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dbhstockton
April 10th, 2003, 05:07 PM
One of the large Brownfield sites considered a few years back for a new movie studio is being developed. *For as long as I can remember, it was a depressingly vast and barren Industrial wasteland just after Newark Penn Station, but I've noticed recently construction equipment and crews, as well as orange markers in the future location of streets. *Looks like it's really going to happen.

Here are some relatively recent photos of the plans (the stadium is to be for the Metrostars -- yes, the soccer Metrostars):

http://www.metrostars.com/images/stadium/harrison/siteplan.jpg

look! how lush and green!
http://www.metrostars.com/images/stadium/harrison/sketch_arial_view3.jpg

http://www.metrostars.com/images/stadium/harrison/sketch_at_main_street.jpg

kotw
October 12th, 2003, 02:03 PM
Check out the Letter to the Editor on

www.KearnyOnTheWeb.com/opinion.html

regarding the MetroStars and the Harrison Stadium.

NYatKNIGHT
October 13th, 2003, 01:12 PM
Until about a decade ago, this was the sight of that giant storage tower, easily visible from the Turnpike in front of the Newark skyline - it had that huge GO NAVY sign painted on it. Does anyone remember that or know its story? Anyway, good for them turning this wasteland into a soccer stadium.

Gulcrapek
October 13th, 2003, 03:54 PM
There's an unavoidable sense of progress when barren land is mapped into streets. What kind of progress will depend on what's built along those streets. I think this is a good kind of progress.

kotw
October 13th, 2003, 05:23 PM
Actually, the site is not the old PSEG site where the large Gas Tank was located (long since gone) but across the street in the historic Charles F. Guyon property. In order for progress to occur a large turn of the century abandoned building with Carnegie Steel beams and massive brick walls will be leveled. The building would make for a great open farmers (and others) market.

NYatKNIGHT
February 25th, 2004, 05:08 PM
This shot is from the Gateway Center in Newark looking across the Passaic River at Harrison - the site of the proposed soccer stadium. The roof of Newark Penn Station is in the foreground with the railroad bridge on the left. The building on the right is New Jersey Transit.

http://galleries.soaringtowers.org/albums/NYatKNIGHT/133_3352_IMG.sized.jpg

A closer look at the industrial NJ, the cargo containers, the NJ Turnpike, and the midtown skyline in the distance.

http://galleries.soaringtowers.org/albums/NYatKNIGHT/133_3354_IMG.sized.jpg

Kris
June 30th, 2004, 10:46 PM
July 1, 2004

MetroStars' New Home Is Nearly a Reality

By JACK BELL

After nearly four years of fits and embarrassing false starts, the MetroStars will announce definitive plans today to construct a 25,000-seat, $100 million stadium on the banks of the Passaic River in Harrison, N.J.

Work is expected to begin within several months, with the MetroStars playing one more season at Giants Stadium in East Rutherford, N.J., before moving in April 2006.

The stadium is part of a $160 million plan to redevelop a derelict 135-acre tract with offices and retail space, about 400 rental apartments, 200 lofts and a 4,000-car parking deck intended for commuters who use the PATH, Amtrak and New Jersey Transit trains, and for stadium events.

The Anschutz Entertainment Group, which operates the MetroStars and four other Major League Soccer franchises, will contribute $30 million to the stadium project. The Harrison Redevelopment Agency and the Advance Realty Group of Bedminster, N.J., are also involved in the project.

Mayor Raymond J. McDonough of Harrison and the eight other members of the City Council approved the agreement last night and recommended to Hudson County that it float a bond issue of about $130 million, which is expected to be paid off by revenue from the parking deck and taxes from the commercial development.

The MetroStars are the fourth professional sports franchise with plans to leave the Meadowlands Sports Complex. The Nets of the National Basketball Association plan to move to Brooklyn, the Devils of the National Hockey League hope to move to a new arena in Newark and the Jets of the National Football League want to move to a new stadium on the West Side of Manhattan. Those projects, however, still face significant obstacles.

"As of last night's Harrison council meeting, this is a done deal," MetroStars General Manager Nick Sakiewicz said in a telephone interview.

The stadium will be located across the river from Newark off Interstate 280 and within walking distance of the Harrison PATH station, making it accessible via a 15-minute, $1.50 subway ride from Manhattan. The stadium will be close to the Ironbound section of Newark and its large, soccer-friendly Portuguese population and Harrison's Hispanic residents, who make up more than a third of the city's population.

"I don't believe there is any magic bullet in the development of soccer, but this new stadium is vital to our business," Sakiewicz said.

At the Meadowlands, the MetroStars sold an average of 15,293 tickets for their first six games this season, but Sakiewicz acknowledged that about 35 percent of the tickets were not used.

The MetroStars initially announced their intention to leave Giants Stadium and move to Harrison in December 2000. The club had considered sites in Perth Amboy, Elizabeth, Kearny and Newark.

The club pays more than $100,000 to the New Jersey Sports and Exposition Authority for use of the stadium and has been unhappy with the quality of the playing surface - now FieldTurf after an abortive experiment with a grass tray system - and the inability to generate additional revenue.

The desultory atmosphere in a cavernous 80,000-seat stadium is also seen as a detriment.

"Soccer thrives on passion and atmosphere,'' M.L.S. Commissioner Don Garber said. "Now the MetroStars will be able to offer that special environment to their fans."

Part of the Harrison development project will be the MetroCenter Plaza, a two-block-long plaza leading to the stadium that will include outdoor cafes and bars.

"It is the essence of what's missing at the Meadowlands; there's no reason to be there before or after the game," Joe Romano, an executive vice president at Advance Realty, said in a telephone interview.

Peter Higgins of the Harrison Redevelopment Agency, said, "We have always viewed the MetroStars as a catalyst for our redevelopment."

The club thought it had secured financing from the state of New Jersey about two years ago, but it evaporated when Attorney General David Samson sued four companies in late 2002, including Qwest Communications. Philip Anschutz, the patron of M.L.S., was one of 10 Qwest executives named in the suit, which alleged that the state's pension fund's portfolio lost $22 billion in value because of accounting irregularities and declines in share values at the telecommunications company Electronic Data Systems, Tyco International and Sears Roebuck.

M.L.S., a 10-team, single-entity league that owns all player contracts, has struggled to succeed during its nine-year existence. League officials have long said that soccer-only stadiums would enable teams to play in more intimate surroundings and provide additional revenue. The Columbus Crew were first in 1999. The Los Angeles Galaxy (another Anschutz team) played its first game at the Home Depot Center in Carson, Calif., on June 7, 2003. The Dallas Burn (Frisco, Tex.), the Colorado Rapids (Denver) and the Chicago Fire (Bridgeview, Ill.) have all announced stadium projects.

Copyright 2004 The New York Times Company

JCMAN320
July 12th, 2004, 02:33 PM
Harrison plans world-class site for MetroStars

Monday, July 12, 2004

BY MATTHEW FUTTERMAN
Star-Ledger Staff

The spirit of soccer in the United States can be found at a fenced-in playground known simply as "The Courts" on Frank Rodgers Boulevard in downtown Harrison.

It is a place that spawned a generation of U.S. stars, including Tony Meola and John Harkes, who have come from across the region to play in the best pick-up soccer games they could find.

So it makes sense that a state-of-the-art professional soccer stadium for the MetroStars would rise less than a mile away in the shadows of "The Courts."

"There is no better place for this stadium," said Kearny resident Abdul Khawam, 19, who plays soccer for Albright College in Pennsylvania. As he spoke recently, a little boy named Miguel danced over a ball in a way that made it hard to tell which foot made it move.

The Harrison City Council last month gave preliminary approval for the $130 million stadium that in two years would be home to the MetroStars and the centerpiece of an ambitious development plan along the Passaic River. The stadium would seat at least 20,000.

Harrison is betting the project, which eventually will grow to $3 billion and 275 acres, will transform the former industrial city where people worked at places such as Guyon Pipe, Otis Elevator and RCA into a sleek, waterfront community filled with young professionals, high-end stores, restaurants and office towers.

It also will mark the latest chapter in the region's evolution from a manufacturing economy to one aimed at providing services.

"We tried to get industry back but it wasn't going to happen," said Mayor Ray McDonough, who, like every member of the city council, has lived in the tight, one-square-mile town for at least 35 years. "The whole town is now going to change drastically."

The development's impact also may stretch beyond Harrison's borders and its 15,000 residents.

Located at the edge of Hudson County, just a mile from the proposed Newark arena for the Devils and 10 miles from Giants Stadium and the Continental Airlines Arena in East Rutherford, the Harrison stadium could set off fierce competition for top musical acts and international soccer matches.

For one thing, the stadium, which will feature cantilevered roofing over some of the seats, will play host to selected international matches that now take place in the 80,242-seat Giants Stadium. More importantly, the Anschutz Entertainment Group, owners of the MetroStars, plans to hold as many as 10 concerts on a permanent stage at one end of the Harrison building.

"It's basically a corporate party deck on a platform that is also a suitable stage," said MetroStars General Manager Nick Sakiewicz, who is the top AEG executive on the East Coast.

But industry executives said the stadium will give northern New Jersey more seats than the concert market can support.

"When you add another venue and you don't increase your product, someone is likely going to get hurt," said Michael Rowe, who spent a decade managing the Continental Arena and Giants Stadium for the New Jersey Sports and Exposition Authority, the state agency that oversees the buildings.

AEG also has pursued a deal with owners of the Devils that would give the company control of the concert schedule in the proposed arena in downtown Newark. Since AEG also represents some of the top acts in music, such as Celine Dion, the company may become the major player in the local live music business.

George Zoffinger, the sports authority's chief executive, said this year's schedule of 20 concerts will produce roughly $2 million of profit for the agency. There aren't enough concerts to go around for three mid-size venues in a 10-mile radius, he said.

He also criticized Harrison for committing public money for a privately operated building.

But McDonough and Peter Higgins, director of the city's redevelopment agency, insist that investing in the soccer stadium will pay major dividends because people attending concerts and soccer games will spend money throughout town.

When McDonough became mayor in 1994, he sought to bring jobs back to a town that lost $100 million from its tax base the previous 15 years as manufacturers shifted work overseas.

"We needed to make Harrison a destination again, but for a different reason," said Higgins.

In 1997, the city began taking over waterfront property south of the PATH railroad tracks and divvying it up among five developers who submitted proposals. The first project, a 161-room hotel, is set to open this fall.

The stadium would be built near the PATH station on the site of the former Spiegel Trucking Company. The land is part of a 41-acre tract controlled by the Advance Realty Company of Bedminster. Advance is planning a $300 million townhouse, retail and office complex adjacent to the stadium. It's the first time Advance has tied a development to a sports complex.

"We want the kind of synergy between urban life and the stadium that compares with Camden Yards in Baltimore," said Joe Romano, executive vice president of Advance.

Four other developers have plans to add retail sites, hotels and condominiums in the area.

AEG will pay $30 million toward the stadium. Harrison has requested the Hudson County Improvement Authority issue $100 million in bonds to pay for the remaining costs of the stadium and a parking deck.

The HCIA is still evaluating Harrison's plan to pay debt of roughly $6 million to $8 million per year with commuter parking fees and payments in lieu of taxes from the developers. A decision is expected within 90 days.

Harrison would own the stadium, though AEG will manage it and keep nearly all the money from ticket sales, advertising, luxury suites and concessions.

Sakiewicz said the stadium plan is different from other proposals because developers already have committed to building on land around the facility.

"This is not a situation where if you build it they will come," Sakiewicz said.

Soccer fans, meanwhile, are ecstatic about the possibilities.

Charlie Stilletano, chief executive at Champions World in Moonachie, the country's leading promoter of international soccer matches, said the biggest games will still take place in Giants Stadium, but "there will be lots of international soccer in Harrison," because the stadium will offer a more intimate atmosphere.

And that is what the players at "The Courts" undoubtedly care about most.

JCMAN320
August 4th, 2005, 09:32 PM
MetroStars reach agreement for new stadium

08/04/2005

Secaucus, NJ (Sports Network) - The MetroStars and Anschutz Entertainment Group (AEG) announced Thursday an agreement was reached to build a new 20,000 seat soccer-specific stadium in Harrison, N.J.

The stadium is part of a redevelopment project along the historic Harrison waterfront. The stadium complex is scheduled to open some time in 2007. "AEG has made it very clear that we have to succeed in this marketplace to be successful and, this public/private partnership to develop a soccer-specific stadium is the one model that will guarantee this success," said Timothy J. Leiweke, President & CEO of AEG. "This is truly a landmark day for this community and the MetroStars as it will create a brand new 'cathedral' for soccer. Our thanks and appreciation goes to Governor Codey, County Executive DeGise and Mayor McDonough as well as the leadership of Harrison for 'hanging in there' and working with us to develop this landmark public/private partnership that is without a doubt a win-win scenario for the community and soccer fans throughout the region." The stadium project had been in the works for several years. AEG will provide the full funding for construction of the $80 million stadium, plus other financial contributions to the $1 billion redevelopment project. The County of Hudson, through the Hudson County Improvement Authority (HCIA) will also provide key financial support to ensure the project goes forward under the new agreement. "Harrison stadium will be much more than an entertainment venue, it will be the centerpiece of one of largest redevelopment projects in state history," said Acting Governor Richard J. Codey. "Projects like this are exactly what New Jersey needs, they reinvigorate growth in our urban areas and combat suburban sprawl." The Metros have played in Giants Stadium since their maiden season in 1996. The team, however, has yet to win a championship. The MetroStars have not even made it to the MLS Cup final in any of the 10 Major League Soccer seasons. "After a long journey filled with many ups and downs this is one of the proudest days of my life," said Nick Sakiewicz, President of AEG, NY/NJ. "The commitment to deliver on a promise made to MetroStars fans and the people of this area is something that I have never wavered on and, I always knew this day would come. This stadium will be a very special place that will reflect the passion that the people of this area have for the sport of soccer, and the history that has made this area a hotbed of soccer in this country." Columbus built the first soccer-specific stadium in the United States several years back, followed by Los Angeles' The Home Depot Center. They are now being joined by Pizza Hut Park in Dallas, which is scheduled to open this weekend, and a new stadium in Chicago, which is in the process of being built.

