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JCMAN320
June 6th, 2003, 10:14 AM
Just curioius what is everyone's opinion of Hoboken?

dbhstockton
June 6th, 2003, 11:42 AM
Really cool city, getting outrageously expensive, constant parking shortage. *Lots of nice blocks of old brownstones. *Unofficial sixth borough, or is it seventh, after JC? *Really nice old train station. *Best views of Midtown anywhere. *Youthful, fun city, rapidly gentrifying and thus losing its edge to young stockbrokers. *Frank Sinatra's home town. *Moody, atmospheric industrial ruins. *
Maxwell's is a venerable music venue for up-and-comers, and is where Bruce Springsteen shot his "Glory Days" video.

(Edited by dbhstockton at 11:43 am on June 6, 2003)

NYatKNIGHT
June 6th, 2003, 12:25 PM
I lived there for a while after college, as did most of my friends. It was the perfect time to live there as there are SO many bars and young, beautiful girls walking around, plus it was affordable back then. And Greenwich Village is a ten minute PATH train away. One block I lived on was a not-yet-gentrified Italian neighborhood where I actually heard a lady yelling "Anthonyyyyyy!" out the window (like the Prince spaghetti commercials). GREAT pizza - as good as anywhere in New York. I loved it there, and occasionally still enjoy the restaurants and the many cool bars. It definitely has that less vibrant but neighborhoody outer-borough feel, obviously a little quieter than Manhattan for the most part, and safe. Parking is, and always has been, a living nightmare.

There are some beautiful blocks of brownstones, as dbh said, and still plenty of creepy projects back near the cliffs. Most of the redevelopment in the backstreets is successful and architecturally interesting, but I'm not crazy about the waterfront development aside from the fabulous new parks and piers.

Baseball's first officially recorded organized game was played there (by two New York clubs) at the Elysian Fields.

Zoe
June 6th, 2003, 01:22 PM
Developement is non-stop in Hoboken. *I agree that the waterfront office buildings are not so hot. *But the town will soon build a W hotel on the water and add another peir next to the one already there. *
Public transportation is getting better. *The PA approved funding to renovate the old Lackawana Ferry terminal. *The lightrail will open 2 new stops along the west-side of Hoboken in early 2004 and there is a new elevator structure they are currently building that will connect the 9th street lightrail stop to JC heights. *In that same area they are building out several new developments including a project called Village West. *That project will be along the lightrail and will be an artist community with several fountains, etc... *Obviously I now live there (but miss Astoria) and enjoy the neighborhoods. *It is extremely gentrified and probably the most Yuppie area in NJ.

Kris
June 7th, 2003, 08:11 PM
New tower and hotel: http://www.nytimes.com/2003/06/08/realestate/08NJZO.html

JCDJ
September 12th, 2003, 01:16 PM
Development finishes fast in Hoboken, one time I checked out skyscrapers.com and it listed one project as proposed, and before I knew it (or even saw any of the construction), I saw the real thing complete, one day when I looked in its direction.

STT757
September 13th, 2003, 03:23 PM
My Girlfriends father own a couple houses in Hoboken, when we get married we hope we can move into Hoboken.

Hoboken is like the City, more like the Village, but safer and smaller.

The night life is excellent in Hoboken, and there are more outside cafes on Washington street than I've seen anywhere in Manhattan.

It's getting expensive but it just adds to it's prestige.

The Lackawanna terminal is excellent, it's the second nicest rail facility after Grand Central.

Also the Port Authority is investing Hundreds of Millions in restoring the orginal ferry landings which will greatly expand the ferry service from Hoboken. Also NJ Transit connects Hoboken with many towns as far away as Port Jervis NY, Hopefully the proposes Lackawanna Cut-off project will get the go-ahead which will restore passenger rail service from Scranton PA to Hoboken.

http://hobokenterminal.com/webpix/hobokenferryslips.jpg

http://hobokenterminal.com/webpix/hoboken_waitingroom_night_small.jpg

http://hobokenterminal.com/photos/snowboken/snowboken_njt_4112_gp40ph-2_12-95_decesare.jpg

Zoe
September 28th, 2003, 12:29 PM
City and grassroots citizen's group file appeal to stop already-built buildings
Tom Jennemann - Hoboken Reporter
Reporter staff writer September 28, 2003

Both the City of Hoboken and a citizens' organization called the Hudson County Alliance have filed appeals of a dismissal of their suit against the developer of two 17-story towers at 101 Marshall St. on the city's southwestern border. The project is commonly referred to as the Gateway Towers.
Construction on the 326-unit high rise was approved by the city's Zoning Board in 1998 and construction began nearly a year and a half ago. Both towers now stand 17 stories tall, and construction of the exterior is nearly complete.
The plaintiffs argue that approvals for the project were given illegally, and that the tall towers will add to congestion and sewer problems.

Uphill fight continues
At this point, the odds of success are stacked against the city's and the HCA's appeal. The first obstacle is that the project was approved back in 1998, meaning that it is going to be exceedingly difficult to argue that the statute of limitations hasn't run out. Normally plaintiffs have one year to file.
The HCA continues to argue that because Jersey City, whose border is within 200 feet of the project, was never notified that the project was before the Planning Board, "the clock [for possible litigation] never started."
Jersey City had joined the HCA and Hoboken in earlier litigation, but has since dropped out after reaching a six-figure settlement with the developer, Gateway I LLC and Harrison Street Apartments.
The second thing working against the city is that Superior Court Judge Arthur D'Italia on August 21, 2002 threw the HCA, Jersey City and Hoboken's case out, and in his ruling scolded Hoboken, Jersey City and the HCA for filing years after the project was approved. In his ruling, the judge said that all parties involved failed to act "with due diligence and dispatch" an that even under "the most liberal" interpretation the city "slept soundly on its rights."
The judge added that stopping work would be an "onerous" hardship on the project's builder, which has received $58 million in bank loans to erect the buildings.
The final obstacle that faces the HCA and the city, and maybe the most obvious, is that the buildings are already built.
While there is a precedent of developers being forced to shave floors off the top of buildings, it's highly unlikely, according to one high-ranking city official, that any judge is going to make a developer tear down 326 units of already-constructed housing.

What's to gain
All of these factors beg the question to be asked, what is there to gain from appealing the approvals for a building that is already built?
One reason is to show current developers, and those who might want to develop in the future, that there are watchdog groups scrutinizing development closely.
"We still strongly feel the [Zoning Board and the North Hudson Sewerage Authority] were wrong and that still needs to be addressed," said Eric Volpe of the HCA. "We believe that it is important that court hears our arguments and rules on the legality of these approvals."
A second rationale for continuing litigation was presented by Councilwoman Carol Marsh. She said that the issues of legality and of possible remediation should be looked at separately.
"Let's first find out if these approvals were illegal," she said. "Then we can talk about what can be done." She added that the buildings being nearly finished shouldn't be a reason to stop litigation. If a wrong was committed during the approval process, it should be brought to light no matter where the construction is.
Neither the HCA's nor the city's appeal gives any suggestions as to what a possible remediation might entail. Also, both Marsh and Volpe both declined to speculate what might be an acceptable resolution if their appeal is successful.

