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Kris
November 17th, 2002, 09:30 AM
November 17, 2002
Newark Puts Its Fiery Riot Behind It
By BRENT STAPLES

The riots that burned through this country in the late 1960's ravaged more than 125 cities and reached into 28 states. Most Americans would find it difficult to name even a dozen of those cities. But the conflagration that ripped through Newark in 1967 remains especially fresh in public memory, perhaps because most people had never heard of the city until they watched it burning on the evening news. Try as it might to escape, Newark has lived in the shadow of its riot for 35 years.

The riots sent businesses and middle-class families streaming into the suburbs. But one of the lesser known legacies of all that fiery violence is what urbanologists call "the architecture of fear" — which includes gated communities and those ubiquitous fortress-style office towers that project windowless stone walls to the sidewalk where stores and shops should be. The architecture of fear has killed the possibility of street life in downtown Los Angeles and hurt the revitalization of Detroit as well. Visit Newark at rush hour on a weekday evening and you will see the same symptoms on display. The train station at rush hour is bustling with commuters sipping coffee and reading, many waiting to be picked up and whisked off to the suburbs. But a short walk from the station, into the heart of the city, you encounter the eerily vacant thoroughfare of Raymond Boulevard, lined with buildings that feature blank facades instead of stores or coffee shops. The Hilton Gateway Hotel has a drab cement-colored face that looks like some kind of bunker at the street level.

Covered elevated walkways allow workers to move from the train station to any one of several office towers without ever touching the street. There is little to see anyway, since the designers omitted shops and retail spaces that would have attracted people. At 6 in the evening, I walked several blocks into this city of 274,000 people and encountered fewer than a half-dozen pedestrians.

Planners and community groups in Newark have become vividly aware of this problem. The architecture of fear downtown seems to have met its match, in the approachable, human-scale architecture of the New Jersey Performing Arts Center. This graceful, low-rise, red brick structure, awash in light, is a visual oasis in Newark and more engaging by far than its unglamorous acronym, NJPAC, suggests. The building has become a magnet for foot traffic in a previously vacant corner of downtown.

The first time I visited the area around the center at night, I passed through empty streets and suddenly encountered throngs of people filing in to see the British pop star Elvis Costello. "If someone had told you 10 years ago that there would be 3,000 people in downtown Newark at night, you would have called them crazy," said Lawrence Goldman, NJPAC's president and chief executive.

The main performance hall, done in warm woods and copper trim, has the intimate feel of a nicely appointed living room. The foyers and lobbies have a similarly warm, even homey feel. The building is popular with foundations and businesses staging parties and retreats. During the summer, the front plaza becomes the stage for weekly free outdoor concerts that attract as many as 2,500 people a night. Once stark and fearsomely vacant, the area is now a thriving singles scene. Restaurants and parking lots have sprouted nearby.

Mr. Goldman was seen as crazy when he first argued that the city should build a world-class cultural institution in its desolate downtown. One set of skeptics told him that white suburbanites who had been scared away by the riots would never come back at night. Another set of skeptics predicted that white suburbanites would come but that black people would stay away in droves.

The doubters have proved to be spectacularly wrong. Celebrating its fifth birthday this fall, NJPAC has become what surveys describe as one of the most well-attended performing arts centers of its kind in the country, outstripping its peers by a significant margin. One in four tickets is bought by minority patrons — a proportion that puts performing arts centers in most other cities to shame.

With its intimate feel, the center has little in common with stolid, formal institutions like the Kennedy Center in Washington or Lincoln Center in New York. Mr. Goldman's architects were pushed to create what he describes as a "welcoming building" that "makes people feel hugged when they come in" — and makes them want to linger.

Mr. Goldman is campaigning to ensure that other parts of downtown Newark are rebuilt with the same goal in mind. His influence is apparent in the new 12-story F.B.I. building that is going up just a stone's throw from NJPAC. What could easily have been a cold, stone obelisk has turned out to be an illuminated, window-filled building that will have restaurants and retail space. Though not perfect, the building harmonizes with the waterfront in a way that a traditional fortress structure would not.

In the old days, Newark would have been pleased to have any building it could get, fortress or not. But the tempering of the look of the F.B.I. building reflects a new awareness that good architecture will help the city's renaissance and that bad architecture can hurt it. When the history of the Newark comeback is written, it will likely begin at the start of the 21st century, when NJPAC solidified its position as the living, breathing town square that had been missing in downtown Newark for 40 years.

Copyright The New York Times Company

bak
November 17th, 2002, 06:45 PM
NJPAC

http://ublib.buffalo.edu/libraries/projects/bruner/2001/newjersey/photos/photo4.JPG
Image from ublib.buffalo.edu

tone99loc
November 17th, 2002, 10:51 PM
While Newark won't be a 24 hour city anytime in the forseeable future, if indeed the Nets and Devils arena makes it to downtown Newark, it should reenforce what this article is saying...

NYatKNIGHT
November 21st, 2002, 12:14 PM
I have actually seen a show at NJPAC - it is a spectacular performance venue.

http://www.rthotel.com/NJPAC/njpac.1.jpg

Kris
November 29th, 2003, 10:15 AM
November 30, 2003

COMMERCIAL PROPERTY | NEWARK

Developers Plan to Repopulate the Downtown Area

By JOHN HOLUSHA

http://graphics7.nytimes.com/images/2003/11/30/realestate/comprop.650.jpg
The Hahne & Company department store and the Griffith Building behind it are to hold 223 apartments.

FOR more than 17 years, the old Hahne & Company department store has sat vacant on two blocks of prime real estate on Broad Street in downtown Newark, defying multiple attempts to convert it to another use. But lately, a new owner, the Cogswell Realty Group, has cleaned up the exterior and installed new windows, planning to convert it and the adjacent Griffith Building into 223 rental apartment units.

Other developers also plan residential projects in the downtown area, including converting office buildings, building new mixed-use towers along the Passaic River shoreline and adding residential structures at the city's colleges and a new "urban village" of midrise and high-rise housing in an area that might or might not become the home of a new sports stadium.

In all, these projects could add more than 6,000 housing units in Newark's downtown, giving it the first sizable resident population in generations, said Arthur R. Stern, the president of Cogswell, which is based in New York.

The hope is that if people live in the city, rather than fleeing to the suburbs after work or school, it will encourage the development of restaurants and other retail services that are largely lacking now.

"Newark has been a ghost town after 5 p.m.," said Sharpe James, the city's mayor. "To have a viable city, you need to have a viable downtown and we are trying to make downtown into a neighborhood." He said that while corporations had moved offices into downtown or expanded their presence in recent years, there had been no parallel growth in a full-time residents.

A big part of the reason, Mr. Stern said, is that there was no housing suitable for the people working in the area. "There is zero supply," he said. He said Cogswell was planning to spend $180 million to convert the Hahne-Griffith complex and a nearby office building at 1180 Raymond Boulevard to residences.

Demand for housing is coming not just from office workers. Educational officials say students at what were largely commuter colleges in the city are increasingly demanding to live on campus and in the process producing a more livable city.

"With our housing and the projects on Broad Street, we could convert this into a 24-hour-a-day community," said Steven J. Diner, provost and chief operating officer of Rutgers University's Newark campus. He said it could be argued that Newark, although its roots were industrial, is now the most college-oriented town in the nation, with more than 40,000 undergraduate and graduate students in a city of 275,000.

IN addition to Rutgers-Newark, the cluster of educational institutions in what is known as the University Heights part of the city includes the New Jersey Institute of Technology, the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey and Essex County College. State plans to merge Rutgers University, the New Jersey Institute of Technology and the University of Medicine and Dentistry would produce a university offering a full range of undergraduate and graduate studies.

Rutgers-Newark is planning a new undergraduate dormitory that would house 600 students — construction is expected to begin this summer — and it is considering apartmentlike graduate housing that would fill a full block.

"We want retail all around on the first floor," Dr. Diner said of the graduate housing. "There is no reason why we could not have a Barnes & Noble or Borders bookstore there with a coffee bar."

For nonstudents, the new developments could offer housing prices and rentals at less than half the cost in Manhattan and less than in parts of Jersey City and Hoboken.

And with the restoration of the PATH line to Lower Manhattan, Newark residents would be a station stop or two away from locations on the Hudson River. The main northeast line of Amtrak also runs through Newark and is about a 15-minute ride into Pennsylvania Station in Midtown Manhattan.

"Newark has a wonderful transportation infrastructure left over from the 19th and early 20th centuries," Dr. Diner said. "And we have the Art Deco buildings that were not torn down and replaced because of Newark's condition."

Newark's condition is a polite way of describing a city whose industrial base dwindled or moved away, whose population declined from more than 400,000 in the 1960's to its current level and that was battered by bloody riots in 1967. Indeed, some of the educational institutions drawing all those students today were expanded or moved into the city after 1967 to provide an economic base.

This is a good strategy for economic development in a postindustrial era, said Peter Smirniotopoulos, an urban planner and faculty member at Johns Hopkins University.

"In a knowledge-based economy, colleges and universities will be the factories of the 21st century," he wrote in the November issue of Urban Land magazine. Rather than stay confined to their own campuses, he said, "colleges and universities should be better integrated into the cities and towns where they are located."

RUTGERS-NEWARK is a few blocks north of Broad Street but is separated from the New Jersey Performing Arts Center and a growing arts area to the south by a dead zone two blocks deep and six blocks wide that includes the Hahne and Griffith Buildings, a surface parking lot and old retail buildings that will probably be demolished.

If they are successfully turned into residences, it would join the two areas into a community, real estate officials said.

The fact that people were willing to go to work in the rehabilitated office buildings on Broad Street in the city's core suggested there was a pent-up demand for housing, said Larry Regan of Regan Development. His company is converting an office building that was completed in 1906 at 9 Clinton Street, just south of Broad Street, into 63 one- and two-bedroom apartment units that will rent for $1,000 to $1,600 a month.

"There has been no new housing or rehabilitation in 15 to 20 years, and we are convinced that there are a lot of people who want to live near where their jobs are," Mr. Regan said.

"The cultural amenities of the city could produce a live-work neighborhood, and that could lead to more restaurants and retail amenities on the commercial side."

Matrix Development, which had largely been an industrial developer in the state's midsection, is planning a mixed-use development, including 400 to 500 housing units, stores, a hotel and possibly an office building along the Passaic River.

Richard F. X. Johnson, the company's senior vice president for development, said the residential and retailing components would be built first, with the units becoming available in the fall of 2005.

He said communities upstream were working to clean up the contaminated Passaic River, which was the area's main transportation link before the 19th century. A riverfront park is being built north of the Matrix development and water events like rowing competitions are planned in the area.

Mr. Johnson said the developers of the individual projects were working together to create an attractive community that would benefit them all.

"It is not enough for us to be successful," he said. "Arthur has to be successful and the others as well if this is going to work."

Not everything is rosy, of course. For one thing, the public schools are widely seen as struggling to provide an adequate education for the city's children. That situation will probably have a lot to do with the types of people who might be interested in living downtown, said James W. Hughes, dean of the Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy at Rutgers.

"The market will be for people in the pre- and post-children phases," he said. "The maturing baby boomers are 57 this year and that means lots of empty nesters. And the echo boomers are 20-somethings interested in an urban lifestyle."

In addition, he said, the efforts to prevent the sprawl of housing over the countryside in the state are beginning to work, redirecting development back into cities. "There is a basic shift on housing," he said. "This may be part of that."


Copyright 2003 The New York Times Company

Gulcrapek
November 29th, 2003, 11:45 AM
Living in the former store looks like it could be awesome. Gigantic windows.

NYatKNIGHT
December 12th, 2003, 03:31 PM
Phase I of the Newark light rail is now under construction. Phase I is the tunnel segment that connects the Newark City Subway to street level near the NJ Performing Arts Center.

http://galleries.soaringtowers.org/albums/NYatKNIGHT/NERL3.sized.jpg

http://galleries.soaringtowers.org/albums/NYatKNIGHT/NERL2.sized.jpg

http://galleries.soaringtowers.org/albums/NYatKNIGHT/NERL1.sized.jpg

http://galleries.soaringtowers.org/albums/NYatKNIGHT/NERL4.sized.jpg

TLOZ Link5
December 12th, 2003, 04:43 PM
Wonderful news! Is there a site detailing the entire proposed system?

All I've found so far is this transit map of the metro area:

http://www.columbia.edu/%7Ebrennan/subway/SubwayMap.gif

It's a biiiiig file, but it includes the subway, MetroNorth, LIRR, Amtrak, NJ Transit, both AirTrains, PATH, Newark City Subway, Hudson-Bergen, lines that are under construction, and major ferry routes. Very informative, and it is updated regularly.

z22
December 13th, 2003, 01:38 PM
Official sites:

http://www.njtransit.com/an_capitalprojects_project005.shtm
http://www.njtransit.com/an_capitalprojects_newark_brochure.shtm
http://www.state.nj.us/transportation/commuter/route21/overview.htm

krulltime
December 18th, 2003, 01:08 AM
This is really what Newark needs. Cities tend to do better with good rail transit transportation. :D

Kris
May 22nd, 2004, 02:32 PM
This is the first I've heard of this, if anyone's got more info please post

Newark's Waterfront http://www.nelessen.org/framep.htm

Where the heck did this come from?!

JCDJ
May 23rd, 2004, 12:08 AM
Oh, thanx :D

NYatKNIGHT
June 4th, 2004, 02:24 PM
http://galleries.soaringtowers.org/albums/NYatKNIGHT/Newark.sized.jpg

The Cathedral Basilica of the Sacred Heart is a huge, Gothic Cathedral seen from Branch Brook Park, another park by Olmstead and Vaux. Branch Brook Park boasts more cherry blossoms than the Tidal Basin in Washington D.C.

NYguy
June 9th, 2004, 03:30 PM
Phase I of the Newark light rail is now under construction. Phase I is the tunnel segment that connects the Newark City Subway to street level near the NJ Performing Arts Center.


This is actually more of an extension of the Newark subway (same system, same cars) and is the key link between Broad St (Lackawana) station and Penn Station. Its basically the same as the Jersey City/Bayonne light rail, and eventually all will be connected...

NYguy
June 9th, 2004, 04:19 PM
Work has steadily been progressing on the Newark waterfront promenade...

http://www.nan.usace.army.mil/business/prjlinks/flooding/minish/archive/sept02/pourl.jpg

Installation of concrete formwork in preparation of concrete pour


http://www.nan.usace.army.mil/business/prjlinks/flooding/minish/archive/sept02/burlapl.jpg

Dewatered cofferdam area and concrete curing with burlap cover


http://www.nan.usace.army.mil/business/prjlinks/flooding/minish/archive/sept02/pennl.jpg

Recently completed bulkhead looking south towards Penn Station



http://pps.org/newark/images/dzn_images/eandk_option7d.jpg


http://pps.org/newark/images/dzn_images/eandk_option7b.jpg


http://pps.org/newark/images/dzn_images/eandk_option6_lg.jpg

Ninjahedge
June 10th, 2004, 09:00 AM
Now comes the hard part in Urban Renewal for Newark.

Gettin all them poor people out of there!

;)

Kris
June 24th, 2004, 09:58 PM
As Jersey City has more than gotten it's act together to compete with Manhattan, Newark, New Jersey's biggest city is virtually a waste land.
While there are some old skyscrapers reminicent of a better day it would seem that nothing is planned to be built. The performing arts center is a plus but quite honestly if it weren't for Newark Liberty Airport, Newark would be about as important as Kalamazoo, Michigan is for to great Metropolis.
What gives Newark?

Kris
June 28th, 2004, 09:35 AM
Newark's classic example

Courthouse is set to show off again

Monday, June 28, 2004

BY NIKITA STEWART
Star-Ledger Staff

More than 100 years ago, Essex County -- then one of the nation's wealthiest and most powerful counties -- wanted something to show off.

Across the country, governments were erecting state capitols, city halls and courthouses designed with elegance and grandeur. Marble stairways, bronze sculptures and colossal Corinthian columns were the standard.

Essex County would not be left out and spared no expense to construct a courthouse envisioned as the showcase for modern artisans.

Cass Gilbert, who would later design the Woolworth Building in Manhattan and the U.S. Supreme Court Building in Washington, D.C., was the architect. He brought along other artisans who were part of a movement to beautify cities through neo-Classical architecture -- a merge of styles from Greek, Roman and Renaissance cultures.

Sculptor Gutzon Borglum, who would later carve the faces of four presidents into Mount Rushmore, created a statue of President Abraham Lincoln to sit on the courthouse steps. Louis Comfort Tiffany designed the glasswork.

The $2 million building -- an expensive venture at the time -- opened in 1906 to rave reviews.

Now, after years of disrepair, neglect and legal wrangling, the building is returning to its grandeur.

The county will unveil its $49 million restoration of the old Essex County Courthouse, located in Newark at the intersection of Market Street and Springfield Avenue, by the end of the year.

"This courthouse is the centerpiece of Essex County," Joseph DiVincenzo, the county executive, said during a recent sneak-peek tour of the renovation.

Newark historian Charles Cummings credits DiVincenzo with pushing the completion of the restoration.

"We will never have another building like that. Never. Even if we had the money, because of the craftsmanship, the skill," he said. "It's a spectacular building that represented the best of the Golden Era."

The restoration has been 14 years in the making, spurred by a lawsuit against the county by the Essex County Bar Association in 1990. The group of lawyers claimed the building was so dilapidated that it endangered the health and safety of its members.

Superior Court Judge Robert Passero, the Passaic County assignment judge who presided over the case, ordered the building restored to its condition of 1929 -- the last year the county made significant renovations.

The courthouse, which was shut down in 1997 for the restoration, will be used for civil court when it reopens. Last year, DiVincenzo announced that the county needed more time and more money to complete the project, but said it was one of his top priorities.

For historians, architects and conservators, refurbishing the courthouse has been lovely labor, especially since Gilbert -- whose work fell out of favor as architecture became more modern -- is seeing a resurgence.

"Cass Gilbert. I mean, Cass Gilbert. What can I say?" Audrey Malachowsky, a conservator working on the building, said gushing like a groupie talking about a rock star.

Malachowsky is part of a 17-member crew from EverGreene Painting Studios of Manhattan meticulously restoring the murals, decorative canvases and woodwork.

Every courtroom is unique -- 10 different designs and artwork, which is being carefully mended to make sure that the original paintings are unchanged.

Using chemically mixed paint to match the period, EverGreene puts varnish over the paintings before touching them up so historians will know "100 years from now" what was done by the original artists and what was done by the restoration firm, said Nancy Barnett, EverGreene's supervisor of the courthouse project.

Architect Michael Mills, who has been on the job since 1990, must make sure all new construction fits Gilbert's original design. He said his firm scoured the New York Historical Society for Gilbert's drawings before creating its own.

The county wanted an extra courtroom so Mills' firm, Ford, Farewell, Mills & Gatsch Architects in Princeton, designed an 11th, with the idea that it would look just like an original courtroom across a hall.

Mills said he has to admit the new courtroom is the lesser of the two. The original, which sits on the first floor, has walls of walnut and wood moldings with egg and dart designs, rosettes and Egyptian lotus motifs.

The wood paneling in the new courtroom rises just 7 feet and there is no intricate woodwork.

"Someone coming in the building will know it wasn't a Cass Gilbert design," Mills said, adding that his firm had to be cost-effective.

That wasn't always the case 100 years ago. Before the courthouse was built, county residents protested when officials announced much of the building would be limestone. About 300 people signed a petition to force the use of marble.

Gilbert also had the advantage of skilled artisans and craftsmen who were immigrating at the time, said Barbara Christen, a Cass Gilbert scholar.

"Tradesmen came off the boat from Italy," said Christen, who edited "Cass Gilbert, Life and Work: Architect of the Public Domain." "They knew how to cut stone, how to lay it, mosaic work."

The immigration wave coincided with the "City Beautiful" movement -- a trend that began in the 1890s toward urban planning and cleaning up cities through open space and majestic architecture. Gilbert was one of the stars in the movement.

But the architect -- appointed chairman of the Council of Fine Arts by President Theodore Roosevelt and reappointed by President Woodrow Wilson -- began losing his clout in the 1930s.

The German Bauhaus architecture movement, which abandoned neo-Classicism and introduced modernism through steel, glass and straight lines, spread throughout the country, leading to the rise of Frank Lloyd Wright and others.

Gilbert's most famous work, the U.S. Supreme Court building, was not praised at the time. He completed the design in 1929 but died in 1934 before the building was completed the next year.

But now Gilbert is back in fashion. In 1997, a group of architects and others formed the Cass Gilbert Society that now boasts 150 members who promote and recall his contributions.

"I think Cass Gilbert always was a great architect, but he may have been taken for granted because he did so many important buildings," Mills said. "It was very fortunate for Essex that they got the renowned architect of the time."

Nikita Stewart covers Essex County government. She can be reached at nstewart@starledger.com or (973) 392-1766.

Copyright 2004 NJ.com

TLOZ Link5
January 3rd, 2006, 05:10 PM
Jan. 02, 2006

Investors bank on Newark rebirth

By Janet Frankston
Associated Press

NEWARK, N.J. - Given that Jersey City and Hoboken have become alternatives to Manhattan as havens for the hip and trendy, some New York developers are banking on downtown Newark as the next place for upscale housing.

The latest attempt to accelerate Newark's long-awaited renaissance is the rehabilitation of an art deco building at 1180 Raymond Blvd., blocks from Newark Penn Station and the New Jersey Performing Arts Center.

Arthur Stern, chief executive officer of the Cogswell Realty Group, hopes to lure tenants with amenities that include valet parking, an 8,000-square-foot health club, a basketball court, and a bowling alley. The 37-story former office building will have 317 apartments.

But whether there is a market is "the $100 million question," Stern said.

The housing boom that has hit other North Jersey cities has bypassed Newark.

"I don't know why it hasn't happened already," said Linda Epps, president and chief executive officer of the New Jersey Historical Society. "The revitalization effort has taken far too long."

The state's largest city struggles with an image as a poor, crime-ridden, unsafe place, a legacy of the riots of 1967.

Slow to recover

"I am surprised it has taken a full generation and then some since the 1967 riots for the city to have the kind of momentum it seems it has now in its downtown corridor," said Clement Alexander Price, a professor of history at Rutgers University-Newark.

The dense downtown and the transportation network are an urban planner's dream.

NJ Transit and PATH funnel commuters into Newark Penn Station. A transit system expected to open in the summer would connect the Penn and Broad Street stations, the New Jersey Performing Arts Center, a riverfront stadium, and other sites. Newark Liberty International Airport is about five miles from downtown.

The arts center opened in 1997, and a few upscale restaurants have followed. In October, Newark and the New Jersey Devils broke ground on a $310 million, 18,000-seat arena scheduled to open in 2007.

Nevertheless, for some the perception of Newark hasn't changed. "The riots just scared everyone away from this place," said Epps, who lives and works downtown.

$200 million push

Mayor Sharpe James said that was changing, and Stern said, "Newark is safe, vibrant and making a comeback."

Stern said his impression of Newark had changed since his first visit in late 1997, when he expected to be carjacked.

His company has invested more than $200 million in the city, buying about six acres bordering Military Park for 3,000 rental units that it plans to build in the next 10 years.

The Raymond Boulevard building, which it bought eight years ago, has been gutted and fixed up with 1,441 new windows, high-speed Internet and cable lines, and four new elevators.

Rent will range from $1,175 per month for a 665-square-foot studio to $2,300 for a two bedroom of about 1,000 square feet.

The first tenants are expected to move in July 1.

One of them, Kevin Ledig, 28, will move from an apartment near the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, where his wife is a student. Ledig said living in Manhattan near his job wasn't an option.

"The rents are ridiculous for shoe boxes," he said, adding that the commute to work was easy. "I saw a lot of potential" in Newark.

But to convince others, developers needed to offer more than a good deal, said John McIlwain, a senior fellow for housing at the Urban Land Institute.

Newark attracts urban professionals like Haley Peele, 25, who got to know the city as a student at the Rutgers campus.

She pays $915 a month for a downtown second-floor walk-up studio apartment. "It's not so rough," she said. "It's kind of like a city that's trapped in the '50s, and I think that's charming."

© 2006 Philadelphia Inquirer and wire service sources. All Rights Reserved.

http://www.philly.com

macmini
February 27th, 2006, 12:48 PM
Sorry I read part of the article from one site that said Newark, NJ and posted from the link from the full article that I didn't read. My bad!!!! :(

Dagrecco82
February 27th, 2006, 02:01 PM
^^^ I think they meant Newark, California.

Dagrecco82
March 11th, 2006, 05:52 PM
Here's a few photos of the development going on in downtown Newark.

The site of the Devil's Arena.
http://img151.imageshack.us/img151/5858/img03642qz.jpg


Advertisement for 1180 Raymond Boulevard, which is undergoing an $80,000,000 conversion to residential and retail use.
http://img65.imageshack.us/img65/7928/img0406medium2ok.jpg


Worker powerwashing the grime off beautiful art deco details.
http://img65.imageshack.us/img65/6951/img0407large9vp.jpg


Construction of 2 of several lightrail stops. The first is of a stop in front
of the Verizon building on Broad St and the second one is the NJPAC stop.
This will be the last stop and the lightrail goes underground
further up to connect with Newark Penn Station.
http://img113.imageshack.us/img113/1361/img0419medium1kr.jpg

http://img113.imageshack.us/img113/7484/img0417medium3rk.jpg

JCMAN320
March 11th, 2006, 05:57 PM
Actually that is the Newark Subway system. This an extension of it. The mainline goes underground quite a ways and later comes above ground deeper in Newark by Branch Brook Park and then into Bellville. Great pics by the way.

Dagrecco82
March 11th, 2006, 06:01 PM
Thanks! Lightrail just has a nicer tone to it. :p

Dagrecco82
March 11th, 2006, 09:36 PM
Here are some shots of the downtown area of Newark and surrounding areas.

http://img87.imageshack.us/img87/4275/img03515vy.jpg

The Prudential Building

http://img62.imageshack.us/img62/3589/img03524tg.jpg

153 Halsey Street

http://img52.imageshack.us/img52/723/img0355large5cf.jpg

http://img215.imageshack.us/img215/6255/img0356large3bb.jpg

County courthouse with Gutzon Borglum 's statue of Lincoln in front.

http://img240.imageshack.us/img240/6628/img0357large5zf.jpg


http://img149.imageshack.us/img149/4224/img0361large2ta.jpg


114-116 Market Street. Most refer to it as the Jukebox building.
Handsome building in despair.

http://img101.imageshack.us/img101/1570/img0363custom0jr.jpg

First Presbyterian Church 1791

http://img116.imageshack.us/img116/6993/img03654kp.jpg

First State National Bank
http://img72.imageshack.us/img72/1378/img0366large6jc.jpg

Firemen's Insurance Building

http://img72.imageshack.us/img72/2802/img03684di.jpg

ablarc
March 11th, 2006, 09:52 PM
http://img240.imageshack.us/img240/6628/img0357large5zf.jpg
That is one really good statue.

Borglum was OK, Rushmore not a fluke.

JCMAN320
March 12th, 2006, 04:04 AM
Newark has great architecture and parks, these pics put it on display beautifully and these are just a small sampling of the beautiful architecture there. With the new Arena hosting various events such as the Devils and Seton Hall BAsketball, circus, concerts etc.., NJPAC, Newark Bears Stadium, subway extension, and the refurbishing of the surrounding buildings that has already started, this will help to bring Newark back to it's former glory. It may be hard to believe for some of you New Yorkers, but the intersection of Broad and Market was BUSIER than Time Square and was the busiest intersection in the world. Had more cars and people going through there per hour than any other intersection at the world and this was through the 20s-40s. Newark was once a great alternative to NYC for a night out and the people that would perfrom in Newark were the same headliners that would be in NYC. I mean Newark once had the population in the 40s-50s of 450,000. A little less than currently in Boston, thats how popular Newark was. Than after the riots it was down hill. But Newark will be back and along with it's come back and Jersey City's already having made a strong comeback, NYC will be given a run for its money.

JerzResident
March 12th, 2006, 12:14 PM
Newark has great architecture and parks, these pics put it on display beautifully and these are just a small sampling of the beautiful architecture there. With the new Arena hosting various events such as the Devils and Seton Hall BAsketball, circus, concerts etc.., NJPAC, Newark Bears Stadium, subway extension, and the refurbishing of the surrounding buildings that has already started, this will help to bring Newark back to it's former glory. It may be hard to believe for some of you New Yorkers, but the intersection of Broad and Market was BUSIER than Time Square and was the busiest intersection in the world. Had more cars and people going through there per hour than any other intersection at the world and this was through the 20s-40s. Newark was once a great alternative to NYC for a night out and the people that would perfrom in Newark were the same headliners that would be in NYC. I mean Newark once had the population in the 40s-50s of 450,00. A little less than currently in Boston, thats how popular Newark was. Than after the riots it was down hill. But Newark will be back and along with it's come back and Jersey City's already having made a strong comeback, NYC will be given a run for its money.

I agree, I see the changes going on in the downtown area and its amazing and Jersey City is simply a burgeoning city ready to take over. I attend New Jersey City University and Im downtown all the time. Its become a mini manhattan over there. People dont realize Wall Street is moving to Jersey City and Newark is already one of the top Insurance towns in the world. Me being born and raised in East Orange I'm very proud of what I am seeing

Dagrecco82
March 12th, 2006, 12:25 PM
^^^ I agree! Here's more pics...
I had Newark Cops chase me away after taking some of these.
I guess they thought I was a threat. :rolleyes:

http://img126.imageshack.us/img126/3199/img0369large2hu.jpg

Gatewat III & IV

http://img130.imageshack.us/img130/8264/img03700my.jpg

Gateway IV

http://img130.imageshack.us/img130/5752/img03724su.jpg

Newark Legal Center

http://img90.imageshack.us/img90/5471/img0387large8dj.jpg

http://img137.imageshack.us/img137/5823/img0390large2os.jpg

Newark Penn Station

http://img390.imageshack.us/img390/9290/img0376large7ty.jpg

http://img390.imageshack.us/img390/212/img0380large8dh.jpg

http://img390.imageshack.us/img390/6745/img0382large4to.jpg


http://img232.imageshack.us/img232/9817/img0386large8xz.jpg

JerzResident
March 12th, 2006, 01:07 PM
Your pictures are great Dagrecoo, keep em coming:)

Dagrecco82
March 12th, 2006, 07:51 PM
Here's some more...

One Newark Center
http://img299.imageshack.us/img299/5460/img0389large1cq.jpg


Scales of Justice Fountain at One Newark Center

http://img157.imageshack.us/img157/2474/img0394large3zj.jpg


http://img147.imageshack.us/img147/1429/img0397large9vj.jpg







National Newark Building and 1180 Raymond Boulevard undergoing
renovation.
http://img147.imageshack.us/img147/8223/img0398large2tz.jpg

http://img147.imageshack.us/img147/3451/img0400large9kl.jpg


Military Park Building
http://img157.imageshack.us/img157/5782/img0403large0ol.jpg


80 Park Plaza with reflection of Military Building

http://img107.imageshack.us/img107/6726/img0404large9eh.jpg

Prudential Plaza Building

http://img107.imageshack.us/img107/1176/img0414large0ef.jpg

NJPAC
I hope everyone enjoyed them :)

http://img221.imageshack.us/img221/6186/img0418large1gv.jpg

ablarc
March 12th, 2006, 08:21 PM
Need to import some people.

JerzResident
March 12th, 2006, 08:35 PM
I always thought that little area by the PSEG building can be a mini rockerfella plaza, the huge fountain resembles the skating rink, they gotta do something about the carlton motel though

Kris
March 14th, 2006, 11:04 AM
Pavilion and Colonnade Apartments by Mies van der Rohe, 1960 (http://www.archnewsnow.com/features/Feature189.htm)

NYatKNIGHT
March 14th, 2006, 04:28 PM
Actually that is the Newark Subway system. This an extension of it. The mainline goes underground quite a ways and later comes above ground deeper in Newark by Branch Brook Park and then into Bellville. Great pics by the way.It is an extension of sorts, but the Light Rail is its own project called the Newark-Elizabeth Rail Link. What they have in common is they both terminate at Penn Station, and the City Subway has upgraded to the technology that was initially proposed for the Light Rail.
The Light Rail was originally intended to head south to Elizabeth all the way to the port terminals, but that's on hold for now.

Nice photos.That McKim, Mead, and White waiting room at Penn Station is sensational.

JCMAN320
March 16th, 2006, 12:33 AM
NJPAC unveils plan for high-rise development

The New Jersey Performing Arts Center unveiled plans today for a high-rise development across Center Street in downtown Newark. The first major expansion since the arts center opened in 1997, the high-rise would feature at least 250 residential units - including 50 reserved for performing and visual artists - 30,000-square feet of street-level retail and structured parking for 700 cars.

“This is a complicated project in an untested market, but it’s time for Newark to have a 24/7 downtown,” Lawrence P. Goldman, NJPAC’s president and CEO, said.

The project, to be known as Two Center Street, will be built on 1.2 acres between Park and Mulberry streets, across from the arts center’s entrance. The land now features a two-story building and parking lot. There are two more planned developments on the art center’s 16-acre footprint.

NJPAC hopes to select a developer for the $100 million-plus building by the end of this year, and to open the site in 2010. NJPAC has already invested $2.5 million in the preliminary stages of the effort, which was first detailed in its master plan in 1988.

Built with $185 million from public and private sources, NJPAC features the multi-use 2,750-seat Prudential Hall and the 514-seat Victoria Theater. In its first eight seasons, the venue has attracted more than 4 million people to classical and pop concerts, dance, theater and jazz programs.