©Tyler Morning Telegraph 2005

JCMAN320
August 5th, 2005, 05:52 PM
MLS HEADED TO HUDSON
Stadium deal to bring soccer to Harrison

Friday, August 05, 2005
By ROSE DUGER
JOURNAL CORRESPONDENT

HARRISON - The deal to construct a Major League Soccer stadium for the MetroStars within the town's redevelopment zone is finally nearing completion, officials announced yesterday at a splashy news conference in Roosevelt Park.

After nearly five years of on-again, off-again negotiations, local, county and state officials have reached an initial agreement with Anschutz Entertainment Group, the parent company of the MetroStars, on financing for the $160 million project, which will include a 20,000-to 25,000-seat stadium and a 1,500-space parking deck.

"For the first time Hudson County will have a major league sports team," said Hudson County Executive Thomas A. DeGise. "This is our dream."

The final agreement still requires the approvals of the Hudson County Board of Freeholders, the HCIA's Board of Commissioners, the Harrison Redevelopment Agency and the Harrison governing body.

Construction of the stadium is expected to begin by next March, with completion targeted in time for the 2007 season.

The 1,500-space garage will be open to commuters who access the nearby Harrison PATH station. Officials said they expect parking revenues to cover the county's portion of the debt.

The town is negotiating a PILOT (payment in lieu of taxes) agreement with AEG, said Peter B. Higgins, III, who chairs Harrison's Redevelopment Agency. He estimated the agreement would net Harrison some $1 million annually.

While the town will retain ownership of the land, the agreement calls for AEG to have the exclusive right to manage and operate the stadium.

Mayor Raymond J. McDonough said the town will begin negotiations today for the land with the owner of the property, which is currently leased to a trucking firm whose lease expires at the end of the year.

"This is a great day for the town of Harrison," the mayor said. "It took many years to try to put this together to get the MetroStars on board. This will open up jobs for the people of Harrison and ratables for the town."

In addition to MetroStars games, the stadium will house concerts and sports events, AEG President and Chief Executive Officer Timothy J. Leiweke said.

The stadium is the jewel in the town's plan to transform 275 acres of largely abandoned industrial complexes into upscale townhouses, retail and commercial space and parking.

AEG President Nick Sakiewicz called the Harrison area "a great market" for soccer, with more than 100,000 soccer fans stretching from the Ironbound section of Newark north into Kearny.


MetroStars footing bill for $75M

Friday, August 05, 2005
By BONNIE FRIEDMAN
JOURNAL STAFF WRITER

HARRISON - Town and county officials are poised to close on a deal to bring the MetroStars Soccer Team to a 20,000-to 25,000-seat stadium under a new agreement where the team's parent company bears the brunt of the financial burden.

Under terms of the agreement, Anschutz Entertainment Group will put up $15 million and take out bonds on an additional $60 million through the Hudson County Improvement Authority. The partnership allows AEG to get the lowest possible interest rates without putting the county in financial jeopardy.

The deal also calls for the county, through the Hudson County Improvement Authority, to take out $40 million in tax-exempt bonds to pay for construction of a 1,500-space parking lot. The county would then collect fees from commuter and on-site parking.

In addition to the county's contribution, the town of Harrison would agree to take out $38 million in bonding to pay for land acquisition and remediation costs at the 14-acre industrial site.

Hudson County Executive Tom DeGise and Harrison Mayor Raymond McDonough hailed the soccer stadium as the catalyst for economic development throughout the 250-acre redevelopment area.

"What the stadium does for Harrison is that it makes it a destination and a place to go, not just a place to live," McDonough said.

Yesterday's announcement followed the decision by state officials to pull out of the project after four years of talks with the company failed to produce results.

Timothy J. Leiweke, president and CEO of AEG, said the future of professional soccer rests in the hands of Hudson County lawmakers.

"The MetroStars are dying a slow death if we don't figure a way to get them out of the Meadowlands," said Leiweke, adding that professional soccer will not survive without a New York-area team.

Stadium could be rocking, too

Jimmy Buffett, Dave Matthews and Elton John may soon grace the stage of the new MetroStars soccer stadium, said Timothy J. Leiweke, president of Anschutz Entertainment Group, the second largest live entertainment group in the world.

The stadium - expected to be completed in June 2007 - will boast a permanent concert stage with 20,000 to 25,000 seats.

The Home Depot Center in Los Angeles - a venue of similar size - recently hosted such popular musical acts as the Dave Matthews Band and Green Day, Leiweke said.

And soccer will not be the only sport on display.

Leiweke said the venue will be the right size to host extreme games, rugby, lacrosse and high school and college soccer.

AEG owns or controls such sports and entertainment venues as the Staples Center, the Manchester Evening News Arena and Nokia Live at Grand Prairie. The company's sports teams include the Los Angeles Lakers and four major league soccer franchises.

JCMAN320
February 1st, 2006, 12:51 PM
EMINENT DOMAIN
Harrison moving to take site

Wednesday, February 01, 2006
By ROSE DUGER
JOURNAL CORRESPONDENT

HARRISON - Town officials are using the power of eminent domain to pave the way for a residential development project on the former Guyon Steel property.

The Advance Group, chosen by the Harrison Redevelopment Agency to build on the 35-acre tract, has already come to an agreement to purchase the property from the Teval Corp., according to Peter B. Higgins III, chairman of the HRA. But the town condemned the property "more as a legal formality than an adversarial matter," Higgins said.

The property, a vacant industrial site south of the Harrison PATH station, has a number of long-standing easements, Higgins said - some dating back 50 to 75 years.

"Our attorneys advised us that the best way to alleviate any further action on the property (stemming from the easements) is through eminent domain," he said.

The site sits within Harrison's 275-acre redevelopment zone, a waterfront tract fronting the Passaic River.

Phase one of the plan calls for Advance at Harrison Urban Renewal, LLC, a subsidiary of the Advance Group, to build 350 condominium units and 350 rental units, as well as 250,000 square feet of commercial space on the property, which fronts Frank E. Rodgers Boulevard.

The property is next to the site earmarked for a Major League Soccer stadium for the MetroStars.

Harrison officials say the Advance Group plans to break ground for the project later this year.

JCMAN320
March 13th, 2006, 12:12 PM
This is a load of crap. We have a legit arguement because the Metrostars have always played in New Jersey and never in New York.

Name change for soccer team is bunch of bulls

Monday, March 13, 2006
By ROSE DUGER
JOURNAL CORRESPONDENT

HARRISON - What's in a name? A lot if you're from New Jersey.

The Garden State, which sits in the shadow of Manhattan, got its latest slap in the face Thursday, when plans were announced to change the name of the state's only Major League Soccer team to Red Bull New York.

The MetroStars will now be known as Red Bull New York after Red Bull Company Limited purchased the team, along with naming rights and a 50 percent stake in a new stadium to be constructed in Harrison.

The announcement sparked an outcry among sports fans and politicians, who are apparently still smarting from a decades-old decision by the New York Giants and New York Jets, both of which play in East Rutherford, to shun a New Jersey moniker in favor of the state's better known neighbor.

The state's other two professional sports teams, the Devils and the Nets, which also call East Rutherford home, sport official names crediting the Garden State.

Harrison officials reacted to the slight with hope that it would soon be corrected.

Mayor Raymond J. McDonough said he expects Red Bull's parent company, which has offices in Hoboken, to realize its error and make reparations by somehow including the state in the name of the team set to become Hudson County's first major league sports team.

"In all honesty, these are intelligent people," McDonough said. "I think they'll realize they've made a mistake. They're not going to slap us in the face. I think this will all be rectified within a day or two."

Team spokesman Matt Chmura, however, said there are no plans to alter the team's new name.

"As far as I've been made aware it's pretty well set," Chmura said. "I haven't heard anything about it changing."

Other than the team's name, fans have already seen changes in the team's logo, which now features two bulls charging toward a soccer ball. New Red Bull uniforms will be unveiled before the team's home opener on April 8 at Giants Stadium against the New England Revolution.


Also this is personal because Hudson County, of which Jersey City is the county seat and the beautiful courthouse is located near JSQ, is footing the bill for the new stadium. This is also Hudson County's first major league sports team ever so to have it called Red Bull New York is a load of S*** and a slap in the face.


Pols urge Jersey ID for Red Bull team

Monday, March 13, 2006
In response to news reports that the major league soccer franchise "NY/NJ MetroStars" has changed its team name to "Red Bull New York," Assembly members Joan M. Quigley (D-Jersey City) and Vincent Prieto (D-Secaucus) have vowed legislative action to ensure that New Jersey isn't left on the sidelines, while neighboring New York gets all the glory.

"This is ridiculous," Quigley said. "The franchise has a 10-year presence in New Jersey. Our residents support the team. And Hudson County and Harrison are helping the team finance a $165 million stadium construction project."

Quigley and Prieto are crafting legislation to pressure the team's corporate owners - Austrian-based Red Bull, makers of the energy drink by the same name - to include New Jersey in the team name.

The legislators also are sending a letter to the Hudson County Improvement Authority urging the HCIA to join them in urging Red Bull to incorporate New Jersey in the team's name. The HCIA and Harrison are putting up $85 million to help the soccer franchise construct a new stadium in Harrison.

KEN THORBOURNE

TLOZ Link5
March 13th, 2006, 06:28 PM
MetroStars was definitely more a democratic name, given the multi-state nature of the NYC area. I sympathize with Jersey residents — at least this time ;) — and I also take offense to the fact that Red Bull — one of the most vile soft drinks in human existence — has attached its name to the team.

yure323
August 16th, 2006, 05:29 PM
http://www.bigapplesoccer.com/article.php?article_id=6664
Groundbreaking is scheduled for Sep.19th, for 25,000 people. It's part of a redevelopment project called MetroCenter.
Here's a map of PATH, that is connecting Harrison to Manhattan :
http://www.panynj.gov/CommutingTravel/path/html/map.html
It's going to be a lot easier to get to RB Park, than Giants stadium, but I'd like to ask you guys, how long does it take people from Queens and Brooklyn to get to Harrison (or Newark) ? Do you think it would make sense to have a 2nd NY area soccer team in Queens or Brooklyn, or is commuting to Harrison easy enough for soccer fans from Brooklyn and Queens ?

ramvid01
August 16th, 2006, 05:42 PM
Another soccer team in Queens would not be a bad idea since i think there is enough support for it, but as for Harrison being more convenient, i would always prefer taking a train over a bus, even if the train was slower. :)

yure323
August 16th, 2006, 06:00 PM
I'm sure a team in Queens would do well, but would another team be necessary or would another team just split the fanbase ?

ablarc
August 16th, 2006, 06:18 PM
I'm sure a team in Queens would do well, but would another team be necessary or would another team just split the fanbase ?
If it did well, why would it matter if it split the fan base?

Eugenius
August 16th, 2006, 08:14 PM
As far as I know, all MLS teams are owned by one organization - the MLS. Therefore, there is a major difference between cannibalizing the fan base of an existing team or bringing in fans that previously did not attend soccer matches. In the former case, the new team would result in a net loss for the league, and in the latter case it would be a net gain.

TonyO
August 16th, 2006, 08:37 PM
That's good its connected to the PATH...now if they could only get some more high profile players I might go and see them regularly (and so would a lot of others I suspect).

yure323
August 17th, 2006, 12:56 PM
As far as I know, all MLS teams are owned by one organization - the MLS. Therefore, there is a major difference between cannibalizing the fan base of an existing team or bringing in fans that previously did not attend soccer matches. In the former case, the new team would result in a net loss for the league, and in the latter case it would be a net gain.
Exactly. MLS is a single entity.

yure323
August 17th, 2006, 12:58 PM
That's good its connected to the PATH...now if they could only get some more high profile players I might go and see them regularly (and so would a lot of others I suspect).
There's talk of a "Beckham rule", where each franchise could have 1 player who wouldn't cout against the salary cap.

TonyO
August 17th, 2006, 02:32 PM
There's talk of a "Beckham rule", where each franchise could have 1 player who wouldn't cout against the salary cap.

Technically don't they already have this? I know Landon Donovan makes near $1M, and Freddy Adu is up there also.

yure323
August 17th, 2006, 04:24 PM
Technically don't they already have this? I know Landon Donovan makes near $1M, and Freddy Adu is up there also.
True, Donovan makes 900k, and Adu 500k. The only difference would be that those players would be payed by the investor/operator ( RB in NY's case ) instead of MLS.

JCMAN320
August 27th, 2006, 03:45 PM
The NY Red Bulls are using New Jersey City University's soccer field right around the cornet from my house for practice till the Harrison Stadium gets built, I saw Bruce Arenas. Just thought I would mention it. Also people it makes so much sense to put the arena right there in Harrison:

1. Right next to PATH station.

2. In Kearny, Harrison, and Ironbound area which are all soccer crazed.

3. Atleast 11 players from Kearny and Harrison in U.S. Soccer Hall of Fame and a current Kearny native and future Hall of Famer Tony Meola is goalie for the Red Bulls.

4. St. Benedicts High School in Newark is known as The Soccer Highschool of the United States.

5. And this article by the Philly Weekly News written in 01, titled; West Hudson: A Cradle of American Soccer.http://www.sover.net/~spectrum/hudson.html

New York, American soccer is a Jersey game. Nough said.;)

OmegaNYC
August 27th, 2006, 07:30 PM
You just love sticking it to people, huh JCMAN? :D

yure323
August 28th, 2006, 07:38 PM
Two more pics :
http://www3.shrani.si/files/rbp3popu878510.jpg
http://www3.shrani.si/files/rbp2popu878512.jpg

pianoman11686
August 29th, 2006, 12:20 AM
New York, American soccer is a Jersey game. Nough said.;)

Well, that makes the fact that the team will be called the New York Red Bulls all the more ironic, doesn't it?

OmegaNYC
August 29th, 2006, 02:39 AM
Well, that makes the fact that the team will be called the New York Red Bulls all the more ironic, doesn't it?

lol, nice....! ;)

injcsince81
August 29th, 2006, 07:22 AM
Well, that makes the fact that the team will be called the New York Red Bulls all the more ironic, doesn't it?