History of the project
Foundation permits were granted in September of 2001 by the city of Hoboken for two 17-story towers at 101 Marshall St. The original zoning approval was granted in 1998. Developer Rene Abreu, the owner of several real estate, mortgage, and tax appraisal companies, submitted and got approval for the 17-story towers for one of his companies, Gateway 1 LLC. He sold the properties and the company and the company in 2001. In May 2002, Abreu was indicted by the U.S. Attorney's Office on charges of bank fraud, mortgage fraud, check kiting, money laundering and bribery of bank officials.
While 101 Marshall was not listed in the indictment, there were checks cited that were deposited into the accounts for "Gateway 1 LLC," which is the name of Abreu's company that was developing 101 Marshall. Those checks were dated before the sale of the property. The current owners are in no way related or linked to Abreu's alleged indiscretions.
Variances approved for the project in 1998 included parking height and lot coverage. Gateway was allowed to have a 17-story height and 100 percent lot coverage, while city ordinance stipulated a five-story building with only 60 percent lot coverage. Similarly, parking ordinances called for 484 off-street parking spaces, and the project got approval for only 431 spaces.
On July 1, 2002 litigation was initiated by the Hudson County Alliance (HCA), a local citizens' group, to stop construction. On July 9, 2002, both Hoboken and Jersey City joined the litigation. The lawsuit aimed to overturn the project's Zoning Board approvals and those from the North Hudson Sewerage Authority that will allow the builder of the project to connect the building to the city's sewer lines.
The buildings - which will feature 326 rental units, two restaurants, a health club, retail space and an enclosed seven-story garage - are nearly complete. The suit filed against the property owners named the Hoboken Zoning Board and the North Hudson Sewerage Authority as defendants. The Hoboken City Council and the HCA were co-plaintiffs along with Jersey City.
Members of the Hudson County Alliance have stated in previous reports that the organization's resistance to the project is due to both possible improprieties in securing variances and permits and also the traffic and flooding problems the complex may cause.
Property values are also at stake, as the 158-foot towers would obscure sight lines to Manhattan and New York Harbor from the Jersey City Heights neighborhood at the edge of the Palisades.
On August 21, 2002, Judge Arthur D'Italia dismissed nearly every count of the case. On Sept.5, 2003 the HCA filed its appeal with the state Appellate Court, and on Monday the city filed its appeal.

NYatKNIGHT
October 14th, 2003, 12:15 PM
Manhattan views from the Hoboken waterfront.

http://galleries.soaringtowers.org/albums/NYatKNIGHT/Waterfront1.sized.jpg

Downtown from Hoboken:
http://galleries.soaringtowers.org/albums/NYatKNIGHT/DowntownfromHoboken.sized.jpg

Reshaping the watefront:
http://galleries.soaringtowers.org/albums/NYatKNIGHT/waterfront2.sized.jpg

From Stevens Institute of Technology:
The Howe Center, superb views of the city high up on a cliff:
http://galleries.soaringtowers.org/albums/NYatKNIGHT/stevens.sized.jpg

http://galleries.soaringtowers.org/albums/NYatKNIGHT/Skyline1.sized.jpg

Waterfront soccer field:
http://galleries.soaringtowers.org/albums/NYatKNIGHT/soccer.sized.jpg

Marina
http://galleries.soaringtowers.org/albums/NYatKNIGHT/marina.sized.jpg

Midtown from the 13th Street pier:
http://galleries.soaringtowers.org/albums/NYatKNIGHT/pier13.sized.jpg

http://galleries.soaringtowers.org/albums/NYatKNIGHT/13StPierView.sized.jpg


Brownstones:
http://galleries.soaringtowers.org/albums/NYatKNIGHT/brownstones.sized.jpg


Train Station waiting room:
http://galleries.soaringtowers.org/albums/NYatKNIGHT/waiting_room.sized.jpg

STT757
October 15th, 2003, 12:51 AM
I Love Hoboken, and I love Hoboken Terminal. Great job with the interior shot, they are begining work to restore the outside of the terminal as well as the original ferry slips.

Should be awesome.

Gulcrapek
May 8th, 2005, 02:01 PM
Gruzen Samton is busy here..


1118 Adams Street
Mixed-use structures in Hoboken, New Jersey
461,165 Square Feet
Hoboken, New Jersey - 2005

http://www.gruzensamton.com/images/project_thumbs/Hoboken-Devleopment_Block_104_Rendering_1_2005t.jpg

Hoboken Northwest Development - Block 88
Mixed-use structures in Hoboken, New Jersey
461,165 Square Feet
Hoboken, New Jersey - 2005

http://www.gruzensamton.com/images/project_pops/Hoboken_Devleopment_Rendering_1_2003_p.jpg

Hoboken Northwest Development - Block 87
Mixed-use structures in Hoboken, New Jersey
461,165 Square Feet
Hoboken, New Jersey - 2005

http://www.gruzensamton.com/images/project_zooms/Hoboken_Northwest_Rendering_Block_87_1_2004_1.jpg

Hoboken Northwest Development - 1100 Adams Street
Mixed-use structures in Hoboken, New Jersey
461,165 Square Feet
Hoboken, New Jersey - 2005

http://www.gruzensamton.com/images/project_zooms/Hoboken_Property_Block_104_3D_Rendering.jpg


www.gruzensamton.com (http://www.gruzensamton.com/)

Ninjahedge
May 10th, 2005, 10:27 AM
A lot of the new development is dissapointing.

You have some of these really nice brownstones all over, and then you get these aluminum stud-wall pre-fab units growing like weeds all over the place and going for upwards of $600 a sf because they have marble countertops in the kitchen...

The general rule with most of these developments is to buy new and sell within 5 years before the window weatehrstripping starts to peel, or the pressboard cabinets start to "loosen".

It is a nice place to live (been there 8 years) but it has its own problems. Parking being one of them.

One of the hardest things to give up here will be the proximity of so many good restaurants within walking distance!

mluetke
September 2nd, 2005, 03:00 PM
I have a friend that just moved to NYC and got an apartment in Hoboken, New Jersey. Anyone ever been there? If so, anything fun to do there aside from going into the city?

I'd love to know!

ebrigham
September 2nd, 2005, 03:29 PM
I have only been a few times, but Hoboken definately has it's own nightlife that doesn't involve going into Manhattan. Restaraunts, bars, outdoor spaces, etc. Parking is a bitch though from what I have seen and heard...

ablarc
September 2nd, 2005, 05:02 PM
Parking is a bitch...
Forget parking. Hoboken has an excellent subway connection to Manhattan via PATH. It's also acessible by frequent ferry service.

Ninjahedge
September 2nd, 2005, 05:31 PM
Hoboken, never heard of it... ;)


Fun to do? Yes:

Hoboken Ski Club
Volleyball
Soccer (although I don't know where to sign up)
Bars all over the place.
Live music (some really good, the rest are covers)
FOOD!

But Hoboken is SO close to the village and central mid-town that you should have no problem getting around.



As for food, I reccomend these places in Hoboken:

Augustinos - Italian
Sri-Thai - Thai
Satay - malaysian
Arthurs - CHEAP steak
Helmers - Beer
Maxwells - New/Up and coming performers. So-so food
Baja - Mexican. Do NOT go to East LA.
Margharitas - PIZZA!!!!

And there are a few others.


www.kannekt.com has some listings.

jiw40
September 2nd, 2005, 05:56 PM
Dude,if your friend moved to New York City they would have an apartment in New York,not Hoboken,New Jersey.

NYatKNIGHT
September 6th, 2005, 10:21 AM
I merged this thread with a new one started by mluetke so there aren't two Hoboken threads.

STT757
September 6th, 2005, 05:09 PM
I have a friend that just moved to NYC and got an apartment in Hoboken, New Jersey. Anyone ever been there? If so, anything fun to do there aside from going into the city?

I'd love to know!

Personally I find Hoboken more fun than the City, Younger crowd with a Wall Street/Party College vibe.

STT757
September 6th, 2005, 05:16 PM
Hoboken, never heard of it... ;)

As for food, I reccomend these places in Hoboken:

Augustinos - Italian
Sri-Thai - Thai
Satay - malaysian
Arthurs - CHEAP steak
Helmers - Beer
Maxwells - New/Up and coming performers. So-so food
Baja - Mexican. Do NOT go to East LA.
Margharitas - PIZZA!!!!

