, over the future median, and move people south around 90 West St. Then they can dismantle the old structure and excavate for the Vehicle Security Center.

ZippyTheChimp
February 2nd, 2010, 11:09 AM
Whew!

Is that the drilling going on just off the right of the photo?

NYatKNIGHT
February 2nd, 2010, 11:15 AM
In the median, yes.

rbenko
February 15th, 2010, 02:33 PM
Eventually isn't there supposed to be some sort of vehicle ramp right in front of the building?

lofter1
March 8th, 2011, 02:43 PM
90 West as seen from the terrace at the W Downtown ...

http://i130.photobucket.com/albums/p242/Lofter1/90%20West%20Street/110308_90West_1.jpg

http://i130.photobucket.com/albums/p242/Lofter1/90%20West%20Street/110308_90West_2.jpg

http://i130.photobucket.com/albums/p242/Lofter1/90%20West%20Street/110308_90West_3.jpg

http://i130.photobucket.com/albums/p242/Lofter1/90%20West%20Street/110308_90West_4.jpg

http://i130.photobucket.com/albums/p242/Lofter1/90%20West%20Street/110308_90West_5.jpg

http://i130.photobucket.com/albums/p242/Lofter1/90%20West%20Street/110308_90West_6.jpg

http://i130.photobucket.com/albums/p242/Lofter1/90%20West%20Street/110308_90West_7.jpg

http://i130.photobucket.com/albums/p242/Lofter1/90%20West%20Street/110308_90West_8.jpg

HoveringCheesecake
March 8th, 2011, 03:50 PM
I'd love to have an apartment in this building.

LightningEagle
March 8th, 2011, 04:19 PM
beautiful building. Architecture at it's best.

Derek2k3
January 26th, 2013, 12:36 PM
http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8218/8415401927_c025c6ffe1_b.jpg
Chuck Kuhn Photos (http://www.flickr.com/photos/ckuhn55/8415401927/sizes/l/in/photostream/)