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scumonkey
June 2nd, 2013, 03:02 PM
Saturday, June 1st 2013
http://dlisted.com/files/ripjeanstapleton2013.jpg
And now the angels in heaven are taking in Jean Stapleton's beautiful hairline (which looks like upside down ocean waves of hair) and exquisitely drawn eyebrows (which I'm pretty sure were drawn on with a No.2 pencil and tar), because she died in NYC of natural causes yesterday (http://www.latimes.com/entertainment/tv/showtracker/la-et-st-jean-stapleton-dies-at-90-20130601,0,2810680.story). Jean was 90.
Jean was born in NYC and she started her career by yodeling and dancing on Broadway in Funny Girls, Damn Yankees and Bells are Ringing. She guest starred in a few TV shows before she got the role of lovable dingbat Edith Bunker in All in the Family. Jean won three Emmys and played Edith for 9 seasons. After All in the Family ended, she guest starred on a million more TV shows and played Birdie, the shop assistant whose nipples got hard for General Franco, in You've Got Mail.
Jean's husband of 26 years, William Putch, died in 1983. She's survived by her two kids.
Rest in peace, flawless dingbat.... You are now reunited with Archie Bunker. (In Edith's case, I don't know if that's a good thing for a bad thing).

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oV5LQcmuGg8&feature=player_embedded

http://dlisted.com/2013/06/01/jean-stapleton-dies-90
Posted by: Michael K

mariab
June 2nd, 2013, 09:53 PM
Those were the daaaaaays! My fave 3 episodes are when she was going through menopause; Archie gets locked in his basement, gets drunk, and meets God, who is black; and Sammy Davis Jr visits the house.

I do think though that her first love was the theater.

Merry
June 3rd, 2013, 03:41 AM
Loved that show. RIP, Jean.


Stifled by Time’s Passage, Fewer Fans Visit the Bunkers’ TV Home

By VIVIAN YEE

But when the news arrived on Saturday that Jean Stapleton — best known for playing the sweet, daffy Edith to Carroll O’Connor’s cranky, bigoted Archie on “All in the Family” for most of the 1970s — had died (http://www.nytimes.com/2013/06/02/arts/television/jean-stapleton-who-played-archies-better-angel-dies-at-90.html), only a few gawkers and a lone television news crew came out to reminisce over 89-70 Cooper Avenue, a little blue house across from St. John’s Cemetery with a shiny flagpole, a floral wreath on the door and a tidy front garden of pansies and potted plants. “There used to be a lot,” as many as 20 a month, said Peter Alcuri, 75, whose back porch faces Cooper Avenue. “No more.”

After all, it has been decades since the everyday dramas of Edith and Archie were played out weekly in millions of American living rooms, as Edith tried to broker peace between Archie and his black neighbor, George Jefferson, and he would constantly refer to her as a dingbat.

“I don’t think the women today would like that,” Mr. Alcuri mused.

It has been years since the nearly all-white, blue-collar neighborhood of the show matched reality in Glendale, where the Cooper Avenue house sits, or Astoria, where the show was set. When the show was running, recalled Mr. Alcuri, who has lived in the neighborhood for 54 years, the block was full of older residents of German, Irish and Italian descent, whose children later sold the houses. “Now it’s all mixed,” he said, with more Asian and Hispanic families.

In the next yard stood Gustavo Recalde, 41, a five-year resident of the block who said he had never heard of “All in the Family.”

“I don’t know about it,” he said.

In 2000, when Jeff Myhre, 51, moved in a few doors down from 89-70 Cooper, the mover was delighted to inform him that he was living on “the Archie Bunker block.” That struck a chord with Mr. Myhre, who grew up in suburban Denver watching “All in the Family,” just because “it was on,” and earnestly discussing the latest plot turns on the playground the next Monday, he said.

It did not resonate so much with Mr. Myhre’s wife, who hails from Alabama and is black. (She is more of a “Sanford and Son” fan.)

“Archie’s block has changed a little,” Mr. Myhre, who is white, said, chuckling.

But Archie’s son-in-law, Michael Stivic, would be glad to know that the block still has at least one die-hard liberal in Mr. Myhre, whose wife often compares him to Meathead, as Archie nicknamed Michael.

Michael may have been at odds with Archie, but he has his devotees on the block. Stan Podolsky, a fan of the show who has lived in the house attached to the Bunker residence for 15 years, said he identifies with Michael because they both are Polish.

(Lest anyone misinterpret the fictional geography of the block, he clarified that he does not live in the Jeffersons’ house. Rather, in his own parlance, “I’m that Italian family,” the Lorenzos, who lived next door to the Bunkers.)

Mr. Podolsky, too, mused that only a handful of people came by to see the house each year.

“Life goes on, I guess,” he said. But he noted that the show lives on in reruns on cable channels like Nick at Nite and TV Land.

Does he ever watch them?

“Of course! I’m old!”

It is probably just as well that the tourists have thinned. On Sunday, when the woman who now lives in the house heard the screechy strains of the show’s theme song, “Those Were the Days,” outside, she slammed the door. Neighbors said she was closely related to Dorothy Brandow, who lived in the house from 1924, when her parents bought it, until at least 2001. Ms. Brandow died in 2006, leaving the house to its current owner.