And there are a few others.


www.kannekt.com has some listings.

Nirvana played Maxwells right before they hit it big with "Smells Like Teen Spirit". There's a band called Eugene based in Hoboken I like to see.

For food..

Precious (Chinese/Sushi)
East LA (Mexican)
Qadoba (Mexican fast food)
Tutta Pasta (Italian)
Malibu Diner
Benny Tedinos (Pizzaria)
Fiores (Mortadella Sandwiches)
Black Bear (Steak)
Chock Full of Nuts (Coffee/Pastry)


My favorite restaraunt that I took my Fiance all the time is/was Flavia which is a lite Italian Fare, however they have not been open the last couple times I was there but I hope they come back!.....

Schadenfrau
September 6th, 2005, 05:45 PM
Karma Kafe (forgive the queer name) is great for Indian:

http://www.karmakafe.com/

Also, Zafra is wonderful for Cuban:

http://www.hobokeni.com/zafra.asp

Ninjahedge
September 6th, 2005, 05:46 PM
Nirvana played Maxwells right before they hit it big with "Smells Like Teen Spirit". There's a band called Eugene based in Hoboken I like to see.

For food..

Precious (Chinese/Sushi) It is OK. I used to live across the street. And take it from my GF, there is no true Chinese outside of Chinatown...

East LA (Mexican) NONONONONO!!!!! It is Cockroach heaven! You go there to drink! They have a VERY bad cleanliness rap!

Qadoba (Mexican fast food) It's OK. MUCH better than TB and not owned by McD's (Chipolte)

Tutta Pasta (Italian) Um, no. Sorry, but that is NOT true italian. It is a chain. Saporitoes is better, although it is hard to understand the specials. Margharitas is good, Augustino's is GREAT, and Michelinas. Tutta is so-so.

Malibu Diner Diner, what can you say. If you have a car there are much better greasy spoons out on the highway. the greasiest I have been to beingthe Bendix Diner out on route 17 by route 46.

Benny Tedinos (Pizzaria) I have to agree, to a point. They have the best simple Jersey slice I have tasted in Hoboken. They are a genuine Italian Suburb pizzaria.

Fiores (Mortadella Sandwiches) I think I heard of that one. Is that teh one with the Au Jus sandwich specials twice a week? Pick your own bread?

Black Bear (Steak) Nah, they are a good burger bar. I used to hang out there almost every weekend, but they kinda tried to become a sports bar. Some of the specials are good, and it is a great place to get something like a beer and a sandwich and sit outside on a summer afternoon, but I would not call it the greatest for steaks.

Chock Full of Nuts (Coffee/Pastry) Hehehe. And I think Landmark had better coffee than StarPlucks, but that is just an opinion...


My favorite restaraunt that I took my Fiance all the time is/was Flavia which is a lite Italian Fare, however they have not been open the last couple times I was there but I hope they come back!.....

Flavia is OK, but very dry . they make things lite by not putting much on it that is fatty.

So it is great for a light pasta or bruchetta, but if you want a true Parmigana you need to go uptown.


Sorry for ranking on some of the places in your post STT, but I just had to offer my opinion on the places you commented on... ;)

STT757
September 6th, 2005, 09:55 PM
They are all good, I love Hoboken. Im getting married there in October '06, my fiance was born there and her father owns some properties on the West Side of Town . His business has a real driveway, where I can park for free when we visit:)

STT757
September 6th, 2005, 09:59 PM
Fiores (Mortadella Sandwiches) I think I heard of that one. Is that teh one with the Au Jus sandwich specials twice a week? Pick your own bread?.

That's the place, real old world sandwiches. I love the Mortedella but it comes back to haunt you after you eat it.

STT757
September 6th, 2005, 10:02 PM
One more place I forgot is City hall bakery, Carlo's.

They are doing our wedding cake.

The two best places in the tri-State area for Italian pastries are Mona Lisa Bakery in Dyker Heights Brooklyn and City Hall/ Carlo's bakery.

Zoe
September 6th, 2005, 10:24 PM
Here are a few other places to check out

Illusion
Trinity
House of Sushi
Pita Grill
OdeFellows (cajun)
Venue
Amanda's

Ninjahedge
September 7th, 2005, 09:09 AM
Here are a few other places to check out

Illusion Trendy, $$$

Trinity See above

House of Sushi Ubu, right across from The Sushi Bar, is better. Robongi on Washington gives you more food, but does not taste as good...

Pita Grill Decent, but weird. Not truly middle eastern, but reminiscent.

OdeFellows (cajun) Pretty good, but go on a weekday. Weekends are very yuppie-drinker-out-of-towner

Venue $$$$$!!!!!!!

Amanda's Very good, but also expensive. If you are going for expensive, you could also go to Frankie and Johnnies.


There are also a few Prix Fixe that are good as well at:

Amandas - Very small window of opportunity though.
Madison B+G
City Bistro

That is all I can remember now.


I do recommend Karma for indian though. Bombay West is not bad either.

And Cuban? get your butt to La Isla!

I just miss Carmalitoes! Charitoes is OK, but it is much more expensive, and ever since the owner "left" (He worked there all the time when it opened), the guys that are left are HORRIBLE at cleanup (I used to live above them).

Roaches in the hallway! Dragging leaking garbage through the foyer from the back to the front curb! Smoking and drinking IN THE HALLWAY!

When the boss is away, the kids will play.



Oh, outside the city, two places I have been to that are nice:

The Iron Monkey (remember the stupid ads?) - Fusion food of all sorts
Prestos - GREAT Italian at can't be beat prices.

There is also a pretty good , I think it is Korean place in JC right next to a decent Korean Grocery, and Fort Lee has a pretty good Kimchee/Soup place right near the GWB (parking is a beast, and the neighbor owns the lot across the street and gets pissey when people park there).

Anywho, GL!

(And I have to try out the bakery. I remember walking along, I think it was 1st or 2nd and smelling this small bakery, all in white tile, baking up some fresh breat one day. smelled so good!)

arbeiter
September 28th, 2005, 01:21 PM
My first place was in Hoboken when I moved to the NYC area. I *hated* it. Absolutely hated it.

Sure, the brownstones were pretty, the waterfront nice, and all of the asian-fusion restaurants palatable, but the people, my god, the PEOPLE!
These are the people who are either too scared to live in New York or too name-obsessed to live in Queens or Brooklyn, or Harlem or somewhere else. The town was so homogenous in the worst way possible. Hoboken types are generally one of the following:

1. the B.A. degree white girl from suburban philadelphia, suburban new jersey or somewhere else. likely went to villanova, northeastern, or another second-tier university. was probably in a sorority. sticks largely to manhattan west of 6th ave. if possible.

2. the frat-boy young wall street worker who only lives there to meet type 1. Can be seen starting fights at an overpriced bar where they serve beer in really large mugs with really large TV's showing really large football players.

Needless to say, I was neither, so I moved to Brooklyn and don't regret it. I didn't move to New York to live in a place like Hoboken... it was basically suburban Dallas with brownstones and a subway.

TLOZ Link5
September 28th, 2005, 01:24 PM
Needless to say, I was neither, so I moved to Brooklyn and don't regret it. I didn't move to New York to live in a place like Hoboken... it was basically suburban Dallas with brownstones and a subway.

Ouch.

TonyO
September 28th, 2005, 04:03 PM
My first place was in Hoboken when I moved to the NYC area. I *hated* it. Absolutely hated it.