Contributed by Peggy McGlone

Kris
March 16th, 2006, 04:36 AM
March 16, 2006
Arts Center Has a Plan to Help Newark Revive
By RONALD SMOTHERS

http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2006/03/16/nyregion/16newark1.583.jpg
A rendering of a housing and retail complex costing more than $100 million, proposed for land across the street from the New Jersey Performing Arts Center.

http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2006/03/16/nyregion/16newark2.650.jpg
Lawrence P. Goldman, chief executive of the New Jersey Performing Arts Center, said that "no city can be great without downtown housing."

NEWARK, March 15 — For nearly 40 years, Newark has been trying to fight its way back from the riots of the 1960's and a generation in which people and businesses spilled out of the city to the suburbs on the highways that crisscross it.

In fits and starts over the last decade, residents have seen some progress in rebuilding the state's largest city: a minor league ballpark, the start of construction on a new hockey arena for the New Jersey Devils, the addition of the New Jersey Performing Arts Center.

But the benefits, like jobs and tax revenues, have not been obvious, and the urban ills of poverty, high crime, gang violence and substandard housing have persisted. To many, a sense of excitement may not have caught on, and they question whether Newark has actually turned a corner.

Now civic leaders and city officials are hoping to give the city another little push toward revival, this time pinning their hopes on the performing arts center.

Built nine years ago, at a cost of $187 million, the center has been a surprise success story, drawing both crowds and interest, and serving as an effective good-will ambassador for downtown Newark.

On Wednesday, Lawrence P. Goldman, the president and chief executive of the arts center, announced a plan to expand both the scope and presence of the complex, in the hopes that it will transform that part of Newark into a haven for artists and art lovers.

The center is seeking developers interested in becoming a partner in the construction of 250 units of mostly market-rate housing and street-level retail space on a plot of land it owns across the street from the red-brick-and-glass building that houses its concert hall and theater and restaurant complexes.

Mr. Goldman said the proposed housing towers, like the performing arts center, would look out over the Passaic River and form a southern boundary to an area now envisioned as a "theater square."

Under the plan, 20 percent of the apartments would be set aside for artists with modest incomes, Mr. Goldman said; the rest would be market-rate rentals. The project involves the first new residential construction in downtown Newark in a generation, he said.

The project is necessary, he said in an interview, "because no city can be great without downtown housing."

If the project gets off the ground, it will be only the latest residential development downtown. Public and private partners are also creating 324 housing units in a former office building, and Rutgers University is building a dorm for its Newark campus a block away from the arts center.

In nearby neighborhoods, Mr. Goldman said, town houses and two-family homes are sprouting on vacant lots where for years there had been only wildflowers and tall grass.

"Urban transformation has always been in the performing arts center's DNA," Mr. Goldman said. "Now we want to ride the wave and amplify the wave of what is happening in Newark."

The cost is estimated at more than $100 million, and most of it would be privately financed, but the center will probably seek some public money to help defray the cost of an underground parking garage. Mr. Goldman said he was confident that public money would be found.

He has some experience in this kind of project. Before coming to Newark, he was the vice president of Carnegie Hall, and he promoted its expansion into housing and office space. The Carnegie Hall Tower includes a mini artists colony in Midtown and has generated considerable income for Carnegie Hall.

Newark is not the only urban area to pin its revival hopes on an arts institution. Cleveland, Pittsburgh and Brooklyn — around the Brooklyn Academy of Music — and myriad smaller struggling cities have hoped to lure more artists and related businesses to their struggling downtowns.

Although arts institutions are important, said Michael D. Beyard, a senior fellow at the Urban Land Institute, they alone are not a "silver bullet" against urban blight. "If an arts institution is lucky," he said, "they do not have to take much action after they are built, and the private sector will do the heavy lifting of revitalization. But that is the exception and not the rule. Many downtowns have declined so far that to recreate the market is not easy."

But Arthur Stern, the chief executive of the Cogswell Realty Group, said he saw other signs that Newark was ripe for revival. His company has already staked more than $200 million on efforts to rebuild the city, including the purchase and renovation of the city's tallest building, a historic office tower. The building, at 744 Broad Street, which reopened in 1999, is nearly full and includes a Starbucks on the ground floor. The company is also completing the renovation of a 28-story Art Deco office tower into 324 units of market-rate housing, with health clubs and a bowling alley for tenants.

Mr. Goldman said that the performing arts center would seek proposals from several dozen developers with experience in urban settings. Arthur F. Ryan, chairman and chief executive of Prudential Financial, who is co-chairman of the center's board, said the company that was chosen would have to share the center's commitment to "artistic excellence, opportunity for all and racial diversity."

The performing arts center has attracted more than four million people to performances in the nine years it has been open, said Mr. Goldman, who called it an artistic success. Consequently, he said, now was the right time to make the foray into housing.

The planned housing will not provide anywhere near the income for the center that Carnegie Hall's office tower has, he said. But he noted that the Newark center owns another nearby parcel, which it would seek to develop next.

Copyright 2006 The New York Times Company

Dagrecco82
March 21st, 2006, 12:26 PM
Here's the website for the newly renovated 1180 Raymond Boulevard. I got myself on the VIP list to preview the apartments so I'm going this weekend. The amenities this building is offering are private lounge, four-lane bowling alley, bastketball court, private health club, and 24-hour valet parking, to name just a few. I'm guesing they are really counting on this building to rejuvenate Newark's downtown. I can't wait :D


www.eleven80newark.com (http://www.eleven80newark.com)

macmini
March 22nd, 2006, 01:42 PM
NEWARK'S NEW LOOK
March 18, 2006

http://www.nypost.com/photos/re03182006040.jpg
By ADAM BONISLAWSKI

GREEN GIANT: The Mulberry Street Promenade will include condos and shops. -- Welcome to brand Newark, a city that's gone from urban blight to pure possibility

It didn't take GLC Group principals Mark Caller and Pinny Loketch long to figure out that they'd hit upon a good thing with their plan to renovate Newark's Parc West building. Before their work on the six-story prewar structure across the street from 311-acre Weequahic Park was even complete, a number of locals had already stopped by to inquire about purchasing an apartment.

"We were approached many times by people in the neighborhood just passing by who'd been watching the renovations and wanted to know about buying a unit in the building," Caller says.

It's the sort of story a person would expect from Manhattan's ever-booming real-estate scene, but Newark? A hot property? Really?

Increasingly, the answer is yes. While for many tristate residents the city has long been synonymous with urban blight, the last few years have seen the area's renewal kick into full swing.

"Five years ago there wasn't a chance that we'd even consider selling apartments here," Caller says. "It was hard enough just running rental properties.

"But I've seen the city change right in front of my eyes just over the last few years. ... You see new homes going up on every single block in Newark."

The Parc West's 44 one-, two- and three-bedroom apartments went to market in late February, with prices ranging from $99,000 to $279,819. Over half the units were reserved in one week.

Among these buyers was Rahway, N.J., resident Dennis Wilks, who, like Caller and Loketch, senses that the city is on the rebound.

"I've known Newark practically my whole life," he says, "and I thought that this would be a good time to buy, because the city is up-and-coming. ... Crime has been going down. People are coming back to invest in the city."

Wilks was also drawn by the Parc West's old-time charms. As Caller notes, efforts were made to play up the building's prewar amenities by restoring original moldings and wood-floor detailing - and preserving the building's Tudor exterior, 1929 elevator lobby and marble staircase.

"It reminds me of some of your old condos in New York City," says Wilks, who bought a Parc West one-bedroom.

Being right across from Weequahic Park doesn't hurt, either. Stocked with tennis courts, a golf course and an 80-acre lake, the park - designed in 1901 by the firm of Central Park planner Frederick Law Olmsted - is no doubt a draw.

Katherine Gray, who, with her husband, James, recently reserved a one-bedroom in the Parc West, remembers the spot from her school days just down the street at Weequahic High.
"I'm dating myself, but I remember when they used to run trotters in the park," she says. "There used to be a big clubhouse there, and people would sit and watch the horses run around the track."

Having lived in Newark for much of her life, Gray has seen many stages of the city's transformation.

"There's been a remarkable change compared to five years ago," she says. "Then there was literally nothing. Now the city is really coming alive."

Ken Baris, president of real-estate firm Jordan Baris - sales representative for the Parc West - has gotten a first-hand look at Newark's revitalization through his involvement with Summit Real Estate Developers' Southwyck Estates project in the South Ward.

A phased development consisting primarily of two-family homes, the project has sold more than 100 units since 2001, with roughly 50 more presently under contract and another 44 having recently come to market. Since the first homes went on sale about five years ago, prices have more than doubled, with units that initially started at $209,000 now selling for $399,900 to $459,900, "Back then, other developers didn't want to take the chance," Baris says. "We even had agents in the company saying that we were crazy for thinking we could get over $200,000 for these homes. But the reality was that the market was there."

It's a reality others are picking up on. Take, for instance, Matrix Development Group's plans for a $400 million mixed-use property on the Passaic River. When finished, the development will add 500 residences to downtown Newark.

Also downtown, the Mulberry Street Urban Renewal Company is looking to build on recent area additions, like the New Jersey Performing Arts Center, with a development called the Mulberry Street Promenade.

Current plans call for up to 2,200 market-rate condominiums and 180,000 square feet of restaurant, retail and office space to be built over 13 acres. Construction on the project's first phase is slated to begin this year, with roughly 100 one-, two- and three-bedroom units coming to market in late 2006.

A few blocks away by Military Park, Cogswell Real Estate Group is working to turn 1180 Raymond Blvd. and the former Hahnes department store and Griffith Piano Company buildings into high-end rental properties. At 1180 Raymond, 317 studio, one- and two-bedroom units are scheduled to hit the market July 1, with rents in the $1,300 to $3,500 range. The Hahnes and Griffith buildings, meanwhile, are being converted to 255 loft apartments that should be ready in 2007.
According to Cogswell CEO Arthur Stern, these two projects represent the start of the company's multi-phase plan to bring some 3,000 new rental and condo units to the western border of Military Park over the next 10 years.

Of course, however high the current upswing might carry it, Newark will never be New York. Caller does see it, though, becoming something of a bargain alternative for those turned off or forced out by Gotham's sky-high prices.

"In Brooklyn, for example, if you want to buy an apartment in a decent area, it's going to be more than double what it is in Newark," he says. "This is a nice urban setting, and for people who want that urban setting, they can have it here for half the price."

Scruffy88
March 27th, 2006, 11:59 PM
this is friggin awesome. this is totally not the Newark I grew up with and thats such a good thing. Mid 80s- early 90s. great stuff for Newark

stache
March 28th, 2006, 02:27 PM
Steel is going up for the stadium. Yesterday was the first day I noticed a sizeable amount of well dressed people East of Raymond on Broad in the afternoon.

kevin
March 30th, 2006, 07:30 PM
Here's the website for the newly renovated 1180 Raymond Boulevard. I got myself on the VIP list to preview the apartments so I'm going this weekend. The amenities this building is offering are private lounge, four-lane bowling alley, bastketball court, private health club, and 24-hour valet parking, to name just a few. I'm guesing they are really counting on this building to rejuvenate Newark's downtown. I can't wait :D


www.eleven80newark.com (http://www.eleven80newark.com) How did that go? My wife and I were among the first three leases to go out for 1180. We're so excited to move in. Seeing the models is like torture, because we have to wait until July. We currently live in those monstrosities, The Pavillion. What a dump compared to our future digs. :)

Dagrecco82
March 31st, 2006, 11:22 AM
I thought they did a remarkable job with that building, unfortunately, my significant other isn't too thrilled with area. So we'll see how that goes. Maybe I can do some persuasion.;)

Marv95
March 31st, 2006, 11:33 AM
The only thing wrong with that area is grafitti, not alot, but a little bit. I agree that they should do a better job of cleaning it up, especially when '07 comes around. Other than that, the area isn't bad at all, just the ususal city traffic and a good amount of suits walking by.

Dagrecco82
March 31st, 2006, 11:36 AM
The only thing wrong with that area is grafitti, not alot, but a little bit. I agree that they should do a better job of cleaning it up, especially when '07 comes around.

Definitely when the stadium opens. They should remember how important first impressions are to some people.

Marv95
March 31st, 2006, 11:55 AM
^^So did you take a tour of the place I assume? Any details to share? A bowling alley and health club sounds cool; much better than Colonades, Pavillion, or Hallmark House(which isn't bad at all).

Dagrecco82
March 31st, 2006, 02:23 PM
The models are beautiful. They really are going full force with this building. Marble bathrooms, washer and dryer included, nice large closets, and kitchens are nicely done ( granite countertops and stainless steel appliances). I was more in awe at the views! Sacred Heart Cathedral to the west with Branch Brook Park and the NYC skyline to the east. Absolutely WONDERFUL!

stache
April 30th, 2006, 05:47 PM
They put up a model in Gateway Plaza for a new tower directly east of the Gateway center. It would replace a parking lot. Sorry I don't have a photo but it looks pretty nice, green glass, maybe 20 foors.

NYatKNIGHT
May 1st, 2006, 01:33 PM
That model has been nearby in the Gateway casueways for at least five years. I noticed they put it next to the Devils Arena model but I assumed that was just for convenience.

stache
May 2nd, 2006, 01:16 AM
Thanks NY, I had not noticed it before. : )

JCMAN320
May 31st, 2006, 11:34 PM
Newark set to sell historic site
Ballantine building, home of Science High, would be razed for Shaq's condo project

Wednesday, May 31, 2006
BY KASI ADDISON AND JEFFERY C. MAYS
Star-Ledger Staff

Another piece of Newark's history may fall victim to a wrecking ball in the name of redevelopment.

Once known as Malt House Number 3, the oldest remaining structure from the Peter Ballantine & Sons Ale Brewery in Newark has been home to Science High School for 23 years.

But Science High, one of the city's magnet schools, is scheduled to move into a new building on Norfolk Street in September. School officials were hoping they'd be able to keep renting the 146-year-old structure from the city for $1 a year and open another magnet program, American History High School, there.

Plans have changed.

A company owned by NBA star and Newark native Shaquille O'Neal wants to buy and demolish the historic school building at 40 Rector St., in the Central Ward, and build a luxury high-rise condominium complex.

The city is ready to sell -- at far below market value.

Today, the City Council will consider a resolution authorizing the sale of the property for $2.75 million. The building and land on which it sits have a combined market value of $6.5 million, according to city records.

Newark Business Administrator Richard Monteilh said the city is not receiving any tax revenue from the land or building. The condo project, he said, is in line with Newark's efforts to put vacant land and abandoned properties back on the tax rolls.

Wayne Garnes, who represents 36-54 Rector LLC, a company in which O'Neal is a principal, said that once the school building is demolished, a mixed-use condominium and retail project, called "One River View at Rector," will be built on the site.

"Both of these are signature projects for Shaquille. He's trying to do a nice job," Garnes said, referring to Science High and another residential project that O'Neal is backing on Springfield Avenue. "It's a fantastic project for the city."

Newark Schools Superintendent Marion Bolden wants the Science High building maintained as a school.

"It's not like we have buildings in our back pocket," she said. "I have overcrowding all over the district. A high school building is hard to find in this city."

The New Jersey Historical Society, Rutgers-Newark and the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History have been working with Bolden to establish the American History High School, which would incorporate history into literature, math and science classes.

"History is very undervalued in schools by students. This allows students to learn in a different way and gives teachers a chance to teach in a different way," said Clau dia Ocello, director of programs and exhibitions at the state historical society.

Because the district is facing a $65 million shortfall and the state is cutting aid, it's unlikely the district will be able to come up with the $500,000 to $700,000 needed to fund the new project this year, Bolden said.

But even if funding becomes available, it won't matter if the city sells the property, she said.

"With every passing day, it looks less likely an American History High School will open this year," Bolden said.

With all the financial problems the city and school district are fac ing, adding another school might not be a good idea, Monteilh said.

"The need for another major high school in Newark is something she has to work out with the state," Monteilh said, referring to Bolden. "We are looking for effi ciencies, not a plant expansion. Marion is an educator. This is a business decision."

The Science High building is the oldest and largest remaining structure from the Peter Ballantine & Sons Ale Brewery. Built in 1860, it was taken over by the former Dana College in 1933. When Dana College was absorbed by Rutgers University in 1945, the building was used as a chemistry lab. Essex County College leased the building for several years before the Newark Board of Education took it over in 1983.

Because the building is located in the Military Park Commons Historic District and has been listed on the state Register of Historic Places, the city needs state approval before it can sell it.

Darlene Yuhas, a spokeswoman for the state Department of Environmental Protection, said her agency had received no application from Newark yet.

Monteilh said council authorization to sell the building will allow the city to begin the process of get ting the necessary state approvals.

Douglas Eldridge, head of the Newark Preservation and Landmarks Committee, said his group opposes the demolition of the building because it is one of the most important buildings in the Military Park Commons Historic District.

Still, he said, the city should follow the necessary process if it wants to sell the building.

"We can't control the outcome, but we want it to get whatever review it's supposed to get. That's why historic districts were created," he said.

The city's historic preservationists already are trying to save another endangered building, the Mulberry Street firehouse, which made the list of Preservation New Jersey's 10 most endangered historic sites this year.

Plans call for the firehouse to be demolished so that Mulberry Street can be widened as part of a massive downtown redevelopment project, which includes construction of a new sports arena.

Glen Leiner, executive director of the Art Deco Society of New York, which conducts tours in Newark, said Science High is the most popular building on the tour, which includes Newark Penn Station and the city's subway.

"Newark has some real treasures, but this building is so visually rewarding that it's always the favorite," he said.

The multicolored terra cotta designs on the outside of the building have won the structure legions of fans, he said.

The loss of the building, he said, would "strip Newark of an architec tural treasure that is unique and strongly tied to the city's heritage."

TeddyJ
June 1st, 2006, 12:32 AM
Its good that Newark's own is investing back into the city but still, to tear a very historic site is robbing Newark's culture but I guess business is business.

STT757
June 1st, 2006, 12:05 PM
Newark light rail gains steam
Line will get in gear this summer
Thursday, June 01, 2006
BY RUDY LARINI
Star-Ledger Staff

Newark's light-rail city subway extension is almost ready to roll.

With equipment testing and crew training under way, the first passengers should be riding along the one-mile light-rail line from Newark Penn Station to NJ Transit's Broad Street Station by early summer, said Dan Stessel, a spokesman for NJ Transit, which will operate the line. He could not pinpoint the start of service any more precisely.

"We won't be ready to set a date until we get a little further along on the testing and training phase of that segment," he said.

The $207.7 million light-rail extension of Newark's city subway will enable passengers on NJ Transit's Montclair-Boonton and Morris & Essex rail lines to reach Newark Penn Station in 10 minutes or less without walking or taking a bus.

Combined with the renovation of the Broad Street Station and the widening of Route 21, the new line is expected to improve commuting to downtown Newark and its businesses and educational, recreational and cultural facilities.

Stessel said the line expects to attract 2,000 daily riders by the summer of 2007, with 3,550 riders a day by 2010. The existing subway line, which stretches through Newark from Penn Station to Branch Brook Park and two stations at Franklin Street in Belleville and Grove Street in Bloomfield, carries 18,450 passengers a day.

The new line has stations at the New Jersey Performing Arts Center and Bears & Eagles Stadium. There also is a station along Broad Street at Washington Park, close to the Newark Public Library and the Newark Museum, and another at Atlantic Street in the center of a growing business district.

Lawrence Goldman, president and chief executive of NJPAC, said the new line is expected to have a positive impact on the arts center.

"We're an urban arts center ... and this enhances our urbanity -- to have a mass transit stop right outside," he said. "It will make it easy to get here from all parts of New Jersey and New York."

Though the arts center is only a four-block walk from Penn Station, Goldman said the light-rail line will be especially valuable in inclement weather.

Those cold January nights, it would be nice not to have to walk outside and to arrive right at the arts center's doorstep," he said.

Goldman said he believes the new light-rail station also will facilitate NJPAC's plan to find a private development partner to build 250 apartments, 30,000 square feet of retail space and a 700-car parking garage on property directly across Center Street from the arts center.

"I believe the light rail will make the arts center's site very desirable for developers and residents who want an urban lifestyle," he said.

He cited the example of growth near subway stations in the outer boroughs of New York City.

"Everywhere there's a subway station, development happens around it," he said.

Jim Cerny, assistant general manager of the Newark Bears Atlantic League baseball team, also said the light rail would make it easier for patrons to attend games.

"We're excited to have the light rail right in front of the stadium," he said, noting the new station is right outside Gate C. "It could not be any better for us. We're very, very excited."

Five new light-rail cars were added to the existing subway fleet of 16 cars for the new line. Daily service on the extension will be offered from 6:04 a.m. to 12:13 a.m. weekdays and from 6:21 a.m. to 12:56 a.m. on weekends. On weekdays, trains will run every 10 minutes during peak periods and every 15 minutes during off-peak. Service will be every 30 minutes on weekends, timed to coincide with trains arriving at Broad Street from points west.

Stessel said the light-rail schedule also could be adjusted to ac commodate patrons of special events at NJPAC, the stadium or other facilities.

"If there's a need for additional service because of a particular event, we're fully prepared to adjust service accordingly," he said.

Initially, commuters who wish to ride both the new line and the existing city subway will have to change trains at Penn Station, though the system is designed to allow a train to continue through both lines.

"That's something we'll look at depending on what the usage pat terns are," he said.

The fare on the new line will be $1.25, the same as the existing subway, with $45 monthly passes allowing unlimited travel. NJ Transit customers with rail or bus passes worth more than $45 will be able to use the new line at no additional cost.

Cars along the extension will travel from Penn Station through a tunnel under Mulberry Street be fore reaching street level at McCarter Highway and Center Street.

The new line crosses Broad Street at two locations -- near the stadium on the way to the Broad Street Station and at Lombardy Street on the way back to Penn Station. There also are grade-level crossings on several smaller streets.

Stessel said NJ Transit engineers, over the course of several years of planning, used extensive computer simulations in working with city engineers to coordinate traffic signalization at the intersec tions of light-rail tracks and city streets.

The light-rail trains are driven by a motorman and powered by overhead catenary lines that Stes sel said have "a low profile."

"They have a very low visible impact on the city," he said.

NJ Transit also operates the Hudson-Bergen light-rail line from Bayonne to North Bergen in Hud son County and the 34-mile River Line between Camden and Tren ton in southern New Jersey.

There also are long-range plans for another light-rail line from Penn Station to Newark Liberty International Airport.

http://www.nj.com/news/ledger/jersey

kliq6
June 1st, 2006, 12:14 PM
was just out in Newark a feee weeks ago for a meeting the place is sure better then it was 10 years ago . Its a shame as this city, Not Jersey City should have been the place to get all those office moves from LM, but crime, corruption and other things killed it. I give Prudential alot of Credit, they never packed up

TeddyJ
June 1st, 2006, 03:44 PM
was just out in Newark a feee weeks ago for a meeting the place is sure better then it was 10 years ago . Its a shame as this city, Not Jersey City should have been the place to get all those office moves from LM, but crime, corruption and other things killed it. I give Prudential alot of Credit, they never packed up

right, prudential has always been loyal to newark

STT757
June 1st, 2006, 05:45 PM
Here's a view of the Newark Broad Street Light Rail Station, Broad Street Station which serve's NJ Transit's Mid-town Direct Montclair/Boonton, Morris/Essex, and Gladstone lines is on the right.

http://www.thecanteen.com/newspur01.jpg

Broad Street Light Rail platform.

http://www.thecanteen.com/newspur03.jpg

Washington Park Station

http://www.thecanteen.com/newspur11.jpg

Grade down to tunnel to Penn Station

http://www.thecanteen.com/newspur14.jpg

Dagrecco82
June 1st, 2006, 06:01 PM
^^^ great pics!

ryanov
June 2nd, 2006, 12:36 AM
I took an apartment in 1180 that I'll be moving into in August. Should be fun!

ryanov
June 2nd, 2006, 12:45 AM
How did that go? My wife and I were among the first three leases to go out for 1180. We're so excited to move in. Seeing the models is like torture, because we have to wait until July. We currently live in those monstrosities, The Pavillion. What a dump compared to our future digs. :)
I'm pissed that I waited a little longer than I should have to accept a lease. My rent is about $20-$30 more per month than it would have been. I live in the Pavilion right now too... it's not THAT bad, but this is certainly an upgrade.

G_Money
June 2nd, 2006, 08:33 AM
How does 1180 look. I work in downtown Newark and the convenience appeals to me. So do the features and ammenities. But 1400 for a studio in newark where there is nothing to do after the work day? I dunno, i think theyre too high. Does anyone have any rough idea how many agreements they have out?

I may just have to take a look at a model this weekend.

ryanov
June 2nd, 2006, 11:56 AM
They are pretty high, but for me it's very convenient. The appartment is beautiful and the amenities are great... and there is stuff to do in the building.

There are also bars in Newark -- Hamilton's is a decent one, and then the bars in the Portugese restaurants.

Hoboken is about as expensive to live... but my guess is you wouldn't go there everyday, and it's only a 20 min ride. <shrug> It all depends.

NYatKNIGHT
June 2nd, 2006, 03:56 PM
Inside the train station:

http://www.pbase.com/image/61195260.jpg

Dagrecco82
June 2nd, 2006, 04:01 PM
:D Wow!

ryanov
June 2nd, 2006, 04:07 PM
Where the hell is that taken from? The PATH ramp?

Dagrecco82
June 2nd, 2006, 04:09 PM
Yeah, how'd you get up there!?

NYatKNIGHT
June 2nd, 2006, 04:23 PM
When you get off the PATH, instead of going down the escalator you take the ramp to Tracks 3 and 4. This is from the top of that ramp, or maybe it's stairs, I forget. Yeah, there's a lot of "wow" in that station.

stache
June 2nd, 2006, 06:02 PM
Odd combination of Nouveau and Deco in that building.

JCMAN320
June 2nd, 2006, 06:15 PM
Thats wasup, Newark's Penn Station is an absolute gem. I'm so pleased at the way they have taken care of it.

Marv95
June 3rd, 2006, 10:58 AM
How does 1180 look. I work in downtown Newark and the convenience appeals to me. So do the features and ammenities. But 1400 for a studio in newark where there is nothing to do after the work day? I dunno, i think theyre too high. Does anyone have any rough idea how many agreements they have out?

I may just have to take a look at a model this weekend.

Expensive yes. But unlike other luxury apts in the area, this one offers alot: a bowling alley, fitness center, valet parking, lounge(for X-Box and Playstation), etc. And have you forgotten the NJPAC and Ironbound clubs and resturants? Don't forget about the new arena opening down the street(ONLY if Booker doesn't screw it up).

J Mintz
June 25th, 2006, 11:04 AM
I just came across and joined this site and I'm very impressed! I live right outside of Newark and am a Planning and Public Policy major at Rutgers-New Brunswick, so thus this whole thread is very interesting to me.
I noticed there was some mention of the Newark Light Rail here... well, the date has been set: (although I won't be around for opening day, it will be on my priority list for when I get back from Italy!)

NEWARK LIGHT RAIL SET TO OPEN JULY 17
http://www.njtransit.com/images/spacer.gif
Connects Newark’s two train stations through downtown district

June 22, 2006
NJT-06-084
Contact: Dan Stessel 973-491-7078
NEWARK, NJ — Newark Light Rail, an extension of the City’s subway system, will begin service on Monday, July 17, NJ TRANSIT Executive Director George D. Warrington announced this week at the corporation’s Board of Directors meeting.
The one-mile, light-rail extension will connect two of NJ TRANSIT’s busiest train stations — Newark Penn Station and Newark Broad Street Station — and support Newark’s economic rebirth along the waterfront and Broad Street. The project includes five new stations that will serve the New Jersey Performing Arts Center, Newark Bears & Eagles Riverfront Stadium, The Newark Museum and the Broad Street commercial district.

“This new connector is part of the revitalization and redevelopment efforts here in Newark, and we are pleased to be a partner with the City in serving as an engine and a catalyst for economic development,” Warrington said.
At Newark Penn Station, Newark Light Rail will connect with the Newark City Subway, which provides 17,900 trips on a typical weekday at 12 stations between Newark Penn Station and Grove Street Station in Bloomfield. For more information about destinations served by NJ TRANSIT, customers may visit www.njtransit.com (http://www.njtransit.com/) or call 1-800-772-2222.

ZippyTheChimp
June 25th, 2006, 01:41 PM
Inside the train station:

http://www.pbase.com/image/61195260.jpg
A trip to infinity.

ablarc
June 25th, 2006, 04:37 PM
A trip to infinity.
You get a slightly different version of that in the Parker Meridien's mirrored through-block arcade. It comes complete with a slight curve, due to the minute misalignment of the mirrors.

G_Money
July 5th, 2006, 10:19 PM
So whats up has anyone moved into 1180 yet? Any news? Im waiting for rents to drop, month to month on my current lease.

Mix106
July 10th, 2006, 11:55 AM
More Ironbound pics, PLEASE!!!

pianoman11686
July 13th, 2006, 09:49 AM
NEWARK AND IMPROVED

By ADAM BONISLAWSKI

July 13, 2006 -- "It all depends on what kind of person you are, an optimist or a pessimist," says new Newark mayor Cory Booker of the prospects for his notoriously troubled city's future.

Booker, by all accounts, falls into the former camp.

A football All-American at Stanford and a Rhodes Scholar, he had any number of high-powered options to choose from after graduating Yale Law School in 1997. Instead, Booker, who grew up in Harrington Park, N.J., headed for Newark, moving to the drug-infested Brick Towers housing project in the city's Central Ward.

In 1998 he ran for city council, unseating a four-term incumbent, and in 2002 he ran for mayor, losing a hotly contested race to long-time incumbent Sharpe James. This spring Booker ran once again, and won - giving Newark its first new mayor in 24 years.

Booker takes the reigns just as the long-moribund city has started to show some signs of life. Development is picking up across the area. Crime has fallen steadily, if unspectacularly (declining roughly 20 percent from 2000 to 2004, according to FBI Uniform Crime Reports). People are beginning to look past Newark's reputation and seeing opportunity instead of urban blight.

Booker has big plans to build on this momentum.

"What we're going to do in Newark, and we're going to do it very aggressively, is put hundreds of more cops on the streets," he says. "We're going to be moving dramatically against crime to create a safer environment that's going to rapidly increase property values."

Booker believes many of the other pieces of a real-estate boom are already in place.

"The reality is that we have so much competitive advantage in this region," he says. "We have one of the busiest ports in the region, one of the busiest airports in the region, all the major highways that intersect here, the rail lines that intersect here."

Downtown, several blocks west of Newark Penn Station, work is wrapping up on one of the more visible signs of the city's resurgence, Cogswell Realty Group's Eleven80 rental building. Formerly an office building, Eleven80 has retained its Art Deco facade, but most everything else has changed. Inside, the building, which offers 317 studio, one- and two-bedroom units, features the sort of amenities more typical of a swank Manhattan high-rise than your traditional Newark digs.

Units come with granite countertops, marble baths and porcelain tile floors. The building itself features a four-lane bowling alley, an 8,000-square-foot health club, a game room, maid service, a concierge, manicure and pedicure service and an on-call masseuse.

While rents at the building are low by New York City standards, $1,350-a-month studios, $1,900-a-month one-bedrooms and $2,600-a-month two-bedrooms represent a raising of the bar for Newark real estate.

And Cogswell is far from done. Over the last four years, the company has acquired plots of land along the western border of downtown's Military Park, where they plan to build some 3,500 rental and condo units in the next decade. Looks like Booker isn't alone in his optimism.

"You have 45,000 students and administrators from the colleges here that are completely under-served," Cogswell CEO Arthur Stern says. "You have 100,000 people who commute to work in Newark every day. For over 40 years people hadn't had it in their vocabulary that Newark was a possibility. Once that happens, the floodgates will open."

Speech-language pathologist Lauren Bradway recently signed a lease on a studio at Eleven80.

"When I tell my friends in Florida and the Midwest that I'm moving to Newark, they're horrified," says Bradway, who's moving from Piscataway, N.J. "But people have no idea what this city is going to become."

"I think if the city can get over its stigma, people will move there," agrees law student Kevin Ledig, who, with his wife Pamela Juarez - a dental student at the Newark-based University of Medicine & Dentistry of New Jersey - were the first residents to move into Eleven80.

Ledig is excited about having Booker in office.

"My wife and I both voted for him," he says. "Everyone thinks of Newark and thinks of corruption because everyone has been in office for so long. When [Booker] ran in 2002, he brought the whole idea that it shouldn't be just an old-boys' network."

Among the changes Booker hopes to bring about is an end to the city's practice of selling publicly owned land for well below market value - sometimes at prices as low as $1 per square foot. He recently sued the city to stop such sales and won a temporary ban.

"If anybody told you that you were going to get a 30, 40 percent return on your money on a project, you would rush to do them here in the city of Newark," Booker says. "But the problem is, we've been giving people 150, 200 percent returns by literally giving away land.

"It was desperation. It was the old way of doing things. What worked in 1980 shouldn't be the plan in 2006."

Ken Baris, president of Jordan Baris Realtors, has a somewhat different perspective on the practice.

"Six or seven years ago, developers were looking at land that they could get from the city for $1 to $2 per square foot and developer after developer balked at it," he says. "Nobody wanted it."

But now, as Baris points out, "the market has changed."

"A city is a business. And businesses on an annual basis do an assessment and analysis of what they have," he says. "It's imperative for the city to take stock and do that, which I think is one of the first things that's happening. And I think that's right on the money."

Recent additions like the GLC Group's 44-unit Parc West condo building and Summit Real Estate Developers' Southwyck Estates - a new collection of multi-family homes - suggest that Newark isn't the no-go zone it once was for developers.

Also slated for the city are the Mulberry Street Urban Renewal Company's 2,200-unit Mulberry Street Promenade condo/retail development (with the first phase to start construction later this year) and a 500-unit, $400 million mixed-use riverfront project from the Matrix Development Group.

And as this building boomlet continues, you can expect to hear a lot from Cory Booker.