Ms. Brandow may have liked the attention no better than the house’s current occupant. When a reporter called after Mr. O’Connor died in 2001, her response was swift.
“Oh, good grief,” she said.

https://www.nytimes.com/2013/06/03/nyregion/fewer-fans-visit-all-in-the-family-tv-home.html?ref=nyregion

ZippyTheChimp
June 3rd, 2013, 10:09 AM
Archie gets locked in his basement, gets drunk, and meets God, who is black;Archie asks the Lord to take him; the heating oil delivery guy opens the cellar door; Archie gets down on his knees,

"Forgive me, Lord! The Jefferson's was right!"

-----------------------------------------------

It always bothered me that the studio house had a full front porch, but the real house didn't.

-----------------------------------------------

Edith answers a magazine ad: Mature, lonely couple seeking new friends, warm affectionate, fun loving, looking for company of lonely, but compatible couple who want to swap good times.

Archie: "Swingers? Is that what youse are?"

Curtis: "Yeah, what do you call it?"

Archie: "Communism!"

Ruth: "...We were drowning. Swinging saved us."

Edith: "I think I would have drowned."

Archie to Edith after the Rempleys left.

"Don't you read no more magazines!"

eddhead
June 3rd, 2013, 11:00 AM
Those were the daaaaaays! My fave 3 episodes are when she was going through menopause; Archie gets locked in his basement, gets drunk, and meets God, who is black; and Sammy Davis Jr visits the house.

I do think though that her first love was the theater.

You nailed it mariab.

There is one other one too from Archie's Place which occurs after Edith dies of a stroke in her sleep. A very poignent scene when Archie comes to grip with her death while discovering her slipper in their bedroom

This quote from Archie comes from Wiki:

It wasn't supposed to be like this. I was supposed to be the first one to go. I always used to kid you about you going first. You know I never meant none of that and that morning when yous was laying there. I was shaking you and yelling at you to go down and fix my breakfast. I didn't know. You had no right to leave me that way ..." (Holding the slipper to his face, Archie starts to cry) "... without giving me just one more chance to say I love you.

I still get a bit misty thinking about it.

BTW, Norman Lear was quite reluctant about killing off the character. From what I understand he was downright emotional about it. Apparently Jean Stapleton had to keep reminding him that Edith wasn't a real person.

RIP. What a great actress.

mariab
June 3rd, 2013, 04:50 PM
It always bothered me that the studio house had a full front porch, but the real house didn't.

What do you mean? I thought the address in the show didn't actually exist in Queens.




BTW, Norman Lear was quite reluctant about killing off the character. From what I understand he was downright emotional about it.

But Jean wanted to be written out before the start of 'Archie Bunker's Place'. Part of it was she didn't want to be typecast the rest of her career. That was a hard scene to watch because Archie didn't show that kind of emotion, but when she went he had to. I remember he also was emotional when Mike and Gloria moved to CA.

eddhead
June 3rd, 2013, 05:57 PM
But Jean wanted to be written out before the start of 'Archie Bunker's Place'. Part of it was she didn't want to be typecast the rest of her career.

That is true. As much as fearing being type-cast which was by that time a likely outcome, Stapleton felt the character had reached its potential and as such believed there was not much more she could do with it. Her desire to kill off Edith was as much about artisitc integrity as it was about type casting, although she did go on to do cameo TV and theater roles later on.

Lear however had a very difficult, and emotional time with he decision.


That was a hard scene to watch because Archie didn't show that kind of emotion, but when she went he had to. I remember he also was emotional when Mike and Gloria moved to CA.

Yes, the sense of isolation was gut-wrenching.

The evolution and growth of the "Archie" character was also very interesting and heavily influenced by Edith.

In the early episodes, Archie showed little capacity for love and emotion, but over time his character grew and evolved. We began to see protective instincts for instance when Gloria temporarily splits with Mike and seeks him out for comfort. In a later episode he shows terrific warmth and sympathy with her when she has a miscarriage; providing strong emotional support through his own sadness. Throughout the life of the series, Archie evolves from a largely unsymapthetic figure to someone more empathetic, relatable and certainly likeable. And much of that is the due to the soft influence of Edith, who frustrates him, but seems to always carry the day when she needs to the most.

She may have been his dingbat but he loved her and deep down, respected her.

mariab
June 3rd, 2013, 08:37 PM
Yeah because he knew his brake with her. When to stop. And his character was written as being from that generation of men that simply doesn't show how they're feeling, so the few times he does show it, it's very powerful. A trivial aside to that: Whenever they had to show the heavy moments, the audience and fade in/fade out background music were silent, which made the scene even more powerful.

ZippyTheChimp
June 3rd, 2013, 09:27 PM
What do you mean? I thought the address in the show didn't actually exist in Queens.I know - 704 Howser St is made up. I mean the house they zoom in on in the opening credits. Here's a screenshot:

http://michaelminn.net/newyork/buildings/queens/archie_bunker_house/1971-archie-bunker-house.jpg

In studio scenes outside the front door, they are on a big porch.

mariab
June 4th, 2013, 04:57 PM
Broadway's lights dim tonight for her.