Sure, the brownstones were pretty, the waterfront nice, and all of the asian-fusion restaurants palatable, but the people, my god, the PEOPLE!
These are the people who are either too scared to live in New York or too name-obsessed to live in Queens or Brooklyn, or Harlem or somewhere else. The town was so homogenous in the worst way possible. Hoboken types are generally one of the following:

1. the B.A. degree white girl from suburban philadelphia, suburban new jersey or somewhere else. likely went to villanova, northeastern, or another second-tier university. was probably in a sorority. sticks largely to manhattan west of 6th ave. if possible.

2. the frat-boy young wall street worker who only lives there to meet type 1. Can be seen starting fights at an overpriced bar where they serve beer in really large mugs with really large TV's showing really large football players.

Needless to say, I was neither, so I moved to Brooklyn and don't regret it. I didn't move to New York to live in a place like Hoboken... it was basically suburban Dallas with brownstones and a subway.

Tell us what you really think of Hoboken...

In all seriousness though, your description is basically on the money.

Ninjahedge
September 28th, 2005, 04:57 PM
You do not go to Hoboken for the people.

You forgot to mention the clique-ey nature of the town.


People are really nice when you start to break down the barriers, but that is hard to do. Most people come in with their own cadre of friends and do not bother looking for any more.

But if you wanted to meet some better people you had to follow some simple rules:

1. Do not go to ANY of the trendy bars.
2. Visit places like Scotland yard to listen to the blues
3. Try clubs or other social organizations
4. Talk to the LOCALS, not the ones that just moved in!!
5. Dont even try to get some open space at the parks on a nice weekend.
6. Visit NY a lot... ;)


I think I like it for a few reasons:

1. It is VERY close to work.
2. A LOT of places to eat, all within walking distance.
3. Nice brownstones.
4. Still close enough for me to easily drive to visit family.

But I do have to agree with you about the people. They seem to be mostly suburbanites coming into Hoboken right after college because it is a shorter commute with more bars, look for someone from the same genre, going out, getting hitched, having a kid and moving out when that kid turns 2.

;)

Morrissey
October 17th, 2005, 01:45 PM
I've visited Hoboken several times - and it definitely reminded me of Brooklyn. Your thoughts? I went to several open houses in Brooklyn and the price is more affordable and you definitely get more space.

Ninjahedge
October 17th, 2005, 02:06 PM
I've visited Hoboken several times - and it definitely reminded me of Brooklyn. Your thoughts? I went to several open houses in Brooklyn and the price is more affordable and you definitely get more space.

Depends on the area. Hoboken had a price boom with all the development running rampant (all you have to do is go back by 10th and Monroe and see the maze of 6 story plain jane condos that are going up.).

Brooklyn Heights compares very favorably to Hoboken, as well as other areas nearby. Park Slope is probably pretty close a comparison as well. There are even 2 or 3 blocks near the projects in Hoboken that remind me of areas of the OLD east village/Bed-Sty.

But it is hard to compare Brooklyn with Hoboken in that Brooklyn seems to have held itself together a little more. Depending on where you go, it is a little more crowded, but more neighborhood-y.

I don't know how else to describe it. I liked areas of both, quite frankly. And the Blues Fest in the Heights had me sold on BH. If it wasn't for the $$ I would be living there now!

Morrissey
October 17th, 2005, 03:55 PM
Depends on the area. Hoboken had a price boom with all the development running rampant (all you have to do is go back by 10th and Monroe and see the maze of 6 story plain jane condos that are going up.).

Brooklyn Heights compares very favorably to Hoboken, as well as other areas nearby. Park Slope is probably pretty close a comparison as well. There are even 2 or 3 blocks near the projects in Hoboken that remind me of areas of the OLD east village/Bed-Sty.

But it is hard to compare Brooklyn with Hoboken in that Brooklyn seems to have held itself together a little more. Depending on where you go, it is a little more crowded, but more neighborhood-y.

I don't know how else to describe it. I liked areas of both, quite frankly. And the Blues Fest in the Heights had me sold on BH. If it wasn't for the $$ I would be living there now!

What are your thoughts on SKY CLUB? i almost purchased a condo there

Ninjahedge
October 17th, 2005, 04:52 PM
Sky Club?

You would have to give me the addy on that one.

There are a lot of new things going up in the area, and it is hard to say which ones are better than others.

The GF and I bought the top floor of a Brownstone on Washington Street. Over 1200 SF, skylights, 10' ceilings, and (now newly replaced by us) hardwood floors.

I like it much better than the newer condos in many ways. The only downside is that we do not have a modern washer/dryer (we have a stacked electric) and that things like the whirlpool tub is also not included.

But, quite frankly, things like marble countertops and whirlpool tubs mean very little when it comes to a new place. Look at what the cabinets are constructed of (wood or pressboard). Take a look at the molding and see if they did it right, or if they just did it as fast as they could to meet deadline. Look for cracks at seams indicating insufficient rigidity (flexible structure, possible longterm damage/leaks/drafts).

Look at the windows. Hell, look at everything! I have seen so many "quick and dirties" in the new construction and the renovations it is not funny.

You may find something worth getting, but you really have to look hard!

Morrissey
October 18th, 2005, 09:32 AM
Sky Club?

You would have to give me the addy on that one.

There are a lot of new things going up in the area, and it is hard to say which ones are better than others.

The GF and I bought the top floor of a Brownstone on Washington Street. Over 1200 SF, skylights, 10' ceilings, and (now newly replaced by us) hardwood floors.

I like it much better than the newer condos in many ways. The only downside is that we do not have a modern washer/dryer (we have a stacked electric) and that things like the whirlpool tub is also not included.

But, quite frankly, things like marble countertops and whirlpool tubs mean very little when it comes to a new place. Look at what the cabinets are constructed of (wood or pressboard). Take a look at the molding and see if they did it right, or if they just did it as fast as they could to meet deadline. Look for cracks at seams indicating insufficient rigidity (flexible structure, possible longterm damage/leaks/drafts).

Look at the windows. Hell, look at everything! I have seen so many "quick and dirties" in the new construction and the renovations it is not funny.

You may find something worth getting, but you really have to look hard!

That's on first street and jackson i believe. i cancelled it because it was next to the projects and is not close to washington street.

when did you purchase the brownstone? how many bedrooms?

Ninjahedge
October 18th, 2005, 12:04 PM
Last year, 2BR (although it was 3 a while back. One of the previous owners tore down a wall).

I would look for some of the older ones before going for the new construction unless you are looking at a quick turnaround.

The pre-fabs only last about 5-7 years before needing replacements/repairs (or you start to see unsightly staining onthe facade and the like).


Also, I am hearing word of the makret slowing up a bit, places staying on the market longer or going off the market. So who knows what that means.

I do not see Hoboken really dropping in price, but a bubble flattening may be coming. Look for what you want, in your price range, and then jump on it.

And you are right about Jackson, it is a DIVE!

Morrissey
October 18th, 2005, 12:56 PM
Last year, 2BR (although it was 3 a while back. One of the previous owners tore down a wall).

I would look for some of the older ones before going for the new construction unless you are looking at a quick turnaround.

The pre-fabs only last about 5-7 years before needing replacements/repairs (or you start to see unsightly staining onthe facade and the like).


Also, I am hearing word of the makret slowing up a bit, places staying on the market longer or going off the market. So who knows what that means.

I do not see Hoboken really dropping in price, but a bubble flattening may be coming. Look for what you want, in your price range, and then jump on it.

And you are right about Jackson, it is a DIVE!

I guess about 8 months ago i was pretty adamant about moving to hoboken. I went to 14 open houses. but it just didnt work out. hence i am in murray hill now! i think in a 5-6 years i want to move to gramercy - you know when the prices are not as crazy!

macmini
December 1st, 2005, 05:22 PM
Hoboken rolls out W-elcome mat

Ground broken for luxury hotel to open in 2 years

Thursday, December 01, 2005By JARRETT RENSHAW


JOURNAL STAFF WRITER

HOBOKEN - The Mile Square City now has something in common with San Francisco, Seoul, Sydney, Barcelona and neighboring New York City.