New York Giants, New York Jets, New York Red Bulls - all based in Jersey.

I understand it's marketing, but isn't it time to call'em an equivalent of New England Patriots - teams named for the ENTIRE metro area?

I think the current situation is pretty stupid, Jersey pride notwithstanding.

ablarc
August 29th, 2006, 08:03 AM
isn't it time to call'em an equivalent of New England Patriots - teams named for the ENTIRE metro area?
Greater New York Giants?

Mid-Atlantic Jets??

New York-New Jersey Bulls???

injcsince81
August 29th, 2006, 11:52 AM
Greater New York Giants?

Mid-Atlantic Jets??

New York-New Jersey Bulls???

New York Metro Giants?

Less wieldy, but oh so inclusive.

yure323
August 29th, 2006, 12:48 PM
How about New York RB/Giants/Jets of New Jersey ? :p

Ninjahedge
August 29th, 2006, 02:27 PM
How about the NY/NJ Bull.

Not Bulls, Bull. :rolleyes:

Metro sounds stupid. Tri-State has always been the best, but other areas also call themselves tri-state. I think they should just drop the state affiliation and call themselves the Giants. Anyone who does not know who they are can bite themselves.

JCMAN320
August 29th, 2006, 04:17 PM
Yes paino it is ironic also considering that Hoboken is the birth place of baseball and we don't have a Jersey team but the Yankees count I guess lol. Also that would be a great idea like Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim. Great idea yure. :)

OmegaNYC
August 29th, 2006, 05:11 PM
Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim.

THE dumbest name is sports. I HATE that name. Just call them the California Angels, like the old days.

JCMAN320
August 29th, 2006, 05:23 PM
I agree with you Omega just to make everyone happy here though lets call the Giants The New York Giants of New Jersey. :)

OmegaNYC
August 29th, 2006, 05:38 PM
I agree with you Omega just to make everyone happy here though lets call the Giants The New York Giants of New Jersey. :)


Just call 'em what they are. The New Jersey Giants. Hell, if my taxes pay for them to be in this state, mind as well put "NJ" on the helments. :mad: (Or the "NJ Meadowlands logo on the 25 yard lines. :))

pianoman11686
August 29th, 2006, 07:34 PM
Yes paino it is ironic also considering that Hoboken is the birth place of baseball and we don't have a Jersey team but the Yankees count I guess lol. Also that would be a great idea like Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim. Great idea yure. :)

I should've prefaced my post by saying that it was meant to be sarcastic. I don't think anyone here is confused as to why a professional sports team would prefer to keep "New York" in their name rather than "New Jersey." All of those hybridized suggestions are pretty mediocre; I still think the New York Metrostars was a good name, because it maintained the marketing leverage of "New York" but gave a nod to the team belonging to the "metro-area."

As for your baseball comments: I know people claim that the birthplace of baseball is in dispute, as is the case in many other such "birthplace battles," but as of now, Cooperstown is still recognized as the birthplace, and it still has the Hall of Fame. It may not be fair: Columbus is still given credit for discovering America, even though there's indisputable evidence that the Vikings did it centuries earlier. But that's the reality. And the Yankees count as a Jersey team? I'm not sure what's that supposed to mean, but I don't know how that could have even been considered.

I remember reading a while back that the Marlins were looking to move out of Miami, and that Northern New Jersey was one of their potential new locations. Anyone know anything about that?

OmegaNYC
August 29th, 2006, 07:51 PM
I remember reading a while back that the Marlins were looking to move out of Miami, and that Northern New Jersey was one of their potential new locations. Anyone know anything about that?

Really? I heard that the Marlins wanted to move to San Antonio, if Miami didn't put up some money to build a ballpark in the Downtown area. If that is true, my friend from Miami would jump into Biscayne Bay..

ablarc
August 29th, 2006, 08:44 PM
I should've prefaced my post by saying that it was meant to be sarcastic.
So were the suggestions for team names.

pianoman11686
August 29th, 2006, 09:05 PM
^You don't say. :) Mid-Atlantic Jets was a good one. Does anyone even use that term anymore, Mid-Atlantic? I have a friend who hails from southwestern Virginia, and he once tried to claim he was from the Mid-Atlantic. We all told him to shut up and admit he's from the South. :D

Omega: I don't remember hearing about San Antonio specifically. I only know they've been interested in getting the New Orleans Saints to move there. As for the Marlins, I also remember hearing about Portland, Oregon; Little Rock, Arkansas; and Las Vegas as possible new locations.

JCMAN320
August 29th, 2006, 10:55 PM
I was joking Piano. Hoboken is the birthplace of baseball and I will send a link to a thread in the anything goes part of the forum showing that Hoboken is the birthplace. The Yankees have had many Jersey connections from having many players such as a Yogi and Scooter live here now, Yogi has the Yogi Berra Museum in Montclair, many Yankees during the 50s had businesses in Newark and went to diner in Newark, went to the bakeries and bars and partied in Newark, and the Yankee's minor league team during their championships runs under it Casey Stengel was the Newark Bears so all those great players came through there, and also they have wanted to move to the Meadowlands with the Giants many times.

As for us getting the Marlins, I'm not sure. If they get a new stadium in Miami then no, but if they move it might be here.

OmegaNYC
August 30th, 2006, 12:59 AM
I was joking Piano. Hoboken is the birthplace of baseball and I will send a link to a thread in the anything goes part of the forum showing that Hoboken is the birthplace. The Yankees have had many Jersey connections from havign many players such as a Yogi and Scooter live here now, many Yankees during the 50s had businesses in Newark and went to diner in Newark, and the Yankee's minor league team during their championships runs under it Caey Stengel was the Newark Bears, and also they have wanted to move to the Meadowlands with the Giants many times.

As for us getting the Marlins, I'm not sure. If they get a new stadium in Miami then no, but if they move it might be here.

Geez, I'm a Mets fan, and they don't have this much history with Jersey. :p

STT757
September 13th, 2006, 09:27 AM
Getting their kicks in Harrison
Red Bulls unveil details for a glitzy $220 million soccer stadium
Wednesday, September 13, 2006
BY MATTHEW FUTTERMAN
Star-Ledger Staff
Six years ago, a soccer team named the MetroStars announced it would scour the region in search of a home.

Next week, a team now known as the New York Red Bulls will break ground in Harrison on a stadium unlike anything the region -- and perhaps the country-- has seen.

Team officials yesterday for the first time revealed details of the $220 million, 25,000-seat, glass and steel stadium that will be built along the eastern bank of the Passaic River, across from Newark's skyline.

"This is different," Nick Sakiewicz, president of the Anschutz Entertainment Group's New York division, said of the stadium his company is building with Red Bull, the energy drink maker and owner of the region's soccer franchise. "That has been our theme all along, because in this market it has to be."

There will be two clubs for high-end ticket holders, one formal and one modeled on a British pub. A roof will cover all seats, but not the playing surface. A ring of luxury suites will be built just 12 rows above the playing field, putting the suites closer to the action here than at any other major league stadium in the country.

For Harrison, the stadium, scheduled to open in July 2008, will be the centerpiece of a $1 billion redevelopment plan that will convert Harrison's abandoned industrial waterfront into a modern, live-work-and-play transit village anchored by 800 apartments and dozens of stores and restaurants.

With a stage at one end of the stadium that will make the facility a top concert venue during the spring and summer, developers say they have a formula that has proven successful in Denver, San Diego and other cities, despite major traffic jams on game days.

"We feel like this is the future, this is what is happening in terms of development in the state today," said Greg Senkevitch, chief operating officer for Advance Realty Group, which is building the housing, retail and, ultimately, an office development next to the stadium.

None of this will come cheap -- for the soccer team, AEG or taxpayers, who will spend $120 million on the project and hope the investment gets repaid in future taxes and parking fees.

Red Bull and AEG are spending at least $100 million to build the stadium, the country's eighth soccer-specific stadium.

The town of Harrison has issued $40 million in bonds, guaranteed by Hudson County, that will help cover the costs of acquiring and cleaning up land near the site of the former Guyon Pipe company for future development and for constructing new roads and utilities.

Harrison also plans to pay back the bonds with real estate tax payments from the future construction, which is expected to include additional housing and retail space.

Hudson County, meanwhile, will spend $80 million to build a 1,500-car parking garage for the stadium and purchase and clean up the land where the stadium will be built. The garage will be used for commuter parking for the nearby PATH station. The county also gets to keep the parking fees from game-day events. County officials insist the parking fees will cover the debt payments for the garage.

"We're helping the Red Bulls build their own stadium," Hudson County Executive Tom DeGise said. "Our calculations show the parking garage will be a moneymaker with just the commuters. The events at the stadium will be a bonus."

Still, critics say the city and the county have no business investing in sports facilities at a time when government at every level is suffering a cash crunch and residents are complaining about rising taxes.

"With all the issues we are confronting, to be building all these facilities with the amount of public money going into them all does not make sense to me," said George Zoffinger, chief executive of the New Jersey Sports and Exposition Authority, which operates the Meadowlands Sports Complex.

Zoffinger has opposed public investment in the Harrison stadium in the past, in part because it will likely hurt the international soccer business at Giants Stadium -- where the Red Bulls now play -- and the concert business at the Continental Airlines Arena.

The project, glitzy as it is, remains fraught with risks for all of the investors. Attendance at Red Bulls and MetroStars games has lagged for years, and the team's owners are betting the lure of a new stadium can bring in thousands of new fans.

Team owners also have to sell 1,000 premium club seats and 67 luxury suites at a time when the Giants, Jets, Yankees, Mets and Devils will also be selling more than 400 luxury suites to local corporations at their new stadiums.

Sakiewicz said Red Bull Park suites will be considerably cheaper at about $65,000 per year, compared with roughly $500,000 for a suite at Yankee Stadium. Also, the suite price at Red Bull Park will include tickets to all concerts and other events at the stadium.

For Advance, selling 350 condominiums and renting another 450 in the shadows of a sports and entertainment destination is new ground for a company that is primarily an office developer, especially at a time when the housing market is cooling off. For now though, the excitement of a project and a stadium unlike anything the region has seen is outweighing any concerns about the risk.

"This project would have been a lot smaller without the stadium," said Senkevitch, whose company has been planning a development in Harrison since the late 1990s. "But once we learned of Harrison's interest in having the Red Bulls, that made us coordinate it into our plans. Now we really believe in this."


http://www.nj.com/news/ledger/jersey/index.ssf?/base/news-4/1158127473264510.xml&coll=1&thispage=2

STT757
September 13th, 2006, 09:34 AM
http://www.sportsvenue-technology.com/projects/harrison/images/Metrostars01.jpg

The main retail boulevard leading to the stadium at the far end.

http://www.sportsvenue-technology.com/projects/harrison/images/Metrostars02.jpg

http://www.stadiumguide.com/metrostarsnew1.jpg

JCMAN320
September 20th, 2006, 10:09 AM
Red Bull energizes Harrison

Wednesday, September 20, 2006
By ROSE DUGER
JOURNAL CORRESPONDENT

HARRISON - Officials hailed the groundbreaking yesterday for Red Bull Park as a pivotal point in the town's urban revitalization project that aims to transform 275 acres of abandoned industrial properties into a thriving mixed-use development.

The $200 million project, which will include a 25,000-seat Major League Soccer stadium and a 300-space parking garage, is the centerpiece of Harrison's redevelopment plan adopted almost a decade ago to address the flight of industry from the city.

Mayor Raymond J. McDonough pointed to the stadium as a turning point in the town's history.

"Today Harrison once again becomes a destination," McDonough said. "After today we take a new image home to Major League Soccer, home to the Red Bull soccer club, home to the largest urban redevelopment that is not just planned, but is actually happening, in the State of New Jersey."

The redevelopment zone will encompass three million square feet of Class A office space, 300,000 square feet of retail and approximately 3,500 housing units.

Harrison Redevelopment Agency Chairman Peter B. Higgins III acknowledged that the project, which has been seven years in the making and spanned the tenure of five governors, attracted skepticism from locals at first.

"Many people thought we were over-reaching when we announced the scope of our redevelopment plan," Higgins said. "It's a good thing I'm not an 'I told you so' kind of guy because I'd be here for a long time."

The public-private partnership to build the stadium calls for the Anschutz Entertainment Group and Red Bull to contribute at least $100 million toward the project, with Hudson County committing $60 million to roadway improvements and parking facilities and Harrison allocating $40 million toward the purchase of the land, including demolition and abatement.

Demolition at the stadium site, now an abandoned warehouse, will begin Oct. 15 and should take about six months, according to Nick Sakiewicz, president of AEG New York. Vertical construction is slated to start next March.

The stadium should be completed by July 2008.

Kearny/Harrison practice site eyed

Wednesday, September 20, 2006
By ANGELA DAIDONE
JOURNAL SPORTS EDITOR

Now that the Red Bulls have broken ground on their new soccer stadium in Harrison, they may be close to inking a deal for a training facility site just a few blocks away.

A source familiar with the project said that after an extensive search in northern New Jersey the organization is "very close" to finalizing the purchase of a 20-plus acre parcel of land in the greater Kearny/Harrison area that will likely be the new home for practice fields for the Red Bulls and their reserve and academy squads.

Full details have not yet been disclosed but, according to the source, plans are for construction of seven soccer fields in all, several of which may be made available to local teams.

Also planned for the site are training facilities for the players and space for the team's front office staff, which is currently housed in an office building in Secaucus.

The Red Bulls currently play in Giants Stadium and must share practice and training space with the New York Giants and New York Jets.

soccerUSA
September 20th, 2006, 08:10 PM
Is there a possibility of to see a new soccer franchise and a soccer stadium in New York City (Queens or Brooklyn) in the next years ?