"We're going to create a group that's doing nothing but marketing the city, bringing in people, facilitating the process of engaging the city, putting together the right incentive packages with the state, with banks," he says. "We're going to create a rational system wherein any developer who has a real vision and a real plan can engage.

"Newark is an emerging market - an undiscovered country."

Copyright 2006 NYP Holdings, Inc.

Dagrecco82
July 13th, 2006, 01:01 PM
I saw the lightrail working on Tuesday, it looked great! I didn't see anyone on-board, I'm guessing they were training the operators. Such a surreal site, Newark's lookin beautiful!

NYatKNIGHT
July 13th, 2006, 01:26 PM
Rides on the light rail will begin Monday the 17th after the ribbon-cutting ceremony. Free rides for the first week of operation, I'm told.

JCMAN320
July 13th, 2006, 01:32 PM
Great I cant wait. Thats how we do in Jersey free rides to lure you in then hit you with the fare and scare the crap out of you. lol

Dagrecco82
July 13th, 2006, 09:52 PM
On the same Tuesday, I passed by the Devils Area without camera unfortunately, and it was looking as if a quarter of the steel skeleton had risen. It's moving fast at the construction site.

kevin
July 14th, 2006, 03:00 AM
I'm pissed that I waited a little longer than I should have to accept a lease. My rent is about $20-$30 more per month than it would have been. I live in the Pavilion right now too... it's not THAT bad, but this is certainly an upgrade. We just moved out of Pavilion. I don't miss it. Many of the people that live there have no respect for their environment or the other people who live there, and management had no intent on improving the situation. It was evident to me whenever I'd see garbage or spit on the floor in the elevator, or when the parking gate would be broken, or everytime the elevators were broken...I think the culmination occured when a five-year-old child was missing for several hours, the Newark police went door-to-door trying to find him. Around 2:00am the fire department showed up. Turns out the kid was stuck in the elevator, and when asked why the guard didn't see him, the response was that the cameras in the elevators didn't work. But the views were amazing, I'll give Pavilion that.

kevin
July 14th, 2006, 03:11 AM
I took an apartment in 1180 that I'll be moving into in August. Should be fun! BTW, I noticed you posting on a railroad forum about the light rail - my cousin posts there all the time (i think his name is hsr_fan or something). Send me a message here or something, I'm the Kevin in all of those articles (my wife and I had our picture in the NY Post on Thursday about 1180). It'd be nice to get to know our neighbors!
How does 1180 look. I work in downtown Newark and the convenience appeals to me. So do the features and ammenities. But 1400 for a studio in newark where there is nothing to do after the work day? I dunno, i think theyre too high. Does anyone have any rough idea how many agreements they have out?

I may just have to take a look at a model this weekend. When we looked at the studios, we were amazed by the fact that they're virtually 1 bedroom apartments without doors. The studio is split up into three sections, a great area, the entry area, and a back sleeping area (no window). Some creativity could allow two roommates to share the apartment. As far as there being nothing to do after the work day, there are three nice pubs in downtown Newark: the KilKenny Alehouse (formerly the Hamilton pub), McGovern's Tavern, which is now open on saturdays, and Skippers Plane Street Pub. Oh, and Mix 27, which is new. If you're not into downtown, there are plenty of places in the Ironbound that offer nightlife...and great Brazillian food.

Marv95
July 14th, 2006, 10:21 AM
Glad people are talking about Eleven80. I was told by one of the managers that the building won't be ready to move in until August. Make sense because honestly, that building is in no shape to be moved in right now--the outside of it anyway. And what's this I hear about the new light rail being free for next week?

lofter1
July 14th, 2006, 01:21 PM
Newark Mayor Chases Suspect,
but His Guards Make the Grab

NY TIMES (http://www.nytimes.com/2006/07/14/nyregion/14booker.html?_r=1&oref=slogin)
By JENNIFER 8. LEE
July 14, 2006

Mayor Cory A. Booker began his term on July 1 in Newark vowing to reduce crime with a program of zero-tolerance policing.

Yesterday afternoon, the new mayor — along with two police officers in his security detail — had a firsthand opportunity to put that policy into effect.

In a city known for rampant crime and a murder rate that has been rising even as it has been generally falling nationwide, it is not unheard-of to see crimes take place in broad daylight.

Sometimes they even take place in front of City Hall.

Mayor Booker and his guards left Newark’s City Hall around 12:30 p.m.
yesterday for a meeting and stumbled upon what appeared to be a confrontation across the street: a police officer and a man in a standoff on Broad Street. The officer held a gun and the man wielded a pair of scissors.

The police later said that the man had just robbed a customer in the City National Bank of hundreds of dollars. In escaping the bank, the man was brushed by a car and fell.

When a nearby police officer went to help him, the man tried to stab the officer with the scissors, but missed, Mr. Booker said. The officer drew his gun as the suspect was running away.

Mr. Booker, 37, who played tight end on Stanford University’s football team, said, “I took off my jacket and gave chase.”

The two officers with him, Billy Valentin and Kendrick Isaac, began running, too.

The guards overtook Mr. Booker and took the man down in front of a parking lot.

Mr. Valentin, 37, a 12-year veteran of the force, said, “He actually didn’t see it coming because he was looking at the officer with the gun, and we came from behind.’’

When Mr. Booker reached the group, he began shouting at the robber: “Not in our city anymore! These days are over!”

Mr. Valentin and Mr. Isaac were recently selected to be guards for Mr. Booker, who recently received death threats from gang leaders in prison.

“These guys, who obviously sprint faster than their mayor, saved a situation from getting far worse,” Mr. Booker said with a laugh.

“I was embarrassed by my own security detail, which I will never forgive them for.”

He said the police arrested the man and took him into custody.

The suspect did not have far to go. Police headquarters was around the corner, only a few buildings down from City Hall.

Copyright 2006 The New York Times Company

NYatKNIGHT
July 14th, 2006, 02:01 PM
Go Cory, you badass.

Kris
July 17th, 2006, 03:13 AM
July 17, 2006
Rail Spur Brings Downtown Newark a Taste of Its Past
By RONALD SMOTHERS

http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2006/07/17/nyregion/17rail.large1.jpg
In downtown Newark, unveiling a rail line to entice visitors, and development.

NEWARK, July 14 — With the scraping of metal wheels on metal track and the occasional sparking of pantograph against overhead catenary wires, Newark’s rail transit system on Monday will usher in what many hope will be a new era.

A new mile-long light rail spur downtown, which took four years to complete, is to start service between the city’s two commuter train stations and make parts of the city more accessible.

The $207 million spur — in some ways a throwback to the city’s past — will take about 10 minutes for a ride starting underground at Pennsylvania Station, the city’s main rail hub, and traveling northward to the Broad Street Station, much of the time at street level.

A northbound train will make intermediate stops at the New Jersey Performing Arts Center, at Atlantic Street and at Riverfront Stadium; a southbound train will make intermediate stops at Washington Park and at the arts center.

It is the stretch above ground that is reminiscent of the 1930’s and ’40s, when Newark was a far more vital city. At that time trolleys, sleeker ancestors of today’s angular light rail cars, crisscrossed the city powered by a tangle of overhead cables serving lines converging on the city from the Oranges, Maplewood, Bloomfield — even from as far away as Paterson.

More than looking to its past, however, the new line represents this struggling city’s future, opening the northern end of the downtown to commercial, retail and residential redevelopment.

Developers note that the Morris and Essex and Montclair-Boonton rail lines, which pass through Broad Street Station on the way to Manhattan, carry large numbers of Newark commuters who will now have an easier way of reaching downtown.

“It was so difficult getting from the Broad Street station to downtown by bus on the streets,” said Joseph North, the general manager of New Jersey Transit’s light rail operations and the Newark subway system.

Marc E. Berson, a major developer in the city and owner of the Newark Bears, the minor league baseball team that plays in Riverfront Stadium, said: “This area of Broad Street has always been one of the gateways into Newark because of the train station and Interstate 280. And if I could script what happens with this new light rail spur, I would like to see it be retail and downtown residential.”

For now, Mr. North said, the transit agency expects the spur to attract 4,000 riders a day in the first year of operation. Trains will leave every 10 minutes during rush hours and every 15 minutes at other times.

Mr. Berson, the president of Fidelco Realty, which has purchased a 17-story office building near the Broad Street station, is not alone in envisioning a period of redevelopment.

The Newark campus of Rutgers, which also owns several parcels near the northern end of the spur, plans to move its business school, along with 3,500 students, into 11 floors of Mr. Berson’s building and build dormitories for undergraduate and graduate students.

Steven Diner, the provost of the Newark campus, said that the expansion plans had been on the drawing board for a while, and that the light rail spur was “icing on the cake.”

Saying the Broad Street train station is the most underused “asset in downtown Newark,” Mr. Diner noted that besides Rutgers, such institutions as the Newark Museum and the Newark Public Library also had ambitious expansion plans in the area.

In addition, Berkeley College, a 75-year-old school that began as a secretarial school in East Orange, has embarked on an $11 million project to renovate a low-rise building on Broad Street across from the spur’s Washington Park stop.

Developers and civic leaders here, who have agonized over the halting pace of redevelopment over the last two decades, long talked about creating a “critical mass” of redevelopment activity that would turn the crawl into a walk and then a trot.

Lawrence P. Goldman, president and chief executive of the Performing Arts Center, said in an interview that the center, which is currently seeking a developer to put up a mix of 250 residential and retail properties on land across the street, had been approached by builders who were aware that the light rail was coming.

“When you add light rail to subways, buses and commuter rail lines, you build a level of excitement and uniqueness,” Mr. Goldman said. “It fills the air with a sense of urbanism that distinguishes this city from the experience of the Short Hills Mall.”

In aging cities like Newark, major construction projects are often complicated by a variety of costly hurdles involving the environment and landmarks. In this case, age and history acted in the city’s favor, said Les Eckrich, New Jersey Transit’s senior director and project manager of construction for the spur.

For one thing, Mr. Eckrich said, the transportation agency was able to use part of a tunnel that as far back as 1929 served the vast network of trolley lines operated by Thomas N. McCarter, the chairman of the Public Service Corporation, which later became Public Service Electric & Gas.

At that time, the tunnel ran to the trolley terminal, a hub for lines that once served two million people with about 2,400 cars.

In addition, Mr. Eckrich said, the agency was able to use some of the old right-of-ways for the light rail tracks and overhead power lines and did not have to acquire or disturb expensive downtown real estate.

Through a competition, the agency settled on public art that will be displayed at each of the six stations. At the Atlantic Street station, near a post office, windscreens will resemble a franked postage stamp.

At the arts center station, a 100-yard-long terrazzo walk will have 26 bronze plaques honoring New Jersey performers, from Sarah Vaughan and Abbott and Costello to Bruce Springsteen and Queen Latifah.

In addition, Mr. Goldman said the transit agency showed an appreciation for the performing arts by installing a “floating track bed” atop several rubber disks at the arts center stop — in an effort to keep passing trains from disturbing a performance or recording session.

“You didn’t want to create a situation,” he said, “where during the pianissimo you suddenly have a concerto for orchestra and light rail.”

Copyright 2006 The New York Times Company

Dagrecco82
July 17th, 2006, 11:21 AM
www.localsource.com

Makeover planned for Market Street


Wednesday, June 21, 2006 2:09 PM EDT

VAILSBURG, NJ - One of Newark’s busiest streets and most important intersections will get a completely new look, as the Department of Engineering launches the resurfacing, beautification, and drainage improvement of Market Street and Elizabeth Avenue. The Market Street Improvement Project will include the famous Historic District Four Corners intersection of Broad and Market streets. The construction is expected to begin Monday.
The construction project will begin with the ceremonial demolition of one of the four newsstand/bus shelters at the Broad and Market intersection, at 11 a.m. Monday. The Four Corners is one of the busiest intersections in New Jersey and this crossroads dates back to Colonial times.

“Market Street is one of our city’s oldest and most important thoroughfares. It dates back to Capt. Robert Treat and his Puritan founders. Now we are restoring this great street to its deserved grandeur, while making it safe and convenient for today’s motorist and pedestrian,” said Mayor Sharpe James.

The project will also improve the Elizabeth Avenue corridor from Grumman Avenue to Meeker Avenue. The city proposes to make improvements to Market Street from Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard to Ferry and Mott streets. These changes will help to ease congestion and reduce diversions to residential areas by improving traffic flows on Market Street, according to engineering director James D. Adams, whose department is overseeing the project.

A landscaped median will be created between Prospect and Madison streets, along with a left-turn lane south of Raymond Boulevard onto Prospect Street. Market Street will also see new trees, decorative lighting, reconstructed sidewalks, utilities and drainage under the program.

The reconstruction project, which is being done by DeFino Contracting of Clifwood Beach, is being funded by a $3.51 million grant from the state Department of Transportation and the Federal Highways Administration. Construction is expected to be completed by June 2007.

ablarc
July 18th, 2006, 07:58 AM
Sounds like Newark is finally turning around. Let's hope the momentum isn't lost.

stache
July 21st, 2006, 08:32 PM
and it's pretty ridiculous imo. They have two stops that are a block apart from each other -

JCMAN320
July 24th, 2006, 10:56 PM
The goal is to link Broad Street Station and Penn Station.

stache
July 25th, 2006, 09:47 AM
I was walking by 1180 last week and I noticed the initials 'LN' over the main entrance on Raymond St. Does anybody know the original name of this building?

Dagrecco82
July 25th, 2006, 11:27 AM
Lefcourt Newark.

stache
July 25th, 2006, 12:03 PM
Thank you Dag! : )

Dagrecco82
July 25th, 2006, 12:12 PM
my pleasure :)

G_Money
August 2nd, 2006, 12:07 PM
Anyone move into 1180 yet? From what i understand Aug 1 was the date?

kevin
August 4th, 2006, 10:30 AM
Anyone move into 1180 yet? From what i understand Aug 1 was the date?

I moved in, but I still have a lot of work to do on my apartment unpacking and all...

Mix106
September 6th, 2006, 07:39 AM
I need more Newark stuff people!
I am addicted to the city... :p

Be cool![][]

JCMAN320
September 7th, 2006, 12:45 AM
NYPD deputy commissioner to be named Newark's top cop

Newark Mayor Cory Booker has chosen a high-ranking New York City police official to become his police director, the most important appointment for an administration whose success hinges on its ability to cut crime.

Garry McCarthy, the NYPD’s deputy commissioner of operations, will be introduced by Booker in a press conference tomorrow, capping a tough week that began with four murders over the Labor Day weekend and continued with statistics showing a rising number of killings, shootings and gun seizures. Yesterday, two Newark officers plead guilty to dealing prescription painkillers.

The Bronx-born McCarthy said in an interview today that after a successful 25-year career in the NYPD, he was geared for the challenges facing Newark.

“Everything I’ve looked at tells me the community here in Newark has been held hostage by crime for at least three decades,” McCarthy said. “Mayor Booker is looking to reform city government within Newark and create a positive outlook here, and it really feels like a good time to get here and make a difference.”

McCarthy, 47, started as a beat cop in the Bronx and rose through the ranks by taking on some of the department’s toughest assignments. He led precincts in troubled sections of Washington Heights and Brooklyn and was a commander in the internal affairs division before his promotion to deputy commissioner nearly seven years ago.

McCarthy said he plans on applying his experience from all those places. He said he will attack violent crime by focusing on drugs and guns, work on improving the community’s relationship with the police department and be vigilant in rooting out officer misconduct.

Booker said that’s exactly what he wants.

“Hearing those things from him was essential because we want to restore not only integrity in our police departmant, but also let the community know they have someone strengthening the integrity of our office,” Booker said. “Garry is a cop’s cop who also served in leadership positions in internal affairs, so that will help us.”

Married with two teenaged daughters, McCarthy said he will retire from the NYPD after giving 30 days notice, take his city pension and move to Newark for the director’s post. Booker said he hasn’t set McCarthy’s salary yet.

Although the appointment must be approved by the City Council, Booker doesn’t expect any opposition. Most of the council members have already interviewed McCarthy.

Read tomorrow's Star-Ledger for the first interview with McCarthy

OmegaNYC
September 7th, 2006, 10:40 PM
This is great for Newark. I was watching on the news, that Newark was rank #10 last year, for the highest amount of murders in the country (I believe the # was 97) . For a city of only 280,000, that is way too high.

JCMAN320
September 24th, 2006, 09:40 PM
RU business school invests $31.5M in the future
It buys 11 floors of Newark high-rise

Saturday, September 23, 2006
BY KELLY HEYBOER
Star-Ledger Staff

Rutgers University sealed a complex $31.5 million deal yesterday to purchase 11 floors of a Newark high-rise to house its business school.

The Rutgers Board of Governors voted unanimously to purchase part of 1 Washington Park despite the school's recent financial troubles. The university will spend an additional $51.5 million to renovate and expand the space at Broad and Washington streets.

Al Gamper, chairman of the Rutgers board, said he had no qualms about spending money on the business school while the state university is laying off employees, canceling classes and eliminating sports teams to plug a budget hole.

"You have to plan for the future," Gamper said following yesterday's meeting in New Brunswick. "We're not closing the doors here just because our budget got cut."

The red-brick tower, which housed Verizon until a few years ago, is owned by Fidelco, a real es tate and development firm. The company's chairman is Marc Ber son, a Rutgers-Newark graduate and one of the school's big donors.

Berson resigned his unpaid seats on two Rutgers boards last year to help deflect any questions about the ethics of the negotiations. He had served on the Rutgers Board of Overseers, which helps manage some of the university's finances, and the Rutgers Business School's Advisory Board, a panel that counsels the school's dean.

Berson estimates he has contributed about $500,000 to the university and helped raise millions more for the Rutgers-Newark law school, which named a board room after him.

Gamper said he saw no problem with the deal.

"He had the space. We bid on it. We got appraisals," Gamper said. "I don't see any significant conflict at all."

Berson did not return calls to comment. But his spokesman re leased a statement praising the purchase as "a win for the university, a win for the city of Newark and a win for the taxpayers."

Berson's company bought the 17-story office building three years ago for $26.5 million. The complex deal finalized yesterday calls for Rutgers to purchase floors 1 though 11 in a condo arrangement. Fidelco will continue to own floors 12 though 17 and rent them out as office space.

The university and the developer spent months haggling over the price after each side's appraisers came in with values that differed by several million dollars, Rutgers officials said. An independent appraiser was brought in to offer a third opinion, which was used to reach the $31.5 million purchase price.

Rutgers will pay for the building using an $18 million special state appropriation that was secured during the state budget negotiations with the help of former Gov. Richard Codey, campus officials said. Another $7 million to $10 million will come from federal tax subsidies offered for urban development projects.

The remaining money to purchase the building and fund the $51.5 million renovation will come from private donors and $40 million or more in borrowing.

The business school, which is currently housed a few blocks away, will move to the new building after renovations are completed in about three years, said Rutgers- Newark Provost Steven Diner. The 15,000-square-foot addition will include a new glass lobby added to the front of the building facing the Newark Library.

The move will help free up classrooms and offices in other campus buildings, Diner said.

"Rutgers-Newark has a unique opportunity to expand space for other current and future uses of the campus, including plans for increased enrollment," Diner said.

Campus officials have preliminary plans to continue expanding Rutgers-Newark's campus north.

The new business building is less than a block from 15 Washington Ave., the former home of Rutgers- Newark's law school. The school plans to turn that now-empty building into graduate student housing, though campus officials are still months away from choos ing one of four plans submitted by developers for the project.

Diner said Rutgers-Newark also will consider turning the parking lot behind the old law school into a block-long parking garage complex with street-level retail stores and rental apartments along University Avenue. Two nearby parking lots on Orange Street, located across from the former Westinghouse factory, also may be used to build new dorms.

Kelly Heyboer covers higher education. She may be reached at khey boer@starledger.com or (973) 392-5929.

JCMAN320
October 13th, 2006, 11:12 AM
Defying expectations

Friday, October 13, 2006
BY PEGGY McGLONE
Star-Ledger Staff

Think you know Newark? If your images of the city are limited to Alvin Ailey at the New Jersey Performing Arts Center, the planetarium at the Newark Museum and garlic shrimp at the Spanish Tavern — well, think again.

If you've visited the Essex County seat recently, you know about the rich cultural district that's formed around Military Park, sparked into growth by the opening of NJPAC nine years ago.

If you work here, you might know the maze of lobbies and walkways inside the Gateway complex near Penn Station, where cafes, lunch spots and shops — connected by walkways suspended above the sidewalk — cater to businesses located in the office towers.

But do you know about the city's burgeoning artist enclave, where live/work studios and sleekly modern galleries are bursting with the region's best contemporary work?

Do you think of the bustling streets of downtown, where the chirping of walkie-talkie cell phones blends with the heavy bass of hip-hop tracks from store sound systems; the bite of incense with the fog of bus fumes? Where kids in high-end hip-hop duds window shop alongside moms pushing carriages? Do you think of Newark the university town, where college students study and play, and nightclubs cater to both Latin dancers and Goths?

The state's largest city is unquestionably its cultural capital, the home to a critical mass of performance and visual arts organizations as well as a Portuguese enclave, known as the Ironbound, that is welcoming new cultures with remarkable speed.

Newark has its challenges, sure. An increase in street crime has caused concern in many neighborhoods and for many arts groups. Protracted delays in downtown housing developments have deflated much of the momentum created by the opening of NJPAC.

But there are positive signs. The new light rail system now connects the districts of the city, and the steel skeleton of the hockey arena has risen above the skyline near City Hall. Several new and ultra-sophisticated eateries have opened — and more importantly — have taken off. And work is underway on an arts district to be anchored by a Smithsonian-affiliated museum.

Newark's story is a tale of many cities, a sprawling narrative of difficulty and renewal, of promise and disappointment.

Which Newark do you know?

The arts

Newark's reputation as New Jersey's cultural core is directly linked to the New Jersey Performing Arts Center, the two-theater complex that opened in 1997. From its modernist architecture to its upscale restaurant to its high-profile roster of acts, NJPAC has achieved a national reputation, maturing into the county's sixth largest performing arts center before its 10th birthday.

That's not enough for its leader, though.

"Newark is the London, the Paris, the Berlin of New Jersey. It's the center of where the arts are happening," said NJPAC president and CEO Lawrence P. Goldman.

The New Jersey Symphony Orchestra, another of the state's flagship cultural organizations, makes its home in Newark, and performs regularly at NJPAC. Under the baton of Neeme Jarvi, the orchestra presents new works and classic favorites, and is a critical provider of classical music education.

Down the street from NJPAC are the offices of WBGO, the giant of jazz radio and a partner in many live performances in the city each year. On the other end of the cultural district is the Newark Public Library. Housed in an ornate Italian Renaissance building on Washington Street, the library is a beehive of activity, offering workshops, concerts and lectures throughout the year. The Sacred Heart Cathedral Basilica is host to classical and liturgical concerts, while Newark's two universities — Rutgers and the New Jersey Institute of Technology — participate in the arts scene with student performances and concerts and shows with national talent.

While these institutions get the lion's share of attention and funds, they are only part of Newark's cultural capital.

"The arts are an integral part of this community, and not just the larger organizations," said Arthur Ryan, chairman and CEO of Prudential Insurance Company of America of Newark and co-chairman of the board of trustees of NJPAC. "There are a lot of smaller groups I was amazed to learn about."

There are organizations like Glassroots, a glass-making studio on Bleeker Street that employs glass-making and graphic design classes to help young people develop self-confidence and self-reliance.

Newark Boys Chorus School — located on Lincoln Park in the Lincoln Park Coast Cultural District — features a concert chorus that tours the world with a repertoire of classics, spirituals, jazz and show tunes.

Next door is Symphony Hall, a former Shriner's hall that houses a 2,800-seat auditorium, a 1,000-seat banquet hall and concert venue and a 200-seat black box theater. Owned and operated by the city, Symphony Hall is used by community groups and independent promoters.

Newark School of the Arts provides training for 1,000 students a week in a host of artistic disciplines, from instrumental classes to music history, ballet, tap and African dance to choral and percussion groups. Alumni include tap master Savion Glover and actress Tisha Campbell.

The Newark Arts Council is the catalyst for many of these organizations, a partner that fosters collaborations and nurtures growth.

"There is great strength in the arts community here," said Linwood Oglesby, executive director of the NAC, "and I think it will only get better."

http://www.nj.com/onthetown/newark/

Keep Reading!!!!!

stache
October 14th, 2006, 12:05 AM
work is underway on an arts district to be anchored by a Smithsonian-affiliated museum.

Details?

JCMAN320
October 14th, 2006, 01:33 PM
It is going to be a muesum on African American Culture and it's influences on art, music, and pop culture. It will be run by the Smithsonian.

lofter1
October 14th, 2006, 04:39 PM
http://affiliations.si.edu/images/img_logo.gif (http://affiliations.si.edu/MainPage.Asp)

Lincoln Park Coast Cultural District/Museum of African American Music

http://affiliations.si.edu/AffiliateDetail.Asp?AffiliateID=143

Location: Newark, New Jersey

Region: Mid-Atlantic

Website: http://www.moaam.org/ (http://www.moaam.org/)

Description: The Lincoln Park/Coast Cultural District (LPCCD) is one of Newark's newest organizations, blending arts, cultural planning and event programming with community economic development. Incorporated in 1999, the mission of LPCCD is to plan, design and develop a comprehensive arts and cultural district, and establish a museum dedicated to collecting, interpreting, preserving, archiving and exhibiting African-American music.

Profile: Plans are proceeding for the Museum of African American Music. The Museum of African American Music will be the first institution of its kind and will bring all of the musical contributions of African-Americans under one roof. Jazz, gospel, hip-hop, rock & roll, blues, house music, rhythm & blues, and many other modes of musical expression will be gathered together in an exciting interactive space for exploring the great breadth of African American music.

Visit Lincoln Park Coast Cultural District/Museum of African American Music (http://www.moaam.org/) website >>

lofter1
October 14th, 2006, 04:43 PM
Lincoln Park Residental Lofts:

http://www.moaam.org/neighbor/imgs/spacer.gif
http://www.moaam.org/lpccd/imgs/lofts.jpghttp://www.moaam.org/lpccd/imgs/spacer.gif

http://www.moaam.org/lpccd/project.htm

The housing project will provide a
pedestrian-friendly, mixed-use community,
blending artist housing units, commercial spaces
and recreational facilities for singles and families.
New lighting, wireless technology, re-built sidewalks,
eateries, commercial venues and security measures
will create a 24/7 urban life dynamic.

http://www.moaam.org/lpccd/imgs/Housing_P_06-04.jpg

JCMAN320
October 18th, 2006, 10:53 AM
Mayor Booker To Report On First 100 Days
(AP) NEWARK Newark mayor assesses first 100 days in office

The shootings and homicides haven't stopped since Cory Booker has been mayor of Newark, but Booker said there was a double-digit decrease in some crimes in August and September.

Booker was scheduled to release a 20-page report Wednesday assessing his first 100 days as mayor of New Jersey's largest city.

Crimes included in the FBI Uniform Crime Report -- such as murder, rape and robbery -- declined for three straight months: 6.6 percent in July, 22 percent in August and 20 percent in September compared to year-ago figures.

Newark spokeswoman Desiree Peterkin Bell said crime-fighting will continue to be Booker's priority, and strategies will be aimed at how residents interact with government.

"It's not just about more cops on the street," she said. "It's about looking for different ways to create a safe environment for everyone."

Clement Alexander Price, a professor of history at the Newark campus of Rutgers University, praised Booker for creating a new energy in the city, but said Newark is far from safe.

"We still have a nagging problem associated with gun violence and killings, and other crime issues still prevail here in Newark," he said. "I'm afraid there's been a subculture of crime in Newark for a while and it's going to take more time for him to root it out."

Booker, 37, took over as mayor in July after Mayor Sharpe James ran the city for 20 years. He was expected to include other crime-related highlights at Wednesday's news conference:

-- The recovery of 628 weapons so far this year, compared to 499 at the same time last year.

-- Increased police presence in 14 targeted schools in Newark and the identification of faith-based organizations to help provide additional patrols.

-- Starting a process of securing land and funding for the construction of new police precinct houses in the North and South wards.

-- The hiring of Garry McCarthy, deputy commissioner of operations for the New York City Police Department, as police director.

McCarthy's appointment hasn't been without criticism. McCarthy was found guilty in March of blocking traffic during an altercation he had in 2005 with two New Jersey police officers. A judge said McCarthy used "extraordinarily poor judgment."

Three minority law enforcement groups opposed McCarthy's appointment.

Walter Fields, a political consultant and former director of the New Jersey NAACP, said Booker could have waited to make the appointment.

"I wish he would have taken more time to consider more options," he said. "This person comes with his own baggage."

But Fields gives Booker high marks for making crime his top issue. Next, he'd like to see more plans for economic development.

"Many Newark residents are unemployed or underemployed," Fields said. "He's got to figure out how he can invigorate Newark's economy so its residents can work and raise families and be supportive of Newark's small businesses. That's the only way the city over the long term has any chance of really turning the corner."

Booker has also been pushing ethics and government reform, but his ideas still need to be approved by the Municipal Council.

They include creating an inspector general, mandatory ethics training, banning political fundraising on public property and contracting with a forensic auditor.

(&#169; 2006 CBS Broadcasting Inc. All Rights Reserved.)

tone99loc
October 19th, 2006, 12:27 AM
Man, Cory Booker has a helluva job - Newark is still so bad for so many reasons and it's going to take a long time yet before it has a different vibe - I'm curious what Kevin, who lives in 1180, thinks of living in downtown Newark...

For instance, tonight I had the displeasure of having to wait outside Penn Station for about 30 minutes and I also had wait for a little while on a nearby side-street...In addition to the usual bunch of vagrants asking for money, I was cursed at twice and told by one crazy guy on a bicycle to "get the f--K out of here" I'm no stranger to Newark, but it's little things like this that make me shake my head and say this place needs work

And if I were to put together a list of things Newark has to overcome to have a real renaissance (it definitely has not, despite Sharpe James constant declarations that Newark was a Renaissance City), cleaning up the homeless beggars in downtown would not even make the top 50. The financial problems, the years of corruption, the property tax fiasco, terrible schools, few incentives for outside development, no civic pride, poor decisions (the new arena, the light rail) -- I could go on forever, but as it stands I have very little faith in Newark...Can someone tell me why I'm wrong?

JerzResident
October 19th, 2006, 03:20 PM
Man, Cory Booker has a helluva job - Newark is still so bad for so many reasons and it's going to take a long time yet before it has a different vibe - I'm curious what Kevin, who lives in 1180, thinks of living in downtown Newark...

For instance, tonight I had the displeasure of having to wait outside Penn Station for about 30 minutes and I also had wait for a little while on a nearby side-street...In addition to the usual bunch of vagrants asking for money, I was cursed at twice and told by one crazy guy on a bicycle to "get the f--K out of here" I'm no stranger to Newark, but it's little things like this that make me shake my head and say this place needs work

And if I were to put together a list of things Newark has to overcome to have a real renaissance (it definitely has not, despite Sharpe James constant declarations that Newark was a Renaissance City), cleaning up the homeless beggars in downtown would not even make the top 50. The financial problems, the years of corruption, the property tax fiasco, terrible schools, few incentives for outside development, no civic pride, poor decisions (the new arena, the light rail) -- I could go on forever, but as it stands I have very little faith in Newark...Can someone tell me why I'm wrong?

Your wrong...

tone99loc
October 19th, 2006, 09:58 PM
Wow that was a really intelligent response Jerz Resident...

JerzResident
October 20th, 2006, 06:11 PM
Wow that was a really intelligent response Jerz Resident...

You asked a question I answered it. Newark is not as gloomy as you make it.

tone99loc
October 20th, 2006, 10:55 PM
I asked "Can someone tell me why I'm wrong?" I did NOT ask, "Can someone tell me I'm wrong?" JerzResident, you have not answered my question or provided any substantive reasons why you think I'm wrong - But, let me dumb my question down so you can attempt a meaningful answer - Give me two reasons why you think Newark will be a better city than it currently is, 5 years from now?

JerzResident
October 21st, 2006, 08:39 AM
I asked "Can someone tell me why I'm wrong?" I did NOT ask, "Can someone tell me I'm wrong?" JerzResident, you have not answered my question or provided any substantive reasons why you think I'm wrong - But, let me dumb my question down so you can attempt a meaningful answer - Give me two reasons why you think Newark will be a better city than it currently is, 5 years from now?

Ok, A, your're attempt in insult my intelligence is not neccessary, and B Newark has a new mayor dedicated to improving not only the downtown district, but the neighborhoods as well. The last mayor Sharpe James was corrupt and only focused on making the downtown area look good. Booker now has the FBI involved in the fight against crime. Because Newark is a small city, unlike Philadelphia, law enforcement in my opinion once given time can contain the crime issue. My only problem with Newark is the lack of office space available.

Jumpgate
October 24th, 2006, 10:35 AM
I live at 1180 Raymond, and though I had my misgivings, I'm very happy there. The building opening was a rough start, and they put us up in a hotel (the Robert Treat for 2 weeks, and then the Hilton) until we were able to move in in early August. There was still a LOT of work to be done on the building, but literally every day when I get home to the lobby, it looks nicer and nicer. It's going to be fantastic!

I moved here from Hoboken, and though Newark does not have the life that Hoboken had, I've had some great evenings.

Last week some friends came and we went to dinner at 27 Mix, followed by drinks at Kilkenney's (formerly Hamilton Pub), and a nite cap at Savoy Grill. It was a great evening and we never left the few blocks around Military Park. There are also some fantastic restaurants, bars, clubs in the Ironbound (Mompou and Brasilia to name two).

tone99loc
October 24th, 2006, 07:33 PM
Awesome, good to hear JumpGate - Here's a question for you - If you were Mayor of Newark or otherwise had the money and power, what's the one thing you would do to encourage other professionals to move to downtown Newark?

investordude
October 25th, 2006, 01:50 AM
I'm not sure if the last question was open ended to any response, but I think Newark needs to make a serious effort to improve on PR. They need to generate buzz - that Newark is the next hip area - Newark is where the artists are going, blah, blah. The problem is Newark's reputation is bad enough at this point that you need to change the perception. Cutting crime would obviously also help.