Hoboken will become the next city to boast a luxury W Hotel following yesterday's groundbreaking ceremony on the city's southern waterfront.

The W Hoboken, a sleek, wedge-shaped, 25-story building, will feature 225 rooms plus 37 luxury condos with unobstructed views of the Manhattan skyline, and an upscale bar and spa. Condo owners will enjoy all the luxuries of hotel life, including 24-hour room service, a daily maid and concierge service. It is scheduled to open in fall 2007.

Hoboken-based Applied Development will develop and own the facility, but it will be operated by Starwood Hotels & Resorts Worldwide.

Local civic and political leaders proudly hailed the coming of the W Hotel as a historic and transforming event in the city's history.

"This is a great milestone in the history of the city, and it solidifies that Hoboken is one of the most favored destinations in the state of New Jersey," said Mayor David Roberts, one of the biggest supporters of the project over the years.

The ground-breaking attracted political leaders from all corners, including Hoboken resident Rep. Robert Menendez, who said the W Hotel's presence "exemplifies the city's enormous potential and all the great success it has already realized."

"It's giving us an icon on the waterfront," boasted City Council President Chris Campos.

Michael Barry, president of Applied Housing, said before yesterday that the $62 million hotel would itself bring the city more than 200 jobs, not including construction work, and that guests would spend roughly $100 in Hoboken per visit.

Rumors were buzzing at the press conference that one of W's newest tenants will be newly elected Governor and Hoboken resident Jon Corzine, whose spokesman refused to confirm or deny.

Menendez was asked if he thought about moving into one of the luxury condos, and replied: "I live on a public servant salary, I don't think I could afford to live there."

Although the W Hotel is still to be built, it has already attracted at least one entrepreneur.

"When I was looking for a site for my restaurant, I looked all over Hoboken, but I chose this spot because of the W Hotel," said Richard Browne, owner of Quays restaurant, located less than a block from the site.

Browne, like others, believes the W Hotel will draw some attention away from Washington Street and cast some light on the night life on River Street, where many upscale restaurants have found homes in recent years.

"It's a huge plus for us, and for the town," Browne said.

JARRETT RENSHAW can be reached at jrenshaw@jjournal.com

czsz
December 1st, 2005, 05:29 PM
But...but...why?

Talk about Hoboken's renaissance all you want, but it's no world cosmopolis and never will be.

Unless of course the W is just planning to "go Starbucks". In which case we'll probably see some pop up in places like Trenton and Bridgeport in no time.

Schadenfrau
December 1st, 2005, 05:39 PM
I think the W was sold recently, but that would have been after the construction on this started.

Still, the idea of a Hoboken W will never fail to crack me up. If anyone's the betting type, who'd like to wager against that being a HoJo's within three years?

Ninjahedge
December 1st, 2005, 06:11 PM
The plot was being discussed for about 3 years or more now.

I saw the tent set up on the way to work and I was wondering what sane person would have a wedding reception in a flooded construction site, then it hit me. This was the ground breaking.


Or, rather, the digging up of a shovelful of dirt that was just back-hoes and leveled to give a flat, dry place to stand.

Anyway, Hoboken has some great opportunities to make an entire riverside plaza from the large buildings it recently put up, but in the greed that is Development, they made only the riverside habitable. the other side is flush with the sidewalk. If they had just left the buildings first bay open it would have made a wonderful open atrium kind of feel, with large dining plazas all around the buildings.

Now all we get to do is look at people working out in Club H, Jos A Clothier, or Chase Bank (among others).

River Street should be named Canyon Street at the rate they are going. Aside from Castle Rock, there is not a single length of the Hoboken Waterfront that is not, or planned to be, blocked by mid-hi rise structures.

It is good to build new stuff, but they just saw the $$ and not the long term impact.....

Ninjahedge
December 1st, 2005, 06:14 PM
I think the W was sold recently, but that would have been after the construction on this started.

Still, the idea of a Hoboken W will never fail to crack me up. If anyone's the betting type, who'd like to wager against that being a HoJo's within three years?

As cynical as I am, I would wager against it.

have you been to Hoboken recently? I realize you are exaggerating to be sarcastic, but the average place there is now going for a bundle and the overall affluence of the area is above most of Queens and large sections of Brooklyn.

It is also close to a central rail station, and has what might be a direct link to Newark Airport without having to be located in Raritan.

Please do us a favor Schade and make fun of the "wholesome" Hoboken city hall rather than NJ in general...... ;)

Schadenfrau
December 1st, 2005, 06:29 PM
I'm not making fun of Hoboken. I've certainly spent time there and the place has its own charm.

However, charm doesn't translate into tourists wanting to spend $400 a night on a hotel room, only to have to schlep it on the PATH the next day.

Ninjahedge
December 1st, 2005, 06:32 PM
That's why they have the ferries.....


I can see them spending $$ to be in Hoboken, MUCH better view of NYC, but looking at the $$ of the restaurants and clubs that opened up along the riverside, I think that $400 a night is a little expensive too.

There has got to be a line somewhere between Luxury and Motel 6.....

(PS, that post was a little unclear.... I do agree with you Schade.... Hoboken is nice, but not Luxury. I guess that is just where the Mayor will have all his friends stay when they come to visit... ;) )

Schadenfrau
December 1st, 2005, 06:45 PM
Middleground, thy name is HoJo's.

Seriously, please don't think I'm mocking Hoboken, but the town is not built to house a W hotel. A great record store, sure. Nice restaurants, of course. Lots of bars? Indeed.

The only market I can imagine for something like that would be entry-level bankers who've got college buddies visiting from out of town. And even then, former frat brahs are not known for turning their noses up at a couch.

Schadenfrau
December 1st, 2005, 06:46 PM
I just read your last post and have to say, finally: we agree on something.

RandySavage
December 1st, 2005, 08:08 PM
The hotel will have more impressive views than any Manhattan hotel... I lived in Hoboken years ago and commuted by Ferry... the hudson view of the Manhattan skyline (which will only get better with BofA, NYT, FT, etc.) never fails to impress.

Schadenfrau
December 1st, 2005, 08:42 PM
But who stays in a hotel for a skyline?

An apartment I can understand, but visitors want to go out.

Ninjahedge
December 2nd, 2005, 09:03 AM
But who stays in a hotel for a skyline?

An apartment I can understand, but visitors want to go out.

I think they will not be able to get what they want out of it unless they get a major presence from places liek Goldman Sachs and JP Morgan (I believe they are both in JC now).

THAT would be the money maker, as I do not see too many hotels springing up in JC.

If JC can build up more like a downtown Brooklyn, Hoboken can easliy be compared to a Brooklyn Heights.


But now? $400?

I agree, too much for a night in NJ.

JCMAN320
December 2nd, 2005, 02:39 PM
Jersey City will be at that level soon. Once we complete all the artist housing in Powerhouse Art District which has almost been completed and we have the artists move in 2006, it will be a step in the right direction. Also, with the money going to and around Newark and Grove St. right now, it will only be a matter of time.

As for the hotel issue, the last one we have built is the Hyatt on the waterfront which usually houses sports teams when they come to Jersey and other celebrities. On top of that, we have Candlewood Suites, Doubletree, and the Courtyard Marriot. There are plan for two more hotels to go up in Downtown JC. One in the Liberty Harbor North development on Marin Blvd., possibly Sheraton or Hilton and one at the corner of Sixth and Washington Blvd., built by Newport Development. Also there possibly might be a third in the Powerhouse Art District.