JCMAN320
September 20th, 2006, 11:49 PM
I don't think so soccer and if they did add another team it would be hear in Red Bull Park. Queens and Brooklyn don't have the rich soccer history that Kearny and Harrison have. 11 players from Kearny and Harrison are in the US Soccer Hall of Fame. The Harrison Courts are the soccer equivalent of Rucker Park in basketball. So if they give another team to the area it will come here most likely.

pianoman11686
September 21st, 2006, 12:12 AM
What are you talking about? History doesn't play a role in where a company wants to locate its team. It's about economics. To blindly disregard the possibility of a soccer stadium in Queens, with its large concentration of immigrants that are more likely to follow a soccer team, (not to mention its advantages in accessibility) just doesn't make sense.

injcsince81
September 21st, 2006, 11:03 AM
What are you talking about? History doesn't play a role in where a company wants to locate its team. It's about economics. To blindly disregard the possibility of a soccer stadium in Queens, with its large concentration of immigrants that are more likely to follow a soccer team, (not to mention its advantages in accessibility) just doesn't make sense.

Pianoman - Kearny, Harrison and Newark's Ironbound is literally POPULATED by the Portuguese, Brazilians, Ecuadorians, Peruvians, Chileans who are NUTS about soccer.

Why do I know?

Because I work there (East Newark) and I saw it every day during the World Cup. Flags hanging out the windows, cars honking, bands of fans taking over the streets (peacefully), everybody going nuts.

Red Bulls ain't no fools - that area absolutely BEATS any other location for soccer in the Metro area, to my knowledge.

Fahzee
September 21st, 2006, 11:22 AM
still - mls requires all new teams to build soccer specific stadiums. And as Red Bull Park (like most soccer specific stadiums) is going to make most of it's money as a concert venue, I seriously doubt the surrounding communities will want a second concert venue close by - not for noise or traffic reasons, but because it probably won't be economically viable to have multiple soccer /concert venues in such close proximity.

My guess is that the next expansion team in this area will be in Philly or Rochester, NY

JCMAN320
September 21st, 2006, 12:06 PM
There are talks about putting a team in the Jersey burbs right outside of Philly in South Jersey. I think they are talking about putting a team in Glassboro, New Jersey.

Injc is right West Hudson is the craddle of American soccer hands down. I posted a news article on this thread about that a while ago. Hands down this area beat any other in the metro area for soccer fan support. I remember when Portugal advanced to the World Cup a few years back, the entire Ironbund broke out into an instant parade.

yure323
September 21st, 2006, 02:51 PM
Adding a second team in Red Bull Park doesn't make sense at all, I know two teams play in the HDC, but that's different because LA Galaxy have always lead MLS in attendance and Chivas USA is only targeting mexican Chivas Guadalajara fans. With so many soccer games played in Flushing Meadows, huge South American population in Corona and Flushing, accessibility by subway and an existing Mets stadium parking lot that could be used for soccer games, it's certainly the most appropriate place to put a second team.

pianoman11686
September 21st, 2006, 04:27 PM
Pianoman - Kearny, Harrison and Newark's Ironbound is literally POPULATED by the Portuguese, Brazilians, Ecuadorians, Peruvians, Chileans who are NUTS about soccer.

You completely missed the point of the post.

I'm sure there are tons of soccer fans in the immediate area that will make the Harrison stadium viable. The question was: where would a second team locate if it was looking to enter the New York Metro area? The answer that was given had nothing to do with the ethnic populations, and everything to do with history.

I'll reiterate my point again: to suggest that a second team looking to entire the New York metro area would completely disregard the option of playing in Queens, with all of the advantages inherent in doing so, for the simple reason that New Jersey has more soccer history, is ludicrous.

injcsince81
September 21st, 2006, 04:56 PM
You completely missed the point of the post.



I did - my bad.

Gotta read threads more carefully.

JCMAN320
January 26th, 2007, 08:12 PM
From redbullpark.com. Queens ain't got nothing on us!!!

Soccer History of Harrison, New Jersey

http://www.redbullpark.com/images/harrison_fc_lg.jpg
Harrison Football Club, c. 1922 (National Soccer Hall of Fame)


Decades ago Harrison, New Jersey, was a key part in the growth of American soccer, the region of northern New Jersey that was known as West Hudson. The last professional team to play in Harrison was in 1923, the same year as the last U.S. Open Cup final was played there.

Although the area was not the birthplace of soccer in America, It may have been just to the south in New Brunswick, N.J., where the game that has often been called the first game of American football, but which actually was soccer, played between Rutgers and Princeton in 1869. Or it may have been Boston, where a game was played in the early 1860s that could have been an early form of soccer.

American college students were very enthusiastic about soccer in the early 1870s, particularly at Princeton (NJ) and Rutgers (NJ). But as the colleges were abandoning soccer in favor of American football, the recent immigrants like the British in New Jersey and New England and the Irish in St. Louis were there to take up the slack.

How the Kearny-Harrison area became a center of American soccer is connected to the story of the American Industrial Revolution and was built on the foundation of the immigrant population. In Kearny, it was the Clark Thread Company, which started in Newark in 1866 and expanded to Kearny in 1880, a huge Scottish company, from Paisley, Scotland.

Clark Thread Company formed a team named ONT, that stood for Our New Thread, a product whose name was a cornerstone of Clark's marketing efforts through the 20th century. ONT was the first champion of the American Football Association (AFA) formed in 1884 in Newark, New Jersey. Thomas Hood of Kearny was chosen as the first president of the AFA, which at the time was the only "national" soccer association in existence outside the British Isles. In 1885, ONT became the first winner of the AFA Cup, beating the New York Club, 2-1. It won again in 1886 and 1887.

Also in 1885 the United States played Canada in Kearny in the first full international game ever played outside the British Isles. This game, on Nov. 28, 1885, is not today recognized by the United States Soccer Federation has having been a full international, because it was played before the formation of the USSF in 1913.

Although Kearny's heyday as a focal point of American soccer ended more than 50 years ago, it has continued to produce good soccer talent right up to this day. Two of the greatest names in American soccer, current New York Red Bulls Assistant Coach John Harkes and current New York Red Bulls Goalkeeper, Tony Meola, grew up there and were teammates at Kearny High School.

Prior to 1922, the top league was possibly the National Association Foot Ball League, which had teams primarily in New York, New Jersey and Pennsylvania.

The West Hudson Club was formed in Harrison which was more varied in its ethnic makeup than Kearny and in 10 seasons, won either the AFA Cup or the NAFBL title 8 times. West Hudson is the first team to win "the double," which means winning the country's top professional league title and its national cup title in the same year. West Hudson won both the AFA Cup and the NAFBL in 1912. In the cup final, it beat Paterson Rangers, 1-0. West Hudson won the AFA Cup in 1906 and 1908. The team from Harrison won the NAFBL a total of six times in 1907, 1909, 1910, 1912, 1913 and 1915.

In its last few seasons, West Hudson made its home at Federal League Park, a 20,000-seat stadium built in 1914 for the Newark Peppers of the Federal Baseball League, which folded in 1915. The stadium was converted to soccer and in 1918 hosted the replay of the U.S. Open Cup final between Bethlehem (PA) Steel and Fall River (MA) Rovers won by Bethlehem, 3-0. In 1923, Paterson (NJ) FC won the U.S. Open Cup over Scullin Steel of St. Louis. The stadium burned down in August 1924.

Other Harrison area clubs included the Kearny Irish who won their only ASL title in 1934, the ASL's Lewis Cup in 1944 and the Erie AA Club, which continued in to the original American Soccer League as Harrison SC.

Harrison SC produced one of the biggest stars in American soccer during the 1920s in Davey Brown, gained his greatest fame with the New York Giants, for whom he scored 52 goals in the 1926-27 ASL season. The goalkeeper for that Harrison team was George Tintle, a Harrison native who had been a member of the U.S. national team in 1916.

The area also produced one star player, who was born there but gained his greatest fame elsewhere. Tom Florie, who was born in Harrison in 1897, but played in New England. Florie, a forward, was the captain of the United States team at the 1930 World Cup at which it reached the semifinals, and he played again in the 1934 World Cup.

Red Bull Parks construction in Harrison will mean a new life for the soccer history of the Harrison area.

A Soccer Community

Harrison, New Jersey and its neighboring communities of Kearny and Newark's, Ironbound are densely populated with diverse international residents rich in soccer heritage. Harrison is located 8 miles to the west of New York City, and is sandwiched between Newark (the state's largest city) to the west and Jersey City (the state's second largest city to the east. Harrison High School owns 21 state championships in soccer, most in state history.

It was during 1994 FIFA World Cup that the town of Kearny, N.J., became known affectionately as "Soccertown USA," because, as every single commentator pointed out at least a dozen times a game, American stars John Harkes, Tab Ramos and Tony Meola all came from the town.

In Newark, New Jersey, St. Benedict's Prep is one of the finest high school soccer programs in the country. The school has been ranked #1 in the country in 1990, 1997, 1998 & 2001 and 2005 along with winning 19 New Jersey state championships. Producing players such as Tab Ramos and U.S. National Team Captain and newest NY Red Bull Claudio Reyna.

Newark's Ironbound is known for being a Portuguese neighborhood. Portuguese roots in the area run deep, with the first immigrants having arrived in the 1910s. Today, immigration is led by Brazil, Ecuador and Mexico. There is a Portuguese festival every June and a Brazilian festival in September. The Ironbound is one of Newark's most vibrant neighborhoods. Along Ferry Street, its commercial heart, features a mix of well-known Portuguese, Spanish, and Brazilian restaurants, cafes, bakeries, sports clubs.

JCMAN320
March 29th, 2007, 10:05 PM
Red Bull soccer stadium gets final OK

HARRISON — The planning board gave its final approval Wednesday for Red Bull Park soccer stadium, clearing the way for construction to begin on the 25,000-seat sports and entertainment venue.

Red Bull Park, the metropolitan area’s first soccer-specific stadium, will be home to Major League Soccer’s New York Red Bulls, as well as a series of international soccer matches, and will host concerts and special events.

The developer of the $150 million complex, AEG New York, has been working since September on demolition and remediation of the site, which sits on the banks of the Passaic River opposite Newark’s Ironbound neighborhood.

The work included the removal of foundations from a century-old, industrial complex.

The stadium is expected to be completed by mid-2008, near the latter half of the Red Bull’s season, said Nick Sakiewitz. That means the team, and its fans, may have to wait until the 2009 season to enjoy the new digs.

“We are still deciding on how to handle it,” Sakiewitz said today. “You just never know how construction is going to go.”

Red Bull Park is the cornerstone to the $1 billion Harrison MetroCentre Development, the largest such brownfield development underway in New Jersey, with 3,500 housing units, 3 million square feet of office space, 300,000 square feet of retail space and a riverside park.

Jarrett Renshaw

weather147
March 30th, 2007, 10:10 PM
I actually work for the engineering firm planning this development. I am not involved in this project, but I may soon be more involved with it. If I come across anything I'll post.

Transic
May 21st, 2007, 10:32 PM
http://www.sportingnews.com/yourturn/viewtopic.php?t=211067

Site cleanup delays opening of Red Bulls Stadium
Print this (http://www.sportingnews.com/soccer/articles/20070521/866253-p.html) | E-mail this (http://www.sportingnews.com/yourturn/viewtopic.php?t=211067#) | Comments on this article (http://www.sportingnews.com/yourturn/viewtopic.php?t=211067#comments): 0 http://i.tsn.com/i/s/hp2/ut_sm.gif
http://i.tsn.com/i/p/s.gif
Posted: May 21, 2007

Associated Press

EAST RUTHERFORD, N.J. -- The opening of the New York Red Bulls' $140 million stadium has been pushed back two months until September 2008 because of delays in the cleanup of industrial waste and foundations at the stadium site.

Any more delays in the completion of the Red Bull Park in Harrison would force the team to play its entire 2008 MLS season at Giants Stadium, managing director Marc de Grandpre said Monday.

De Grandpre said that oil and old structures have been found below the surface at the construction site and "it takes time to clean them up."

Peter Higgins, chairman of the Harrison Redevelopment Agency, said there was very little unforeseen contamination since ground was broken in September and that the majority of the delay was caused by the discovery of subsurface structures.

"It's building foundations, huge concrete slabs, concrete monoliths that probably supported cranes or heavy machinery of some type," Higgins said in a telephone interview.

Higgins said some of the slabs are 16 inches in diameter and 4 feet thick, and they have been found on different portions of the old industrial site that included a pipe factory.

The additional site work will cost more than originally budgeted, Higgins said, adding that the team will pay the bill. He did not know how much it would cost.

"To be two months behind schedule at this point is not a minor delay," Higgins said.

Had the stadium opened on time, the Red Bulls would have played about 10 home games next season at the new stadium. It is a 25,000-seat facility that will feature a "European-style" roof that covers all the seats and 53 luxury suites situated 12 rows from the field.

With a September completion, the team would play about five home games at Red Bull Park.

The Red Bulls, who were known as the MetroStars until last season, have played the past 11 seasons at Giants Stadium in the Meadowlands sports complex.

Anschutz Entertainment Group, which began looking to build the stadium six years ago, owned the MetroStars until March 2006, when it sold the team and a half-interest in the stadium to Austrian energy drink maker Red Bull.

AEG also owns the Chicago Fire, Houston Dynamo, and Los Angeles Galaxy, and built the $150 million Home Depot Center complex for the Galaxy in 2003.

With surrounding infrastructure, Red Bull Park will cost $200 million and be the centerpiece of a $1 billion construction project that will include office space, retail outlets and housing across the Passaic River from Newark.

-------------------------------------------------------------------------

http://blog.nj.com/ledgerupdates/2007/05/red_bulls_stadium_stalled.html

Red Bulls' stadium stalled
Posted by Frank Giase (http://blog.nj.com/ledgerupdates/about.html) May 21, 2007 2:31PM
Categories: Sports (http://blog.nj.com/ledgerupdates/sports/)

The Red Bulls, in a letter to their season ticket holders, announced today that the soccer stadium they are building in Harrison will not be completed on time next year.

The facility, scheduled to be open in the summer, is now expected to be completed in late September due to the cleanup of industrial waste and the removal of extensive cement foundations that were discovered after the site was cleared.

"Based on our original timeline, it's unexpected," Red Bulls managing director Marc de Grandpre told The Star-Ledger. "Like any construction project, problems arise. The site wasn't the cleanest of sites when it was selected. It's part of the normal process."

De Grandpre said that if any other delays occur, the facility will not open until April 2009, when the Major League Soccer season gets underway.