JCMAN320
October 29th, 2006, 01:06 AM
Mayor warms up to Newark's new ice hockey arena
Changes in pact make Booker a backer

Saturday, October 28, 2006
BY JEFFERY C. MAYS
Star-Ledger Staff

Newark Mayor Cory Booker has called the arena being built for the New Jersey Devils hockey team a block from City Hall a waste of money and a bad deal for residents who contributed $210 million to the project.

But on Monday, Booker will stand shoulder-to-shoulder with Devils owner Jeff Vanderbeek and, in a flash, become one of the arena's biggest promoters.

Though Booker had taken a strong stance against the project during his campaign and his first 100 days in office, city officials and the Devils have agreed to changes in the contract that have elicited a new attitude from the mayor.

"Starting on Monday, when we sign this agreement, I can say for the first time ever that I am a Devils fan," Booker said yesterday.

The changes are not necessarily groundbreaking, but Business Administrator Bo Kemp said they make for a better overall deal for the city.

They include a promise by the Devils to hire more minority-owned vendors and an agreement by the team to give the city at least $125,000 more in cash payments to fund other projects throughout Newark.

The city also will be able to use the giant video screen outside the arena and other advertising venues around the site to promote itself. For their part, the Devils agreed to return a lot they acquired on Broad Street that was being considered for retail development. Newark can now sell the property to a developer.

"They had some things they wanted us to do to solidify the partnership and we ended up agreeing on things to help the community and help the Devils and the city go forward in a partnership," Vanderbeek said.

Meanwhile, the Devils have negotiated a guaranteed maximum price of $365 million for the final cost of the 18,000-seat arena with construction manager Gilbane Construction, Vanderbeek said.

That figure is $55 million higher than the original $310 million price tag. The Devils are responsible for construction costs above the city's $210 million contribution, so the team will spend $155 million, up from its original $100 million contribution.

"We are all now on the hook to make sure the arena is successful. That means the city will do everything to make sure the arena opens on time," next October, Kemp said.

Meeting that target date will also cost.

Money must be found to pay for improvements to Lafayette and Mulberry streets near the arena, which is located at Broad, Market, Lafayette and Mulberry streets. Construction of a park area leading to the site is also on the table. And the city has to reimburse the housing authority for its purchase of land next to the arena.

Developers Jerome Gottesman and Jose Lopez swapped pieces of land on which the facility is being built for land surrounding the arena that will be used to develop a hotel, parking and residential space. One of those parcels is property the housing authority purchased with $4.1 million in federal funding that was to be used to house the poor.

That purchase was the focus of a federal audit by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development that said the authority should not have spent the money. Now, HUD and the authority are demanding payment.

Until the authority is paid, all the land swaps are on hold, meaning all development around the arena is also on hold. Economic development experts have said the promise to develop the 24-acre zone around the arena was the main reason to invest city funds in the project.

The road improvements and other projects will cost the city tens of millions of dollars above the $210 million in taxpayer money the administration of former Mayor Sharpe James committed to the project, Kemp said.

The James administration was going to borrow to cover some additional costs, but Booker said he will first look for outside resources to help the city pay for the projects.

Though Booker was against the project, he admitted it would be financially disastrous for the city to try to stop construction.

Vanderbeek, the Devils owner, said there are no hard feelings.

Meanwhile, Patrick Hobbs, dean of Seton Hall Law School and chair of a commission that examined and endorsed the arena redevelopment zone, said Booker's involvement is vital to the project's success.

"Here are real benefits: the sizzle, the excitement, the buzz," Hobbs said. "There have been people on the sidelines waiting to see what the administration's final response will be. There are 24 acres to be developed and they are the most important pieces of real estate in the city."


Jeffery C. Mays covers Newark City Hall. He may be reached at jmays@starledger.com or (973) 392-4149.

JerzResident
October 29th, 2006, 08:57 AM
Booker is the man!:cool:

Jumpgate
October 30th, 2006, 02:01 PM
I'm not sure if the last question was open ended to any response, but I think Newark needs to make a serious effort to improve on PR. They need to generate buzz - that Newark is the next hip area - Newark is where the artists are going, blah, blah. The problem is Newark's reputation is bad enough at this point that you need to change the perception. Cutting crime would obviously also help.

I couldn't agree more - the issue is that Newark still has a negative reputation around the country. I am a relatively successful well educated young person who chose to move to Newark, and everyone I speak to is shocked. But once they come visit and I take them to a show at the NJPAC, dancing in the Ironbound, and drinking at 27 Mix - they all go home and talk about how "oh I can just tell that Newark is going to be happening in a few years!"

Unforunately, the best PR is always word of mouth. Newark is doing a reasonably good job of publicizing itself around NJ, but people won't take what they say very seriously because, well, it's Newark, and most NJ people between the ages of 0 and 35 grew up with a constant negative view of Newark. Haven't you seen Harold and Kumar?

I like to compare it to Hoboken and Newport ~ 10 - 15 years ago. People were just starting to move there, and it was just turning the corner, it just took a while for word to spread.

The best thing the Mayor could do is to get people to COME VISIT Newark instead of just read about it. Glossy brochures are good propaganda but nobody takes them serious (you should see some of the Camden PR material! It make it look like Paris!).

Sponsor some pub crawls, gallery walks, and publicize those in conjunction with NJPAC events so people will be here anyway. How about "after the show join some Newark locals for drinks at the fine bars on Halsey street." Or, "before the show, meet local artists and view the new galleries on Broad street." Get people to stick around, and then the next time they want to go out for an evening, Newark will pop into their heads.

Everyone who comes and visits me leaves with a new and improved vision of Newark.

tone99loc
October 31st, 2006, 10:50 PM
Thanks to whomever replied - Interesting comments and I encourage anyone else to chime in w/ their 2 cents...

kevin
November 1st, 2006, 01:15 AM
Man, Cory Booker has a helluva job - Newark is still so bad for so many reasons and it's going to take a long time yet before it has a different vibe - I'm curious what Kevin, who lives in 1180, thinks of living in downtown Newark... Kevin's retarted for downtown Newark. I've lived here for about two years now, starting out at the Pavillion (across from Broad Street Station) and moving down to 1180 when they opened. I was married in Newark. I love it here. In the two years I've lived here I have to say I've seen Newark improve 100%. New restaurants have opened, and the bars in downtown stay open much longer.

For instance, tonight I had the displeasure of having to wait outside Penn Station for about 30 minutes and I also had wait for a little while on a nearby side-street...In addition to the usual bunch of vagrants asking for money, I was cursed at twice and told by one crazy guy on a bicycle to &quot;get the f--K out of here&quot; I'm no stranger to Newark, but it's little things like this that make me shake my head and say this place needs work Panhandling is an issue here - but then again, I remember when it was a problem in NYC until Guliani decided to "fix" the problem. I've noticed in the last year or so that the panhandlers are back in NYC. As far as getting cursed out or at or told to get our of here...I've been commuting through Penn Station daily since I lived here. I used to take the train from Broad Street into the city, then the PATH back to Newark and walk home. Now, since I live at 1180, I take the PATH both ways, and walk home. I have never had anyone yell at me, curse me out, or tell me to get out of here. We park the car on the street below (when permitted by law) and have not had an issue there, either.

To be honest, the worst part of my commute regards annoying commuters from the northeast corridor who push anyone out of the way to get on the PATH.

Now, I don't generally hang out in or near Penn Station except when I'm commuting. My wife would sometimes pick me up when I got home really late when we were living in the Pavillion, but I never had a problem then, either.

And if I were to put together a list of things Newark has to overcome to have a real renaissance (it definitely has not, despite Sharpe James constant declarations that Newark was a Renaissance City), cleaning up the homeless beggars in downtown would not even make the top 50. The financial problems, the years of corruption, the property tax fiasco, terrible schools, few incentives for outside development, no civic pride, poor decisions (the new arena, the light rail) -- I could go on forever, but as it stands I have very little faith in Newark...Can someone tell me why I'm wrong? I hate the term "renaissance city" - it's played out and it's ridiculous. It can be called that after the fact, not before (which it was, unfortunately). I think Cory Booker is doing a good job right now, and I see a tremendous change in this city. Living here, I also see the civic pride. It's evident in the marches - either in protest (as was the case during the whole illegal immigration thing), the parades, the street parties near Military Park or the festivals IN military park. At Branch Brook park you can always find families relaxing, and sometimes you'll stumble upon a celebration. And, if you were around for the World Cup, a simple walk through the Ironbound would have given you an idea of the ethnic pride that exists here.

The light rail has improved the city significantly - not so much because of its purpose, but the fact that it opens up and connects the northern part of downtown with the southern part. I can walk the route in 15-20 minutes, but most people won't. They can take the rail to the museum (if you haven't been, you're missing out), the library, the Bears games, or some of the other shopping.

And if you have no hope then you haven't been paying attention. Apartments are opening in downtown. The trickle down effect may take a little while, but you'll notice. When you have people living here, you create a demand. Since there's little supply right now, businesses will move in when they realize the money is here. When the businesses move in, more people will take notice and the demand for apartments will go up. The more money that's spent here means more revenue for the city. It kind of happened in Hoboken and Jersey City. It's happening in Orlando right now. Unless 1180 totally flops, and I don't think it will, Newark will join the ranks of Hoboken, Red Bank, Jersey City, Williamsburg, Harlem, etc.

investordude
November 1st, 2006, 02:57 AM
Another idea I had to fix the impression actually of pretty much all of New Jersey would be for them to pass laws requiring building owners to fix broken windows and other egregious blight, especially for factory buildings in visible areas like along the railroads. They should also require cities and authorities like the Port Authority to fix their broken windows.

Guliani was right - it creates both the perception and reality of crime to tolerate such unbelievable neglect. The state has a right to building have a reasonable building code and enforce it, and they should do that. Any landlord that objects, take their property and sell it to reputable developers. I would think a lot of people would be interested in sites along the NE Corridor rail line (and that besides, most landlords would just repair the windows).

As it stands right now, the PATH trip to Newark is somewhat less than a visual advertisement, even though I realize many of the blighted structures along the way are not actually in Newark (which is why the state should take the lead on these things).

NYatKNIGHT
November 1st, 2006, 11:08 AM
The light rail has improved the city significantly - not so much because of its purpose, but the fact that it opens up and connects the northern part of downtown with the southern part. I worked on that light rail job for six years, and though we knew what the studies told us and that in our gut it was worth the money and construction, it is nice to hear it.

kevin
November 1st, 2006, 11:38 AM
Another idea I had to fix the impression actually of pretty much all of New Jersey would be for them to pass laws requiring building owners to fix broken windows and other egregious blight, especially for factory buildings in visible areas like along the railroads. They should also require cities and authorities like the Port Authority to fix their broken windows.

* * *

As it stands right now, the PATH trip to Newark is somewhat less than a visual advertisement, even though I realize many of the blighted structures along the way are not actually in Newark (which is why the state should take the lead on these things).

Actually, the PATH is only in Newark when it's in Penn Station, and for the few seconds until it goes over the Passaic River. Yeah, there's a lot of blight in Kearny and Harrison. But Harrison is working on it with the new project that's anchored by the Red Bull stadium. Supposedly, there's going to be a nice little community over there where they just demolished that building. I agree, however, that many of the first impressions one has of Newark are formed by the train ride in. But believe it or not, the city is investing money in aesthetics. Broad Street is going to have some sort of promenade with trees in the middle of the road. Mulberry street is also *supposedly* undergoing an improvement, and that's a significant part of the train ride. As the city improves, the improvements will move outward.


I worked on that light rail job for six years, and though we knew what the studies told us and that in our gut it was worth the money and construction, it is nice to hear it.

Oh, for the Newark residents, the light rail is *practically* useless. I only say this because the route was already covered by NJT buses. But, that's only as far as actual transportation goes. What the light rail means to the residents is that people who know nothing about bus schedules (most non-newarkers) will feel safe riding a beautiful system, and many will discover that their fears of Newark were unfounded. Oh, and the system is quite beautiful. The designer did a wonderful job on the stations, and it was a great idea to incorporate the art. The light rail makes Newark feel like a tighter city - more like a San Francisco. It would have made sense to have the light rail go all the way down Broad Street into Elizabeth, or to the airport, or to have it link up with the subway in or near Branch Brook Park, but what it brings to the city in the sense of pride, safety, and flexibility does not show up on those stupid studies.

As much as I hate the Yankees, I'll use the example that A-Rod was a solid performer with gold glove all-star/hall of fame numbers that was a can't miss for any team that signed him. At the same salary, Derek Jeter can be a defensive liability who puts it solid, not spectacular numbers. The Yankees are overpaying for A-Rod, and have a steal with Jeter.

So when Joe Freehold spends his money at the Bears game, or Tammy Linden takes her family to the museum and then for a bite at the Brasilia Grill, the're not only contributing directly to the general revenue of Newark, but they're also going to tell their friends what a great time they had, what great food there is, and how they'd come back. Without the light rail, I don't think those people would be so brazen to have stepped foot outside of Penn Station.

The Star Ledger had a great writeup that pointed out all of the highlights in the city:
http://www.nj.com/onthetown/maps/index.ssf?newark

NYatKNIGHT
November 1st, 2006, 11:45 AM
It would have made sense to have the light rail go all the way down Broad Street into Elizabeth...Makes sense, it's the funding that's not available. It was forever referred to as NERL - the Newark-Elizabeth Light Rail - and this is Phase 1. Funding for the rest has never occured, though it could inch along through the years, the extension to at least to Newark City Hall is most probable.

kevin
November 1st, 2006, 02:05 PM
Makes sense, it's the funding that's not available. It was forever referred to as NERL - the Newark-Elizabeth Light Rail - and this is Phase 1. Funding for the rest has never occured, though it could inch along through the years, the extension to at least to Newark City Hall is most probable.

The Devils arena is only a few blocks away, especially if you cut through the gateway center. But a link to Elizabeth would be cool, though maybe redundant since it's already covered by NJT rail and bus.

But yeah, I realize the funding is a major issue. Still, an untimate connection with the rest of the Newark City Subway near Branch Brook Park would make the ride much more worthwhile to someone like me!

tone99loc
November 1st, 2006, 08:30 PM
Good dialougue all around and thanks for the lengthy response Kevin - I was definitely around for World Cup and saw the Portugal/Brazil/Argentina/Columbia/Ecuador national flags everywhere in Ironbound -- It's really an incredible sight to see and was like that for previous World Cups -- Of course, the increasing diversity of Ironbound means every four years the flags get more diverse as well -- That said, there is definitely a changing sentiment in the Portuguese community that no longer views Ironbound as a final destination. While it may make sense to initally settle in Ironbound, the trend now is to move out to the surrounding suburbs (i.e. Union, Hillside, Kenilworth) as fast as you can - I don't know how that bodes for long term stability of Ironbound, but it's something to think about..

stache
November 1st, 2006, 11:36 PM
The light rail makes Newark feel like a tighter city - more like a San Francisco.

Maybe a baby step in that direction -

kevin
November 2nd, 2006, 12:06 AM
Maybe a baby step in that direction -

I couldn't think of an undesirable city that everybody else would know off the top of my head. It's not SF, but the light rail adds a lot to the simple image of the city.

millertime83
November 2nd, 2006, 01:14 PM
Pittsburg?

Radiohead
November 5th, 2006, 07:02 PM
Here are some pictures of the progress on the new downtown arena. Pics taken 10/30/06.

http://static.flickr.com/119/289904144_bf424a0b2f_o.jpg

http://static.flickr.com/118/289904147_83e3632f64_o.jpg

http://static.flickr.com/108/289904148_6ecdfb2c9f_o.jpg

http://static.flickr.com/113/289904150_d6b4b22085_o.jpg

http://static.flickr.com/116/289904157_02ffbd618b_o.jpg

http://static.flickr.com/101/289909813_3a8cb7283d_o.jpg

http://static.flickr.com/107/289904162_de76446b40_o.jpg


http://static.flickr.com/100/289909820_51ce1042ed_o.jpg

The signage along Broad Street......tacky, tasteless and trashy. Hopefully it will be cleaned up one day; these old buildings deserve better.
http://static.flickr.com/100/289909821_a302f94ba9_o.jpg
http://static.flickr.com/100/289909823_de42a101f5_o.jpg

JCMAN320
November 6th, 2006, 09:40 AM
Radio I see visions of boutiques and restaurants danciing in my head. lol. That arena is coming along great. This is just what Broad and Market needed right at the busy bustling intersection that not so long ago in the 1920s was the busiest intersection in the world. Devils Hockey, Seton Hall Basketball, also it is on Wikipedia.org, Newark will be getting a Major League Indoor Soccer team for the arena. All of this only two blocks from Penn Station. If only my Nets would go there then I would be real happy. Ahh a guy can dream and hope. lol

In all seriousness I hope that this arena does for Downtown Newark what MSG did for that area of Midtown. Newark is really going to suprise everybody in a few more years watch!

With Jersey City already well on it's way and Newark stepping up it's game finally, hmhmhmhmhm, New York better recognize and watch itself.

TriHobo
November 6th, 2006, 04:51 PM
While restaurants and cafes are good, the key is finding enough events for the Arena besides from 40 home Devils games that will attract people to the neighborhood and therefore make those restaurants and cafes viable. The factors that will test the attractiveness of the Arena are its access, i.e. convenience to transportation (CHECK) and the comfort of people visiting the area. On the latter, until the crime rate is lowered and the stigma of years of Sharpe James' corrupt governing is wiped away, people are not going to look at Newark as their first option. I say this as someone that has enjoyed visiting Newark, and believes that it has the potential in 7 to 10 years be a vibrant thriving urban destination.

On a side note, speaking as someone that has lived near the Garden in NYC, the last thing one should think is " (I)hope that this arena does for Downtown Newark what MSG did for that area of Midtown." The Garden has attracted drunks, drug addicts and prostitutes, which i guess for some people is what they hope for - to each there own

kevin
November 7th, 2006, 12:39 PM
While restaurants and cafes are good, the key is finding enough events for the Arena besides from 40 home Devils games that will attract people to the neighborhood and therefore make those restaurants and cafes viable. The factors that will test the attractiveness of the Arena are its access, i.e. convenience to transportation (CHECK) and the comfort of people visiting the area. On the latter, until the crime rate is lowered and the stigma of years of Sharpe James' corrupt governing is wiped away, people are not going to look at Newark as their first option. I say this as someone that has enjoyed visiting Newark, and believes that it has the potential in 7 to 10 years be a vibrant thriving urban destination.


I hear people talk about the crime rate of Newark all the time. It's kind of funny, actually. As a Newark resident, I know there are certain parts of the city I rarely venture into (S. Orange Avenue to Seton Hall, and a lot of the West Side), but to characterize all of Newark, especially the downtown area, because of the plight of one area...well, not to focus on stereotypes, but I've heard LA is quite dangerous...or is that South Central? NYC can be a tough neighborhood...in certain parts of the Bronx and Queens. But none of those places come into play when you're speaking of the downtown shopping districts.

The Devils Arena is a block away from the Gateway center. I see it every morning when I walk to the train station. In the neighborhood are the Clinton St. Lofts, 1180, 744 Broad, the Prudential Building, Seton Hall Law School, a Community Bank (coming soon), and a supposed Mulberry St. revitalization. If Newark treats the Devils games (and any other activity at the Arena) the way it does the Bears games or shows at NJPAC, then people have nothing to worry about. The city has a strong police presence at all public events, and given the short distance from the Gateway Center (which will probably stay open for the out-of-towners to get back to Penn), people in that area won't have a problem at all.

I say this as a person who enjoys living in downtown Newark and who'd love to see more cafes move into the surrounding area.

investordude
November 7th, 2006, 08:16 PM
kevin, your argument is logical but logic isn't always enough. I think Newark needs to work on improving its reputation.

By the way, I think they need to encourage public transit to the games or the restaurants won't do much good.

One concern I have - I'm not sure the average fan is going to eat at restaurants that will attract the same people seeking the urban sophisticated lifestyle, if that is what downtown Newark wants to attract. I love hockey, but it doesn't seem culturally consistent with the $15 martini or the ahi tuna restaurant or even the cool ethnic restaurant, in no small part because most hockey fans have suburban kids with them and suburban kids are typically picky eaters who (at least legally) don't drink.

I think urban residents might actually want a different kind of restaurant than sports fan with small kids. It's better than nothing, but its not going to turn Newark into Williamsburg.

investordude
November 7th, 2006, 08:31 PM
Oh yeah, the other demographic for hockey, the one without kids, may also be a problem. I think more hockey fans are probably men than women, although for the record, any girl gets extra credit with me if she likes hockey.

The reason I think this matters is that guys hanging out with other guys at a hockey game (or maybe this is just me) don't usually go the sexy sophisticated cafe with the sleek decor that's going to attract a huge urban influx. I realize that's a generalization, but I would guess marketing numbers would back it up.

My guess, from everything I've learned at HBO and Sex in the City, is you need something that's going to appeal to women before you start really getting great restaurants and shopping and beauty spas and other gentrifying elements I think.

kevin
November 7th, 2006, 11:00 PM
kevin, your argument is logical but logic isn't always enough. I think Newark needs to work on improving its reputation.

By the way, I think they need to encourage public transit to the games or the restaurants won't do much good.

One concern I have - I'm not sure the average fan is going to eat at restaurants that will attract the same people seeking the urban sophisticated lifestyle, if that is what downtown Newark wants to attract. I love hockey, but it doesn't seem culturally consistent with the $15 martini or the ahi tuna restaurant or even the cool ethnic restaurant, in no small part because most hockey fans have suburban kids with them and suburban kids are typically picky eaters who (at least legally) don't drink.

I think urban residents might actually want a different kind of restaurant than sports fan with small kids. It's better than nothing, but its not going to turn Newark into Williamsburg.

I think it's easier than you think. I'm not placing all of my eggs in the arena basket - in fact, I haven't thought much about the arena except for what others have mentioned here. It's gravy compared to the other development going on in downtown Newark. First of all, you've got the Renaissance towers, you have the Clinton St. Lofts, you have 1180. Next up are the dorms at Rutgers and that college city block thing up by NJIT, and then the eventual construction/renovation at the Hahnes/Griffith buildings. It's nothing to do with getting hockey fans into Newark, it's everything to do with getting people, middle class people with money to move in. This *seems* to be happening here, at least at 1180, as I'm seeing new faces every day.

Newark also has some great restaurants in the Ironbound, which is just on the opposite side of Penn Station from downtown. Frankly, I think placing the arena in downtown Newark does more for the Devils than it does for Newark, as now the 20K or so fans per night can get to the game without having to fight the rt. 3 traffic, worry about parking, etc. Plus, if hte area builds up, you've got more options for a meal than you do in the Meadowlands, which by last count was zero.

investordude
November 8th, 2006, 04:50 AM
Right, I don't think the devils is detrimental, its just you could do so much more. As a for example, Newark seems like its missing a major corporate biotech park, even though land is probably cheap enough to make that work and there's a huge bio presence in New Jersey at locations that seem like they'd be harder to get people to. I would think if the city gave grant money to that, they'd get some interest, especially since there is some academic presence in the area. They could build hotels, restaurants, and condos around the good jobs subsequently created.

Fahzee
November 8th, 2006, 02:42 PM
In all seriousness I hope that this arena does for Downtown Newark what MSG did for that area of Midtown. Newark is really going to suprise everybody in a few more years watch!


You want Downtown Newark to be surrounded by class B office space and sub-par retail?

JCMAN320
November 8th, 2006, 07:40 PM
I meant business, excitement, buzz, and energy.

Radiohead
November 8th, 2006, 11:13 PM
You want Downtown Newark to be surrounded by class B office space and sub-par retail?

That's still better than being surrounded by homeless winos, pimps, hustlers and crack whores.

Have you been to downtown Newark at night? I have, and it ain't pretty.

investordude
November 9th, 2006, 06:24 AM
You could take the same public subsidies building a stadium and invest them in an increased police presence around the clock. That seems like a more efficient method of addressing the problems, or the perception of a problem since I think you're exaggerating a little on downtown Newark's social ills. Plus, you could repurpose the valuaable land the stadium is occupying for office and residential to attract higher paying jobs and residents.

Dagrecco82
November 9th, 2006, 11:03 AM
Newark Postmark Becoming a Thing of the Past

NEWARK (AP) -- Fewer letters mailed in New Jersey will bear the postmark of the state's largest city.

Later this month, the U.S. Postal Service will transfer all Newark's outgoing mail to a processing plant in nearby Kearny. The letters will then bear the Kearny postmark.

Without one's own postal meter machine, the only way to have a Newark postmark on a letter will be to mail it at the counter of a Newark post office and ask the clerk to stamp it.

``I think it's an atrocity,'' Gloria Hopkins Buck, vice president of the Newark Museum board, told The Star-Ledger of Newark for Wednesday's newspapers. ``It means that a little small town in North Carolina would have a postmark, and the city of Newark would not have a postmark at all. It's not even acknowledging an existence.''

Clement Price, a professor of history at Rutgers-Newark, agreed.

``It certainly could not occur at a worse time given that Newark seems to be enjoying a revived self-identity,'' he told the newspaper. ``After so many years of losing institutions and residents and sensibilities affiliated with Newark, this just comes at a terrible time.''

George B. Flood, a postal service spokesman, said the move is part of a nationwide effort to consolidate processing centers and save money. In addition to Newark, 10 other city postmarks will be fading: Olympia, Wash.; Mojave, Bakersfield, Marysville and Pasadena, Calif.; Kingston, N.C.; Greensburg, Pa.; Bridgeport and Waterbury, Conn.; and NW Boston, Mass.

Flood said the change will only affect a fraction of the city's mail, since 71 percent of the letters mailed in Newark are from businesses that have their own meter machines, which will still bear the Newark postmark.

Postmarks made their debut on letters around the 1850s, according to historians at the National Postal Museum in Washington, D.C.


http://wcbs880.com/pages/122808.php?contentType=4&contentId=238293

kevin
November 9th, 2006, 11:22 AM
That's still better than being surrounded by homeless winos, pimps, hustlers and crack whores.

Have you been to downtown Newark at night? I have, and it ain't pretty.

I took a stroll from Society Hill (by the court house) down Market, home to 1180, and I had no problems last night. Granted, it was about 12:30 in the morning, but I'm left to wonder whether I'm disillusioned, or simply not walking in the same place you are...I have a view of downtown Newark from all six of the windows in my apartment, and I have to say that all this hype is simply overrated.

Marv95
November 9th, 2006, 11:22 AM
That's still better than being surrounded by homeless winos, pimps, hustlers and crack whores.

Have you been to downtown Newark at night? I have, and it ain't pretty.

Depends what part of Downtown. Going south of Broad/Market, it's no different than going to the South Bronx(Stadium) or 9th Ave Manhattan at night. And I've been to those places before

Radiohead
November 9th, 2006, 05:38 PM
Since I'm not from Newark, my fears are probably exaggerated by what others have told me. It may very well be fairly safe at night. I still wouldn't want to walk off the beaten path onto dark side streets, then I wouldn't do that in most cities.

Jumpgate
November 14th, 2006, 04:22 PM
I may be foolish, but I recently walked home at 3 AM from the R-N campus to 1180 carrying a laptop.

A man asked me if I had a light for his cigarette - but that's about as eventful as it got.

I feel generally safe in the University Heights - Downtown - Ironbound trifecta, but I really wouldn't feel comfortable traveling beyond these three neighborhoods.

Though Newark is really really growing on me, there are a few things that I find a little frustrating. The lack of anything open on weekends (especially Sunday) in the downtown area is probably my #1 frustration. If you need toilet paper on a Sunday afternoon you've got to go all the way to Walgreens in the Ironbound.

TriHobo
November 16th, 2006, 08:46 AM
Arena-Led Urban Revivals

November 1, 2006
Parke M. Chapman

When the 18,000-seat Sprint Center opens in Kansas City next year, local officials hope that the arena will give downtown an economic jolt. After all, other large cities have used arena-led redevelopment campaigns to revive blighted districts.

What Kansas City officials are hoping for is an instant replay of what happened when Denver plopped a new major league ballpark in the middle of a rundown industrial area. It became the centerpiece of a $2 billion redevelopment that has produced a vibrant new neighborhood.

Kansas City has all of the pieces of the puzzle — the $276 million arena is part of more than $2 billion in subsidized redevelopment activity — except one: The city has yet to land an NHL or NBA franchise.

A speculative stadium or arena project is indeed a high-stakes proposition. In San Antonio, where the $186 million Alamodome was built 13 years ago, the city is still trying to lure an NFL franchise. To get the Tampa Bay Devil Rays to commit to playing in the $110 million Sun Coast Dome in 1998, the City of St. Petersburg had to pony up $67 million for renovations to the eight-year-old facility.

But filling the stadium is only the first step in the ambitious redevelopment projects that Kansas City and other cities have planned around sports facilities. It's not enough to bring fans to the neighborhood 80 nights a year: The new urban arenas like Sprint Center are expected to justify their massive public subsidies by generating permanent improvements to the surrounding neighborhoods.

"The Sprint Center has already made a vital contribution to the redevelopment of downtown Kansas City," says Kevin Grey, president of the non-profit Kansas City Sports Commission. "The arena has already created some strong momentum among local businesses that want to be near it."

Commercial space within a few blocks of the Sprint Center is slowly filling up with tenants. But one local leasing broker says that much work remains to be done before the CBD can be called vibrant. Phillip James, senior vice president at Grubb & Ellis/The Winbury Group, believes that momentum is gradually building downtown. "I'm hoping that our growing residential base will help fill restaurants and office buildings downtown," he says.

Mile High Miracle

When a downtown sports attraction clicks, the results can be impressive. One example is Denver's Coors Field. Back in the early 1990s, local officials decided to build the 50,250-seat, $380 million stadium in a rundown district along the northern edge of the Denver CBD.

One Denver City Council member described this strip of dilapidated 1930s warehouses and industrial buildings as "double ugly." Instead of facing the usual not-in-my-backyard objections, Denver's big worry was if suburban sports fans would venture to this seedy part of town.

"People were really skeptical, but Coors Field was a home run in just about every way," says Sherman Miller, executive managing director of Cushman & Wakefield's western region.

Since Coors Field opened in 1995, the surrounding Lower Downtown area has been reborn as "LoDo," a hip residential district known for its restaurants and art galleries. Fans who throng to the team's 81 home games routinely circulate through the district where they shop and eat.

More than 90 restaurants, thousands of residential units and dozens of art galleries are located in the 25-square block district. Retail and residential property values have tripled over the past decade, says Miller. Lofts in the area are among the city's priciest apartments.

Even the LoDo office market is thriving. Unlike Denver's metro market, which was 14.9% vacant at the end of September, the LoDo submarket had a 6% vacancy rate, according to Cushman & Wakefield data. The district is still growing, too. In September, local developers won the bidding to create a mixed-use project on a 19.5-acre Union Station site located only a quarter-mile away from Coors Field. "The stadium is really what got LoDo started," says Miller, who adds that critics nearly foiled plans to build Coors Field on that site.

Foul Ball

The success of Denver and other cities such as Pittsburgh has encouraged planners and developers to believe that the introduction of a sports facility can act as a catalyst for neighborhood upgrades.

Steve Weathers, president and CEO of the Regional Growth Partnership in Toledo, Ohio, says that successful downtown arenas all share certain traits. Most tend to be near bus and subway stations, which reduces the hassle of stadium parking. It's also ideal if a critical mass of residents and office workers live and work within walking distance. Many will spend money along the way, he says. Another ingredient is keeping the facility active with concerts and other events when the team's away . "You need to draw people to the arena all year round," he says.

Despite the enthusiasm for in-town stadium developments — more than a dozen have been built around the country since 1990, according to the Urban Land Institute — experts continue to debate the overall economic benefits. Andrew Zimbalist, an economics professor at Smith College in Northampton, Mass., has studied the economics of arena development for decades. He says that arenas absorb dollars that could have been spent more effectively for economic development elsewhere in the city while imposing new costs, including security for patrons and residents.

According to Zimbalist's analysis, rental fees and revenue-sharing deals with sports teams rarely cover the direct and indirect costs of a new arena. He says that when the construction costs borne by the city and/or state are factored in, even the most successful stadiums rarely break even. Zimbalist says that building a speculative arena development such as Kansas City's Sprint Center is "irresponsible."

Central Access

Whether or not arenas and stadiums can jump-start economic revival in urban neighborhoods, it's clear that when such projects are built on sites away from business and residential centers, it's hard to discern any community-wide payoff. One example is Atlanta's Turner Field. Built in 1996 as an Olympic stadium and future home of the Atlanta Braves, the $235 million project is hemmed in by highways and surface parking — two miles outside of downtown Atlanta. And it's not conveniently connected to the MARTA rail system, so fans must either utilize a shuttle bus or find their own form of transportation. After a decade, few restaurants or retail businesses have sprung up near Turner Field.

"The city didn't want to take any risks by developing a stadium in downtown Atlanta, so it built Turner Field on the edge of the city in the middle of highways," says Janet Marie Smith, former vice president of planning and development for the Atlanta Braves. In her career, Smith has worked on Turner Field, Camden Yards and Fenway Park.

"Baltimore's Camden Yards was really the first urban ballpark whereby officials actually made the arena part of the city," says Smith, adding that in 1988, Baltimore officials viewed the stadium as a way to grow the downtown economic base. The stadium is an easy walk from Baltimore's popular Inner Harbor seaport district, making it a tourist draw, and has attracted restaurants, museums and shops. "It has ended up being the model that many other cities have tried to copy," she says.