Trust me I think the W Hotel would have been more appropriate here somewhere by Paulus Hook or by the Grove St. PATH.

http://jerseycityvibe.com/index.php?option=com_content&task=blogsection&id=5&Itemid=63

I'm really sry didn't mean to get off topic.

czsz
December 2nd, 2005, 07:00 PM
This is the problem. Once Hoboken gets a W every little resurgent burg thinks it's entitled to one.

Zoe
December 2nd, 2005, 10:17 PM
There are no other hotels near. The residents of Hoboken have been waiting for a place in-town to have people be able to come and visit and stay at a hotel (you only have room for so many people, like during the holidays). Every woman I know in Hoboken is excited to finally be able to have a shower or some other function there.
I'm not sure who you all know from Hoboken, but almost every person I know here is well off. Many more millionaires live here than you think.

Zoe
December 2nd, 2005, 10:27 PM
Oh, but I agree it will not be $400 a night. My guess, low three hundreds...

millertime83
December 5th, 2005, 12:51 AM
W Hotel
http://www.gwathmey-siegel.com/projects/architecture/corporate_projects/whotel/images/thumbs/w_hobo_r01.jpg
http://www.gwathmey-siegel.com/projects/architecture/corporate_projects/whotel/images/pop-ups/w_hobo_r03.jpg

czsz
December 5th, 2005, 01:18 AM
That's quite the photorealistic rendering. Not the most imaginative building, but handsome nonetheless.

Ninjahedge
December 5th, 2005, 08:35 AM
You see that road behind it?

It is called River Street. many are getting pissed though and think it should be called "Hoboken Canyon".

TimmyG
December 5th, 2005, 09:19 AM
Is that building to the left (south) of the hotel actually being planned, or is it just space filler for the rendering?

Ninjahedge
December 5th, 2005, 04:00 PM
It is being planned, but I do not know of any solid construction plans.

They were talking about it being exactly like the other two, but three flourescent pyramids would be a little much for me.... :P

STT757
December 17th, 2005, 12:15 PM
In the Region | New Jersey
A Destination Hotel for Hoboken

Published: December 18, 2005
AS Hoboken continues its notch-by-notch niche-by-niche climb from slummy to sophisticated, this month's groundbreaking for a 25-story W Hotel on the refurbished waterfront has to be counted as another significant step.

The stylish new W beside the Hudson River will be Hoboken's one and only major hotel. None survive from the dockside city's less refined past, and city officials have been pressing to get a new one built for nearly a decade. The W is to open next fall.

With 225 first-class rooms, 40 elegant hotel residences and a signature array of amenities, the W Hoboken is expected to zoom to the four-star status now enjoyed by only one other hotel in New Jersey, the Short Hills Hilton - and add new credibility to Hoboken's claim to cutting-edge cachet.

"The city has gone from a place known for its college-age bars," with their stereotypical excesses, "to becoming the height of a hip urban scene," said John Avoletta, proprietor of Lua, a sleek restaurant and bar fronting the Hudson River that opened last year.

Only four years ago, there were not yet any restaurants or nightspots beside the river, but now there is a row of very nice establishments, Mr. Avoletta's Lua among the nicest.

"We have begun focusing on a more mature and discriminating clientele," he said, "and the W will be a terrific addition to the scene."

The W brand, begun in 1998 with the opening of the first W New York, now operates in 20 cities - 16 in the United States and one each in Australia, Canada, South Korea and Mexico. Ross A. Klein, president of the hotel company, which is owned by Starwood Resorts and Hotels Worldwide Inc., said hotels are currently in various stages of construction in Las Vegas, Hollywood, South Beach, Phoenix, Vieques and Barcelona. The W Maldives-Fesdhu, W's first resort, is scheduled to open in next June.

Hoboken is a little city, just a mile square, with only about 40,000 residents. But it is ready for the big time, in Mr. Klein's view.

"We do not see the W in Hoboken as a case of us taking an urban-city product and installing it in a suburb," Mr. Klein said. "We consider it to be a world-class property in the same way as we think of W's in London, Hong Kong, Dallas and Denver."

At the same time, Mr. Klein said he thinks it is "neat" that the W chain is creating a hotel just across the river from Manhattan that will face "the city of its birth."

Michael Barry, a principal of the Applied Development Company, the hotel's builder, noted that the building is designed to provide maximum views of the New York skyline. The wedge-shaped structure, designed by Gwathmey Siegel & Associates Architects of Manhattan, will be angled on its site near the Hoboken PATH and ferry stations so that huge bay windows will provide a panoramic view of Manhattan from all of the higher floors.

The tall slim tower will rise well above adjacent office buildings put up by SJP Properties during commercial development of the waterfront several years ago. Its gleaming metal-and-glass surfaces will provide a contrast to the traditional brick-and-masonry look of the city.

The hotel residences - featured in all newer W hotels - will occupy the top nine floors and have views north and south along the river.

The two-, three- or four-bedroom residences, which will have prices starting around $1.5 million, according to Mr. Barry, will offer all the amenities and services attached to a hotel stay: a striking lobby with a street-level bar, a fine restaurant, a shopping area, a glamorous upstairs bar, a Bliss spa, ballroom facilities and "Whatever, Whenever" concierge service.

Mr. Klein said that the hotel chain has discovered that its business draws as much from local communities as from travelers.

"We find a lot of people using our properties as weekend homes - urban escapes with great dining and lounges and the Bliss spa," he said. "We try to keep W exciting, so you can always find something to intrigue and delight you." Mr. Klein said he recently dropped into one of the two New York W's - they are at Union Square and Times Square - and was tickled to see a special on "manly-cures" at the spa.

The W Shop at the hotel offers spa products for sale, as well as items used in furnishing the rooms: down comforters, linens, piqué bathrobes, slippers, etc.

Mr. Klein talked of his hotel's becoming a cornerstone in Hoboken, and Mr. Barry predicted it would become an icon for residents on both sides of the Hudson. The president of the Hoboken City Council has already taken to referring to the skyscraper as "Hoboken's exclamation point," Mr. Barry said.

"The building will give New York something exciting to look at," he said, "and locally, people can look at it and think: 'Wow! This is Hoboken!' "

http://www.nytimes.com

pianoman11686
December 17th, 2005, 06:16 PM
Rendering of the hotel from the same article:

http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2005/12/18/realestate/18njzo.jpg

TimmyG
January 19th, 2006, 07:28 PM
I was by the W Hotel site in Hoboken today. It looks like they are getting ready to do foundation work. There was also a sign up showing a rendering of the building there that will be next to the hotel. Thankfully, no pyramid on the top of it.

Ninjahedge
January 20th, 2006, 08:37 AM
I was by the W Hotel site in Hoboken today. It looks like they are getting ready to do foundation work. There was also a sign up showing a rendering of the building there that will be next to the hotel. Thankfully, no pyramid on the top of it.

I walk by it twice a day on the way to and from work.

They had two large stacks of things on the site for a while. I guess that was for surface consolidation/compaction, but I am not sure. Also, it looks like they have a bunch of standpipes and a few trial piers (probably site survey, checking blow count and water table levels).

I just wish they would start already. It is just collecting garbage now.....

macmini
January 24th, 2006, 04:27 PM
The most exciting culturally anchored, transit-based, mixed-use community in Hoboken’s hottest market is yours to call home.
Immediately adjacent the 9th Street/Congress Street NJ Transit Light Rail Station and the core of Hoboken’s bourgeoning Northwest sub-market; Monroe Center is a luxury mixed-use development project with 435 condominiums, 125,000 square feet of retail, 1,120 parking spaces and the internationally renowned Monroe Center for the Arts. Monroe Center offers city living with a softer edge™. Features include stunning views of NYC, an emphasis on the arts, ample open space, rooftop gardens, a sense of community, and the charm of Hoboken.

http://www.monroecenter.com/images/residences-photo.jpg
ABOUT TO BREAK GROUND? The developers of the Monroe Center believe that their artist friendly and transit-accessible project will attract area home buyers.