The Red Bulls' lease at Giants Stadium has a provision that will let the team play there until their own stadium is completed, even if the opening is pushed back to 2009.

Once Red Bull Park is open, MLS is expected to play the league championship game and the all-star game there as soon as possible.

investordude
May 21st, 2007, 11:25 PM
I think the removal of the ghastly industrial buildings is more important than the soccer delay - they should take their time and do it right so it becomes an attractive gateway to Newark that helps both cities.

JCMAN320
July 24th, 2007, 09:25 PM
NJ.com - Jersey Journal Online
Tuesday, July 24, 2007

Military ordnance shuts down Red Bulls construction site

Construction workers building the new Red Bulls soccer stadium in Harrison today found an old piece of military ordnance, said Peter Higgins, the head of the town's Redevelopment Agency.

Higgins said the Jersey City Bomb Squad was called and took the item away before turning it over the Army. He said construction was shut down for the day and will resume tomorrow.

He did not elaborate on what was found; military ordnance is generally defined as weapons, ammunition or other equipment.

Higgins said he believes it is a World War II era piece of equipment but had no other information.

On Friday, a 20-year-old rocket launcher was found in a yard in the Jersey City Heights and turned over to the Army. Officials said that weapon was used for training purposes only and was not operable.

Bernette Pearson

This one's a rocket launcher, too

A construction worker at the future Harrison home of Major League Soccer’s Red Bulls found a rocket launcher today, a spokesman for the developer said.

Initially police believed it to be a weapon, but bomb squad technicians from Jersey City and the Army officials determined it to be a harmless rocket launcher from the Vietnam era.

Jersey City police should be getting good at recognizing rocket launchers. Just last Friday a homeowner in the Heights discovered one on her front lawn. That rocket launcher was also deemed harmless, and not quite as old. Police said it was about 20 years old.

JCMAN320
August 7th, 2007, 04:28 PM
Red Bulls to build facility in Hanover, New Jersey

by Frank GiaseTuesday August 07, 2007, 3:35 PM

http://blog.nj.com/ledgerupdates/2007/08/large_bulls.jpg
Artist illustration of the new New York Red Bulls training facility.


Professional soccer players will soon be training in Morris County.

The Red Bulls announced today they will build their new training facility in Hanover.

The facility, the home for the entire organization, will consist of six soccer fields, a 50,000-square-foot, two-story office building/training center and a one-story field house. The complex will be located in Hanover Township, off Melanie Lane, near Route 10.

Construction is expected to begin in the fall, with an anticipated completion date of December 2008.

The first floor of the training center, which will accommodate the Red Bulls and the organization's academy teams, will consist of multiple locker rooms, a players' lounge, weight room and trainer's room. The front office and business side of the organization will be located on the second floor.

Final details have yet to be worked out, but the facility is expected to be available for use by soccer leagues, youth teams and tournaments

-------------------------------------------------------

JCMAN320 Neat O Stats of the Day

This is all great news for New Jersey and it couldn't make me anymore happier. New Jersey is raking it in when it comes to sports as big business:

The Red Bulls will play here in Hudson County in Harrison giving Hudson County, also i.e JC considering we are the county seat, it's first major league sports team. Now they will also have their training facility and headquarters in Morris County in the Town of Hanover, New Jersey. Also where they will have their staidum in West Hudson County is considered the craddle of American Soccer given all the stars and soccer history to come out of Harrison and Kearny.

The Jets will be part of New Meadowlands Stadium in East Rutherfordand in Bergen County, will have their new training facility and headquraters in the next town over from Hanover in Florham Park, New Jersey, also in Morris County. This will move their headquarters out of Long Island and to New Jersey.

The Giants will also be part of the New Meadowlands Stadium and keep their training facility and headquarters in East Rutherford at the new stadium.

The New Jersey Devils will move in to the new Prudential Center in Newark, New Jersey and also have their training facility in West Orange, New Jersey at the Richard Codey Ice Arena at South Mountain Reservation State Park and Forest.

The New Jersey Nets, while atleast here for another 2 seasons given BK is still not definate, will play at the Meadowlands and have their headquarters in East Rutherford.

Also look at the big name Division 1 single A pristigious schools in the state.

Rutgers University athletic program has grown its respect over night. Now no one can even buy a ticket to a Rutgers football game because of the excellent success of last season turning the college football scene up side down and their is 6,000 person waiting list for tickets so those people get first priority. Also Rutgers is the birthplace of college football when the first game took place their in 1869 between Rutgers and Princeton in New Brunswick. Also the Woman's Basketball team earned national praise and tickets for them are selling like hotcakes.

Seton Hall will be playing the Prudential Center along with the Devils and will bring Division 1-A college basketball to Newark, with Seton Hall being in South Orange it is going to be much easier for students and fans to get to the games.

Princeton, well haven't been great in athletics in a while except for swimming, but hell they gotta be put up here because it's Princeton and is ranked the beast college in the country so it just has to be here baised on that.

Hoboken is the birthplace of baseball with the first game taking place there in 1846 at the Elysian Fields between the New York Knickerbockers and New York Nine. Jackie Robinson broke the color barrier at Roosevelt Stadium here in Jersey City as a member of the BK Dodgers minor league team the Montreal Royals taking on the New York Giants minor league team, the JC Giants in April of 1946. 10 years later to BK Dodgers played numerous games in 56 and 57 as part of a negotiaion tactic to get a new stadium built in BK that came to naught.

Now the Trenton Thunder at the AA minor league team for the Yankees, and the Lakewood Blueclaws are the AA minor league team for the Phillies to show baseball is alive and well in Jersey as well. We also have the New Jersey Jackels, Newark Bears, Somerset Patriots, Atlantic City Surf, and Camden Riversharks as numerous indepdent minor league teams.

In a nut shell New Jersey is doing extremely well when it comes to the sports business.

JCMAN320
October 16th, 2007, 03:43 PM
Water tower falls in Harrison

by Debby Berger Tuesday October 16, 2007, 2:00 PM

A 130-foot water tower falls during ongoing demolition at the site of the new Harrison Commons development in Harrison. The new development will have 3,000 residences and 90,000 square feet of retail space.

Watch Tower Fall:
http://www.nj.com/news/index.ssf/2007/10/water_tower_falls_in_harrison.html

investordude
October 17th, 2007, 06:07 PM
It's ashame this project isn't in Newark. But, I still think improving the approach to Newark will help change its image so its good for both Newark and Harrison.

http://www.therealdeal.net/breaking_news/2007/10/17/1192663360.php

66nexus
October 17th, 2007, 11:21 PM
It's ashame this project isn't in Newark. But, I still think improving the approach to Newark will help change its image so its good for both Newark and Harrison.

http://www.therealdeal.net/breaking_news/2007/10/17/1192663360.php



Agreed. Hopefully new Harrison residents (and Red Bull arena patrons) will go downtown for food/drink and add to the atmosphere. Whew, I hope these two cities work out the schedules b/c if they have an event on the same night there is going to be traffic that'll make LA's laughable

TonyO
November 18th, 2007, 07:36 PM
SI

Red Bulls buy AEG's interest in Red Bull Park

Secaucus, NJ (Sports Network) - Red Bull New York announced Friday that it has purchased AEG's 50 percent interest in the development of Red Bull Park, a state of the art 25,000 seat soccer-only facility under construction in Harrison. Going forward, Red Bull New York will have full ownership of the project and oversee all aspects of construction and stadium management. Projected completion for the much-delayed Red Bull Park is optimistically in 2009.

"We would like to thank AEG for their hard work in our partnership over the past 18 months," Red Bull New York Managing Director Marc de Grandpre said. "To fulfill our ultimate goal of creating an elite sports franchise in the United States for our fans, it is vital that we have a home that all of us can be proud of. When completed, Red Bull Park will be the crowning centerpiece of our club, as we challenge for an MLS Cup year after year."

In addition, RBNY announced the hiring of John Amorosa as Construction Manager. Amorosa will be responsible for overseeing the construction of both Red Bull Park as well as the Red Bulls Training Grounds in Hanover Township.

Red Bull Park is the cornerstone to the Harrison MetroCentre Development, a mixed use urban redevelopment initiative. Red Bull Park will be a short walk from the Harrison PATH station, which is just 20 minutes from Midtown Manhattan, making it one of the most accessible sports-entertainment venues in the region. The stadium is also within walking distance of Newark’s Ironbound neighborhood.


11/16 14:58:50 ET

I LOVE THE SOCCER
November 18th, 2007, 08:25 PM
Good news for the Red Bulls, but now I hope that Wilpon will build a new soccer stadium in Queens and will put a true New York City soccer team in MLS 2010 !

ASchwarz
November 18th, 2007, 10:36 PM
The MLS head has repeatedly said he expects a second New York area team "shortly".

I would agree that a new stadium in Queens near the Mets' new CitiField would be the best location.

JCMAN320
November 29th, 2007, 03:05 AM
Next week start for redesigned Red Bull Park

Thursday, November 29, 2007
BY FRANK GIASE
NEWHOUSE NEWS SERVICE
AND MAURA McDERMOTT

Fourteen months after the formal groundbreaking and after numerous clean-up and design delays, construction on Red Bull Park in Harrison will begin next week, team executives said yesterday.

The announcement comes less than two weeks after Red Bull, which owns the team, bought out AEG's 50 percent stake in the Major League Soccer facility.

"We have permits for the foundation so we can start construction early next week," Red Bulls managing director Marc de Grandpre said. "The timeline is 18 to 20 months.which puts (completion) in mid-summer '09."

With AEG out of the picture, the final design has been modified to become a soccer-specific facility, which will seat 25,189.

Gone are the concert stage that was to be built into one end of the stadium and the supports that would have obstructed the views from some seats. The number of luxury suites has been reduced from 50 to 30.

Perhaps the biggest change is a new roof design. A translucent polycarbonate and aluminum structure will cover every seat, as opposed to the cantilevered roof that would have left several thousand fans exposed to the elements.

"We had a specific vision we wanted and AEG had their vision, and we couldn't come to an agreement on the final design," said de Grandpre, who would not reveal the cost of the added expense. ".The intimate experience was critical for us and it wasn't as important for AEG. We want fans to experience the game the way it should be."

With surrounding infrastructure, Red Bull Park was expected to cost $200 million and be the centerpiece of a $1 billion development project in Harrison that will include office space, retail outlets and housing across the Passaic River from Newark.

The other projects are still in place and have nothing to do with the stadium redesign, de Grandpre said.

"The message is clear," de Grandpre said. "We're investing in the stadium and the sport and we're going to provide our fans with the best MLS stadium in the country."

The stadium will be a welcome addition to Harrison, a community of 14,000, said Mayor Raymond McDonough and Greg Castano, attorney for the Harrison Redevelopment Agency.

"We're very pleased to see the project moving forward," Castano said. "We've been waiting a long time."

The new facility, as well as hundreds of homes and businesses to be built nearby, will give Harrison an economic boost, bringing visitors from throughout the region, Castano said.

But the stadium also has its critics, too.

Detective Thomas Corblies, president of the local police union, said he is worried the town will not have enough officers to cope with an influx of 25,000 soccer fans.

He said the department has barely more than 50 officers, down from about 65 in the mid-1990s, and its communications system is outmoded and in need of repair.

The PSE&G facility near the stadium could become a terrorist target, and the roads are not wide enough to let crowds out and emergency vehicles in, Corblies said.

"You have the potential for disaster," he said.

arcman210
November 29th, 2007, 10:58 AM
http://blog.nj.com/ledgerupdates_impact/2007/11/large_20071128redbullaerialL.jpg

http://blog.nj.com/ledgerupdates_impact/2007/11/large_20071128redbullcloseL.jpg

Much better than the old one they were proposing.

JCMAN320
November 29th, 2007, 01:28 PM
That looks way more first class then the old renderings. I love it. This is great that Hudson County will have this world class facilility that will set it apart from any other soccer stadium in the USA and it will be only one stop on the PATH away from Journal Square in Jersey City. I can't wait. I will be definately be in attendence for Hudson County's first major league sports team.:)

z22
November 29th, 2007, 08:04 PM
It is sad to think about the fact that at some point in the near future the town officials will realize the mess that they have created by approving all developments that are going on right now in that area without addressing anything on the transportation infrastructure issue. They rather rely on one thing, the already crowded PATH train. Not too long from now, the narrow streets of the town will virtually become the parking lots themselves as there is no way to move high volume traffics in a very tiny town.

JCMAN320
December 24th, 2007, 01:43 PM
A PARKING MESS

Monday, December 24, 2007
By RENATA MAGALHAES
JOURNAL STAFF WRITER

HARRISON - Commuters who use the Harrison PATH Station have recently noticed a decrease in the number of parking spaces - and an increase in tension.

Doug Fine, who commutes from Verona to Harrison, waits most mornings for anywhere from 45 minutes to an hour just to get into the lot. Then he and dozens of other drivers cruise up and down the rows, hoping to find a spot.

"You have to get there before 9 (a.m.) to be able to find a spot," said Fine. "You have people coming in from two directions, all trying to get into this small lot. There is no traffic control."

Fine says the problem started a couple of months back when one of the largest lots slowly started to shrink.

"They had this fence put up because of the construction. It started to cut back on spaces," Fine said. "They started making piles . and then they bought in a crusher to break down all the concrete . and then as of last Friday the lot was closed."

Fine estimated that about 2,000 spaces were lost due to the closing of that particular lot. He says it's the fourth or fifth lot closed since construction began on a massive redevelopment project that includes luxury condos and the new Red Bull professional soccer stadium.

PATH commuters aren't the only ones complaining. The overflow of cars waiting to get into the remaining parking lots is causing congestion throughout the already tight streets of Harrison.

Sal Ferraro, who comes from Nutley, expressed the same frustrations as Fine.

"There seems to be no contingency plan in place," said Ferraro. "They don't seem to care and it's getting out of hand."

Ferraro said he's seen some pretty heated confrontations over parking spots in the past few months.

There also have been complaints that there aren't enough street lights in the commuter lots.

Harrison Police Chief Derek Kearns acknowledges there's a problem and says the town is working to solve it. He said a new 1,440-parking lot/deck is in the works for Somerset Street at Frank E. Rodgers Boulevard, and there will soon be a new pick-up/drop-off area.