Steel City Success Story

Pittsburgh is another example of how a sports project in just the right spot can spur development. The 65,050-seat Heinz Field opened five years ago near the site of the old Three Rivers Stadium on the northern edge of downtown. On another side, the Steelers' new home adjoins the $216 million PNC Park, which was built in 1999 for the Pirates.

"The idea was to create a mixed-use district between the two stadiums on what was formerly a bunch of parking lots," says Bernard McShea, senior vice president of business investment at Pittsburgh economic development group Allegheny Conference.

The new development also played off the northward expansion of the business district, which includes the $67 million Alcoa headquarters that opened in 2002 just 100 yards away from PNC Park. McShea says that Alcoa's decision to occupy space across the Allegheny River was viewed as a bold step at the time.

"Once they moved into the area, we started seeing some restaurant owners lease space. It definitely helps that the office is only a short walk across the Roberto Clemente Bridge from downtown Pittsburgh, too," says McShea. There are now roughly 1,000 new housing units in what has become known as the North Shore district.

"When we began redeveloping the Three Rivers site in 2003, the city made it clear that this would become a mixed-use area," explains Barry Ford, president of Continental Real Estate, which helped redevelop the 12-acre Three Rivers stadium site. "The stadiums were a way for them to create added opportunities for this area. They also demanded that an esplanade and park be developed on the riverfront."

Earlier this year, Continental built a $30 million, two-building headquarters for Del Monte Foods. And in May, Continental announced plans to develop its fourth office building in the North Shore district. Ford says that this 190,000 sq. ft. property, between the football and baseball stadiums, is already half-leased.

Tough Sell in the Heartland

For Kansas City, igniting that kind of new urbanist spark may be more difficult. The city, with a population of just 460,000, sits at the edge of an 18-county metro area of 2 million that spreads out north and west across a landmass roughly six times as large as the city of Pittsburgh.

Many upper- and middle-class white residents left Kansas City during the 1980s and early 1990s for booming suburban areas. That trend began to reverse itself in the mid-1990s and Kansas City has its share of loft conversions and downtown condo projects now. But it is still a struggle to lure upscale consumers downtown. In late October, the city announced a plan to raze four problem buildings in downtown Kansas City (one is an old Greyhound Bus Terminal).

A major focus of redevelopment is the so-called Power & Light District project. This $850 million mixed-use project, which is being developed near the Sprint Center by Baltimore-based Cordish Development, is one of the largest mixed-use projects in the Midwest.

Anchored by H&R Block's recently completed 1.3 million sq. ft. headquarters, the Power & Light District will also feature shops and galleries styled after Manhattan's hip SoHo district. The project's title harkens to the early 20th century when the district had a coal-fired power plant, which was demolished in 1930.

"It's hard to go downtown and miss all of the redevelopment activity," says Thomas Willard, CEO of Kansas City-based Tower Properties. Willard owns a 5 million sq. ft. portfolio of mostly office properties in the Kansas City metro area.

"There are two or three different catalysts driving the growth downtown, and the Sprint Center is clearly one of them. Buildings near the center are in greater demand, too," says Willard, adding that Class-A office vacancy rates in the metro region have been slowly declining in recent years.

Still, by any measure, downtown Kansas City is a troubled market: Grubb & Ellis data shows that the CBD office vacancy was hovering at 21.5% at the end of September, up from 20% at the end of 2005. New office supply doesn't appear to be an issue: There was only 550,000 sq. ft. of new office construction underway at midyear, which is a small fraction of the 12.8 million sq. ft. CBD office inventory.

"We see the Sprint Center as one very important piece of the puzzle here because the entire CBD is economically depressed," says developer Willard. "We're now just waiting to see what happens."

kevin
November 16th, 2006, 01:13 PM
If anyone here is a baseball fan (Mets all the way), surely you know about Turner Field's woes. For a team that had been a perennial winner (14 straight NL East championships, one WS), they sure did have a hard time selling out the building, even in the playoffs.

Baltimore, on the other hand, in a city that has seen its share of crime, has had no problem selling tickets to the Orioles games, despite the fact that you're more likely to see the Orioles lose than win.

Admittedly, Turner Stadium is no Camden Yards. They did it right in Baltimore. Also, one could argue that Atlanta isn't really even a baseball city, pulling more fans in from outside markets (due to Turner broadcasting games on his cable network).

Could the lack of attendance at Devils games be due to the fact that the CAA is so old and not that great of a venue? The Devils have won the Stanley Cup three times in the last 11 years, so the product itself is a good one. Could it be that, with the Flyers in Philly and Rangers at MSG, interest in the Devils is spotty, at best? Could be. But how do you describe the Islanders' fan base? Hartford was a comparable distance as Philly is to Rutherford, and the Rangers, well, as much as I despise them, they're the Rangers.

We'll only know if the Devils will sell out once the stadium opens and people get past their irrational fears.

JCMAN320
November 16th, 2006, 07:25 PM
Well this year the Devs said that attendence is unusally low this year and they it is in part to the Xanadu construction scaring many people away with the difficulty parking. I mean this is their last year in the CAA and the Devs are also thinking if people are just waiting till the move. I don't know? Hell but attendence at most NHL games is low this year. They really hurt themselves with that year lockout.

ZippyTheChimp
December 17th, 2006, 08:22 AM
December 17, 2006

Newark’s 101 Homicides Near a Record

http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2006/12/17/nyregion/17newark.xlarge1.jpg
Richard Perry/The New York Times
A memorial in Newark marks the killing of a woman last week in what the authorities said was the city’s 101st homicide of the year.

By ANDREW JACOBS

NEWARK, Dec. 15 — The flickering votives, the tearful relatives and the angry activists scolding City Hall for the death of a young mother. It was a familiar tableau as a small crowd huddled to mark the killing of Taheerah Sweat, who the police say was shot twice by a man who had taken her out on the town but then left her to die on the chilly pavement after they had a fight.

Ms. Sweat’s killing early on Dec. 10 was the 101st homicide in Newark this year, the authorities said, one body short of a 1995 record, when Newark was buckling under a wave of crack-fueled mayhem.

With three times the number of homicides per capita as New York, Newark remains one of the most violent cities in the country. New York’s homicide rate has edged up this year, but it is nowhere near that of the late 1980s. Cities across the country, including Philadelphia, Phoenix, Orlando, San Antonio and Boston, have seen increased killings, part of a two-year rise in major crimes after a decade-long drop.

“If I were an epidemiologist instead of a criminologist, I would say it looks like we have the makings of an epidemic of violence in a number of cities across the country,” said Chuck Wexler, executive director of the Police Executive Research Forum, a Washington-based law enforcement group. “Newark is not alone.”

At a news conference here on Friday, Mayor Cory A. Booker and his police director, Garry F. McCarthy, tried to draw the focus away from homicides by highlighting successes of recent weeks, including a newly fortified warrant squad that had arrested 75 people, and an overall drop in crime.

Officials also noted an aggressive quality-of-life campaign that has yielded 600 summonses in recent weeks. With two weeks left in the year, City Hall is bracing for another killing and the inevitable headlines that will thrust Newark back into public consciousness as a blood-soaked city where young thugs, guns and drugs rule the streets.

For a mayor staking his administration on both the perception and reality of Newark as a safe place, every shooting is a blow.

“It’s frustrating because these murders are overshadowing all the progress we’ve made making Newark a safer city,” Mr. Booker said shortly after learning of the death of Ms. Sweat, whose killer is still on the loose.

On Friday, as he unveiled a “12 Most Wanted” poster with two mug shots triumphantly crossed out, the mayor added, “I want to be held accountable, but not for the 60 murders that happened this year before I took office.”

Every other category of crime, he repeatedly says, is down 25 percent since he took office in July, with shootings, robberies, rapes and car thefts all recording double-digit drops. And while homicides have edged up, Mr. McCarthy, the police chief, said that the pace of killings had slowed markedly since the summer.

“We have a hundred things going, and they will start to pay off in the coming months,” he said. “People just have to be patient.”

But patience is wearing thin on the streets of Newark, especially among the loved ones of victims of violence. “You can put a thousand cops on the street, and it isn’t going to stop these knuckleheads from killing people,” said Chris Sweat, 40, as she stood beside an impromptu sidewalk memorial for her niece. “I know it’s not the mayor’s fault, but something has to change. And soon.”

Since he came to Newark in September from the New York Police Department, Mr. McCarthy has pledged to shake up a department often criticized for sluggishness and a lack of professionalism. He has given more autonomy to precinct commanders, and demanded greater accountability from them, and he has shifted 150 uniformed officers from desk jobs to the streets.

Also in the works are a new narcotics division and a video surveillance program that will put 60 cameras in the city’s most crime-battered neighborhoods.

In Newark, as in other cities, the rise in homicides and other violent crimes is mostly in low-income, minority neighborhoods, where guns are plentiful and the narcotics trade is flourishing. In many cases, both perpetrators and victims have criminal pasts that involve drugs, the police here say.

Because guns are used in 90 percent of Newark’s homicides, a fundamental challenge is reducing their abundance. The streets are awash in Glocks, AK-47’s and .357 Magnums, and even someone unable to muster the $200 to buy a cheap pistol can rent one for the day, the police say.

“In the past, a drug dealer might have had a gun stashed nearby,” said Michael Wagers, executive director of the Police Institute at Rutgers University. “Now it’s in his waistband, so small disputes quickly lead to gunfire.”

Mr. McCarthy is taking a page from New York’s playbook, where the decade-long drop in homicides has been partly tied to a crackdown on illegal guns. He said the department was tracking buyers and sellers to other states and forcefully prosecuting people caught with illegal guns to discourage them from treating the weapons as everyday accessories.

Mr. McCarthy also said he was hoping that word of Newark’s participation in a tough federal program that leads to stiff sentences for some gun possession cases would trickle down to the streets.

“Instead of spending a half-hour in the county jail, you’re going to spend five years in a federal penitentiary in South Dakota where no one will visit you,” he warned.

But Tony Edwards, a former convict who helps run Street Warriors, a group that tries to steer young people away from trouble, said Mr. Booker’s success in reducing violent crime would depend not on how many prison cells he filled, but on how many jobs he created.

“Increased law enforcement is all good, but we have to look at the bigger picture,” Mr. Edwards said. “It’s about jobs, it’s about poverty, it’s about education and it’s about paying attention to our kids. If we all work together, I think we can turn this city around.”

Ms. Sweat, 25, whose death last week left four children without a mother, had not been planning to stick around for the dawn of a new Newark. According to relatives, she had grown weary of the violence and was weeks away from moving her family to Virginia.

http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2006/12/17/nyregion/17newark.graphic.jpg


Copyright 2006 The New York Times Company

ablarc
December 17th, 2006, 11:30 AM
“If I were an epidemiologist instead of a criminologist, I would say it looks like we have the makings of an epidemic of violence in a number of cities across the country,” said Chuck Wexler, executive director of the Police Executive Research Forum, a Washington-based law enforcement group. “Newark is not alone.”
Epidemiologists generally know what causes the epidemic they're studying.

But this seems mysterious.

Must be a force of nature.

The power of the Universe...


Newark ... a blood-soaked city where young thugs, guns and drugs rule the streets.
Why? Why do young thugs, guns and drugs rule the streets?

Actually, scratch that. Guns and drugs don't rule anything, they're inanimate.

The proper question is: Why do young thugs rule the streets?


“You can put a thousand cops on the street, and it isn’t going to stop these knuckleheads from killing people,”
Yup, it's a force of Nature alright. Can't do much about that.


But Tony Edwards, a former convict who helps run Street Warriors, a group that tries to steer young people away from trouble, said Mr. Booker’s success in reducing violent crime would depend not on how many prison cells he filled, but on how many jobs he created.
An implausible claim. It suggests that for every unemployed person you jail for a crime, there's another to spring into his place:


“Increased law enforcement is all good, but we have to look at the bigger picture,” Mr. Edwards said. “It’s about jobs, it’s about poverty, it’s about education and it’s about paying attention to our kids. If we all work together, I think we can turn this city around.”

Ms. Sweat, 25, whose death last week left four children without a mother, had not been planning to stick around for the dawn of a new Newark. According to relatives, she had grown weary of the violence and was weeks away from moving her family to Virginia.
Put the punks in jail and simultaneously provide jobs. But no one should buy the idea that all unemployed folks are inevitably criminals. That's the Universe speaking again. The Universe doesn't decide anything.

Immediately implementable solution to this problem is a job for the police. Creating the jobs may take a decade. Meantime, there are victims' lives to be saved.

kevin
December 18th, 2006, 01:55 PM
Epidemiologists generally know what causes the epidemic they're studying.

But this seems mysterious.

Must be a force of nature.

The power of the Universe...


Why? Why do young thugs, guns and drugs rule the streets?

Actually, scratch that. Guns and drugs don't rule anything, they're inanimate.

The proper question is: Why do young thugs rule the streets?


Yup, it's a force of Nature alright. Can't do much about that.


An implausible claim. It suggests that for every unemployed person you jail for a crime, there's another to spring into his place:


Put the punks in jail and simultaneously provide jobs. But no one should buy the idea that all unemployed folks are inevitably criminals. That's the Universe speaking again. The Universe doesn't decide anything.

Immediately implementable solution to this problem is a job for the police. Creating the jobs may take a decade. Meantime, there are victims' lives to be saved.

That's a nice bar graph they have. One thing they don't have is a listing of *where* the murders took place. Every time I hear about a murder (or shooting) in Newark, I hop onto google maps and try to pinpoint the location of the murder.

As unscientific as this study is, I've discovered that the bulk of the shootings occur in a triangle between Lincoln Park, Weequahic Park and West Side Park.

That triangle contains the south and west wards of Newark, the two more crime ridden areas of the city, and the area that requires the highest police presence.

That is also the area of the highest poverty rate in the city. More jobs? maybe. More police? Definitely.

But it doesn't paint a picture of Newark as a whole. In the downtown area, the Ironbound, and to a lesser extent, the north ward, the city is quite a safe place. Why? Money, for one reason. But there's also a much higher police presence. One thing Sharpe James cared about was the image of the city. So you had a police kiosk on Market St. You have a temporary police station across from the NJPAC, and plenty of police cars on the day of a game at Eagles and Bears stadium. Where do these police go afterwards?

My guess would be that if you targeted the highest crime areas (that triangle) and stationed an equal amount of police down there as you do in the business district, you'll see a significant decrease in crime.

JCMAN320
December 21st, 2006, 02:03 PM
A polished and wrinkle-free city hall
In Newark, 100-year-old structure's $18M face-lift is finished

Thursday, December 21, 2006
BY KATIE WANG
Star-Ledger Staff

Exactly what did it take to give Newark City Hall its first deep cleansing in 100 years?

Several splashes of lemon juice, a few cans of shaving cream and 250,000 sheets of gold.

It was just what the doctor ordered.

After spending nearly a year concealed under scaffolding and white plastic, Newark City Hall's $18 million face-lift is complete -- in time for its 100th birthday, which passed yesterday. Mayor Cory Booker will rededicate the building at a ceremony today.

The building features restored front steps, energy-saving windows, a dome gilded with fresh gold and a brighter granite exterior. The brass railings and light fixtures on the outside have also been restored.

"City Hall is a national landmark and one of Newark's most prominent buildings, designed by local genius and ingenuity and stands as a testament to the city's history," said Brad Small, a librarian at the Newark Public Library and curator of an exhibit on the building's history. "Now when I pass by City Hall on the way home, it looks fresh, bright and really stands out again."

Giving a building its first makeover in a century was no easy task.

Even though the building's exterior has been cleaned from time to time, it has taken a beating from Mother Nature, Father Time and the pigeons -- the unwelcomed house guests who turned the top of City Hall into their penthouse suite, leaving behind thick piles of droppings.

"The pigeons were all nesting on the building and it was a health nuisance," said John P. Gross of Austin Helle Co. Inc., which was responsible for the restoration.

At least half the building is now draped in a nylon netting that protects it from birds. It is barely visible from the outside.

The most evident difference was also the hardest and most complicated part of the project -- the 60-foot dome.

When construction workers pried open parts of the dome, it created a funnel effect, sucking in the construction dust and odors into the building. They plugged the building's joints and gaps creatively, using tape, plastic and even shaving cream.

"That was probably our biggest headache in the whole project," City Architect Robert Dooley Jr. said.

When it came to refurbishing the dome, one of the gilders borrowed an old trick from her grandmother: lemon juice. The dome is made out of copper, but was gilded with gold in the late 1980s.

Workers from EverGreene Painting Studios Inc. scrubbed the copper dome using jugs of lemon juice to strip off the dirt and oils. After applying primer, two gilders spent five months atop the dome, pressing 250,000 sheets of delicate 23-carat gold leaf around the dome.

Each gold leaf weighs 18 grams and is 3 1/2 inches, approximately the size of a business card and the weight of tissue paper. It took two gilders about four months to complete the dome.

"It's essentially a labor intensive process done the way artisans have been doing it since they've started putting gold on buildings," said Tim Reilly, the supervisor of the dome portion of the project. "It took a lot of time to do."

So did the window replacement, which eventually had to be done in the evening and on the weekends because the noise was distracting employees during the day.

"There was a lot of trial and error, too," Dooley said. "We were replacing work that was done 100 years ago."

The building is one of the oldest City Halls in the state. Hoboken City Hall was built in 1883 and Jersey City's was completed in 1898.

The Newark building was designed in a Beaux Arts style, an ornamental European type of architecture that was popular in the 19th century.

Dooley said the next phase will be the interior of the building, expected to cost about $3 million. Dooley said he would like to replace the three large panes of stained glass inside the building, restore water-damaged plaster and repaint the walls.

Eventually, he hopes to restore the restrooms and remove the safety netting that was placed beneath the dome to catch chunks of falling plaster.

Regina Cummings, 42, of the North Ward said the building looked dramatically better. Cummings was at City Hall yesterday to get a copy of her birth certificate.

"It makes the city look much better," she said. "It used to be dull. It's much brighter."

---------------------------------

Katie Wang may be reached at kwang@starledger.com or (973) 392-1504.

Dagrecco82
December 21st, 2006, 02:39 PM
I passed by it last week and was completely in AWE on how beautiful the restoration looked. I've never seen City Hall look so beautiful.

Mix106
December 26th, 2006, 10:23 AM
Heys!!!

I am worried about security in Newark!!! Should I be afraid of moving to Ironbound, Newark?

Merry Christmas!;)

Eugenious
December 26th, 2006, 01:21 PM
I passed by it last week and was completely in AWE on how beautiful the restoration looked. I've never seen City Hall look so beautiful.

Original Pic

http://www.virtualnewarknj.com/publicbuild/images/cityhall/new/cityhall4.jpg

macmini
January 5th, 2007, 10:25 PM
Boulevard in Newark Runs From Decline to Rebirth

http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2007/01/04/nyregion/600_econ_1.jpg
Richard Perry/The New York Times
Krueger-Scott mansion is empty, but new houses are nearby.
By ANDREW JACOBS (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/reference/timestopics/people/j/andrew_jacobs/index.html?inline=nyt-per)
Published: January 5, 2007

NEWARK, Jan. 2 — Carolyn Whigham stood on Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/reference/timestopics/people/k/martin_luther_jr_king/index.html?inline=nyt-per) Boulevard and took in the landscape of tattered brownstones, trash-strewn lots and skinny addicts by the front door of the funeral home that has been in her family for three generations. Then she closed her eyes and a vision of the street in the 1950s took hold, a reverie of mansions, graceful oak trees and the reassuring roar of a bustling industrial city.

“I can see Lawyer Tate, Dr. Shelton, Old Lady Ruffin and all the beautiful buildings,” Mrs. Whigham said, ticking off the people who once filled the granite-and-marble Victorians. “It was a gem. For a black family, it was a dream to be living here.”

In the summer of 1967, the Whighams huddled on their rooftop as rioters burned neighboring buildings; then the Whighams helped bury a dozen victims of the violence. In the decades since, they have witnessed the flight of the professional class and the onslaught of drugs and despair, planning countless funerals for teenagers killed by gunfire and young mothers felled by AIDS (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/news/health/diseasesconditionsandhealthtopics/aids/index.html?inline=nyt-classifier).

“To see all that happening to my street, to my city, has been very traumatic,” Mrs. Whigham, 57, said.

But now, across the street from where she grew up, workers are laying sod in front of 100 crisp Georgian-style town houses that replaced a forbidding housing project. A few blocks north, a new dormitory for 800 students is to be finished by fall. To the east, the steel bones of a hockey arena are filling the horizon. Throughout Newark, even on the most ragged blocks, new three-family homes are selling for $400,000.

“This city is coming back,” Mrs. Whigham said. “It’s finally happening, and I believe it’s going to happen in my lifetime.”

After 30 years of decline and a decade of sporadic renewal efforts, the two-mile boulevard through Newark’s Central Ward — known as High Street until 1983 — is showing signs of progress. So is the entire city.
More than 2,500 private homes are being built, Barnes & Noble is looking downtown, and hundreds of suburbanites and New Yorkers are moving into the city’s first luxury high-rise in a generation.

Though these projects began under his predecessor, Sharpe James (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/reference/timestopics/people/j/sharpe_james/index.html?inline=nyt-per), Cory A. Booker (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/reference/timestopics/people/b/cory_booker/index.html?inline=nyt-per), Newark’s ambitious young mayor, has revved up the momentum since he took office in July. He has made lofty promises to recast his struggling city as a national model for urban revitalization, and dismantled bureaucratic impediments to development. His administration plans to lift the more stringent zoning rules to encourage downtown residential construction, create building trade apprenticeships for jobless young people and develop a municipal loan pool for minority business owners.

“It feels like all the pieces are finally coming together,” said Dennis M. Bone, president of Verizon New Jersey, one of the few corporations to keep its headquarters here as Newark lost many of its blue-chip employers and almost half its population.

Yet Newark faces steep obstacles to prosperity. Real estate taxes are onerous, the public school system is in shambles and any new businesses Mr. Booker may bring in will find a largely unskilled work force: of those 25 and older, 58 percent lack a high school diploma and 9 percent have a bachelor’s degree, according to the 2000 census.

As it stands, more than three-quarters of the city’s 150,000 jobs are held by out-of-towners. For Mr. Booker, already tarnished in the eyes of some as an outsider for his suburban upbringing and criticized for hiring too many aides from New York, the true challenge will be to spread change beyond a few shiny spots in the business district downtown into the struggling neighborhoods.

“All my life, the politicians have been calling this place the Renaissance City,” complained Latonya Edwards, 28, a part-time security guard who is raising three children in a decrepit apartment building on Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard. “I think the renaissance is for suburban people who go downtown. If they have their way, people like me would just disappear.”
Even some of Newark’s biggest civic boosters worry about outsize expectations after Mr. Booker’s public pronouncements of the city’s potential. (The mayor, a vegetarian, often talks about luring a Whole Foods market to the city.) And while Newark’s overall crime rate dropped last year, homicides recently reached a 10-year high, hardly helping to improve its reputation.

“The edge is so thin right now,” said Alfred C. Koeppe, president of the Newark Alliance, a consortium of business leaders working to improve the economy and schools. “All it takes is one kid who recently moved here to get shot on the way to the PATH train and it could be all over.”

Still, urban experts say Newark, population 278,000, has an edge over other midsize cities still stumbling from the loss of their manufacturing bedrock. Just 10 miles from Manhattan and surrounded by wealthy suburbs, Newark is blessed with an expanding seaport, an international airport and a skein of highways and commuter rail lines.

Quietly and with little fanfare, high-tech entrepreneurs have set up shop over the past decade at a 60-acre science park that is growing alongside the city’s five colleges and professional schools. In October, the hockey arena is scheduled to join a decade-old performing arts center that has proved successful in drawing visitors to a downtown that otherwise feels like a disused Hollywood set after dusk.

“The one thing that New Jersey lacks is a premier city,” said Thomas K. Wright, executive vice president of the Regional Plan Association (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/reference/timestopics/organizations/r/regional_plan_assn/index.html?inline=nyt-org), which has helped formulate redevelopment plans for a number of struggling cities in New York’s orbit. “This is Newark’s moment to become that city. It’s going to happen in the next few years. Or it won’t.”

Directing Mr. Booker’s economic development efforts is Stefan Pryor, a friend from Yale (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/reference/timestopics/organizations/y/yale_university/index.html?inline=nyt-org) Law School who led efforts to revive Lower Manhattan after 9/11. Now, as one of Newark’s three deputy mayors, Mr. Pryor has been hawking Newark to national retailers, streamlining the way City Hall doles out licenses and building permits, and trying to create a new Planning Department to replace a politicized, fragmented one that developers say often stymied projects.

“In the past you had to do back flips and jump through rings of fire,” Mr. Pryor said at a recent Chamber of Commerce breakfast where he gave a presentation of the streamlined permit process. “This is a new era. We’re going to be the new high-integrity folks at City Hall who you can talk to with intelligence.”

Mr. Pryor, 34, recently moved from Manhattan to an Art Deco tower a few blocks off Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard that has become a highly visible symbol — and test — of Newark’s aspirations. Vacant for 20 years, the building at Raymond Boulevard and Broad Street is being transformed into 317 apartments, and will feature valet parking, a mod bowling alley and a yoga studio. The average rent for a two-bedroom is $2,500; the building is still under renovation, but half the finished apartments have been rented.
A year from now, the landlord, Cogswell Realty Group, plans to break ground nearby on a project that would bring 2,900 units to a stretch of Broad Street now dominated by abandoned department stores. The company sees its markets as college students who currently commute to Newark, young professionals priced out of Manhattan and empty-nesters seeking an urban experience without depleting their savings.

“When we started this 18 months ago, there were plenty of people who thought we wouldn’t sign a single lease or that we wouldn’t get the rents we’re getting,” Arthur Stern, Cogswell’s chief executive, said during a tour of the health club in the Art Deco building. “I think we’ve proven everyone wrong.”

Mr. Pryor was among the first to move in, as much to make a statement about the area’s viability as for the five-minute walk to work. Unpacking boxes in his 15th-floor apartment one recent evening, he gazed out at City Hall’s gold-leaf dome and the fast-rising arena. Then his eye settled on the darkened 19th-century mercantile buildings in the foreground. “I’m hoping we can inject these buildings with some life,” he said.

To that end, Mr. Pryor soon plans to ask the City Council to eliminate stringent zoning rules that have made it difficult to get approval to renovate the upper floors of commercial buildings. Another major goal is revamping the city’s master plan, which has not been updated in 50 years. In a city with no bookstores and just two supermarkets, he spends most of his days on the phone with retailers and restaurateurs, talking up the untapped spending power of Newark residents.

Business leaders and politicians alike say such retail — and residential — development depends in part on the 50,000 students and teachers whose lives revolve around Seton Hall (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/reference/timestopics/organizations/s/seton_hall_university/index.html?inline=nyt-org) Law School, Rutgers University (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/reference/timestopics/organizations/r/rutgers_the_state_university/index.html?inline=nyt-org), New Jersey Institute of Technology (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/reference/timestopics/organizations/n/new_jersey_institute_of_technology/index.html?inline=nyt-org), Essex County College and the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/reference/timestopics/organizations/u/university_of_medicine_and_dentistry_of_new_jersey/index.html?inline=nyt-org).

Once largely commuter schools, their academic buildings walled off from the surrounding city, these five institutions have been building furiously, constructing new dormitories that, by the fall semester, will house 4,000 students in and around downtown.

“People don’t think of Newark as a college town, but I think that’s about to change,” said Gene A. Vincenti, executive vice provost at Rutgers-Newark, at the school’s new $50 million administrative building, part of a $210 million capital improvement plan.

Up the hill from Rutgers, in a futuristic, four-story building, a biophysicist was busy working on a new ultraviolet system to treat psoriasis and purify drinking water, while a former telecommunications executive plotted the rollout of software that uses a computer-generated voice to read e-mail messages over the phone. Others in the so-called Newark Innovation Zone were creating facial recognition software for security firms and technologies that can detect biological agents in luggage.

Started 10 years ago, the zone — also known as University Heights Science Park — is one of three technology incubators in the state, with 60 start-ups and scores of lone entrepreneurs who enjoy cheap office space, free business advice and monthly networking lunches. There is a waiting list of several months, so this year organizers plan to build another 100,000-square-foot building, christened the Digital Century Center. A separate stem-cell research center is on the drawing board.

The lofty dream, those running the incubator say, is to turn the surrounding area into a high-tech manufacturing zone that could employ thousands of people. “The idea is to make these things here, and create more than just jobs for a bunch of Ph.D.’s and their secretarial and janitorial support staff,” said Donald H. Sebastian a vice president of the New Jersey Institute of Technology, the center’s main sponsor.

But with almost a third of Newark’s residents living in poverty, and the city’s unemployment rate at 10 percent — more than double New York City’s rate and more than double New Jersey’s average — cynicism about such ideas abounds.

Ronnie Addy, who said he never finished high school and spent a year in jail for gun possession more than a decade ago, said he would “love to work in an office” someday, but has more or less given up looking for a job and survives on public assistance. “I can’t make ends meet flipping burgers and making minimum wage,” said Mr. Addy, 44.

An associate professor of management and global business at Rutgers, dt ogilvie, said many of the chronically unemployed here needed the most basic training: how to dress for an interview, how to speak to an employer and how to handle disputes without storming out the door. “We have plenty of willing workers in Newark,” he said; “a lot of them are just not equipped to work.”

Indeed, down at the waterfront, where the business of unloading and loading cargo has doubled in the past decade, producing about 1,000 new jobs a year, nearly 80 percent of the 28,000 stevedore and truck driving positions are held by people who live outside the city. At Newark Liberty International Airport, the airlines hire hundreds of baggage handlers, flight attendants and reservation agents every month; few are from Newark.
Mayor Booker insists that City Hall will not ignore the city’s poorest residents and frequently says he is trying to make the rehabilitation of former offenders like Mr. Addy a top priority.

With 1,500 to 2,000 parolees returning to Newark each year — and 60 percent of them ending up in handcuffs again within three years, according to city officials — the Booker administration plans to unveil a program next month that would provide ex-felons with job training and help them expunge their criminal records.

During a recent City Hall meeting, when Mr. Pryor gushed about a flood of calls from potential investors, his counterpart in charge of minority economic empowerment, Michelle Thomas, flashed an expression of concern.

“I’m worried people in the Central Ward will be upset if we emphasize downtown housing,” Ms. Thomas said of the neighborhood that took the most damage from the 1967 riots. “It’s semantic, but people will care and there’s potential for a backlash.”

Nodding, Mr. Booker said, “We don’t want to gentrify people out of the city,” but he added that “creating a 24/7 community means providing retail and jobs and these will be opportunities for Newark residents.”

From the antiseptic hush of the high-tech park on its northern tip to the Hotel Riviera, where $10 buys a room for an hour, two miles south, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard is a jagged montage of Newark’s grand history, nightmarish depths and nascent revival.

Not far from the Riviera, and an abandoned housing project occupied by a small army of squatters, sits Hopewell Baptist Church, a 3,000-seat behemoth known to another generation as Temple B’nai Jeshurun. The Rev. Jason C. Guice struggles to keep the rain from destroying Hopewell’s organ and to stop the termites from chewing the cherry-wood pews; last year, the sanctuary’s huge Star of David chandelier shattered on the floor. The congregation runs a soup kitchen that feeds 300 people every Saturday, a nursing school for young women and a day care center for their children.
“We haven’t really arrived yet, but we’re on our way,” Mr. Guice said of both Newark and his church.

Mrs. Whigham, the funeral home owner, left Newark a few years ago for Livingston, an affluent suburb nine miles northwest.

Yes, she said, she has appreciated the tranquillity of sleeping behind windows without bars. But she misses the energy and rich history of her High Street.

“This place is in my blood,” she said.

Mrs. Whigham plans to turn one of the four brownstones her family owns on the boulevard into a mortuary-science school. And, this month, she plans to sell her house in Livingston and move back into the apartment above the funeral home.

JCMAN320
January 5th, 2007, 11:27 PM
Newark can become the premier city for the state, but right now that city is Jersey City. Newark has to not just focus on it's Downtown but its neighborhoods. Thats where JC has Newark beat. We have nicer neighborhoods and only few areas became down trodden compared to Newark. Newark can do it and has the pieces but if they don't do it right now, it will never happen.

macmini
January 6th, 2007, 12:12 AM
Like the article said there is no premier city in NJ right now Jersey City is trying to be but it's not. I think Rem Koolhaas describes Jersey City the best “It is clearly emerging into a new future, though it’s not clear what.” We have a great sky line, but there are parts of Jersey City that are just not cohesive.


Directing Mr. Booker’s economic development efforts is Stefan Pryor, a friend from Yale (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/reference/timestopics/organizations/y/yale_university/index.html?inline=nyt-org) Law School who led efforts to revive Lower Manhattan after 9/11. Now, as one of Newark’s three deputy mayors, Mr. Pryor has been hawking Newark to national retailers, streamlining the way City Hall doles out licenses and building permits, and trying to create a new Planning Department to replace a politicized, fragmented one that developers say often stymied projects.

To that end, Mr. Pryor soon plans to ask the City Council to eliminate stringent zoning rules that have made it difficult to get approval to renovate the upper floors of commercial buildings. Another major goal is revamping the city’s master plan, which has not been updated in 50 years. In a city with no bookstores and just two supermarkets, he spends most of his days on the phone with retailers and restaurateurs, talking up the untapped spending power of Newark residents.Mr Pryor is exactly what Jersey City needs to become a premier city. We have a master plane, but we just don't use it. Developers just come in and take control of the city closing down blocks for months at a time.

macmini
January 11th, 2007, 05:33 PM
New look for Newark

Contrarian developer pushes downtown luxury projects


http://www.therealdeal.net//issues/JANUARY_2007/images/1167681525.jpg

By John Celock
The lounge at Eleven80, a new 35-story rental in Newark.



Cogswell Realty Group is betting big on the notion that if you build it, buyers will come, even if they're coming to the drug- and crime-ridden core of Newark.