Monroe Center Development, LLC is ready to break ground on Jan. 27 on a high-rise condominium tower at 800 Monroe St.
This will ultimately be part of a 435-unit development on a 5.5-acre site just steps from the Ninth Street stop of the Hudson Bergen Light Rail.

Not only is this one of the largest projects in the city, it is also one of the most ambitious. Just a decade ago the city's west side was filled with blighted and underutilized properties. But with Hoboken's real estate boom, and the western alignment of the Hudson Bergen Light Rail, the conditions were right for construction.
The developers hope to create a mixed use transit village, with condos, restaurants and shopping, while supporting and bolstering the local artist community.

Nuts and bolts

When completed, the Monroe Center project, which will be built between Seventh and Ninth streets on Monroe and Jackson streets, will include four high-rise residential buildings of between 10 and 13 stories, with ground floor retail, commercial arts space, and mezzanine space. The residential component will be built in several phases.
On Jan. 27, the developers are scheduled to break ground on the 123 unit tower at 800 Monroe St. This building will take between 16 and 18 months to complete, said the developers.

In addition, two former industrial buildings at 700 Monroe St. which house the Monroe Center for the Arts' office and loft spaces, theaters and galleries, are being completely renovated.
The total project also will include be 125,000 square feet of retail space.
Dil Hoda, the managing partner of the development team, added that he is looking forward to finally starting construction. "When we started out, many people this property was really far out on the west side of the city," Hoda said. "But now it's an area that is blossoming."

Artists and small businesses

Already underway is the renovation of the interior of the existing Monroe Center for the Arts at 720 Monroe St. Since opening in 1990, the converted Levelor Blinds Factory has maintained an eclectic mixture of businesses that now include ad agencies, interior designers, cake bakers, architects, toy makers, dance instructors, and yoga studios.
Over the years, the Monroe Center has gained the reputation for attracting some of the city's best artists and most innovative small businesses and entrepreneurs.

Currently, 95 percent of the 110,000 square feet of office space located within the center is being leased by 70 artists and 130 small businesses.

Hoda said that featuring the artists will helps everyone involved. "[The condo owners] will have full access to all of these services. Imagine being able to walk next door to take lessons from a Julliard-trained musician, or take a pottery or dance class. But the artists also benefit because they have a new customer base just steps way," Hoda said.

The new construction of the project will also include seven new artist work and live loft spaces, a two-screen independent movie theater, and a public open area with outdoor performance space.
An 'urban transit village'

Another selling point, said Hoda, is the project's location. Hoda said that because of the property's proximity to the light rail, this project will be a good example of the "smart growth" principle of a "transit friendly community."
A transit village is a state-promoted planning initiative to redevelop and revitalize communities around transit facilities, making them appealing choices for people to live in, while lessening their reliance on cars.
More than required parking

In Hoboken, parking is always an issue, and this is one of the few projects that will provide more parking spaces than the zoning requires. When fully built out, the project will have 1,120 garage parking spaces to complement the surrounding off-street parking.

Park space

According to the developers, outdoor areas at Monroe Center will include one large plaza with stylistic fountains, seating decks and a "hammock park." Each new building at the community will also feature rooftop gardens. "Monroe Center's appeal as a destination will be enhanced by its substantial outdoor public areas," points out Gerard Saddel, a partner of Monroe Center Development, LLC. "A series of public parks and a plaza will be scattered throughout the entire development."
According to the developers, condominiums will run between $450,000 and $1.5 million, and they expect to have a Web site and sales office open in the next month or so.

JCMAN320
January 24th, 2006, 08:33 PM
This is where Hoboken fails to be a good neighbor and becomes pig headed and self-centred. Those towers better not be taller than the Palisades of the JC Heights above. JC has been trying to fight these stupid towers and Hobokens pompus mayor shurggs us off. Hoboken already f'd around with us with the those ugly towers near the 2nd Street Light-Rail station (which is in JC not Hoboken, they just try to make it their own, same as the 9th/Congress St. Lightrail station but atleast they included the Heights St. where the elevator goes to). Hoboken has some nerve they are not good neighbors at all. Again JC is still fighting to get those towers lower than the Palisades if they aren't already.

macmini
January 24th, 2006, 11:26 PM
Sorry JCman I have to disagree with you why should people in the Heights be guaranteed views of NY. Alot of people in Downtown JC had views of NY before they started building 40 to 50 storey buildings. If it's any body being pigheaded it's people from the Heights. Think of the people who are going to buy at Trump Plaza who are paying 1mil + for their great views. Who don't know if Harborside 7 is built their views are gone no one is guranteed a view.

Ninjahedge
January 25th, 2006, 09:12 AM
Sorry JCman I have to disagree with you why should people in the Heights be guaranteed views of NY. Alot of people in Downtown JC had views of NY before they started building 40 to 50 storey buildings. If it's any body being pigheaded it's people from the Heights. Think of the people who are going to buy at Trump Plaza who are paying 1mil + for their great views. Who don't know if Harborside 7 is built their views are gone no one is guranteed a view.

I partially agree with both of you on this.

I hate the "great wall of Hoboken" that is being built along River/Sinatra/Whatever they want to call it today, but at the same time, they have been doing this for a while on a lot of projects.

Also, somehow Hoboken should be the one made to feel guilty about building up when places like the Galaxy, the Doric and other multistory high rises have already been built OVER the edge of the Pallisades, blocking EVERYONE'S view behind them?

I do agree that they should try to keep hoboken's skyline below the pallisades if for one reason, keeping them visible to all, rather than building up. But calling Hoboken pompous while downtown JC is trying to be the next Downtown Brooklyn, especially with high rises built ON the water, is not exactly fair.

JCMAN320
January 25th, 2006, 11:49 AM
Mac they shouldn't be sacrificed up there. What the hell did they do. That view has been there for centuries. The Palisades have been there since prehistoric times and the Heights has grown there over hundred years. So just because they are up there and "out of the way" that they should be spurned, I think not. I undertsand with Downtown but if you know anything about JC history where all those highrises were were rail yards and terminals and warehouses. So the people may have had the view from Grove and Newark, but they couldn't even get to the waters edge with out risking their lives. The waterfront has always been a reflection of the national economy. Back in the day it was industrial and in todays worlds it service jobs.

Ninja the highrises aren't built ON the water as you put it, they are built on the land that was once occupied by railyards and factories. Long Island City is starting down the same course as we did. When we were building it was building up a new economy when our city was in crisis and it just snowballed. I'm not saying Hoboken can't have a skyline, it think it's awesome. But right at the base of the Palisades is pushing the limit. I also agree that Guttenburg and West New York ruined their section of the Palisades.

Ninjahedge
January 25th, 2006, 03:07 PM
I am talking about that monolith right at waters edge.

If that is not on the water, I do not know how you could get any closer without pontoons.

And yes, I have also worked on the design of several of the buildings that have gone up ON the piers, so I know what "on the woter" means literally.

Also, it still does not address the Doric, or the one building a bit further up, or the Galaxy, all high rises built not only on the edge of teh pallisades, but over them, constructing ugly scaffolding all over the side.

And then there are the popcorn condos going up all over the waterfront which do not block the view of the pallisades, but do mar their original stark profile.