"As for the lighting situation I will have to take a look at that, because that is a problem if there isn't enough lighting," Kearns said. "Lighting is the cheapest way of deterring crime, we have done that in other areas, so that (the complaints) is a concern."

Kearns says he doesn't want commuters to feel that the town is forgetting about them. "We want to work with them and if there is anything they need, they should call."

And to top things off, commuters say they've been hit with a price increase.

"The other day I got my change back and it was a buck short," Fine said. "I asked the guy what happened and he just said they raised it. No warning."

TonyO
January 5th, 2008, 01:00 PM
NY Times - Goal
January 4, 2008, 3:48 pm

Digging in the Dirt in Harrison, N.J.

http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/blogs/goal/posts/stadium.533.jpg
One can almost picture where the goal posts would go as bulldozers prepare for stadium construction in Harrison, N.J. (Courtesy N.Y. Red Bulls)

By Jack Bell

More than a year after holding a well-attended media event on the site of the new Red Bull Park in Harrison, N.J., replete with local and state politicos, and other assorted luminaries, the club has finally begun construction on its redesigned 25,000-seat, $200 million soccer stadium.
Workers from Hunter Roberts, a subcontractor on the project, began moving dirt around the site on Dec. 27 in preparation for the driving of the stadium’s piles, which is expected to begin in the next few weeks. Workers in front-loaders and bulldozers will be moving about 10,000 cubic yards of dirt to prepare the site for the columns that will support the stadium.

One can almost picture where the goal posts would go as bulldozers prepare for stadium construction in Harrison, N.J. (Courtesy N.Y. Red Bulls)Red Bull Park is expected to open sometime late during the 2009 Major League Soccer season, after many, many years of fits, starts and more fits. The club is also at work on a new training facility in Hanover, N.J., which is expected to be ready by the end of 2008. The club currently trains at Montclair State University in Little Falls, N.J.

The bulldozers on-site are outfitted with global positioning system antennas and displays that allow the operators to know where they are on the site and how much soil must be placed or excavated at a specific location.
Initially, Red Bull, which bought the team from the Anschutz Entertainment Group before the start of the 2006 season and changed the club’s name, planned to develop the stadium in partnership with AEG. But the two companies continually butted heads over differing visions for the building. AEG New York, which had been run by the MetroStars’ former top executive, Nick Sakiewicz, signed on to manage the stadium and wanted to include a permanent stage in one end zone, like the one installed by AEG at Toyota Park outside Chicago, where the Fire plays its games. (AEG has since sold the Fire to an investment company led by Andrew Hauptman, a member of the Bronfman family.)
Red Bull was adamantly opposed to the stage and AEG’s vision of using the building for other diverse events that could potentially damage the grass playing surface. Last fall, Red Bull bought out AEG’s half-share, a transaction that has allowed the Austrian-based energy drink maker to finally get construction started.

JCMAN320
February 4th, 2008, 07:56 PM
ON THE PATH TO A BOOM
Development in Harrison puts the train-line town in position for a renaissance

Monday, February 04, 2008
BY MAURA McDERMOTT
Star-Ledger Staff

The hulking factories and warehouses that once ringed Harrison's PATH station lie in ruins, a testament to a lost economy, but also an indication of the renewal to come.

Long ago nicknamed the "beehive of industry," the blue-collar Hudson County community is buzzing with talk of change.

Now instead of plant workers, Manhattan-bound commuters hustle along the sidewalks each morning. And with up to 7,000 new homes, a soccer stadium, a hotel, restaurants and stores coming in the next 15 years, many residents believe Harrison is the next boom town along the PATH line, like Hoboken and Jersey City.

"I'm hoping it will be something nice, nicer than when I grew up," 21-year-old teacher Mari Mendoza said, looking out from the train platform at the pyramids of rubble, with the Manhattan skyline at her back. "I'm picturing something like Pavonia-Newport, where they have nice buildings and park benches."

The new construction could double the densely packed, 1.3-square-mile town's population of 14,000.

"It would be good to bring some kind of renaissance to the town," said Jo-Ann Capella, who commutes by train to her job at a Manhattan bank. But she also said she was concerned it was going to "price people out."

The new homes, she added, will look "cookie-cutter."

Already, the mostly decaying industrial sector in the southwestern third of Harrison is on its way to becoming an upscale neighborhood clustered around the train station. Workers are knocking down buildings, cleaning up contaminated land and preparing to construct condominiums, rentals and storefronts.

"It's really taking a fallow site with serious environmental contamination and making it into a jewel," said Kevin Tartaglione of Advance Realty Development, which is building 1,200 residences, as well as stores and offices, just south of the PATH station, near the 25,000-seat Red Bulls stadium set to open in mid-2009.

The project, Harrison MetroCentre, is one of five redevelopments now under way. Most of the new buildings will be seven stories or less, although a few could rise 20 to 30 stories.

Developers also are building a walkway and park that stretch for two miles along the Passaic River.

Local families gather at the walkway near the 3-year-old Hampton Inn&Suites to watch fireworks at the Newark minor-league baseball stadium across the river, said Peter Higgins III, chair of the Harrison Redevelopment Agency.


LOCATION, LOCATION, LOCATION

The construction marks a turnaround from the economic slide that began in the 1970s after the factory whistles went silent. Back in the boom years following World War II, Harrison bustled with more than 100,000 residents and workers, Higgins said.

The town's redevelopment started to move forward in 2001, he said. But the 9/11 attacks destroyed lower Manhattan's PATH station, taking away Harrison's direct connection to the city. A temporary World Trade Center station opened in 2003.

The quick ride from Harrison to lower Manhattan will help bring in young professionals, said James Hughes, dean of the Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy at Rutgers.

"Given the pattern of extreme housing costs in Manhattan, it puts the Harrison site in a pretty good location," he said. "Whatever they build is going to be far more affordable than New York City."

Roughly half the new residents are expected to commute by mass transit, said Richard Miller, chief executive of the Pegasus Group of Hoboken. Pegasus and Applied Development Co. are getting ready to build nearly 500 residences north of the station, with more to follow.

The train line is what makes Harrison so attractive, Miller said. The second of five stops from Newark to Manhattan, Harrison is 20 minutes from the World Trade Center and a half-hour from Herald Square.

"Tell me any other place you can do that, that's undeveloped, in the New York area," Miller said.

Harrison also is convenient to Newark's office jobs, as well as the New Jersey Performing Arts Center and the new Prudential Center, said Gregory Kowalski, executive director of the redevelopment agency.

Even the troubles in the housing and credit markets don't seem to be affecting Harrison -- at least not yet, Kowalski said.

"It may even help with rentals because people can't buy," he said.

The development plans have raised other concerns.

A husband and wife, Steve and Maria McCormick, won council seats by insisting developers who receive tax breaks should provide more parks, affordable housing and services for senior citizens.

The developers "are going to make money on this, so give us a little bit back," Steve McCormick said.

The development agreements were signed in 2000 and 2001, before the town was in a strong position to negotiate for more amenities, Kowalski said.

Maria McCormick said she worries that if Harrison doesn't spruce up the row houses and shops in the older sections of town, those sections risk becoming the "wrong side of the tracks" compared with the new construction.

That's unlikely, said Jersey City Mayor Jerramiah Healy. Healy's city has undergone massive redevelopment since the 1980s. The new luxury high-rises on the water have helped all 240,000 city residents, including those in the older, inland homes, he said.

"Since property values have gone up all over the city, people realize their houses are worth something so they're investing in them, they're maintaining them," Healy said. "As they say, a rising tide lifts all boats."

Another flashpoint is the use of eminent domain to force out longtime property owners. Manny Amaral, the owner of a car dealership and parking lot near the PATH station, recently moved to Lyndhurst under threat of eviction.

Another landowner, Lester Entin, has challenged the Red Bulls in court, charging the new stadium will block access to his busy warehouse. The lawsuit also cites security experts who say the stadium will attract dangerously large crowds too close to a PSE&G facility. The Red Bulls declined to comment on the lawsuit.

The new homes also evoke fears about traffic tangles and parking woes. Even now, drivers fleeing gridlock on Route 280 cram the town's narrow streets.

The highway "kills the whole town," said Chris Barry, a 25-year-old recruiter who takes the train to work. If the town's population doubles, "it's going to have to become like a commuter town, where nobody has a car. It's ridiculous."

The state and Hudson County aim to add on- and off-ramps to Route 280 and improve local intersections, according to the state Department of Transportation. The proposal does not yet have all the federal funding it needs.

The aging PATH station is due for an upgrade, too. The Port Authority of New York and New Jersey expects to open a new, wheelchair-accessible station with a longer platform in about four years, said Susan Bass Levin, the authority's deputy director. The work will cost about $150 million, she said.

The station also will get a 1,500-car garage, built by the Hudson County Improvement Authority.

Even before all those changes, the town is drawing in young professionals like Santosh Aithani, who takes the train to his job at a software firm in Manhattan.

"It's close to Manhattan, and it's comparatively cheaper than Wall Street or any other place," said Aithani, 28, who has lived in Harrison for a year. All the new construction, he added, "will be good. We can shop here rather than going to Manhattan."

Maura McDermott may be reached at mmcdermott@starledger.com or (973) 392-7964.

JCMAN320
April 2nd, 2008, 12:25 AM
Judge orders halt to Harrison work, says clarity needed

Tuesday, April 01, 2008
By MAURA McDERMOTT
NEWHOUSE NEWS SERVICE

HARRISON - Redevelopment work in the downtown area was at a standstill yesterday after a Superior Court judge issued an order halting the project.

The work cannot resume until it is clear whether the Harrison Redevelopment Agency had the right to condemn properties there, Judge Maurice Gallipoli ruled in Jersey City.

[/b]Gallipoli's stop-work order affects properties near the Harrison PATH train station, where Steve Adler owned parking lots and industrial buildings, said Anthony Della Pelle, Adler's attorney.[/b]

Yesterday, the Harrison Redevelopment Agency filed papers asking the state appellate division to allow the redeveloper, Harrison Commons, to continue its work, said Gregory Castano Jr., the agency's attorney.

"The main thing that has been going on is the remediation of the properties so there's really no reason to stop that," Castano said.

The appeals court could rule on the emergency request as soon as tomorrow, he said.

The redevelopers are spending $15 million to clean up contamination at Adler's properties, said Paul Fernicola, an attorney for Harrison Commons, which is building nearly 500 residences north of the PATH station.

Adler and three other landowners have been fighting Harrison's condemnation of their properties, saying the town did not give them enough warning that their land could be seized.

In February, a state appeals court ruled in the property owners' favor and sent the case back to the lower court. Gallipoli, who ruled in favor of the town more than a year ago, has scheduled another hearing in May, Della Pelle said. A new trial could begin after that, he said.

scrollhectic
August 21st, 2008, 05:08 PM
UPDATE Last updated: August 21, 2008 09:17am
By Eric Peterson (http://www.globest.com/cgi-bin/udt/im.author.contact.view?client_id=globest&story_id=173222&title=%24200M%20Soccer%20Stadium%20Moves%20Ahead&author=Eric%20Peterson&address=http%3A//www.globest.com/news/1228%5F1228/newjersey/173222%2D1.html&summary=HARRISON%2C%20NJ%2DAfter%20a%20number%20of %20stops%20and%20starts%2C%20the%2025%2C000%2Dseat %2C%20renamed%20Red%20Bull%20Arena%20is%20finally% 20moving%20forward%20with%20vertical%20constructio n.)

http://www.globest.com/newspics/nej_redbullinterior.jpg
Red Bull Arena

HARRISON, NJ-It's to be a centerpiece for this city's major redevelopment, but for all of the starts and stops, some wondered if the new 25,189-seat stadium for the Red Bulls franchise of Major League Soccer would ever get done. Now, it will apparently happen with the start of vertical construction for the $200-million facility.

"It's something tangible that people can see," says Red Bull New York managing director Erik Stover. "If they're driving by on I-280 or riding on the PATH train, they can see it coming out of the ground. Up to now, it just looks like a dirt field."

Its genesis goes back nearly a decade, when the Red Bulls were known as the MetroStars. The team continues to play its home games at Giants Stadium in the Meadowlands, but their average crowd of 20-25,000 rattles around in that 76,000-seat venue, and the team, which became known as the Red Bulls a couple of years ago, has long been in search of a more intimate venue. That venue is now slated for completion by September 2009.

Ground was officially broken more than two years ago, but site remediation and team and stadium ownership issues had thrown up some barriers to actual construction. The project got a jumpstart in November when team officials unveiled a revised (http://www.globest.com/news/1045_1045/newjersey/166381-1.html) design for the stadium. Those changes came shortly after the Red Bull New York franchise bought out the 50% ownership interest (http://www.globest.com/news/1041_1041/newjersey/166213-1.html) in the stadium held by entertainment giant AEG.

And it has a new name. Originally called Red Bull Park, the stadium will now be named Red Bull Arena. "The name was changed to be more in line with other Red Bull properties worldwide," Stover says. The parent company is the Red Bull of energy drink fame, which has a number of soccer and ice hockey franchises across Europe.

"Over the course of construction to this point, the naming was not controlled by Red Bull," Stover says. "Since Red Bull took over complete control in November, we have been planning to make a change more in line with other Red Bull properties."

Located on just more than 12.4 acres on a former industrial site bounded by Sixth and Cape May streets, the stadium's seating will include 1,116 club seats and 30 luxury suites. Media seating, rather than in an upper-level press box, will be located at field level directly behind the player benches.