Developer Arthur Stern's vision of residential redevelopment for the city's downtown seeks to draw young, hip and value-conscious buyers to the urban core at Eleven80. Cogswell's new 35-story tower sits across the street from Seton Hall University Law School, a block from Gateway Center and Pennsylvania Station.

The luxury apartment tower is scheduled for February completion, after which Stern plans to start work on several new condominium and apartment complexes lining Broad Street across from Military Park. Stern said the end goal is to add 3,000 residential units to downtown Newark, as well as 200,000 square feet of retail space and 2,500 parking spots.

Revival of New Jersey's largest city has been a fond hope for decades, ever since the former manufacturing center was ravaged by riots in the late 1960s, spurring a cycle of economic woe, white flight and urban poverty.

Recent steps to revive Newark include siting the New Jersey Performing Arts Center on the banks of the Passaic River in the late 1990s. Most recently, Newark's downtown will be the location for the National Hockey League's New Jersey Devils when the 2007 season begins, and boosters say a full-scale downtown revitalization is in the works.

Cogswell is one of the believers. The firm purchased the National Newark Building at 744 Broad Street several years ago, did extensive restoration and renovation, and recruited new businesses to fill its space. Tenants include the information management company LexisNexis.

Stern said prospective tenants at Eleven80 are the type of people who are eager to pioneer a residential renaissance.

"There is a segment of the population who is looking for the new hip thing," Stern said of the demographic he is targeting. "They like when the eyebrows go up when they give their address."

After Eleven80 is complete, Stern said the former Hanes Department Store building will be torn down for the next phase of development. The trio of new buildings will look like progressively rising steps in the revived skyline, he said. Stern also said he recruited architects who worked on Manhattan's Bryant Park to redesign Military Park. The entire process is scheduled to be finished in seven years.

Eleven80 first started renting units last summer, but some apartment floors and amenity spaces are unfinished. The project is loaded with amenities, which Stern says helps attract his target demographic of young professionals. The doorman-staffed tower has a bowling alley, billiards room, lounge, massage therapist, health club, Pilates studio and basketball courts. It also offers parking and shuttle service to the train, airport and local universities.

Loading buildings in less-developed areas with lots of amenities to give residents all they need right at their fingertips is a strategy used in recent years in places like the Financial District and Long Island City.

Rents on the one-bedroom units average $1,500 a month, with $2,200 a month for a one-bedroom with den and $2,500 a month for a two-bedroom. Several duplex penthouses with terraces are set to open when the building is completed.

"It's much more value than you'd get elsewhere," Stern said of Eleven80. "When you look at the game plan for the building you have to offer something compelling."

Much of Newark's recent visibility has been generated by new Mayor Cory Booker, who took over in July from Sharpe James, a long-standing incumbent. Since Booker took office, Stern said he has seen more interest from other developers and the state in helping revitalize Newark. Booker has been praised for recruiting Deputy Mayor Stefan Pryor, the former president of the Lower Manhattan Development Corporation, to oversee economic development in the city.

Eleven80's tenants average between 25 and 40 years old, with a few empty nesters. Many are originally from Manhattan and 34 percent are single women. Stern takes pride in the high number of single women in the building, saying they traditionally avoid unsafe neighborhoods.

Stern said he hopes to see more college students and medical residents move into the building. Newark is home to a campus and the law school of Rutgers University, the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey and the New Jersey Institute of Technology, along with several hospitals as well as Seton Hall's law school. Estimates suggest 50,000 students and university staff work and study in Newark daily.

Stern noted that his biggest battle has been overcoming negative perceptions of Newark as a center of urban blight and high crime. In addition, many metro-area young professionals view the neighboring Hudson County communities of Hoboken and Jersey City as the Garden State's best areas to live. Jersey City Councilman Steven Fulop, who represents the growing waterfront, touts his city's growth rate and said it's on pace to outgrow Newark by the end of the decade, a notion Stern disputes.

"Newark has reversed its population decline, and I think there will be significant population growth here," Stern said. "What's different to me with Newark and Jersey City is that Newark has long been an established city with a great cultural and higher education system. It's got all the pieces, but it lacks the perception."

Radiohead
January 11th, 2007, 10:04 PM
During a recent City Hall meeting, when Mr. Pryor gushed about a flood of calls from potential investors, his counterpart in charge of minority economic empowerment, Michelle Thomas, flashed an expression of concern.

“I’m worried people in the Central Ward will be upset if we emphasize downtown housing,” Ms. Thomas said of the neighborhood that took the most damage from the 1967 riots. “It’s semantic, but people will care and there’s potential for a backlash.”

Nodding, Mr. Booker said, “We don’t want to gentrify people out of the city,” but he added that “creating a 24/7 community means providing retail and jobs and these will be opportunities for Newark residents.”


Ms. Thomas' comments stuck out to me. It's tantamount to a mother fearing her child will be upset with her for repainting her crayon streaked dining room walls. Does this woman have a clue, and what is she even doing in charge of minority economic empowerment? It seems she prefers the status quo, which clashes with the vision of the mayor, Mr. Pryor and others. If the residents are economically empowered via education and training, then they would be able to afford to live in the "new" Newark. Rather than showing optimism that the investment in Newark could be a boon for the area's residents, she seems more concerned about appeasing the chronically unemployed Ronnie Addy's, who rely on the public dole. Whether she likes it or not, some gentrification is necesssary to save downtown Newark. Unfortunately, that means poor residents will be priced out of some areas. So it is with any urban renewal project. While the city does need to ensure that safe, affordable housing is available as well, it has to welcome potential investors, who have been few and far between over the last 40 years.


Statements like hers remind me why Newark is still the way it is, and why it has the reputation for high crime and urban blight. Fortunately, Mayor Booker seems to "get it". Unlike some, he doesn't want the image of Newark to be this.............


http://farm1.static.flickr.com/146/354459810_23d0a6086f_o.jpg

ablarc
January 12th, 2007, 12:53 AM
Ms. Thomas' comments stuck out to me. It's tantamount to a mother fearing her child will be upset with her for repainting her crayon streaked dining room walls. Does this woman have a clue, and what is she even doing in charge of minority economic empowerment? It seems she prefers the status quo, which clashes with the vision of the mayor, Mr. Pryor and others.
She needs to read this article: http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?t=11879

JCMAN320
March 5th, 2007, 11:39 PM
Newark creates police foundation to battle crime

3/5/2007, 5:12 p.m. ET
The Associated Press

NEWARK, N.J. (AP) — Newark Mayor Cory Booker raised $1.25 million in a month from private companies, public agencies and foundations to create a police foundation in another effort to reduce crime in New Jersey's largest city.

Among the first objectives of the Newark Police Foundation are a gun buyback program and police-monitored tip line, called Crime Stoppers and Gun Stoppers. Tips leading to an arrest and/or indictment can result rewards up to $2,000 in cash.

Callers to a toll-free number will be able to anonymously provide information about criminal activity in Newark directly to police.

Police Director Garry F. McCarthy said detectives will answer two tip lines, which will be staffed 24 hours a day and will accept calls in English, Spanish and Portuguese.

The Newark Police Foundation, a fund within the Newark Community Foundation, will support programs that the city cannot finance itself.

Money has come from companies that have strong ties to Newark, including Prudential Financial Inc.; Cogswell Realty Group, a developer with several high-profile projects in Newark, and the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey.

Arthur Stern, CEO of Cogswell, said the real estate community was appalled to see the condition of some police precincts.

"We have pledged to work with the city," he said, "giving the police the support that they need to make changes."

The foundation will publicize its efforts with donated billboards and will raise money to buy equipment for police officers, including mobile data computers, video cameras, satellite cellular phones and computers to fingerprint arrestees.

___

On the Net:

http://www.crimestoppersnwk.com

http://www.gunstoppersnwk.com

clubBR
April 1st, 2007, 05:39 AM
My father owns a business on Market St. in Newark. I've been there a few times and noticed how thin the commercial strip was. Immediately surrounding this thin commercial sector is vast and dark residential zones. The lights are dim or there are no lights at all. There are police cars on every street corner. The only buildings you see are projects and bodegas. How is Newark going to up these surroundings? The police presence helps but there needs to be some sort of gentrification. Anyone have any ideas of their own?

Marv95
April 1st, 2007, 12:30 PM
My father owns a business on Market St. in Newark. I've been there a few times and noticed how thin the commercial strip was. Immediately surrounding this thin commercial sector is vast and dark residential zones. The lights are dim or there are no lights at all. There are police cars on every street corner. The only buildings you see are projects and bodegas. How is Newark going to up these surroundings? The police presence helps but there needs to be some sort of gentrification. Anyone have any ideas of their own?

Is this near the arena site or is past the UMDNJ area? I think it's up past UMDNJ off Central Ave, since the Georgia King projects and bodegas are there. unfortunately that area will not be "gentrfied" since low-income residents live in that zone.

investordude
May 5th, 2007, 12:01 AM
http://www.nj.com/news/ledger/jersey/index.ssf?/base/news-6/117756180198850.xml&coll=1&thispage=1

I think the city of Newark should favor, rather than resist, airport growth. First, it provides jobs for Newark residents - Newark happens to be an area where flight crews would be reasonably likely to live given its low cost, etc. And this happens to be something someone without that much education can do to get started in life.

Besides, who in their right mind buys a house next to an airport and then sues the airport for being loud?

investordude
May 5th, 2007, 08:34 PM
http://www.nytimes.com/2007/05/06/nyregion/06newark.html

I personally think Newark is still a long way from gentrifying, but the Times plays up a good hype for the city. I guess decide for yourself

JCMAN320
May 5th, 2007, 11:11 PM
If they can't get the crime under control, Newark will never thrive and prosper.

STT757
May 6th, 2007, 12:16 PM
I'm hopeful, especially given how things are finally turned around in Asbury Park, a place with huge potential. Newark has huge potential also, but the corruption, crime and reputation are huge obstacles.

I used to work for the State of New Jersey on Halsey street (mentioned in the times article), it has some nice points especially the Newark Musuem. The biggest downside is the total lack of decent places to eat, get a cup of coffee and shop. In Downtown Newark there's a Dunkin Donuts below the Prudential Building in a mall trapped in 1968, a Starbucks across Broad Street and a New York and company clothing store.

Outside of that there is nothing decent in Downtown Newark outside the Ironbound. Way too many wig and weave shops, shops selling $3 dollar white tee shirts etc..

They need the following:

More Dunkin Donuts, Starbucks, Panera, Cosi, Barnes and Noble, decent super markets, a department store or two, a Gap etc..

They should focus on developing the Iron Bound and the Downtown area especially around Prudential, the Newark Arena, and Rutgers. The State keeps looking at expanding Rutgers in New Brunswick and Piscataway, they should develop the Rutgers campus in Newark. There's tons of potential to further expand the University campus in Newark.

Downtown Newark also needs some decent hotels, tear down the Hilton and it's outdate mall and rebuild a new Hilton. Also a Courtyard Marriott, Hampton Inn, Sheraton etc.. can feed on city business as well as Airport travelers.

investordude
May 6th, 2007, 08:19 PM
Why not put a Gateway Center type mall in Newark, as well as truck driver friendly motels and retail?

It seems to me Newark doesn't do enough mundate stuff. If you can put a Gateway Center with big box stores in East New York, on a highway you only travel if you're headed to southern Long Island from New Jersey, and it can succeed, I'd have to think you could do 10 times as well in Newark. For a place that's lost 40% of its population, I'd have to think you could assemble the lots you need to make that turn a hefty profit, create jobs for people in Newark and revenue for the city that it could spend to fight crime.

West Hudson
May 6th, 2007, 08:29 PM
When riding the PATH from Newark back to Jersey City today, I couldn't help but notice that a MAJOR new development is on its way for the waterfront, right next to Gateway center (East of Penn Station). I believe it may be the long-awaited Newark Waterfront office plaza. Several pieces of heavy equipment are there, and pilings are being driven into the ground. The site was vacant up until about two or three weeks ago I believe.

I personally think that the massive new Prudential Center will spread redevelopment through Newark like wildfire. Given all major schools there (Rutgers Law, Rutgers Business, and Seton Hall Law, to name a few) in addition to the transportation (PATH, Amtrak, lightrail, subway, two NJ Transit stations, and, or course, the AIRPORT!), as well as several very high capacity roads, proximity the nation's largest port, history, and now two major entertainment centers (NJPAC and Prudential Center), as soon as the city gets a better grip on crime, it will take off unlike anything NJ has ever seen before in terms of redevelopment. There is just so so much potential. Office tower construction in Jersey City will add an additional boost to this, as the commute from Newark Penn Station to Exchange Place via PATH is under 20 minutes.

Marv95
May 7th, 2007, 01:40 PM
If they can't get the crime under control, Newark will never thrive and prosper.
Baltimore and Cleveland are "thriving", yet their crime rates are totally off the charts.

kevin
May 7th, 2007, 06:19 PM
The biggest downside is the total lack of decent places to eat, get a cup of coffee and shop. In Downtown Newark there's a Dunkin Donuts below the Prudential Building in a mall trapped in 1968, a Starbucks across Broad Street and a New York and company clothing store.

***


They need the following:

More Dunkin Donuts, Starbucks, Panera, Cosi, Barnes and Noble, decent super markets, a department store or two, a Gap etc..

They should focus on developing the Iron Bound and the Downtown area especially around Prudential, the Newark Arena, and Rutgers. The State keeps looking at expanding Rutgers in New Brunswick and Piscataway, they should develop the Rutgers campus in Newark. There's tons of potential to further expand the University campus in Newark.

Downtown Newark also needs some decent hotels, tear down the Hilton and it's outdate mall and rebuild a new Hilton. Also a Courtyard Marriott, Hampton Inn, Sheraton etc.. can feed on city business as well as Airport travelers.

When was the last time you were to Newark? When you come, check out Mix 27, the Key Club, the Thai restaurant across from McGovern's Tavern, etc.

The places are coming. It's not going to happen overnight, but it's happened in the three years I've lived in Newark.

1180 is there. The hockey arena is almost there. There are plans to redevelop or tear down and rebuild all those buildings around Military Park. Rutgers or NJIT just built beautiful dorms with street-front store space.

People are moving into 1180 - I see it. The more people that move in means more money is infused into the local economy. We can speculate all we want about Newark making it or not, but if you're a part of the daily grind there, you see how different the place is than it was just one year ago.

investordude
May 7th, 2007, 11:16 PM
I got to hear him speak tonight. He seems like a man with a vision and determination. I don't know if Newark's deeper problems are tractable, but he seems like a highly motivated leader.

Not that fixing corruption necessarily helps make downtowns pretty, but Newark's real problems are in its neighborhoods and they need to be fixed.

kevin
May 8th, 2007, 11:12 AM
People are moving into 1180 - I see it. The more people that move in means more money is infused into the local economy. We can speculate all we want about Newark making it or not, but if you're a part of the daily grind there, you see how different the place is than it was just one year ago.


I've been working on a google map of stuff to do in and around Downtown Newark. It's far from complete, and generally only incorporates the places in Newark I've either heard of or been to (and could remember when I started this map!)

Let me know if there are any other places of interest that spring to mind.
http://maps.google.com/maps/ms?ie=UTF8&hl=en&msa=0&msid=117405519356297561934.0000011253a333252fe85&z=14&om=1

Visionway
May 8th, 2007, 04:36 PM
I've taken the liberty of reading through this blog to get to know this community and I will begin by stating I am PRO Newark. There's a change underway that I believe in. For the last 2 1/2 years I've researched Newark and now is the time to get in and get involved. I will be closing on a condo across from the Prudential Center by Mulberry and Market next month.

During my process of purchasing in Newark I had strong reservations about the city. I became more involved in Newark politics to see what is happening with Newark. Yes crime is a problem, its a matter of time before thats corrected. Booker has taken the reigns from Sharp and is running the city with more rigor. When crime is pushed out of one area it goes to another area and the criminals retaliate or claim new territory. Major cities have turned crime around and it did not happen overnight. If your goal is to be in a urban atmosphere, close to fine restaurants, arts & entertainment and easy commute, with Newark you are getting in on the ground floor. The only place to go from here is up. In the last 9 years I've had the pleasure of working in Jersey City, New York, Boston, Hartford, Charlotte, Atlanta, Philadelphia etc... and saw a positive change in these cities with the real estate boom. Yes the real estate boom is over for this cycle but for Newark it is just beginning. There are friends of mine that live in Brooklyn and Harlem and real estate prices are outrageous in those areas and lets not forget to mention that crime is down after the area began its revitalization. When I speak about Newark I don't sugar coat what's there and what's not there but I do let people know that this revitalization is real. Yes, downtown and the Ferry street section are currently your safest sections of Newark but change happens with time. Several of my friends and colleagues are now looking at purchasing homes in Newark and moving from New York and Jersey City. Set real expectations and be patient. Over time Newark will become another New York or better. Let's not forget that many years ago Newark was once a more bustling city than New York with shoppers traveling from up and down the east coast.

Change must begin by changing the mentality of the youth and their parents. Abolishing the gangs and painting a prettier, safer picture for the streets of Newark. We don't want to admit it but Newark taxes must be increased to improve the school systems. Adults must take some time to disciple to these young boys and girls to show them that life has a better direction to offer them. The city must find new methods of removing social assistance programs and providing training and jobs for those in need.

I have spoken to several individuals and was told that there are plans for a new park next to the Prudential Center, New Hotel across from the Rock and some of the buildings on Market to be demolished (this may be one reason why no one has seen any activity in the Dunkin Donuts on Market). Research shows that developers have been buying up downtown for the last 20 years and the revitilization of Newark is a big initiative for the state of NJ.

Bringing the professional residents to Newark may begin at the grass roots level and thats a great thing.:)

investordude
May 8th, 2007, 05:34 PM
If more money for schools was the key to success, Newark students would also be geniouses. You need to close non-performing schools, give people a right to hire and fire, and hold principals accountable for school performance. They should also make a significant effort to discourage teen pregnancy and tear down housing projects - you can't have teen pregnancy and also have adequate academic performance.

Newark spends more per pupil than most of the surrounding suburbs, and those suburbs have better academic performance.

kevin
May 9th, 2007, 11:47 AM
If more money for schools was the key to success, Newark students would also be geniouses. You need to close non-performing schools, give people a right to hire and fire, and hold principals accountable for school performance. They should also make a significant effort to discourage teen pregnancy and tear down housing projects - you can't have teen pregnancy and also have adequate academic performance.

Newark spends more per pupil than most of the surrounding suburbs, and those suburbs have better academic performance.

If you close the schools, where do you propose the children go? Better schools? Where?

Also, what do you do with the displaced people from the newly torn-down housing projects?

Newark *is* turning around, and it seems to be due to favorable market changes. It's too expensive to live in NYC, it's getting too expensive to live in Brooklyn, Queens, Jersey City, and Hoboken. Newark still has reasonable rent, excellent mass transit, and a whole lot of colleges. If you take into consideration the influx of commuter money, plus the student population, there is money to be made, and investors are seeing this. That they plan to build a special walkway from Penn Station to the Prudential Center is a travesty, simply encouraging the myth that Newark is unsafe.

I've heard horror stories about the public schools in NYC. All of my coworkers that grew up in NYC went to private schools.

I think you need to put into perspective the overcrowding situation in cities as compared with the suburbs.

investordude
May 9th, 2007, 06:14 PM
I think Newark is ripe for an upswing. Just don't raise taxes and stifle the upswing. Newark is a city that is corrupt. Teachers view their jobs as patronage appointments. If we can change expectations on performance, and grant hire/fire privileges based on performance, then Newark students will do fine with the money the have.

Newark's housing projects simply give an incentive to people that are unemployable to stay in the area. Encourage them to move to a part of the country with more blue collar jobs if they are unskilled and mentally healthy - those jobs are going to continue to disappear in New Jersey. Newark should be focused on encouraging employed people to move there that can turn the city around.

Dagrecco82
May 18th, 2007, 01:27 PM
Found these while prowling the net. More at the website


http://files.cosential.com/FirmFiles/8/images/40046-Site-Plan-large.jpg



http://files.cosential.com/FirmFiles/8/images/40046-Newark-Street-Scene-l.jpg


http://files.cosential.com/FirmFiles/8/images/40046-Newark-large.jpg


http://files.cosential.com/FirmFiles/8/images/40046-Aerial-Model-karge.jpg


http://files.cosential.com/FirmFiles/8/images/42012-Broad-St-large.jpg


http://files.cosential.com/FirmFiles/8/images/42050-RPW-large.jpg

http://www.eekarchitects.com/index.cfm

JCMAN320
May 20th, 2007, 09:59 PM
If I had to be an officer in Newark I'd be depressed too.

Police force riddled with problems
Report: 'Low morale' in Newark

Sunday, May 20, 2007
BY JONATHAN SCHUPPE
Star-Ledger Staff

The Newark Police Department is woefully under-equipped, disorganized, badly trained and reeling from years of political meddling, according to a sweeping analysis of New Jersey's largest municipal police force.

The review, completed by a New York consulting firm in January but not made public, found a wide array of problems in the 1,300-member department, including rampant patronage, poor recruitment and no proper budgeting process or capital planning.

The report by the SafirRosetti consulting firm also cited a variety of specific shortcomings: cops forced to buy their own computers and bulletproof vests, detectives without proper interview rooms, narcotics units without enough money to make undercover drug purchases, an unsafe forensics lab and a Police Athletic League sharing a building with a unit visited by registered sex offenders.

The consultants described the Newark Police Department as "an organization with little equipment and little money for work necessities."

By and large, the department is staffed by dedicated, hard-working officers, the consultants said. But the report, a copy of which was obtained by The Star-Ledger, said the department was plagued by low morale, and it urged "major steps" to improve esprit de corps among officers.

"In many cases they have not been treated as professionals and have been subjected to arbitrary and at times capricious decisions concerning their assignments and discipline," the report said. "They have also been forced to work in substandard conditions with inadequate equipment."

The critique was done at the request of Mayor Cory Booker and Police Director Garry McCarthy, a former deputy commissioner at the New York Police Department, after they took office last year. A principal of SafirRosetti is Howard Safir, a former NYPD commissioner who was once McCarthy's boss.

Among the major findings of the report were:


An "understaffed, ill-equipped" drug enforcement operation that had no organized undercover program, only $500-a-month for undercover buys and no formal system for tracking confidential informants


Staffing decisions corrupted by politics and patronage, resulting in rookies earning detective badges, junior officers threatening commanders and seasoned officers "reassigned arbitrarily."


A severe equipment shortage that left the department without enough cars, lockers, computers and bulletproof vests, and no plan to buy them.


A shortsighted hiring plan that may cost the city hundreds of thousands of dollars in federal grants.

McCarthy declined to comment on the report, but in recent months he has made moves to tackle many of the problems noted by SafirRosetti, including putting more cops on the streets by moving dozens of officers out of desk jobs.

SafirRosetti noted the absence of a formal anti-drug strategy, and McCarthy created a Central Narcotics Division. He decentralized power by shifting more responsibility on precinct commanders, another SafirRosetti recommendation, and put more detectives on shifts when most violent crime happens.

In his campaign for mayor, Booker promised to boost morale in the police department, and since taking office he has made a priority of improving the decrepit working conditions in the city's precinct stations. The 5th Precinct building in the South Ward has been renovated, and work on the 3rd Precinct in the East Ward is under way. Nearly all officers now have lockers, officials say.

His administration also is replacing an obsolete paper-based record management system with an electronic one. A newly created nonprofit group, Newark Police Foundation, is raising money to outfit the department with more high-tech equipment.

Portions of the report were positive. The review team singled out a few programs -- including the Police Clergy Alliance and Operation CeaseFire, an anti-gun-violence program -- as models of community-minded law enforcement. The team also noted the city is installing a state-of-the-art computer network.

SafirRosetti's work was funded by a $157,369 grant by the Newark Alliance, a nonprofit group. Four consultants made several visits to the police department, interviewing officers and commanders, hosting focus groups and reviewing internal documents. The firm said it spoke to 12 percent of the force's 1,300 members, including union heads, precinct commanders and top brass. It also met with local government leaders.

Derrick Hatcher, president of the union that represents Newark police officers, agreed the Booker administration is dealing with many problems noted in the report -- though he said change is coming too slowly. At the same time, he has fought McCarthy's attempts to "civilianize" the communications unit. And he complained officers haven't yet gotten the boost in pay that was included in a newly negotiated labor contract.

The contract raises pay for starting officers from $26,561 to $29,877 this year and to $31,072 in 2008, Hatcher said. Senior officers' pay will rise from $69,255 to $77,902 this year and to $81,018 in 2008.

The SafirRosetti report doesn't make any recommendations about officers' salaries.

Hatcher noted one shortcoming -- also mentioned by SafirRosetti -- as particularly troublesome: the department's poor recruitment efforts. The city doesn't advertise for potential officers, he said.

"I think the citizens of Newark deserve better," Hatcher said. "They need to at least get the word out that we're looking for a few good men and women."



Jonathan Schuppe may be reached at jschuppe@starledger.com or (973) 392-7960.

----------------------------------------------------------------

Two shootings leave one dead in Newark

Posted by Alexi Friedman May 20, 2007 11:50AM
Categories: Crime/Courts

Newark police are investigating the slaying yesterday afternoon of a 26-year-old man who was shot in the chest, authorities said.

Faheem Gordon's death was the 39th homicide in the city this year, police said, one fewer than the same time last year.

The killing came hours after a 16-year-old boy was shot in the neck early yesterday morning, just after midnight, several blocks away.

Gordon was shot at 2 p.m. on the 500 block of South 12th Street. A man stepped out of a dark-colored sedan and fired multiple shots at the victim, hitting him in the chest, authorities said.

The victim was taken to University Hospital, where he died a short time later.

The police department's Homicide Squad and the Essex County Prosecutor's Office are investigating.

The teenager who was shot around midnight in the 900 block of South 20th Street was listed in critical condition at University Hospital, authorities said. His name was withheld because of his age.

Anyone with information on either shooting should call (877) 695-8477.

OmegaNYC
May 21st, 2007, 12:19 PM
I saw the same report on MY9 news the other night. Talk about major problems for a city that has struggled for years to bring down an out of control crime rate. This is what Booker was voted for. I wonder how this guy is going to handle this.

Radiohead
May 21st, 2007, 11:58 PM
Racial politics is the 3000 pound gorilla in the room that few want to talk about, for fear of being called an ignorant racist. Plans to revitalize the city via redevelopment and gentrification will be deemed by many "community activists" as way of kicking blacks out of the city. While this doesn't necessarily need to be the case, the chronically unemployed and those on the public dole, whatever their race, do not need to be holding Newark hostage.

It is from this population of economically depressed individuals that crime, gangs, illegitemacy and the like are borne. This is an urban problem that has no easy answers. The 1960's answer to house them in highrises was a disaster. Do you attempt to educate this population, via grants and scholarships, in order to get them decent jobs? Do you try to move them to another area of town (and should that even be the city's responsibility?). When does personal responsibility come into play? Is societal racism to blame for the plight of this (primarily African American) population of Newark?

In the end, in order for Newark to thrive again like it did years ago, many residents will need to be displaced. Crime will need to be tackled and more thugs, gang members and drug dealers will need to be locked up. Most involved will be black. And it will be up to the Newark city leaders to decide if and how this will be done.

Eventually, Newark needs to be fixed, whether through personal responsibility or through forced action from the city. It's been done in other places, to a degree (see downtown Cleveland and Memphis).

JCMAN320
May 23rd, 2007, 02:46 AM
Newark is going to take a LONG time to thrive. Until it changes it's image from a hell hole to a livable workable city, it will never be as succesful as it use to be:(

Marv95
May 23rd, 2007, 09:38 AM
Newark is going to take a LONG time to thrive. Until it changes it's image from a hell hole to a livable workable city, it will never be as succesful as it use to be:(

And I told you that Baltimore and Cleveland and Charlotte are "thriving", yet their crime rates are out of control. Why don't people get that? And being around NYC doesn't help matters either...And I agree with Radiohead. If the city wasn't over 50&#37; black you'd see a sharp decrease in crime(the Ironbound and over half of the North Ward has less crime than the other parts of the city, and those areas are working class Italian, Hiaspanic, Portugnese, etc.).

OmegaNYC
May 23rd, 2007, 11:06 AM
^^^ The reason why Baltimore, Cleveland, Charlotte, etc are "thriving" is because people just don't fear them as people fear Newark. New Jersey is mostly a state of affluent suburbs. When people hear "Newark" most people think of an urban wasteland of bombed out projects, carjackings, muggings, shootings, drugs, and mostly poverty. Baltimore has the harbor, Cleveland has the lakefront, Charlotte has banking and NASCAR. Also, it doesn't hurt when each of these cities have over 420,000 people living there. Where Newark has less than 290,000. Each of these cities are tourist destinations. While people only visit Newark for the airport or Penn Station. People in NJ fear Newark more than anything. It's a mindset.

Visionway
May 23rd, 2007, 12:14 PM
I'm sitting hear reading this blog and wondering why are there so many pessimists on this thread. I have lived in Charlotte and one of my good friends is a councilman for Baltimore. I love the Baltimore inner harbor which has gone through a major redevelopment effort but Baltimore crime was much worse than Newark and crime in Charlotte never compared to Baltimore or Newark. The difference is Newark is a more densely populated city which gives the appearance that crime is magnified. Are we forgetting the crime that once plagued Harlem, Manhattan, Brooklyn and Boston? Because crime still exists in those cities. Newark will transform itself one building at a time. We all need to practice patience, change won’t come overnight. And for those that don't want to be patient we all have choices on where we live and visit.

Newark has endless opportunites for those who possess vision.

investordude
May 23rd, 2007, 08:44 PM
I'm sorry, I don't believe that it is. Inner Harbor, Johns Hopkins campus, and Fells Point are nice, and I think probably never were really that hard hit to begin with. There are many areas of Baltimore that are messed up - its lost half its population.

I'd actually argue Newark is receiving more non government/academia related investment than Baltimore these days. That's not to say Newark is thriving either. But if you compare recovering areas like Forest Hills and the Ironbound to recovering Baltimore areas, I think its pretty much the same state - if not better.

But its also true that Newark needs to reduce crime and corruption - electing Cory Booker is probably a good step if he turns out to be serious about cleaning up after Sharpe James and doesn't become part of the system he fought against.

investordude
May 23rd, 2007, 08:52 PM
One more note. I think its silly to compare Newark to a world city like Boston. But there's a better example to be hopeful about Newark - Jersey City. Pretty much everyone would have made all these points about Jersey City being hopeless as recently as a decade ago, and its transforming very quickly right now. Also, while Hoboken gets a lot of frat types who just got a job in the city, I think Jersey City tends to be populated by both finance people as well as two income households where 1 person works in New York and the other works in New Jersey. For these buyers, Newark is actually the better location if the city became less corrupt and investment could start flowing there.

Visionway
May 30th, 2007, 01:32 PM
Hello All,

Can anyone provide information on Renaissance Towers (the condominium building) located at the cross streets of Market and Mulberry? Please provide all information that you know.

thank you

kevin
May 30th, 2007, 03:07 PM
Can anyone provide information on Renaissance Towers (the condominium building) located at the cross streets of Market and Mulberry? Please provide all information that you know.


It's right across the street from the gateway center and Commerce Bank. I'm not a big fan of the fact that it's right off of Market Street, as that area can get shady sometimes. Other than that, I don't know a whole lot about the place. It's strange that they don't have a website or any web presence.

investordude
May 30th, 2007, 07:34 PM
I think it would? Newark has a lot of historic architecture that people aren't willing to visit because of the danger perception. If they could browse it online, that could help generate buzz for the city and investment as crime declines. The same is true of Jersey City, but I think Newark at the end of the day still has more history. When I pass it on the train, I often think of taking a stroll, but decide not to because I'm not sure what areas are safe.

JCMAN320
June 3rd, 2007, 11:59 PM
Newark has history but Jersey City is far more historic when you consider that it was first established as New Jersey's first permanent European settlement in New Jersey in 1660. Jersey City has also had more of a fruitful history than Newark. Jackie Robinson breaking the color-barrier at Roosevelt Stadium, Dr. Matrin Luther King Jr getting his docterate at my college, Saint Peter's College, major battle of the American Revolution fought at Paulus Hook, all four of the under ground railroad lines convereged under house in Jersey City, which is looking to possibly becoming a museum, etc.....

kevin
June 4th, 2007, 01:18 PM
Newark has history but Jersey City is far more historic when you consider that it was first established as New Jersey's first permanent European settlement in New Jersey in 1660. Jersey City has also had more of a fruitful history than Newark. Jackie Robinson breaking the color-barrier at Roosevelt Stadium, Dr. Matrin Luther King Jr getting his docterate at my college, Saint Peter's College, major battle of the American Revolution fought at Paulus Hook, all four of the under ground railroad lines convereged under house in Jersey City, which is looking to possibly becoming a museum, etc.....

I disagree. While JC might have an interesting history, Newark is the location of many famous events. Aside from being the third-oldest major city in the US (after Boston and NYC), it's also the first home of WJZ (now WABC radio), patent leather was invented here, as was the stock ticker, and the city was home to many of the former prominent stores - Kresges and Bambergers. Prudential was founded here, and it's the site of New Jersey's only medical school.

The Polhemus House in Newark was also a stop on the Underground Railroad. Military Park was a training ground for many troops that fought in the Revolutionary War.

Where baseball is concerned, we've got the Eagles and the Bears. As nice as the Jersey City museum is, I think the Newark Museum beats it, hands down. We've got the largest Portuguese population in North America as well.

We also have Justice William Brennan, Author Allen Ginsberg, Vice President Aaron Burr, among many other noted influential people in history.

JerzResident
June 4th, 2007, 02:16 PM
I agree with Kevin, JC has a very rich history but Newark was the corner stone of New Jersey

Eugenious
June 4th, 2007, 09:30 PM
I agree with Kevin, JC has a very rich history but Newark was the corner stone of New Jersey

They need to install cameras on every corner in every school in every building there. They need to flood the worst areas with cops, they need to redevelop a good chunk of Newark for it to start to turn around.