A curving roof form will wrap Red Bull Arena in a metal shell, with its roof extending 130 feet over the main stands. The last 60 feet of that roof will be translucent to let in natural light. And the stadium's exterior will be composed of metal, clear polycarbonate and glass panels.

scrollhectic
November 10th, 2008, 09:25 PM
November 7, 2008 04:22pm

By Eric Peterson (http://www.globest.com/cgi-bin/udt/im.author.contact.view?client_id=globest&story_id=175065&title=%241B%20Redevelopment%20Set%20for%20Construc tion&author=Eric%20Peterson&address=http%3A//www.globest.com/news/1284%5F1284/newjersey/175065%2D1.html&summary=HARRISON%2C%20NJ%2DAnd%20the%20Advance%20R ealty%20project%20formerly%20known%20as%20Harrison %20MetroCentre%20has%20a%20new%20name%2C%20the%20R iverbend%20District.)


http://www.globest.com/newspics/nej_Riverbend.jpg
Riverbend


HARRISON, NJ-The site has been cleared, contaminated soil removed and replaced, and now the $1-billion redevelopment project formerly known as Harrison MetroCentre is set for above-ground construction. The project of Bedminster, NJ-based Advanced Realty has been renamed the Riverbend District, and the site is directly across the Passaic River from downtown Newark

Advance officials say the new name better reflects what they plan to create on the 135-acre site along a bend in the river. On tap are upwards of three million square feet of mixed uses, built in phases. The name change is also likely an offshoot of the renaming of the Major League Soccer team that will call the 25,000-seat stadium (http://www.globest.com/news/1228_1228/newjersey/173222-1.html) currently under construction as a centerpiece for the redevelopment. The New York Red Bulls were, until a few years ago, known as the MetroStars.

What’s on tap initially is work on site utilities and roadways, expected to be completed by October 2009 when the stadium, now known as Red Bull Arena, is slated to open. The remediation effort included the removal of more than 48,000 cubic yards of contaminated soil, the result of decades of industrial usage of the site.

"Completing such an extensive site remediation really gets the ball rolling toward both horizontal and vertical construction," says Peter J. Cocoziello, president and CEO of Advance Realty. "When it’s completed, Riverbend District will be made up of several interconnected neighborhoods. And the location is ideal."

Plans for the project call for more than 800,000 square feet of retail space, including an anchor supermarket, a 16-screen cinema and a number of eateries. Two hotels are also part of the plan, including a 200-room property and a 350-room full-service hotel with 25,000 square feet of conference space.

The project will be topped off by a wellness center, 1,800 for-sale and rental residential units and as much as 1.5 million square feet of office space. Actual vertical construction is expected to start in early 2010. It’s also a transit-oriented project, with close links to NJ Transit, Amtrak and an onsite PATH light rail station that’s getting a $180-million upgrade.

The project dates to early 2004 when Advance finalized a redevelopment agreement (http://www.globest.com/news/20040223/newjersey/111384-1.html) with the City of Harrison. Advance subsequently picked up site approval (http://www.globest.com/news/954_954/retail/162476-1.html) in mid-2007.

scrollhectic
November 10th, 2008, 09:31 PM
http://www.harrisonmetrocentre.com/

There's a 22 page PDF brochure of the Riverbend District

arcman210
November 11th, 2008, 04:16 PM
Speaking of which, Red Bull Arena construction is well underway...

Photos from WCBS880:

http://imgsrv.wcbs880.com/image/DbLiteGraphic/200810/3375413.JPG

http://imgsrv.wcbs880.com/image/DbLiteGraphic/200810/3375412.JPG

http://www.wcbs880.com/pages/3224820.php?imageGalleryXRefId=799904

STT757
November 12th, 2008, 11:31 AM
Looks like a cool place to have Summer concerts.

NYatKNIGHT
November 12th, 2008, 05:19 PM
Wow, I had no idea they were that far along. Thanks for the update.

JCMAN320
January 23rd, 2009, 09:38 PM
Red Bulls stadium won't open until 2010

by The Associated Press
Friday January 23, 2009, 6:52 PM

SECAUCUS -- The opening of the New York Red Bulls' new stadium in Harrison, originally scheduled for the 2009 season, has been pushed back to next year.

Managing director Erik Stover said in a statement Friday that construction delays and colder than expected winter weather pushed the project back so that the 25,000-seat stadium couldn't be finished until after the upcoming season.

"The best decision for us is to prepare for the 2010 season," Stover said. "Our goal has always been to create a first-class experience for our fans."

The Red Bulls, formerly the MetroStars, have played at Giants Stadium since Major League Soccer's inaugural season in 1996. New York reached the MLS Cup for the first time in franchise history last season, losing the title game to the Columbus Crew.

Marv95
January 24th, 2009, 08:34 AM
Well when one goes past Rogers Blvd like I did a few times recently it's not surprising. The steel looks to be put in place but that's about it. All I see is some white tarp on it. It's nowhere close to being done, and the season starts in April.

NewarkDevil5
January 24th, 2009, 06:37 PM
Besides which, even if they busted their humps and got it done by April (virtual impossibility) at this point nothing but the Stadium would be done. There is no parking infrastructure ready and the roads are still a mess. You'd have a gleaming stadium sitting in the middle of an inaccessible dirt heap.

Bronxbombers
January 27th, 2009, 11:04 PM
I also don't like the names the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim & the California Angels. They need to be called the Anaheim Angels. My 2 favoirte Major League Baseball teams are the New York Yankees and the Los Angeles Dodgers. The New York Red Bulls really really need to play in New York City & not the Meadowlands East Rutherford New Jersey.

NewarkDevil5
January 28th, 2009, 02:31 PM
We've had this discussion before regarding the other various metropolitan area teams, but in any event, given the fact that they've never played in New York and that their new stadium was paid for by New Jersey taxpayer money, it would seem to me that their name ought to be Red Bull New Jersey and then their location would not concern you.

As I understand it, the MLS wants to start a new New York team anyway.

ASchwarz
January 28th, 2009, 07:04 PM
We've had this discussion before regarding the other various metropolitan area teams, but in any event, given the fact that they've never played in New York and that their new stadium was paid for by New Jersey taxpayer money, it would seem to me that their name ought to be Red Bull New Jersey and then their location would not concern you.


New York Red Bulls refers to the city, not the state, and most of NJ is part of metro NYC.

It therefore makes no less sense (if anything, more sense) for taxpayers in Bergen County to pay for something with the name "New York" as it does taxpayers in (for example) Albany, NY. At least Bergen County is part of the metropolitan area.

ASchwarz
January 28th, 2009, 07:07 PM
I also don't like the names the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim & the California Angels. They need to be called the Anaheim Angels.

Why? Why can't they be called whatever the owner wants to call them?

You think the Dallas Cowboys HAVE to be the Irving Cowboys, and the Miami Dolphins HAVE to be the Unincorporated Dade County Dolphins, just because that is their technical street address?

And then I assume you want the New York Yankees to be called the Bronx Yankees? After all, there are no New York addresses in the Bronx. It's all Bronx, NY, no New York, NY.

66nexus
January 29th, 2009, 01:20 AM
-sigh-

And the metro-area argument continues.


Folks on this side of the Hudson may want a little more of a home-team (completely confused as to why this is so hard to understand). I assure you that the going thought isn't just 'hey we're all the NY metro area so let's just have all the teams in the metro be called NY.'

The NY Yankees argument is a bad comparison at best b/c simply: the Bronx IS a borough of NYC.

We all know that the reason the Red Bulls chose the NY name is b/c the NY name carries media and sponsor weight, and yet they don't have to pay the NY tax.

And since we're talking about metros...the official title is the New-York Northern New Jersey-Long Island msa. I wished the region used its 'Gateway' name to more identify itself.

STT757
January 29th, 2009, 09:51 AM
Why? Why can't they be called whatever the owner wants to call them?

You think the Dallas Cowboys HAVE to be the Irving Cowboys, and the Miami Dolphins HAVE to be the Unincorporated Dade County Dolphins, just because that is their technical street address?

And then I assume you want the New York Yankees to be called the Bronx Yankees? After all, there are no New York addresses in the Bronx. It's all Bronx, NY, no New York, NY.

Add to that the Washington Redskins who moved out of DC to the Maryland suburbs.

NYatKNIGHT
January 29th, 2009, 11:02 AM
You think the Dallas Cowboys HAVE to be the Irving Cowboys, and the Miami Dolphins HAVE to be the Unincorporated Dade County Dolphins, just because that is their technical street address?

And then I assume you want the New York Yankees to be called the Bronx Yankees? After all, there are no New York addresses in the Bronx. It's all Bronx, NY, no New York, NY.

Those examples aren't similar comparisons. Newark and/or New Jersey are far bigger and have more recognizable names than Irving or Unincorporated Dade County, and Newark and/or New Jersey may lie inside the greater New York metro area but are also a city and state in their own right. Nobody is saying it should be the Harrison Red Bulls or the East Rutherford Jets. And none of your examples have what makes the NY-NJ naming unique: two states, not to mention that 'New York' itself is the name of a city and state. Also, it could have been the Bronx Yankees as easily as it was the Brooklyn Dodgers, despite those places being the same metro area. NJ has its Devils and Nets and perhaps they have suffered for not marketing the name NY, but they seem to have gotten by nonetheless.

All of the team names are fine by me as they stand now, but I'd have to agree, if there are really going to be two soccer teams I have no problem with the one located in NJ being called NJ. It was my impression that the new soccer stadium was part of a redevelopment plan for the Newark, NJ area.

Marv95
January 29th, 2009, 11:26 AM
The Redskins argument is invalid since DC isn't a state nor represents it, unlike NY. Cowboys, Dolphins and to a lesser extent the Angels are fine since not only they play in the same state, places like Irving, TX are small or almost right next to the large city. Harrison is small, but it isn't right next to NYC, and both aren't in the same state. If they were called the NY Red Bulls of New Jersey I wouldn't have a problem with it since it has NJ in its name.

Some of you either know nothing about state pride or have a large inferiority complex. And paying taxes for 3 teams that has NY in them and doesn't want to recognize the fact they are IN NJ isn't fair.

STT757
January 29th, 2009, 11:34 AM
The Redskins argument is invalid since DC isn't a state nor represents it, unlike NY

But it is a City, which is where the Jets and Giants get "New York" from. They're not referring to New York State they are referring to New York "City". New York State has an NFL franchise, the Buffalo BIlls.

The "New York" Knicks, Mets, Yankees are identifying themselves with the City of New York and it's market which includes Northern New Jersey, not Rochester, Binghamton, Watertown, Albany, Syracuse etc..

ASchwarz
January 29th, 2009, 08:01 PM
The Redskins argument is invalid since DC isn't a state nor represents it, unlike NY.

The Redskins play in the State of Maryland, but they are not called the Maryland Redskins. Using your logic, they must be called by either the city or state: Landover Redskins or Maryland Redskins.

And none of the teams we are talking about even represent a state. They represent NYC. Most people outside the U.S. don't even know there's a NY State. The value of the team name is in the city.


Cowboys, Dolphins and to a lesser extent the Angels are fine since not only they play in the same state,

Of course they play in the same state. There is no other state within hundreds of miles of any of these cities.

We're talking about cities, not states, and there are four states within 70 miles of Manhattan, all of which contain part of the official Census-designated NYC metropolitan area. States in the Northeast are tiny, and they're huge in other parts of the country.

Heck, the Giants played in CT in the 1970's. You think they should then be called the Connecticut Giants, just because much of CT consists of NYC suburbs?


places like Irving, TX are small or almost right next to the large city. Harrison is small, but it isn't right next to NYC, and both aren't in the same state.

Harrison is MUCH closer to NYC than any of these other teams are to their supposed city. It's maybe 6-7 miles from Manhattan.

The Angels are 30 miles from LA, the Cowboys are 20 miles from Dallas, and the Dolphins are 15 miles from Miami.

66nexus
January 29th, 2009, 11:42 PM
^It seems that you feel that NJ residents should be all accepting because it is the same metro area? (of which the official title is: New York-Northern New Jersey-Long Island msa)

You ask this: why should it matter what a team on this side of Hudson is called if it's the same metro area...

I ask: why does that team have to be called NY...

I love NY, always did. But a team calling itself Red Bull NY is not my home-team. The Red Bulls want to represent the city but they don't wanna pay the cost to be the boss.

Did you ever consider that you may not understand perhaps because your location makes the situation a bit foreign?

ASchwarz
January 30th, 2009, 12:57 AM
I ask: why does that team have to be called NY...

On this we agree 100%. I do not care too much about team names. I am not saying a team MUST be called NY; I just don't understand why others care if that's what the owners decide.

Heck, if they want to call the Red Bulls the Harrison Red Bulls or the NJ Red Bullls, fine by me. They're still the NYC soccer team, and everyone knows it.

I just don't understand why you think teams in NJ MUST have the state or city name somewhere in their official team name, as if it really matters if a team is in Hackensack, Stamford or Queens.

66nexus
February 2nd, 2009, 02:15 PM
On this we agree 100%. I do not care too much about team names. I am not saying a team MUST be called NY; I just don't understand why others care if that's what the owners decide.

Heck, if they want to call the Red Bulls the Harrison Red Bulls or the NJ Red Bullls, fine by me. They're still the NYC soccer team, and everyone knows it.

I just don't understand why you think teams in NJ MUST have the state or city name somewhere in their official team name, as if it really matters if a team is in Hackensack, Stamford or Queens.

According to your logic, the NJ Nets are an NYC basketball team, and the Devils are an NYC hockey team (as evidenced by your saying the Red Bulls could call themselves NJ but they'd still be an 'NYC' soccer team)

As for the bolded statement: the Red Bulls do not have the NY identity that the Giants/Jets have (perhaps because as recently as two years ago they were the NY/NJ Metrostars...and certainly NOT an NYC team.)

Hell, I remember one of the reasons they chose Harrison at all was the proximity to soccer community in the Ironbound and Hudson County.

No, I don't think all teams west/north of the Hudson have to use their city of origin in their name...but it'd be nice. I don't consider this metro a single-knit sports region. It's sheer size leaves too much room for local competition.




http://www.advancerealtygroup.com/ehtml/harrison/images/Aerial.jpg
file:///C:/Users/MELLLI%7E1/AppData/Local/Temp/moz-screenshot-1.jpg

file:///C:/Users/MELLLI%7E1/AppData/Local/Temp/moz-screenshot.jpg

ASchwarz
February 2nd, 2009, 06:53 PM
According to your logic, the NJ Nets are an NYC basketball team, and the Devils are an NYC hockey team (as evidenced by your saying the Red Bulls could call themselves NJ but they'd still be an 'NYC' soccer team)

They are NYC basketball and hockey teams. NY metro, to be more specific.