If they want change they can do it, in this age it all depends on the commitment from the government. If there's a will there's a way. Unfortunately the politicians are only concerned about being politically correct, and steps aren't taken to clean up. Of course you cant put all the thugs in jail because they are all black and live in the community, that's why you need DIVERSITY.

Radiohead
June 4th, 2007, 10:55 PM
If they want change they can do it, in this age it all depends on the commitment from the government.

It would help a bit if the residents did their part. Like actually "snitching" on the thugs, quit having kids out of wedlock, parents(usually singular) disciplining the kids and stressing education.

OK, I'm just a dreamer.

Gentrification it is.

Visionway
June 5th, 2007, 10:34 AM
Of course you cant put all the thugs in jail because they are all black and live in the community, that's why you need DIVERSITY.

I see you are drawing this statement based on your own ignorance? Newark is a diverse mix of cultures. I see Portuguese, Brazilian, African American, Irish, Whites, Asian, African, South African...My father who is a white German migrated to America and first lived in Newark, NJ.

Although the majority of the crime appears to be committed by Blacks; Hispanics and other cultures are committing crime also. The truth is the biggest criminals and the decay of Newark was caused by politicians and their ability to sweep things under the rug, accept kickbacks and turn the other cheek. I was downtown last week and I saw a White girl (late teens to early 20s) standing next a BMW blasting her music with a black male standing next to her. I could have easily assumed she must be from out of town trying to buy some drugs. Although that may have been her intent I didn't think much of the situation. EUGENIOUS, that does sound like a comment you would make if you saw a group of young Black males or maybe one Black male.

When there is no means to and end it becomes survival of the fitest. Some people don't know how to fend for themselves. Economics teaches us that the reason we earn a salary to pay taxes is to support not only the school system but the justice and prison systems. If our money wasn't going towards the school system there would be more crime.


I heard someone say flood the areas that have high crime with more cops. That's what Booker has done. It is a good method but it also has its faults. When criminals are pushed out of one area they move to another area and that’s when crime and the murder rate rises. The government will win if they stay with it.

It's about educating and teaching the people that never had much of anything how to fish for themselves. Give them a sense of hope. Make them accountable and responsible for their future. A large population of African American’s and other cultures lost their way because the generation before them never provided the lessons and the structure for them to continue advancing.

Eugenious
June 5th, 2007, 09:34 PM
I see you are drawing this statement based on your own ignorance? Newark is a diverse mix of cultures. I see Portuguese, Brazilian, African American, Irish, Whites, Asian, African, South African...My father who is a white German migrated to America and first lived in Newark, NJ.

Although the majority of the crime appears to be committed by Blacks; Hispanics and other cultures are committing crime also. The truth is the biggest criminals and the decay of Newark was caused by politicians and their ability to sweep things under the rug, accept kickbacks and turn the other cheek. I was downtown last week and I saw a White girl (late teens to early 20s) standing next a BMW blasting her music with a black male standing next to her. I could have easily assumed she must be from out of town trying to buy some drugs. Although that may have been her intent I didn't think much of the situation. EUGENIOUS, that does sound like a comment you would make if you saw a group of young Black males or maybe one Black male.

When there is no means to and end it becomes survival of the fitest. Some people don't know how to fend for themselves. Economics teaches us that the reason we earn a salary to pay taxes is to support not only the school system but the justice and prison systems. If our money wasn't going towards the school system there would be more crime.


I heard someone say flood the areas that have high crime with more cops. That's what Booker has done. It is a good method but it also has its faults. When criminals are pushed out of one area they move to another area and that’s when crime and the murder rate rises. The government will win if they stay with it.

It's about educating and teaching the people that never had much of anything how to fish for themselves. Give them a sense of hope. Make them accountable and responsible for their future. A large population of African American’s and other cultures lost their way because the generation before them never provided the lessons and the structure for them to continue advancing.

I didn't means to sound racist TRUST ME, I'm the farthest thing from racist I live in Brooklyn there are so many cultures in my neighborhood it would be impossible for me to be a racist. What I hate is homogeneity. The worst areas of Brooklyn are the areas where there are no immigrants and only drugs and thugs (which happen to be black but not only).

What I am saying is that there is reluctance in the community to own up to the fact that a part of it is anti-social and criminal. Once people start to change their lives there is no going back, but there must be serious effort from all. And the thing is its alot easier to change a neighborhood for the better when there are different kinds of groups and no one dominates or controls the other. In my neighborhood there are Asians, eastern Europeans and various subgroups within those and it's just a giant rainbow of people. Everyone works hard and everyone is trying to achieve the American dream.

investordude
June 6th, 2007, 12:49 AM
My suggestion to Cory Booker - tear down every public housing project in Newark, sell it to private developers, and use the proceeds to hire more police. Public housing breeds dependence on government, which leads to a vicious cycle wherever its tried. Flooding the streets with cops works if there are enough cops - which is not the case in Newark.

OK, I realize I'm going to get flamed that is not possible to tear down all the public housing in Newark, but you can take incremental steps. New York's plan to sell the parking lot in East New York is an excellent example of how Newark could use its assets to help the city.

kevin
June 7th, 2007, 03:30 PM
My suggestion to Cory Booker - tear down every public housing project in Newark, sell it to private developers, and use the proceeds to hire more police. Public housing breeds dependence on government, which leads to a vicious cycle wherever its tried. Flooding the streets with cops works if there are enough cops - which is not the case in Newark.

OK, I realize I'm going to get flamed that is not possible to tear down all the public housing in Newark, but you can take incremental steps. New York's plan to sell the parking lot in East New York is an excellent example of how Newark could use its assets to help the city.

I think Newark would have a hard time severing the federal aid from the public housing projects. You're looking at this the wrong way. Step one is already underway - bring market rate housing into the city. 1180, Clinton St. Lofts, Renaissance Towers, etc...with much more underway.

With that comes the disposable income. I want to spend my money at a bar or restaurant within walking distance. Once the money is there, the places will come. The Key Club is just the latest example. With all this comes increased tax revenue. Cities aren't born (or in this case, reborn) overnight.

investordude
June 7th, 2007, 10:51 PM
They said the same thing about welfare reform - that it would never work to cut dependence on government. But of course it's been spectacularly successful. The same thing would happen with housing. Take away incentives to live on the public dole and people will change the way they live.

Especially bizarre is that a big problem is out of wedlock children. So, why subsizide that by rewarding people with children with free housing? We should stop complaining about that disastrous problem when we stop providing major incentives for it.

Newark needs to sever its dependence on the feds, regardless of the short term economic pain.

JCMAN320
June 21st, 2007, 02:28 AM
Newark residents jam council chambers

by Katie Wang and Jeffery C. Mays
Wednesday June 20, 2007, 9:24 PM

More than 300 Newark residents crammed into City Council chambers tonight to vent about pending layoffs, city services and the leadership of Mayor Cory Booker, who took office a year ago.

Wearing white T-shirts with the word, "Recall" and "We supported Booker and all we got was this lousy T-shirt," the residents delivered a blistering assessment of the new mayor's first year in office. Extra police officers were on guard to patrol the audience, which was so large that it filled the upper balcony of the council chambers.

Frank Hurtz, one of the leaders of the protest movement, said they plan to initiate an effort to recall Booker.

"It's recall time," said Hurtz to an audience that broke into applause. "The time for Cory Booker has passed. We are calling tonight for the firing of the carpetbaggers he brought into this town."

Booker, who did not attend the meeting, said the critics are politically motivated and stood silently when his predecessor, Sharpe James, sold city land at drastically reduced prices.

"These are the same people who drove our city into bankruptcy, who lost an election," Booker said. "These are political opponents who are whipping things up."

In order to pull off the recall, the organizers need to collect the signatures of at least 25 percent of the Newark residents who were registered to vote in November's general election. In this case, the recall group needs between 32,000 and 33,000 signatures.

Most of the residents said they are still stewing over the 8 percent tax increase that Booker levied when he first took office. Booker said the hike was needed in order to ward off the fiscal crisis that James left behind. Booker has said the city is facing a $180 million budget gap.

In addition to the tax increase, residents questioned the influx of new employees who are not Newark residents and who are getting paid higher salaries while City Hall employees are bracing themselves for layoffs.

Read more in Thursday's Star-Ledger.

Punzie
June 21st, 2007, 06:03 AM
I moved your last post, "Jersey and Hudson Cnty still cashing in on Sopranos," over to Soprano's addict (http://wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?t=13910) in Anything Goes. (One more thread where you can brag about New Jersey.:))

Visionway
July 3rd, 2007, 03:20 PM
Does anyone know what the plans are for the run down buildings on Market Street thats perpendicular to Mulberry? With the arena in front I hope there are major plans for that area.

JCMAN320
July 3rd, 2007, 09:22 PM
It was later announced after Friday that Booker will have to layoff 100 Cops!! Newark has 52 murders this year and you wanna lay off cops. There were just 3 stabbings in one night the other night as well. Too much crime for a city just 3 miles bigger than Jersey City while we only have 9 murders!!!!! This is terrible!!!

Booker, facing budget gap, considers 500 layoffs or more

Friday, June 29, 2007
BY JEFFERY C. MAYS
Star-Ledger Staff

Between 500 and 1,000 city employees could be laid off if Newark does not save enough money through voluntary buyouts, Mayor Cory Booker is expected to announce today, during a speech about his first year in office.

Booker is expected to discuss efforts his administration has made in closing a $180 million budget deficit and to explain why layoffs may be necessary, said a high-ranking administration official. The official was not authorized to speak publicly about the address and asked not to be named.

This would be the first time Booker publicly set a target number of layoffs needed to stabilize the city's budget. The estimate represents 10 percent to 20 percent of the city's work force.

The noontime speech at City Hall comes on the final day of Booker's first year in office. Last July 1 he became only Newark's third mayor in 36 years.

Earlier this month, the city notified employees about a voluntary "separation" plan that would pay between 30 percent and 60 percent of their annual salary in a lump sum if they agreed to resign. About 3,000 of the city's 5,000 employees with an average salary of about $72,000 are eligible. Uniformed police and firefighters are not being offered buyouts.

So far, only about 125 employees have applied for the program, well below the number necessary to prevent massive layoffs, city officials said. The deadline to apply is July 6 and the last day of work for those who are accepted would be Aug. 3.

Employees have expressed skepticism at informational seminars about the buyouts. Sanitation workers threatened human resources staff members at one session, and City Hall employees have been on edge. Booker has taken criticism over the last year for adding city workers and raises given by his executive orders.

"I'm not surprised many people haven't taken the buyouts," said Rahaman Muhammad, president of Service Employees International Union Local 617, which represents 600 city sanitation workers, crossing guards and operators of 911 lines. "I would rather get laid off and enjoy the state benefits, including job training, and be on a civil service list to possibly be called back to work. Why would I sign away my rights?"


'BUMPING' RIGHTS

Civil service rules would have to be followed during any layoff. Employees with seniority will have "bumping" rights over newer employees and the right to return if the city later needs to fill their position.

The problem, Booker has previously said, is a structural budget deficit, meaning the city spends far more every year than it gets in revenue. During the last five years dating back to the administration of Sharpe James, the budget was balanced using money from the settlement of a lawsuit with the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey.

Booker continued the practice in the $785.4 million budget for 2007 by using $115 million to balance the books.

Only $40 million in settlement funds is available for the 2008 budget. The pool of money vanishes after 2010.

Of this year's $180 million budget deficit, Business Administrator Bo Kemp has said he can likely close all but $50 million of the shortfall. Raising taxes is not seen as an option, especially after Booker raised taxes by 8 percent in the 2006 budget. Officials also feel another substantial tax increase could inhibit the city's growth and development opportunities.

Layoffs have become the most likely alternative.

In today's speech, Booker is expected to discuss other cost-savings measures he has taken, such as a hiring freeze and eliminating vacant positions. Those two actions have saved the city only $6.5 million, according to the official.

"We are doing everything we can, removing bad performers, attrition, voluntarily separation, to prevent this," the official said.



Jeffery C. Mays covers Newark City Hall. He may be reached at jmays@starledger.com or (973) 392-4149.

JCMAN320
July 6th, 2007, 12:37 AM
100 Newark workers seek buyout

by Jeffery C. Mays
Thursday July 05, 2007, 11:29 PM

About 100 Newark municipal employees have applied for a voluntary buyout package with only one day remaining to do so, according to city officials.

The figure is far below what Mayor Cory Booker has said would be needed to avert likely layoffs of up to 1,000 people or 20 percent of the 5,000-person work force this year.

The deadline to express interest in the buyout for nonuniformed employees is 4:30 p.m. today. Booker last week said Newark's $180 million budget gap means the city must cut employees to save money.

"As for the next step ... the mayor was clear last week when he said that we will unfortunately have to move to involuntary separation from the city," Booker spokeswoman Lupe Todd said. "Real change is hard, but the city is in a fiscal crisis, and we cannot simply wish away our financial problems."

Booker also announced last week the buyout was being extended to about 150 high-ranking police officers and firefighters. Public safety has been a major focus of the Booker administration, and the announcement was a surprising turnabout.

Business Administrator Bo Kemp has said the city has been able to close all but $50 million of a projected $180 million structural budget deficit. The deficit was created because the city has regularly spent more money than it receives in revenue.

Proceeds from a $400 million lawsuit settlement with the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey have balanced the budget for the last five years. This year, only $40 million is available.

Under the terms of the buyout, employees would be offered between 30 percent and 60 percent of their salary in a lump sum if they agree to resign. About 3,000 of the city's 5,000 employees with an average salary of about $72,000 are eligible. The administration retains the right to accept and reject employees from the program. The last day of service would be Aug. 3.

The response from city employees has ranged from lukewarm to hostile. Booker, with one year in office, has come under fire for hiring new employees and authorized raises through his power of executive order.

66nexus
July 6th, 2007, 11:12 PM
Gotta save that money somehow. The budget crunch was only a matter of time(PANY/NJ money was going to run out eventually) I just hope the city can break even.

JCMAN320
July 10th, 2007, 12:03 AM
http://www.nj.com/newark1967/

This is about the anniversary of the fall and demise of Newark, how bats and balls led to tanks and guns running through the streets of Newark. It is a four part series. Part 1 I'm posting.

Crossroads Pt. 1: Before 1967, a gathering storm

Posted by Brad Parks July 08, 2007 3:00AM
Categories: News
(This is the first of a four-part series.)

He thought it was some kind of providence, the perfect confluence of a man, a time and a place.

The man was David Suchow, a 37-year-old pharmacist. The time was 1955. The place was the corner of Springfield Avenue and Bergen Street in Newark, where Suchow had just been given the opportunity to buy a pharmacy, Post Drugs, for no money down and a reasonable monthly payment.

To Suchow, it looked like a future. The location was in the middle of a two-mile-long commercial corridor stretching from Newark's downtown to its outskirts. In the days before shopping malls, Springfield Avenue was what shopping malls later would aspire to be.

"It was a hustling, bustling area," said Suchow, now 89 and living in Hunterdon County. "Back in my day, we called it action. It had great action, a lot of foot traffic."

What he couldn't know in those optimistic times was just how quickly the action was changing. A little more than a decade later, Suchow's corner and the blocks around it were the epicenter of one of the most severe civil disturbances in American history, a spasm of racially steeped violence and destruction that began one hot July evening in 1967 and ended five days later with 26 deaths and $10 million in damage.

As the city prepares to mark the 40th anniversary of the event, The Star-Ledger is examining the Newark riots from the vantage point of the neighborhood around Springfield and Bergen. Today and for the next three days, more than 50 years of the area's history will be revisited - from gilded commercial strip to riot-shredded shell, then from vacated inner-city wasteland to urban-redevelopment success story.

Drawing on thousands of pages of documents recently discovered in State Police headquarters, four decades of scholarly research, and the living memory of dozens who crossed through the neighborhood, this four-part series will debunk some popular myths. Among them:

* The riots were responsible for the decline that turned Newark into one of America's most desperate cities. In reality, the city had long been in a downward spiral which by 1967 created an atmosphere ripe for unrest.

* The riots were sparked by a rumor that cabdriver John Smith had been beaten to death by police. In fact, the serious looting didn't begin until nearly 24 hours later, when a rally staged by community activists got out of hand. By that point, the rumor of Smith's death had already been dispelled.

* The riots caused most businesses along Springfield Avenue to immediately close. To the contrary, 83 percent of businesses in the riot area reopened. They shuttered in the coming months and years when owners realized their suburban customers were too scared to return.

The series also will reveal some never-before-reported details about the disorders. Among them:

* Mayor Hugh Addonizio did not want to call in the State Police and National Guard, going so far as to cancel a request from his police department for assistance. But a report of looting at Sears Roebuck, which sold guns, forced his hand.

* The "Soul Brother riots," when rogue members of the State Police shot hundreds of windows owned by black businessmen, appear to have been planned to coincide with a press conference, a time when most reporters and photographers were not on the streets to observe the troopers' behavior.

* The sniper fire, on which many of the 26 riot deaths were blamed, was mainly gunfire from authorities, not snipers, who unwittingly shot at each other as a result of a communication breakdown.

Springfield and Bergen was a main crossroads in the neighborhood where the trouble began, a hub around which much of the damage revolved, and it is now a symbol of the recovery that has taken place.

It also is a living reminder that in an ever-changing city like Newark, a junction like Springfield and Bergen is more than just a place where two roads cross. It is a place for intersections of other sorts - of people, events and the forces of history.


UNCONVENTIONAL WISDOM
Even now, 40 years later, what happened in Newark July 12 to 17, 1967, is like a kaleidoscope: Twist the canister and the scene changes.

Some people still see it as little more than a opportunistic shopping spree, a time when looters exploited a lapse in authority to steal things they were too lazy to work for. Others call it a rebellion, a willful act of defiance by an African-American community pushing back against centuries of oppression.

Aging white ethnic groups remember it as a time when they lost their city. Yet for a generation of black leaders, it was a time when they gained power.

"People put into the riots their own beliefs," said Max Herman, a Rutgers-Newark sociology professor whose research compares Newark's race riots with the hundreds of others that erupted throughout the 20th century. "The event essentially becomes a vessel for whatever ideology someone wants it to hold."

Yet for whatever baggage individuals bring to the subject, the academic community has, over the past 20 years or so, produced a fairly unified view of what led to the events of 1967. And it's a different take on What Happened to Newark than what many in New Jersey grew up believing.

"The conventional version of what happened in Newark and other American cities during the 1960s is that things were fine, and then the riots came, and then things went downhill," said Thomas Sugrue, a professor of history and sociology at the University of Pennsylvania who has written extensively on urban America. "That version has huge, huge flaws."

Scholars have come to view the 1960s civil disturbances as the result of more than 100 years of local, state and national policy decisions - the inevitable conclusion to a long series of choices by those who were in power and the frustration it created among those who weren't.

They were decisions about urban planning, housing and transportation that made America's suburbs flourish while systematically devastating its inner cities, Newark more so than most.

"There's a widespread belief Newark died in the riots," said John T. Cunningham, a historian who wrote what is considered the city's definitive history. "The fact is, the city was dead 30 years before anyone recognized it."

To David Suchow - and to most merchants and shoppers who crowded Springfield and Bergen outside the pharmacist's doors in the mid-1950s - it was awfully hard to see.

They regarded the long stretch of busy storefronts as evidence of the area's prosperity.

"You could buy anything you wanted on Springfield Avenue," said James Singletary, now 65, who has lived his entire life near Springfield and Bergen. "It was beautiful."

For a kid growing up in one of those stores, it was a kind of retail wonderland. David Silovitch, whose father owned Universal Shoes just up from Springfield and Bergen, spent his after-school hours each day popping into one store or another, such as the candy shop next door run by a kindly 80-year-old woman.

"She would pay me a dollar to mind the store while she was in back," Silovitch said, then laughed. "I found out later she was running numbers out of there."

There was plenty of business for everyone. A massive high-rise public housing development, Hayes Homes, opened in 1953, bringing thousands of new customers to Springfield and Bergen.

The neighborhood's racial mix quickly changed. Hayes Homes was designated for black residents, and blacks were moving into the nearby apartments that were once filled by Eastern European immigrants, who were either moving out or dying off.

While some merchants took advantage of the newcomers - charging them exorbitant interest rates on credit accounts or pounding them with late fees - other merchants happily accommodated them.

"I used to tell my help, 'I don't care if they're black, green or gray. If they come through that door, they'll put money in all of our pockets,'" Suchow said.

Little did Suchow know Springfield Avenue was already nearing its zenith. According to figures released by the Newark Economic Development Office in 1968, the city reached its peak of small-business production in 1958.

The next year, Newark's small businesses, which included all the mom-and-pop storefronts on Springfield Avenue, began a long, slow decline, both in terms of sales and total jobs.

One of the first to realize it was Samuel Sheitelman, who owned an appliance and furniture store, Sheitelman's, a few doors up from Post Drugs.

In 1957, Sheitelman opened the Mart Furniture Gallery on Route 22 in Union. Jerry Sheitelman said his father realized customers were moving to the suburbs and wanted free parking and air conditioned stores, things they couldn't find in cramped, aging Newark.

"We were one of the first ones out on the highway," said Jerry Sheitelman, whose family is still in the furniture business, operating as Bassett Furniture in Middletown and Green Brook. "Everyone said my dad was crazy. He was crazy, all right, like a fox.

"My dad was smart enough to see the future wasn't in Newark."


THE SHRINKING CITY
How that happened - how Newark lost its future - is a story that begins in the 19th century, when, to 21st-century eyes, the city fathers made two critical mistakes.

The first was allowing industry to pollute the air and build shoddy housing for its workers, turning Newark into the kind of place people wanted to leave as soon as they had the means.

While white flight is popularly believed to be a post-riot phenomenon, Newark's newspapers were writing editorials as early as the 1920s, fretting over the departure of the city's leading citizens - its lawyers, its captains of industry.

That led to the second 19th-century mistake: failure to annex the suburbs. At a time when other American cities were adding huge chunks of land through annexation, Newark was shrinking. All of suburban Essex County and parts of what is now Union County peeled off from Newark during the 1800s.

It left a city of 24 square miles, smaller than any other city in the nation's top 100 in population.

In cities that expanded, the movement of well-to-do residents from the core to the periphery had no impact on the bottom line. Those residents still paid taxes to the city.

In tiny Newark, well-off residents looking to leave center city ended up in places like Montclair and Millburn, taking their checkbooks with them. This left Newark with less money for police and schools. It also created a greater tax burden on those left behind. That caused even more people to leave.

By 1967, Newark believed its property tax rate, $7.75 per $100 of assessed value, was the highest in the nation. If taxed at that rate today, an average home in New Jersey - valued at $350,000 - would owe more than $27,000 a year in property taxes.

Even though Springfield and Bergen was largely populated by rental housing, soaring taxes had an impact. Landlords, fearful that making improvements would increase their tax bills, began neglecting their properties.

Tom Sherman, 64, grew up in one of those buildings, a six-family house on Holland Street, just west of Springfield and Bergen. His parents moved out in 1960, when he was 17.

"You used to see people sitting on their stoops at night, and everyone knew each other," said Sherman, who now lives in Tennessee. "All of a sudden it seemed like the building wasn't being kept up and there was a lot of crime and unexplained fires. People were leaving in droves."


RED AREAS
But there were many other factors driving citizens, especially wealthier ones, from Newark.

Chief among them was the dream of home ownership, something the Federal Housing Authority - created as part of Franklin D. Roosevelt's New Deal in 1934 - was making possible for more Americans than ever.

But only in the suburbs, not the city. FHA guidelines forbade underwriters from approving mortgages in "crowded neighborhoods." They also were instructed to avoid "inharmonious racial groups."

The FHA's maps were even more explicit. The entire area around Springfield and Bergen - including every part of the Central Ward that would become a riot zone - was shaded red, the least-desirable rating. The maps soon became a self-fulfilling prophecy, as property values in red areas stagnated or dropped.

"People forget that it was the federal government that really created and codified red-lining," said Richard Cammarieri, a lifelong Newark resident who has spent a career in the city as a community developer. "From there, the private sector picked it up quite eagerly, and the banks refused to offer loans in these areas. But it started with the FHA."

According to Kenneth Jackson's book on suburbanization, "Crabgrass Frontier," the FHA approved 28 loans during 1936 in all of Newark. In Livingston, which had less than a hundredth of Newark's population, 37 loans were approved.

After World War II, the GI Bill - using the same underwriting guidelines - greatly exacerbated that trend, making it cheaper for veterans, most of them white, to buy a home in the suburbs than to rent in the city. Even though one of every nine servicemen during World War II was black, only one in 670 mortgages insured by the GI Bill went to black veterans, according to "When Affirmative Action Was White," a book by Columbia professor Ira Katznelson.

"The myth of postwar suburbanization is that it was the whim of the marketplace that was leading whites to move out to places where they had green lawns," said Sugrue, the University of Pennsylvania professor. "The fact is, it was basically a massive federal subsidy that made possible the development of the suburbs. And New Jersey, as a largely suburban state, is ground zero for that."

What's more, the federal government was providing the highways that made it easy for people to leave.

With the passage of the Interstate Highway Act of 1956 - which used a gas tax to provide enormous funds for highway construction, while allotting no money for mass transit - New Jersey officials set about planning Interstates 78 and 280, which in coming years greatly hastened the flight from Newark.


'WHERE DID HE GO?'
The trickle of the upwardly mobile out of town was barely noticeable at first.

George Fontaine, who was born in Newark in 1930, grew up in a racially mixed neighborhood on Hartford Street, just off Bergen Street.

"It was the Germans, the Irish and us," said Fontaine, who is black. "And everyone was poor. And everyone was having a lot of babies."

Then, in the late&#164;'40s and early&#164;'50s, Fontaine watched as his neighborhood began to change.

"The person you knew as a child, he was a friend. You didn't see what color he was. And then suddenly one spring, you wake up and your neighbor is gone," Fontaine said. "Where did he go? He's moved to the suburbs.

"Basically it was: White people living on one side of a tenement house could use the GI Bill and buy a new home in Maplewood for about the same as they were paying in rent. Black people living on the other side had to stay in Newark."

For them, the federal government was encouraging a different kind of dwelling: public housing.

With the creation of the United States Housing Authority in 1937 and again with the passing of the Housing Act of 1949, the government made grants available to municipal housing authorities to clear slums and construct public housing.

Newark grabbed the federal money with both hands. It was a move that, in the short term, pleased a diverse array of constituents: the poor who clamored to move into them, the reformers who applauded the clearance of slums, and the organized crime bosses who grew fat off the construction contracts.

The city soon had the nation's highest number of public housing units per capita.

"Those buildings were clean, functional. The hallways were bright white," said Roger Smith, who grew up in Hayes Homes, which towered over Springfield and Bergen. "There was a sense of organization and family at Hayes Homes."

It didn't last. Hayes Homes moldered quickly as management and tenant neglect led to problems like uncollected garbage and rodent infestation. By the eve of the riots, Hayes Homes was festering with discontent and Newark was already beginning to regret its former zeal for high-rise public housing.

"The buildings turned out to be unmanageable," said Gus Heningburg, a court-appointed special master of the Newark Housing Authority, charged with overseeing the settlement of a lawsuit involving the NHA. "It was too high a concentration of low-income families in too small a space."


OPPORTUNITY THWARTED
Yet even as public housing deteriorated through the '50s and '60s, poor blacks escaping the discrimination of the Jim Crow South continued to flock in.

"The only thing there was down south was farm work," said Ossie Boyd, now 75, who came up from Georgia in the 1950s and settled near Springfield Avenue. "Up north, there was opportunity for prosperity. All my friends were coming up."

Newark has long been a first stop for waves of immigrants, from German to Irish to Jewish to Italian, and the city was continually transformed by their energy and dreams. The new arrivals from North Carolina or Georgia were no different in their aspirations but had several disadvantages other groups didn't.

As the grandchildren and great-grandchildren of slaves, they were largely without education or skills beyond agriculture. Their attempts to gain those things, or to achieve any kind of social mobility, had been greatly hindered.

Coming north for factory jobs didn't help. After World War II, the nation's economy began shifting from manufacturing toward service-based businesses. Between 1950 and 1967, Newark alone lost nearly 20,000 manufacturing jobs.

"These factory jobs had long been the first rung on the economic ladder that immigrant groups had grasped onto as they climbed upward," said Clement Price, a history professor at Rutgers-Newark. "Suddenly, that first rung was gone. And it dealt a serious blow to the ability of this group of African-Americans to replicate the success of other ethnic groups."


CAUGHT IN THE DECAY
No one was more cognizant of that failure than the blacks themselves. On July 3, 1967, The Star-Ledger began a survey of residents in Newark's ghettos, never realizing the city was less than 10 days away from exploding.

"A large number of those questioned," the paper reported, "voice a fervent wish for a better job to permit them to a buy a home in the suburbs."

But without the means to move, they had to stay in neighborhoods like the one surrounding Springfield and Bergen, which had decayed rapidly throughout the 1960s.

With middle- and working-class residents fleeing, the people left behind were increasingly jobless or on public assistance. In the streets, seedy elements were taking over.

"It seemed like the only new thing opening on Springfield Avenue were bars," said Brenda Spellman, who grew up in Hayes Homes and whose mother, Eloise Spellman, was killed during the riots. "It was the worst thing that could have happened, because everyone started hanging out, drinking and spending money they didn't have."

For merchants and landlords, that translated into more customers who defaulted on credit accounts or tenants who refused to pay rent. Marvin Cohen, whose family owned H. Cohen and Sons clothing store, remembers watching the neighborhood turn.

"I saw a lot of black people staggering around drunk in the middle of the day," said Cohen, 58, now a co-owner of Sam's of Livingston. "Sailors would come in the store with prostitutes, because we were a women's store. Sometimes you could smell the marijuana on people."

Crime became rampant. Merchants no longer felt safe after dark.

After a rash of break-ins, James Petine, who with his brother Nick ran Petine's Deli, started bringing a gun to work.

Shortly before closing one night, they got a call from a fellow merchant, saying a man outside appeared to be casing the store.

"Nicky put his .45 under his belt and he swore that if that guy asked him for a cigarette, he was going to get it right in the gut," Petine said. "Sure enough, the guy came up to him and asked him for a match. Nicky put his hand in his trench coat, looked the guy right in the eye and, real serious, said, 'I don't smoke.' From the tone of Nicky's voice, I think the guy knew he meant business.

"After that, I said, 'Nicky, let's get out of here.'"

By the eve of the riots in 1967, it was clear to everyone passing through the corner of Springfield and Bergen that the area's heyday had long passed.

"It had been a beautiful thing, but the business that had been there was no longer there," Sheitelman said. "It was like watching a flower die."

And in its place, something far more foreboding had started to grow.

Radiohead
July 12th, 2007, 12:52 AM
Interesting JCMan. I look forward to reading the rest. Personally, I think some of it is BS, i.e. downplaying the riots on the decline of Newark:

Scholars have come to view the 1960s civil disturbances as the result of more than 100 years of local, state and national policy decisions - the inevitable conclusion to a long series of choices by those who were in power and the frustration it created among those who weren't.

They were decisions about urban planning, housing and transportation that made America's suburbs flourish while systematically devastating its inner cities, Newark more so than most.

"There's a widespread belief Newark died in the riots," said John T. Cunningham, a historian who wrote what is considered the city's definitive history. "The fact is, the city was dead 30 years before anyone recognized it."

This is why I think many so-called "scholars" are full of s__t. This basically absolves the rioters of their actions, as they were led to their violence by a century of policy decisions. Um, when immigrants came over from Ellis Island, they were dirt poor and faced the same discriminations for generations. But they didn't riot, they prospered. Convenient how they only focus on the "choices by those who were in power" and no judgements are made on the choices of those who did the rioting.

And Newark was "dead" in the late 30's? Whatever.

Hamilton
July 12th, 2007, 09:34 AM
This is why I think many so-called "scholars" are full of s__t. This basically absolves the rioters of their actions, as they were led to their violence by a century of policy decisions. Um, when immigrants came over from Ellis Island, they were dirt poor and faced the same discriminations for generations. But they didn't riot, they prospered. Convenient how they only focus on the "choices by those who were in power" and no judgements are made on the choices of those who did the rioting.

Maybe if you were more open-minded and didn't regard yourself as so much better and more knowledgeable than people who've researched this issue for decades, you'd learn something.

The good ethnic Whites have never rioted like those gangbanger Negroes who killed Newark, you say?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/New_York_Draft_Riots

"The New York Draft Riots (July 13 to July 16, 1863) were a series of violent disturbances in New York City that were the culmination of discontent with new laws passed by Congress to draft men to fight in the ongoing American Civil War. President Abraham Lincoln sent several regiments of militia and volunteer troops to control the city. The rioters numbered in the thousands and were predominantly Irish. Smaller scale riots erupted in other cities about the same time.
Initially intended to express anger at the draft, the protests degraded into civil disorder directed against African Americans. "

Then there's the Buffalo Riot of 1894, where Italians and Irish hurled bricks and shot at each other, the Newburg Riot of 1899, where 80-100 Arab laborers attacked Black workers for taking their jobs...etcetera....

And obviously these riots didn't kill the cities where they were staged (though Buffalo and Newburg died later).


And Newark was "dead" in the late 30's? Whatever.

Again, if you didn't have such disdain for book-learning that doesn't square with your thinly-veiled, entrenched resentment toward Blacks, you'd learn a thing or two: A look at U.S. Census data will show that Newark's demographic decline did indeed begin in the 1930's. The vicious cycle of abandonment was already set by that point, and would have been difficult to stop once it started.