As for the bolded statement: the Red Bulls do not have the NY identity that the Giants/Jets have (perhaps because as recently as two years ago they were the NY/NJ Metrostars...and certainly NOT an NYC team.)

They don't have any identity yet, whether NY, NJ, or whatever. And things weren't any different before. They were always an NYC team. They play in the Meadowlands, which is the primary sports complex serving the NYC metro area.


Hell, I remember one of the reasons they chose Harrison at all was the proximity to soccer community in the Ironbound and Hudson County.


I don't doubt that's a reason, but the primary reason is the PATH subway connecting to Manhattan the rest of the tri-state region.

If you just wanted to be in the middle of tons of soccer fans, you would get MUCH more soccer fan density in Brooklyn, Queens or the Bronx.


No, I don't think all teams west/north of the Hudson have to use their city of origin in their name...but it'd be nice. I don't consider this metro a single-knit sports region. It's sheer size leaves too much room for local competition.
Agreed, I don't think it's a one-size-fits-all region, but I do not see the divides across the Hudson being all that different from the divides on the same side of the Hudson (Yankees/Mets, Giants/Jets, Rangers/Islanders).

JCMAN320
February 2nd, 2009, 07:50 PM
Hudson County is one of the most dense counties in the country, in fact its density is only surpassed by New York, Kings, and San Fransisco AShwarcz. Also West Hudson is the birthplace of American Soccer and the site of the first internationl soccer match in the USA. Also there are 13 players in the US Soccer Hall Of Fame from Harrison and Kearny alone!!

66nexus
February 3rd, 2009, 11:11 AM
They are NYC basketball and hockey teams. NY metro, to be more specific.

They don't have any identity yet, whether NY, NJ, or whatever. And things weren't any different before. They were always an NYC team. They play in the Meadowlands, which is the primary sports complex serving the NYC metro area.

Agreed, I don't think it's a one-size-fits-all region, but I do not see the divides across the Hudson being all that different from the divides on the same side of the Hudson (Yankees/Mets, Giants/Jets, Rangers/Islanders).

Then we just see things in completely different lights. I tell you this: an NYC team and an NY 'metro' team are not the same, and should not be viewed as the same.

The Knicks are an NYC team, as are the Rangers, but tell any NY'er that the Devils and the Nets are NYC teams. As far as the former NY/NJ Metrostars, viewing them as an NYC only team is a pure matter of opinion on which I disagree with you.

I think your going thought is that b/c NY is the media center of this tri-state metro than it holds all governance over metro sports. Or put simply: what is New Jersey's...is essentially New York's.

I absolutely disagree on every level.

lammius
February 4th, 2009, 11:01 AM
Maybe I'm alone here, but I find the "Red Bull" part of the name more offensive than the "New York" part.

I imagine, for sake of comparison, Citi bank, which secured naming rights for the Mets new stadium, adopting the team and changing its name to the New York Citibank ATMs! And then between-inning theatrics at the games, "Come to the Citibank kiosk behind home plate. If you prequalify for a mortgage at a rate lower than Johan Santana's ERA, you'll get a free ATMs t-shirt from Citibank!"

STT757
March 19th, 2009, 11:14 AM
New video from the Star Ledger:

http://videos.nj.com/star-ledger/2009/03/construction_continues_at_red.html

STT757
May 24th, 2009, 08:40 PM
I've seen the renderings, the new station is huge.


NEW HARRISON PATH STATION MOVING AHEAD
Renderings for a new $168 million PATH station in Harrison were unveiled by the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey. Final design is expected to be completed this year for the station, which is part of a major makeover of the area that includes Red Bull Arena and a large-scale residential development.

Construction will begin in 2011. The Port Authority also will build a five-level parking deck next to the station. Last year 1.8 million passengers used the station. That number is expected to quadruple to about 6,000 as a result of the redevelopment project.

http://www.townofharrison.com/images/redevelopment/harrisondevpath02.jpg

DonJ81
May 25th, 2009, 10:16 AM
VERY NICE! Now let's see if it ever happens being that the rule of thumb for the newark area is that if it's nice it won't happen.:p

STT757
May 25th, 2009, 01:13 PM
The station is being built by the Port Authority, they already budgeted the project. The stadium is also well underway.

stache
May 25th, 2009, 05:53 PM
One thing I've noticed, Harrison is a much better maintained municipality than Newark. I can envision this happening.

block944
May 26th, 2009, 05:27 AM
Plus most of it is nonresidential space unlike newark where people would be displaced. I see the harrison area being the next hot spot. Already the park across the water is underway also: http://newarksriver.wordpress.com/

DonJ81
May 26th, 2009, 09:27 AM
Good point guys, this Harrison development is going to get done, and in the end, it will help Newark as well.

STT757
October 19th, 2009, 08:53 AM
Aerial view of Red Bull Park Development from a plane landing at EWR.

http://www.airliners.net/photo/Continental-Express-(ExpressJet/Embraer-EMB-145LR-(ERJ-145LR)/1594491/L/

JCMAN320
December 13th, 2009, 02:10 AM
Big East college soccer championships will be played in Harrison stadium

By The Jersey Journal
December 11, 2009, 5:00PM

http://media.nj.com/hudsoncountynow_impact/photo/red-bull-arenajpg-d88dffd37791cc85_large.jpg
AP file photo
The Red Bulls Arena in Harrison will host Big East Conference soccer championship games for next three years.

For the next three years, the Big East will play its college soccer championship and semi-finals in the New York Red Bulls Arena in Harrison.

The Red Bulls and Big East announced today a three-year agreement allowing the 16-college conference to play in the professional soccer organization's soccer-specific arena which is scheduled to open March 27, 2010. It will seat 25,000, including 30 suites and 1,000 club seats.

"The Red Bulls organization is excited to bring the Big East Men's Soccer Championship to Red Bull Arena," said Erik Stover, Red Bull New York managing director. "One of our goals is to help elevate the sport of soccer in the United States and our partnership with the Big East Conference is an important step in that process."

The dates of the Big East championships are: 2010, Nov. 12 and 14; 2011, Nov. 11 and 13 and 2012 - Nov. 9 and 10. Besides holding the end of the conference tournaments games in Harrison, team practices will be held in Harrison before each day of competition.

"The Big East is thrilled to announce the partnership with Red Bull New York and their new world-class facility," said Jim Siedliski, Big East associate commissioner for Olympic Sports. "We feel Red Bull Arena is the ideal location to hold our men's soccer championship, and will allow our student-athletes to play in a professional atmosphere and in a major metropolitan market that embraces the sport of soccer."

The Big East started to get noticed when St. John's captured the NCAA title in 1996 followed by BE member Connecticut winning the national championship in 2000, 20 years after its 1981 title. Rutgers and Seton Hall universities are also BE members.

"This is a fantastic partnership between the Big East and the Red Bulls, which gives our league a fantastic home in one of the best soccer venues in the US," said Bobby Clark, Notre Dame men's soccer head coach.

The added games at the new soccer facility is expected to provide an economic boost to the host municipality and the surrounding area.

arcman210
January 24th, 2010, 11:28 AM
Aerial photos courtesy of WCBS880

http://www.wcbs880.com/pages/6145226.php

lofter1
March 6th, 2010, 01:58 PM
Red Bull Arena Grand Opening is March 20 (http://www.redbullarena.us/).

Anybody been up close to see it?


Saturday, March 20, 2010
Santos FC
6:00 PM - 8:30 PM

New York takes on legendary Brazilian side, Santos FC, in the Grand Opening match at Red Bull Arena.

arcman210
March 6th, 2010, 11:55 PM
I've been past it a few times... looks very futuristic and imposing, quite a cool looking stadium. Will reportedly be the best soccer stadium in North America, judging from the looks of it, I can see why its being said so...

Here's some cool aerial shots from WCBS880:
http://imgsrv.wcbs880.com/image/DbLiteGraphic/201003/6209887.jpg?1267853928 (http://www.wcbs880.com/pages/6505282.php?imageGalleryXRefId=1727175#imgXR)

link to more:
http://www.wcbs880.com/pages/6505282.php

newarkdevil1
March 7th, 2010, 12:31 AM
Here is what I find amusing. Everyone saying that Harison is the next big it and yet they have the same situation Newark did when their arena opened, nothing around it. I just point this out to say that things will move along with one another and that Harrison and Newark have a mutual relationship in development. Driving by this stadium every day gives me hope that Harrison will provide a progressive city across the river to push Newark to break out of it's shell and grow.



I've been past it a few times... looks very futuristic and imposing, quite a cool looking stadium. Will reportedly be the best soccer stadium in North America, judging from the looks of it, I can see why its being said so...

Here's some cool aerial shots from WCBS880:
http://imgsrv.wcbs880.com/image/DbLiteGraphic/201003/6209887.jpg?1267853928 (http://www.wcbs880.com/pages/6505282.php?imageGalleryXRefId=1727175#imgXR)

link to more:
http://www.wcbs880.com/pages/6505282.php

lofter1
March 7th, 2010, 10:31 AM
The upcoming schedule (http://www.redbullarena.us/events/default.aspx?) shows it isn't heavily booked -- usually 2-3 events per month, but over the summer months only 1 match / month.

Will it be used for anything but soccer?

Marv95
March 7th, 2010, 11:19 AM
The upcoming schedule (http://www.redbullarena.us/events/default.aspx?) shows it isn't heavily booked -- usually 2-3 events per month, but over the summer months only 1 match / month.

Will it be used for anything but soccer?
Big East championship soccer(already posted in this thread)for now. I would think they may hold a couple of concerts during the summer months.

arcman210
March 21st, 2010, 09:45 AM
http://www.nj.com/redbulls/index.ssf/2010/03/red_bulls_christen_new_home_with_exhibition_victor y_over_santos.html



Red Bulls christen new home with win over Santos FC

By Frank Giase/The Star-Ledger

March 20, 2010, 9:13PM

http://media.nj.com/red_bulls/photo/inside-red-bull-arena-for-inaugural-game-ec46783537a72527_large.jpg
John Munson/The Star-Ledger Inside Red Bull Arena, before kickoff of the stadium's inaugural game between the Red Bulls and Santos of Brazil, Marcos Leite, who is from Santos, but now lives in Fairfield, waves the flag of the local fan club of Santos.

The Red Bulls opened Red Bull Arena the same way they closed Giants Stadium, with a convincing victory in front of a cheering crowd.

Saturday night they christened their brand new stadium with a 3-1 victory over Santos FC of Brazil before 25,000 screaming fans in their final tune-up for the Major League Soccer season.

“I can’t put it into words,” said defender Mike Petke, who scored the second goal. “There came a point this week that I had to stop smiling and realize we had a game tonight. Â… Tonight was a special night. However, the season starts next week and that’s going to be a special night as well.”

The game was billed as a friendly but it was a heated match from the start with plenty of fouls, hard challenges on the ball and four yellow cards. Midfielders Carl Robinson (knee) and Dane Richards (hamstring) limped off with injuries for the Red Bulls, who were already playing without leading scorer Juan Pablo Angel, who sat out as a precaution with a knee injury.

Still, the victory enabled the Red Bulls to finish the preseason undefeated (7-0-3), quite a difference from the 5-19-6 record they finished up last season with.

“The second half, it’s difficult when you’re three up,” Red Bulls coach Hans Backe said. “At halftime, we said ‘Go for the fourth one. Don’t sit back and let them have possession,’ but it’s typical all over the world when you are two or three up something happens in the game and you sit back a little too much.”

It was difficult to tell which team the fans were rooting for. Whenever Santos had the ball the fans went wild as players dribbled through the Red Bulls defense, but whenever the Red Bulls scored a goal they cheered as well.

And at halftime, that was three times.

Joel Lindpere scored the first goal in Red Bull Arena, pouncing on the rebound of his own free kick to drive home a left-footer from 15 yards for a 1-0 lead just 11 minutes in.

Petke slipped in front on a corner kick and redirected a Tim Ream header into the net in the 43rd minute to make it 2-0. Richards increased the lead to 3-0 in the 45th minute on a 15-yard shot from the right that zipped into the upper left corner.

Santos, playing without leading scorer Robinho, who injured a thigh last weekend in a regular-season game in Brazil, had chances, but Red Bulls goalie Bouna Coundoul made some excellent saves and appears to have wrapped up the starting job. Greg Sutton was in net when Santos’ Germano scored in the 91st minute to ruin the shutout.

Petke, the franchise leader in appearances (153) and minutes (13,013), has heard talk of a stadium for years. When it never happened he figured it never would.

“After the six-week (groundbreaking) announcement starting in 1999 or 2000, it was six weeks away, six weeks away,” he recalled. “This last 10 years has been the longest six weeks of my life, and up until the point that ground was broken I wasn’t sure if it was ever going to happen. It was a great day for the New York franchise, MLS in general and soccer in this country.”

STT757
April 14th, 2010, 11:01 AM
It will be a cool concert venue, for 99% of touring acts the Meadowlands stadium is too big.

West Hudson
August 11th, 2010, 08:06 PM
After being on hold for more than three years, the Harrison Commons Project has sprung back to life today. Work re-started this morning as infrastructure crews began to wrap up work on underground utilities necessary for the Harrison Commons mini-city:

THE BEAST has AWOKEN!
10339

A set of pilings waits to be driven into the earth:
10338

Overview of the western portion of the site of Building 1:
10337

A second rig that was delivered to the site last week:
10340

ramvid01
August 17th, 2010, 12:12 AM
That's good to hear. I was at a Red Bull game earlier this year and was kind of surprised to see how completely baren this area is.

I also hope they start renovating the PATH station. It is way too undersized to accomidate not only the Red Bull crowds but also the future development if it gets off the ground.

West Hudson
August 18th, 2010, 10:26 PM
According to someone who works in the engineering/design division at the Port Authority, construction of the new station is about 5 years away (on hold; the PA still needs to acquire land for the station buildings and set aside the funds for doing so). However, the westbound stairwell will receive a completely new exterior in the interim to make it look a little more modern. I'll post renderings as soon as I can get my hands on them (side note: I'm wondering if one of the principals at the Pegasus Group bribed PA officials to get them start this interim replacement project...)