What's most curious to me is that you appeal to the same selective idealization of "Ellis Island immgrants" that is used by present-day xenophobes to argue against Latino immigration to the U.S. The truth is a lot less clear-cut, and ironically enough, there are whole anti-Irish and anti-Italian newspaper op-eds from the 19th Century that could be re-published today, verbatim, without anyone batting an eye.

OmegaNYC
July 12th, 2007, 10:13 AM
^^^^ Good point.

Radiohead
July 12th, 2007, 11:14 PM
Maybe if you were more open-minded and didn't regard yourself as so much better and more knowledgeable than people who've researched this issue for decades, you'd learn something.

The good ethnic Whites have never rioted like those gangbanger Negroes who killed Newark, you say?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/New_York_Draft_Riots

"The New York Draft Riots (July 13 to July 16, 1863) were a series of violent disturbances in New York City that were the culmination of discontent with new laws passed by Congress to draft men to fight in the ongoing American Civil War. President Abraham Lincoln sent several regiments of militia and volunteer troops to control the city. The rioters numbered in the thousands and were predominantly Irish. Smaller scale riots erupted in other cities about the same time.
Initially intended to express anger at the draft, the protests degraded into civil disorder directed against African Americans. "

Then there's the Buffalo Riot of 1894, where Italians and Irish hurled bricks and shot at each other, the Newburg Riot of 1899, where 80-100 Arab laborers attacked Black workers for taking their jobs...etcetera....

And obviously these riots didn't kill the cities where they were staged (though Buffalo and Newburg died later).

Oh quit playing the race card. Rioters are rioters, no matter their race (Hispanic, Black, Caucasion, Asian etc.) In this case, the subject was the 1967 Newark riots, which happened to be caused primarily by blacks. Funny how if you dare try to make a point renouncing the theory that the riots were inevitable and almost justified, you have a "resentment" toward blacks. No, I have a resentment toward ANY group of people, WHATEVER their race, who riot, loot, injure, kill and help to destroy their city. There is no justification for this. But as you imply, I'm just a pompous, closed minded hick who hates blacks. By the way, do you have any instances of those "idealized" Ellis Island immigrants rioting beyond the 19th century?









Again, if you didn't have such disdain for book-learning that doesn't square with your thinly-veiled, entrenched resentment toward Blacks, you'd learn a thing or two: A look at U.S. Census data will show that Newark's demographic decline did indeed begin in the 1930's. The vicious cycle of abandonment was already set by that point, and would have been difficult to stop once it started.

What's most curious to me is that you appeal to the same selective idealization of "Ellis Island immgrants" that is used by present-day xenophobes to argue against Latino immigration to the U.S. The truth is a lot less clear-cut, and ironically enough, there are whole anti-Irish and anti-Italian newspaper op-eds from the 19th Century that could be re-published today, verbatim, without anyone batting an eye.


Interesting analysis. Funny how you can read so much about me from my brief criticism of some scholars about the Newark riots. How dare I criticize an intellectual scholar.

I have a masters degree myself, but that does not make my opinions any better than someone without, just like a PH.D does not make theirs better than mine (or yours). And if I don't agree with them, I will critcize them. Isn't that what this board is about, free speech. Sorry if it's not the kind of free speech that YOU approve. Should this narrow-minded, holier than thou, racist, book-hating xenophobe consult your grand exalted scholars on who I should vote for as well? It is only THEIR opinion that really counts, right?

JerzResident
July 13th, 2007, 10:27 AM
Comparing the Immigrant plight to the African American plight is like apples and oranges. Immigrants were mistreated but no way were they mistreated like African Americans.

Punzie
July 14th, 2007, 12:03 AM
Former Mayor of Newark Is Indicted

http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2007/07/13/nyregion/13james-600.jpg
Ozier Muhammad/The New York Times
Newark’s former mayor, Sharpe James, leaving the federal courthouse in Newark Thursday.


By DAVID KOCIENIEWSKI (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/reference/timestopics/people/k/david_kocieniewski/index.html?inline=nyt-per)
The New York Times
July 13, 2007

NEWARK, July 12 — Sharpe James (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/reference/timestopics/people/j/sharpe_james/index.html?inline=nyt-per), the former mayor who towered over politics in this city for two decades and was a charismatic if combative cheerleader as it struggled to regain businesses and middle-class residents, was indicted on Thursday on charges of using city credit cards for personal expenses and letting a companion buy municipal property for a fraction of its worth.


Related

Remembering a Leader, Loyally, Fondly and Sometimes Angrily (http://www.nytimes.com/2007/07/13/nyregion/13react.html) (July 13, 2007)

Companion in Travels, and Now in Court (http://www.nytimes.com/2007/07/13/nyregion/13riley.html) (July 13, 2007)

Text of the Indictment (http://graphics8.nytimes.com/packages/pdf/nyregion/20070712James_Indictment.pdf) (pdf)

Times Topics: Sharpe James (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/reference/timestopics/people/j/sharpe_james/index.html?inline=nyt-per)


Mr. James, who built a patronage machine largely through cult of personality, is accused of illegally charging more than $58,000 on two city credit cards for Jacuzzi dips, alcohol, movies, meals and weekend getaways for tennis tournaments with friends.

The United States attorney for New Jersey, Christopher J. Christie, said the case against Mr. James contained “stark examples of the greed and arrogance of unchecked power.”

Mr. James also faces a charge of conspiring with one of his frequent travel partners, Tamika Riley, to defraud the city by selling her nine parcels of city land for $46,000 that she quickly resold for $665,000.

Mr. James, 71, was led in handcuffs and leg shackles into a courtroom just two blocks from the City Hall where he held power. Released later on $250,000 bail, he told reporters that his wrists were a bit sore from the cuffs, but that he was happy to be freed.

“I’m innocent of all these charges,” he said. “And I look forward to my day in court when the truth will come out.”

The investigation, named “Operation Cornered Lot,” began three years ago, when federal agents received a telephone call from a Newark resident who said that the James administration was funneling city property to the mayor’s friends and political associates, according to Weysan Dunn, special agent in charge of the F.B.I. (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/reference/timestopics/organizations/f/federal_bureau_of_investigation/index.html?inline=nyt-org)’s Newark office.

The case expanded last spring, when the United States attorney’s office began reviewing Mr. James’s use of his city credit cards during his last five years in office.

It culminated on Thursday in a 33-count indictment that included claims that he defrauded the city in ways both extravagant and venal: $1,440 for a trip to a beachfront resort in the Dominican Republic, where Mr. James claimed he wanted to assess the tropical gardens to see if they could be replicated at the Newark train station.

There was also, according to the indictment, $3,500 for a trip to Martha’s Vineyard (plus $207 for an advance ferry reservation for his Rolls-Royce); $167.22 at clubs in Rio de Janeiro’s red-light district; $297 to inspect a yacht he wanted to buy in Maryland; and $2,989 for a penthouse suite on a cruise that began six weeks after he left City Hall.

He also ran up more than $1,600 in frequent trips to Applebee’s restaurants and movie theaters outside Newark — and resulting in a $39 fine for exceeding the credit limit on the city card.

Then there was a $2,976 charge to rent a storage unit, the indictment charges, where Mr. James hid records pertaining to the city’s land sales to Ms. Riley and had a contract stating, “Authorized Users: None.”
Ms. Riley, 38, whom prosecutors described as a failed clothier lacking experience in real estate or redevelopment, was also indicted on Thursday and released on $100,000 bond.

Mr. James is accused of helping steer city property to her at severely discounted prices on nine occasions from 2001 to 2006. In February 2005, for instance, the city sold Ms. Riley land with an assessed value of $212,600 for $4,000; she resold it for $100,000 a month later.

While the indictment does not present evidence that Mr. James directly benefited, it said Ms. Riley gave him thousands of dollars in campaign donations, often shortly after buying or reselling the properties.

“When Sharpe James had a choice between enriching himself or helping the people of Newark, he chose self-enrichment,” Mr. Christie said in a statement as Mr. James and Ms. Riley pleaded not guilty in a 15-minute hearing in federal court here.

“When he had the choice between impartially serving the citizens of Newark and the state of New Jersey or rewarding female companions, supporters and himself with taxpayer money, he chose to cheat the people of Newark and the citizens of New Jersey.”

Mr. Christie said Mr. James could face up to eight years in prison.

But it is one thing to indict such a popular politician in this town, another to convict him. Mr. James’s immediate predecessor, Kenneth A. Gibson, was indicted in 2000, years after he stepped down from the mayoralty, on bribery, fraud and tax evasion charges involving his dealings with a suburban school board. Mr. Gibson’s trial ended in a hung jury, but he later pleaded guilty to one minor count.

Though Mr. James’s indictment was long anticipated, its official announcement was nonetheless a startling moment in Newark politics, magnified by its occurrence on the day the city commemorated the 40th anniversary of the riots that decimated its core.

“This is happening at a time when the entire city is involved in a retrospective of the riots, which is also the impact over the last 40 years of black political power here and elsewhere,” said Larry Hamm, the founder of the Peoples Organization for Progress, a community group that protested everything from police brutality to eminent domain proceedings during Mr. James’s tenure.

“We have had two black mayors in Newark since then and now both of them have been indicted by federal prosecutors. Those of us who have been in the struggle can’t help but believe that the larger society is trying to send some signals.”

Mr. Christie brushed aside suggestions that race played any role in the prosecution, and said that the timing, in relation to the commemoration of the riots, was coincidental.

In Trenton, where Mr. James is retiring this fall after four terms as a state senator, Republicans (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/reference/timestopics/organizations/r/republican_party/index.html?inline=nyt-org) said the charges seemed like an overdue comeuppance for a man who had lived an extravagant lifestyle — he owned a Rolls-Royce, yacht and a home on the Jersey Shore — that many considered beyond the reach of his government salaries. Senate President Richard J. Codey, a Democrat, said only that it was a sad day for the city of Newark and for Mr. James’s family.

It is unclear what may happen to the three government pensions Mr. James collects; on Thursday, the state suspended withdrawals from the two accounts it controls.

According to the state treasurer’s office, he withdrew more than $500,000 from his $1.1 million retirement account at Essex County College, where he was athletic director before becoming mayor in 1986.

Mayor Cory A. Booker (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/reference/timestopics/people/b/cory_booker/index.html?inline=nyt-per), whose administration is trying to reclaim some of the properties sold under Mr. James, declined to comment.

Mr. James’s defenders have said the property sales were part of a broader effort to boost the economy and reduce blight.

But Mr. Christie said on Thursday that for all the redevelopment Mr. James had orchestrated during his 20 years in office, his legacy “is forever scarred by the allegations contained in this indictment.”

http://www.nytimes.com/2007/07/13/nyregion/13james.html?pagewanted=1&ei=5087%0A&em&en=8460f7786d0f6880&ex=1184472000

JerzResident
July 14th, 2007, 10:43 AM
YES! I've been waiting for that slimy snake to be caught for years now. Finally some justice for the people of Newark and New Jersey.

Hamilton
July 21st, 2007, 02:43 PM
Oh quit playing the race card. Rioters are rioters, no matter their race (Hispanic, Black, Caucasion, Asian etc.) In this case, the subject was the 1967 Newark riots, which happened to be caused primarily by blacks. Funny how if you dare try to make a point renouncing the theory that the riots were inevitable and almost justified, you have a "resentment" toward blacks. No, I have a resentment toward ANY group of people, WHATEVER their race, who riot, loot, injure, kill and help to destroy their city. There is no justification for this. But as you imply, I'm just a pompous, closed minded hick who hates blacks. By the way, do you have any instances of those "idealized" Ellis Island immigrants rioting beyond the 19th century

The comparison of Newark's Blacks to the ethnic Whites who came over from Ellis Island invites the pulling out of a race card something fierce, amigo.

Hamilton
July 21st, 2007, 02:51 PM
After some good news in the courts for Newark, some (probably) bad news (from the New York Times):


Judge Stops Newark Redevelopment Project
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By ANDREW JACOBS
Published: July 20, 2007
A New Jersey judge effectively killed an ambitious downtown redevelopment project in Newark yesterday, ruling that the city’s decision to condemn 14 acres of property on behalf of a private developer was ill-conceived and wrong. The project, the Mulberry Street Redevelopment Project, a proposed collection of 2,000 market-rate apartments and stores in the shadow of the city’s new hockey arena, would have been the largest development initiative here in decades.

In her decision, Judge Marie P. Simonelli of Superior Court said the administration of Mayor Sharpe James misused the state’s rules on condemnation when it declared 62 parcels “an area in need of redevelopment.” She said the row houses, mechanics’ shops and parking lots, while somewhat tattered, were not “blighted” and suggested that the decision to condemn the property was politically motivated.

In her decision, Judge Simonelli mentioned the close links between the developers and the James administration, adding that large contributions had been made to the former mayor and the Municipal Council, whose approval was needed for the area’s condemnation.

The decision comes after a landmark State Supreme Court ruling last month that restricted the ability of towns and cities to use eminent domain as a way to seize property they deem could be put to better use. “It clearly shows that the teaching of the Supreme Court is having an effect,” said Ronald Chen, the New Jersey public advocate. “If they want to declare land blighted, municipalities are just going to have to work a little bit harder to make their case.”

In her decision, Judge Simonelli cited documents from 2002 in which the developers essentially dictated the terms and scope of the project, including tax incentives. She observed that there was evidence that the project was “a done deal, a fait accompli, before the required statutory redevelopment process began.”

John H. Buonocore, a lawyer for the residents and business owners facing eviction, said he was pleased with the judge’s decision, which contradicted the city’s contention that the neighborhood was beyond repair. “The court, to the contrary, found that the Mulberry Street area is structurally sound, fully occupied, tax generating and well-maintained,” he said. “We’re delighted that the court saw through this prearranged land grab on behalf of politically favored developers.”

Bruce J. Wishnia, one of the principals behind the $550 million project, criticized the decision, saying, “If it is not reversed, it will effectively shut the door on urban redevelopment in New Jersey.” He declined to answer questions about allegations that the company’s connections and contributions to City Hall were factors in the company’s selection as the area’s sole developer.

Although they blame Mr. James for condemning their neighborhood in the first place, residents and merchants said they were disappointed that Mayor Cory A. Booker upheld the city’s use of eminent domain, despite having promised during his campaign that he would not. Mr. Booker was on vacation yesterday and city officials declined to comment, saying they were studying the decision and had not yet decided whether to appeal the ruling.

George Mytrowitz, whose auto body shop would have been torn down for the project, said he was relieved by the ruling. “Now I can get on with my life and not spend every waking moment worrying where I’m going to be tomorrow,” said Mr. Mytrowitz, whose great-grandfather started the business in 1913 as a blacksmith shop. “I have the best location in Newark, and I’m glad I’m going to stay here.”

http://www.nytimes.com/2007/07/20/nyregion/20domain.html?ref=nyregion

Hamilton
July 21st, 2007, 02:55 PM
What I'm worried about here is that without eminent domain, this land just isn't attractive to developers, since putting up luxury condo's next to Mytrowitz Auto Body Shop just isn't attractive. In other words, this area of Newark will take many decades to develop without eminent domain, many times longer than it would with ED.

ASchwarz
July 21st, 2007, 03:23 PM
I bet you the city appeals, because the court decision makes no sense whatsoever and contradicts precedent.

Even if the city loses, all Newak has to do is "reach out" more to property owners, and then it can decare eminent domain for a second time, this time under the court guidelines.

I think this project will happen, because the land is directly adjacent to the arena and steps from Penn Station Newark.

The court decision basically affirms the previous administration had no idea what it was doing. The Booker administration is very competent and will push this forward, with or without eminent domain.

JCMAN320
July 21st, 2007, 08:52 PM
Another black eye for Newark?!? This city can't catch a break whatsoever.

66nexus
July 22nd, 2007, 02:00 AM
I do respect the fact that there are people willing to fight for their areas and/or homes in the area but c'mon...it ain't exactly like Newark would be better off with (let's just call the 'locations') instead of the Mulberry St Promenade. I respect their love for their homes but oh...what could have been. I don't think it's over, I too think the developers may have to put a good deal on the table. I hate to say, in Newark's case any development like the MSP is good for the city and well...beggars can't really be choosers. I don't think the landowners realize that the project was bigger than them.

JCexpert558
July 22nd, 2007, 07:54 PM
Will Newark ever get any renavations to it's Penn. Station like give more platforms, tracks, and more stores because with the this Hudson Tunnel going on alot more people will be coming to Newark.:confused:

66nexus
July 22nd, 2007, 08:19 PM
They did an aesthetic renovation I believe a few years back, but as far as commuter volume I don't think there's any plans. Newark Penn is generally a good-sized station and it being a hub it can handle a lot of trains coming from NYC and the rest of Jersey (and the east coast for that matter). They added the light rail to connect Broad St station but I'm not sure if there's any other plans underway for Newark Penn itself

JCexpert558
August 1st, 2007, 09:59 PM
I think I think Im going to stop liking Jersey City And go on to Newark.:(

66nexus
August 1st, 2007, 10:06 PM
I think I think Im going to stop liking Jersey City And go on to Newark.:(


LOL why? Why not like 'em both like I do?

JCexpert558
August 1st, 2007, 10:16 PM
Well I like them both but Im not sure if Jersey city is ever going to get any real development. But I should still believe in Jersey city and just see what the future of Jersey City holds. Who knows I might just see some later on. So I'm going to believe in Jersey City once more:D

JCMAN320
August 6th, 2007, 01:20 AM
Four killed in Newark

by Alexi Friedman and John HollSunday August 05, 2007, 4:32 PM

Four people have been killed in Newark since last night, including three young people shot execution-style in a school playground and a man in an unrelated slaying this morning.

Two men, Deshawn Harvey and Terrance Aeriel, and one woman, Ofemi Hightower, were the victims of a confrontation at about 11:30 p.m. between two groups behind Mount Vernon School, police said.

Terrance Aeriel's sister, 19-year-old Natasha Aeriel, also was shot. She was listed in fair condition today at University Hospital, hospital spokesman Rogers Ramsey said.

A separate shooting at 8:30 a.m. on Smith Street left one man dead, in what the prosecutor's office is calling a retalitatory shooting for an attempt on two people's lives earlier this morning in the same area.

Newark police and the Essex County Prosecutor's Office are investigating the circumstances surrounding the homicides, according to Newark Detective Todd McClendon.

All four people in the schoolyard killings were shot in the head at close range, prosecutor's office spokesman Paul Loriquet said. He said the three victims who died were lined up against a back wall of the school and shot.

The victims all are Newark residents, Loriquet said, and three had Delaware State University identification cards.

"Our detectives said they were good kids, they never had any issues with the law," Loriquet said. "It's a real tragedy for Newark."

The killings brought the number of homicides in the city this year to 60, compared with 63 for the same time last year, McClendon said.

The spate of gun violence has some residents loudly criticizing Newark Mayor Cory Booker and the police department.

"They are not keeping us safe. It's appalling that (Booker) will allow bodies to keep falling on the streets of Newark," said Donna Jackson, president of Take Back Our Streets. Her group will stand on the steps of City Hall at noon Monday to pressure Booker to resign.

The mayor declined to comment. "It's an ongoing police investigation," said his spokeswoman, Lupe Todd. "It would be irresponsible for him to comment. That's not to say that he hasn't spoken to people, including the victims' families."

"As a parent myself, I can only offer sincere condolences on behalf of the Newark Police Department on what must surely be a very dark day," said Newark Police Director Garry McCarthy. "In the midst of their tragedy, the families have found the strength to cooperate and assist us with the investigation. We will continue to conduct a thorough investigation in an effort to bring the assailant(s) responsible for this heinous crime to justice."

Authorities are asking anyone with information to call the Newark Police Department's "Crime Stoppers" anonymous tip line at 877-NWK-TIPS (877 695-8477) or the "Gun Stoppers" line at 877-NWK-GUNS (877-695-4867).

Staff writers Suleman Din, Julie O'Connor and Jonathan Schuppe contributed to this report.
--------------------

You know while Cleveland and Baltimore have crime problems Newark is and becoming a special case. Random execution stlye murders are you serious?? The streets of Newark are looking more and more like Iraq. I want this city to turn around so bad but for every step forward they take, they take 100 steps back.

66nexus
August 6th, 2007, 01:47 AM
Four killed in Newark

by Alexi Friedman and John HollSunday August 05, 2007, 4:32 PM

Four people have been killed in Newark since last night, including three young people shot execution-style in a school playground and a man in an unrelated slaying this morning.

Two men, Deshawn Harvey and Terrance Aeriel, and one woman, Ofemi Hightower, were the victims of a confrontation at about 11:30 p.m. between two groups behind Mount Vernon School, police said.

Terrance Aeriel's sister, 19-year-old Natasha Aeriel, also was shot. She was listed in fair condition today at University Hospital, hospital spokesman Rogers Ramsey said.

A separate shooting at 8:30 a.m. on Smith Street left one man dead, in what the prosecutor's office is calling a retalitatory shooting for an attempt on two people's lives earlier this morning in the same area.

Newark police and the Essex County Prosecutor's Office are investigating the circumstances surrounding the homicides, according to Newark Detective Todd McClendon.

All four people in the schoolyard killings were shot in the head at close range, prosecutor's office spokesman Paul Loriquet said. He said the three victims who died were lined up against a back wall of the school and shot.

The victims all are Newark residents, Loriquet said, and three had Delaware State University identification cards.

"Our detectives said they were good kids, they never had any issues with the law," Loriquet said. "It's a real tragedy for Newark."

The killings brought the number of homicides in the city this year to 60, compared with 63 for the same time last year, McClendon said.

The spate of gun violence has some residents loudly criticizing Newark Mayor Cory Booker and the police department.

"They are not keeping us safe. It's appalling that (Booker) will allow bodies to keep falling on the streets of Newark," said Donna Jackson, president of Take Back Our Streets. Her group will stand on the steps of City Hall at noon Monday to pressure Booker to resign.

The mayor declined to comment. "It's an ongoing police investigation," said his spokeswoman, Lupe Todd. "It would be irresponsible for him to comment. That's not to say that he hasn't spoken to people, including the victims' families."

"As a parent myself, I can only offer sincere condolences on behalf of the Newark Police Department on what must surely be a very dark day," said Newark Police Director Garry McCarthy. "In the midst of their tragedy, the families have found the strength to cooperate and assist us with the investigation. We will continue to conduct a thorough investigation in an effort to bring the assailant(s) responsible for this heinous crime to justice."

Authorities are asking anyone with information to call the Newark Police Department's "Crime Stoppers" anonymous tip line at 877-NWK-TIPS (877 695-8477) or the "Gun Stoppers" line at 877-NWK-GUNS (877-695-4867).

Staff writers Suleman Din, Julie O'Connor and Jonathan Schuppe contributed to this report.
--------------------

You know while Cleveland and Baltimore have crime problems Newark is and becoming a special case. Random execution stlye murders are you serious?? The streets of Newark are looking more and more like Iraq. I want this city to turn around so bad but for every step forward they take, they take 100 steps back.

I've been to Iraq. Newark ain't it.
As far as the president of Take back the Streets saying Booker is 'allowing' bodies to fall in the streets sounds like Booker-hate. I mean as if Newark didn't have a high murder rate when James was in office.
There's nothing too special or new about Newark crime....but this city has a long way to go

JCMAN320
August 6th, 2007, 01:51 AM
66nexus I understand what your saying but random executions on the streets now?? I mean these weren't gang bangers, these were college kids chosen by random. It seems like Newark keeps losing it more and more and on top of this the guy is on the lose still.

66nexus
August 6th, 2007, 01:59 AM
Not for nothin', but random executions, although less common and less pronounced than gang-related ones, aren't new to Newark. This happens to be the latest and perhaps most gruesome.

TeddyJ
August 6th, 2007, 08:29 AM
Thanks for showing some rationale Nexus, JCMan you really need to stop with the fallacious metaphores, Newark becoming Iraq? Get f'n real. Just because the term "execution style" is a new label for Newark murder doesnt mean it's become the American Baghdad. It's a tragedy and a heartless murder but stop spinning.

Radiohead
August 7th, 2007, 12:10 AM
C'mon, quit ragging on JCMan. Newark is a mess.

I saw the report on the kids who were killed. A few were already enrolled in college. How sad.

66nexus
August 7th, 2007, 01:26 AM
C'mon, quit ragging on JCMan. Newark is a mess.

I saw the report on the kids who were killed. A few were already enrolled in college. How sad.

No one's ragging, but I don't think Newark is synonymous with Iraq in any way. There's bad, and then there's living in an existential threat place

JCMAN320
August 7th, 2007, 03:24 AM
Your right I went over the top but these crimes are so heinous and sickening it just pisses me off. Newark is in shambles and can't get it's act together and it's just sad.

TeddyJ
August 7th, 2007, 08:26 AM
Your right I went over the top but these crimes are so heinous and sickening it just pisses me off. Newark is in shambles and can't get it's act together and it's just sad.

I understand where ur coming from. The crimes are heinous, but you gotta have faith that things will change. It takes time to transform a poverous city into a flourishing one like JC. At one point JC was more dangerous then Newark and JC turned around, so will Newark. BTW, like Nexus said, these activists that want Booker out are politically motivated and are shades of the James administration, dont by the hype. Newark will turn around.

66nexus
August 7th, 2007, 10:23 AM
Your right I went over the top but these crimes are so heinous and sickening it just pisses me off. Newark is in shambles and can't get it's act together and it's just sad.

Yeah these things piss me off as well and they definitely weren't deserved. Newark's fiscal problems hurt the city because it needs more cops. Somehow I still think the city can recover. I ride on the fact that in the 80s/early 90s Newark crime (in every category) was much worse. I don't think the city can remain bad forever

JCexpert558
August 7th, 2007, 06:17 PM
I was thinking that Like Jersey City Harrison elizabeth Secucaus and Bayonne should merge with Newark. Do you guys think thats exceptable.

OmegaNYC
August 7th, 2007, 06:26 PM
bad idea. it will never happen.

JCexpert558
August 9th, 2007, 03:55 PM
Know its not. If someone wrote to the city concuil about that and they aproved it. Then it could happen

66nexus
August 9th, 2007, 05:08 PM
Know its not. If someone wrote to the city concuil about that and they aproved it. Then it could happen

Oh it's definitely possible, but highly unlikely is all they're saying

OmegaNYC
August 9th, 2007, 05:44 PM
Like I said, it would be a bad idea. If anything Hudson Cty/Jersey City should merge together to make one city. (JC would be a city of 62 sq miles and a population of over 600,000) but Newark, JC, Elizabeth, Harrison, etc? No. County lines would have to be redrawn. New county seats would have to be form (this could lead to infighting between towns). And this can cause hell for property taxes and the like. In other words, A complete mess for the state of New Jersey.

Ninjahedge
August 14th, 2007, 11:06 AM
No it's not. If someone wrote to the city council about that and they approved it. Then it could happen

JCE.... Take a bit of time when you are posting! It gets hard to take someone completely seriously when they err so much.

Also, your grammar seems a bit disjointed. Kind of conversational.


As for the material, it is not as easy as just writing your city councilman to get something like this proposed, voted on, and approved. If you are not sure about a subject, sometimes it is better to ask, than to refute (contradict with, disagree). Simply saying "Know its not" is no way to get people to agree with you.

Just a few pointers. You really have not done anything WRONG, but you may want to read up a little before making broad statements.

millertime83
August 14th, 2007, 01:08 PM
Maybe if you were more open-minded and didn't regard yourself as so much better and more knowledgeable than people who've researched this issue for decades, you'd learn something.

The good ethnic Whites have never rioted like those gangbanger Negroes who killed Newark, you say?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/New_York_Draft_Riots

"The New York Draft Riots (July 13 to July 16, 1863) were a series of violent disturbances in New York City that were the culmination of discontent with new laws passed by Congress to draft men to fight in the ongoing American Civil War. President Abraham Lincoln sent several regiments of militia and volunteer troops to control the city. The rioters numbered in the thousands and were predominantly Irish. Smaller scale riots erupted in other cities about the same time.
Initially intended to express anger at the draft, the protests degraded into civil disorder directed against African Americans. "

Then there's the Buffalo Riot of 1894, where Italians and Irish hurled bricks and shot at each other, the Newburg Riot of 1899, where 80-100 Arab laborers attacked Black workers for taking their jobs...etcetera....

And obviously these riots didn't kill the cities where they were staged (though Buffalo and Newburg died later).



Again, if you didn't have such disdain for book-learning that doesn't square with your thinly-veiled, entrenched resentment toward Blacks, you'd learn a thing or two: A look at U.S. Census data will show that Newark's demographic decline did indeed begin in the 1930's. The vicious cycle of abandonment was already set by that point, and would have been difficult to stop once it started.

What's most curious to me is that you appeal to the same selective idealization of "Ellis Island immgrants" that is used by present-day xenophobes to argue against Latino immigration to the U.S. The truth is a lot less clear-cut, and ironically enough, there are whole anti-Irish and anti-Italian newspaper op-eds from the 19th Century that could be re-published today, verbatim, without anyone batting an eye.

or you could just watch "Gangs of New York"

Ninjahedge
August 14th, 2007, 01:39 PM
The New York Draft Riots (July 13 to July 16, 1863) were a series of violent disturbances in New York City that were the culmination of discontent with new laws passed by Congress to draft men to fight in the ongoing American Civil War.

In all fairness, comparing a violent protest to gangbanging is not exactly fair.

All you have to do is read up about the whole Irish immigration (and eventual integration and almost complete annexation of the NYCPD at the time) and you will get an idea about "white" violence.

People who have no means have different ways of trying to secure them. One of them being violence. When you have little to lose, and feel you can gain wealth, power or respect, the use of violence becomes less egregious in the minds of those seeking the previously mentioned rewards.

I have not read the post that Ham was responding to, but no doubt it was rather one-sided (judging from the responses). Suffice to say that every ethnic group out there ha had its own "growing pains". The problem occurs when that group hits a social speed bump that retards its societal development and absorption into the mainstream.

What do you think has slowed this progress? What social impediments are stagnating the incorporation of these gangs, or rather their constituents, into the fold?

NYatKNIGHT
August 14th, 2007, 03:10 PM
August 14, 2007

After Killings, Sense of Unity Surprises Newark (http://www.nytimes.com/2007/08/14/nyregion/14newark.html?pagewanted=1&_r=1&ref=nyregion)

By ANDREW JACOBS


Copyright 2007 (http://www.nytimes.com/ref/membercenter/help/copyright.html) The New York Times Company (http://www.nytco.com/)

JCMAN320
August 14th, 2007, 03:41 PM
This is a tipping point for the city of Newark. This will either define the city or become it's finest hour in turning the city around. This unity that the city is seeing must run deep and be powerful enough to turn the city around and not just temporary apathy.

Cory Booker has taken this wondefully and handeled it with poise and dignity. He said it best though at one of the student's funerals; he banged his fist on one of the pues and yelled "ENOUGH IS ENOUGH!!!!" with tears in his eyes. He has been one of the most hands on mayors I have ever seen and all mayors should be like him and visible in the community and show every cities residents that he is just like them and crys and weeps when these crimes happen and will be with his people through the good times and bad.

Booker also said this; "God bless these children, Gold bless their families, God bless the community, and God bless and help Newark!"

NewYorkDoc
August 14th, 2007, 03:47 PM
The pledge by Prudential is excellent. I commend them for supporting their city and not running away when times get bad. Things can certainly turn around for Newark.

66nexus
August 14th, 2007, 04:22 PM
The pledge by Prudential is excellent. I commend them for supporting their city and not running away when times get bad. Things can certainly turn around for Newark.

Agreed, they historically stick it out no regardless of how conditions are in the city. They believe in Newark and I too respect their commitment.

JCMAN320
August 16th, 2007, 06:49 PM
Corzine, Booker go after guns

Thursday, August 16, 2007

By JASON TSAI
STAFF WRITER

NEWARK — For the second day in a row, officials on Thursday announced landmark initiatives designed to address gun violence statewide in the wake of this month’s execution-style murders of three college students in Newark.

Proposed legislation would make firearm registration and safekeeping a requirement in the embattled city – an approach to crime prevention that Mayor Corey Booker hopes will become a model across New Jersey.

“What we have today is a full commitment from every layer of government,” Booker said during a news conference Thursday. “We’re going to work collectively with mayors…so that they can adopt our model ordinance.”

Flanked by Governor Corzine and state Attorney General Anne Milgram, Booker said the initiatives unveiled this week aim to staunch gun crimes statewide and the “iron pipeline” of illegal firearms that flows through New Jersey.

“We have a broad community problem,” said Corzine, calling the initiatives “fundamental, fundamental work in a country that will not go to the registration of guns.

“If we do not trace illegal guns, we will be falling further and further behind,” the governor said.


The moves announced Thursday would chiefly require the registration of all firearms in Newark and the reporting of any lost or stolen guns.

Additional city legislation would restrict gun dealers from operating in or near school and residential zones, and would mandate certain firearms safekeeping measures, including trigger locks.

Booker said he’s been drumming up support by contacting the mayors of towns that have gun shops, including Garfield.

“I think stricter enforcement and tighter controls will help,” Garfield Mayor Frank Calandriello said. “I do believe in the right to bear arms, but based on what has been going on in the state, tighter control could never hurt.”

Booker acknowledged there’s no “one quick fix” to the battle against illegal firearms. But he said he would deem the initiatives a success if they stopped three or four guns from being used in violent crimes.

“Everything that can be done must be done,” he said.

The announcement came one day after officials announced that State Police will be able to trace illegal firearms through a nationwide database operated by the federal Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives.

Earlier this week, Booker unveiled a $3.2 million surveillance program that will install gunshot detection technology and dozens of police surveillance cameras in some of the city’s most crime-plagued neighborhoods.

“For too long local communities have had to wage the war against the proliferation of illegal handguns, which has been a federal plague that needed a federal response,” said Jersey City Mayor Jerramiah Healy. “Now we have it.”

E-mail: tsai@northjersey.com

LeCom
August 21st, 2007, 11:18 AM
Shame that it always takes a tragedy to push some serious legislation through.