I guess what I am saying JC is try not to demonize any one municipality. That never gets things done and only starts a fight. ;)

JCMAN320
January 25th, 2006, 03:28 PM
Yea i agree the Dorifc and Galaxy and Troy towers suck. I still long for the day that they get torn down. I hear ya us Jerseyans especially in Hudson County have to stick together. :)

TimmyG
March 1st, 2006, 01:25 PM
I hope the city council votes against using eminent domain on this factory. Aside from all the arguments for/against this type of eminent domain, Hoboken doesn't really need another block of apartments that will probably be exactly the same as all the other buildings put up on the west side of town.

Hoboken factory sits in city's crosshairs

HOBOKEN - D. Kwitman & Son is one of the last vestiges of the Mile Square City's industrial past.
But the factory - which has produced drapes and other home furnishings for the past 23 years - may soon be on its way out as the City Council is expected to vote tonight on whether to use the power of eminent domain to take the property, as well as a neighboring self-storage facility, and turn it over to condominium developer Ursa/Tarragon.
The Kwitman factory sits on a quiet cobblestone stretch of Grand Street near 10th Street in what was once an area of vacant and abandoned factories and warehouses.

In 1998, a 20-block area that included the old factory was condemned and slated for redevelopment by Ursa/Tarragon, which aims to build a six-story, 150-unit building with one level of parking. In return, the developer offered givebacks including open space, a supermarket, 200 units of affordable housing and a community center and swimming pool.
City officials say they have no choice but to honor the deal or face mounting legal challenges.

"This was not the dream of the developers; this was the dream of a community advisory panel," said Councilman Michael Cricco. "The agreement was done in 1998 and the town already appreciated the reward from the plan."

But some area residents say what seemed like a no-brainer a decade ago now has to be rethought given Hoboken's red-hot real estate market.
"This area is hardly in need of economic development," said Thomas Pini, a Grand Street resident who blasted the city's plan at a public meeting held last week. "I have a great problem with two viable businesses being seized by the government and turned over to developers."

Harold Kwitman, whose family has owned the business for 70 years, said if he's forced to sell, he will likely reopen in another location. However, he doesn't know where or when, and he worries some of his several dozen employees won't be able to follow him.

"The government and real estate developers are in a close relationship, and unfortunately this is the way it is," Kwitman said.

Ninjahedge
March 1st, 2006, 03:16 PM
ONE parking level?

What frigging planet are they coming from?

They need at least 2 if you have 6 floors of residential above it!!!!


hell, I am in favor of developing these things, but you have to make sure that it does not make life harder for everyone else around it just because the developers are too greedy to build a functional attractive living space!

TimmyG
March 1st, 2006, 06:00 PM
Originally Posted by Ninjahedge: They need at least 2 if you have 6 floors of residential above it!!!!
I think the six floors listed in the article includes the parking level (1 level of parking, 5 of housing). That would match the design of the other buildings in the area.

TimmyG
March 3rd, 2006, 09:59 AM
Hoboken Council greenlights seizure of two businesses



Friday, March 03, 2006 By BONNIE FRIEDMAN

JOURNAL STAFF WRITER
HOBOKEN - The City Council introduced an ordinance Wednesday to use eminent domain to seize two businesses on Grand Street and turn them over to a condominium developer, angering area residents who say the 150-unit building will destroy the character of the block.

"We purchased the condo specifically because it's a quiet neighborhood," said Maxie Plant, who lives across the street from the two properties. "By constructing a massive complex, it will extremely alter the character of the neighborhood."

The two properties - a factory and a self-storage facility - sit in the Northwest Redevelopment Zone, a 20-block area that runs from Seventh Street at the western edge of the city to the 14th Street Viaduct. In 1998, when the city approved the redevelopment plan, the area was overrun with vacant factories and warehouses.
Eight years later, the northern part of the city is rife with development, leaving many to wonder how the city can justify taking the property for the economic good of the city.
"We do understand that the plan was put into place eight years ago," said Grand Street resident Rick Hemmer. "We appreciate that fact, but things have changed."

City officials say they have no choice but to honor the redevelopment plan because the city has already realized benefits from the developer, Ursa/Tarragon.

In exchange for redevelopment rights to several parcels within the district, Ursa/Tarragon offered give-backs, including 200 units of affordable housing, open space, and a supermarket. The developers have also promised to build a community center and a swimming pool.

"It would be easy to say, 'let's not do it,'" said Councilman Michael Cricco. "But we are trying to do something right, and to do that we have to follow through with the process."

Stuart Deutsch, the dean of Rutgers Law School-Newark, said the law does not specifically address how long a redevelopment plan can remain in place.
"That is one of the questions unanswered in Kelo," said Deutsch, referring to the recent Supreme Court case that reaffirmed the government's right to hand over private property to developers as long as it provides for the public good.

Mark Settembre, a principal of Ursa/Tarragon, tried to allay residents' concerns at a meeting last week, promising to keep the style of the building in line with the architecture of the neighborhood and to preserve the cobblestone streets and trees.

"We have no problem designing it like a factory building," Settembre said. "But the buildings have to come down. This is part of a contract we made with the city and we have to fulfill it."

While all nine council members voted to introduce the ordinance, Councilman Peter Cammarano said his mind is not yet made up.
"I have concerns at the general level about the city using its eminent domain power to accomplish what we are trying to accomplish here," Cammarano said. "I am sympathetic to business owners who don't want to go out of business. I can't say we are not listening to their concerns."

Harold Kwitman, owner of D. Kwitman and Son, which has manufactured drapes and home furnishings in Hoboken for 23 years, said he does not want to relocate his business, which employs several dozen workers.
"I'm not thrilled," he said. "The cost to move is expensive and the cost to find a new place is expensive. I own the property outright and I can't even develop it myself. I can only sell it to one person."

Ninjahedge
March 3rd, 2006, 02:09 PM
I think the six floors listed in the article includes the parking level (1 level of parking, 5 of housing). That would match the design of the other buildings in the area.

Tim, I live there.

The other buildings in the area made the parking situation worse, not better.

Therefore, they should be building places, especially LARGE places, with more parking capacity than the TOTAL anticipated resident load. (IOW, Hoboken is filled with people between 25 and 40 years old. A lot of them meet someone and move in together in this area before they move out. Most have cars. So even a 1 unit to 1 parking space ratio is not enough. But I believe the current ratio required for building is some small 1 for every 2 or something similar.)

So the current regulations, and current building scheme does not work, therefore it should not be used as the standard for other structures being built in the area.

Ninjahedge
March 3rd, 2006, 02:11 PM
The two properties - a factory and a self-storage facility - sit in the Northwest Redevelopment Zone, a 20-block area that runs from Seventh Street at the western edge of the city to the 14th Street Viaduct

I hate to say it, but this area is not quiet, really. It is on the edge of the popcorn development going on around ShopRite.

Go for a walk around there and see how much neighborhood it will ruin.

The only thing that would be able to make that area worse would be flaming clown ninjas.

NYatKNIGHT
March 3rd, 2006, 04:04 PM
I agree, they blew it with this one.

kitchie
March 7th, 2006, 08:55 PM
Hoboken is a nice place. If you want to spend time at ease there are great clubs by night and the crowd is great. Lots of pretty girls and of course lets talk about the food...pizzas are superb! They are right it is a much quieter place than Manhattan. :)

ablarc
March 8th, 2006, 07:27 AM
Lots of pretty girls
You ain't kidding! Where do they all come from?

Ninjahedge
March 8th, 2006, 08:56 AM
I will tell you one thing though. Most of them do not go out at night. I think they are werewolves or something.

If you want those women, you will have to go to the more expensive bars, or listen for dance, but not heavy dance music.

If they do not have a cosmo/martini menu then you will probably not find the Homo Yuppieus females in attendance ;)

Oh, the pizza is great. Grimaldis out on 1st (I think) is excellent thin pizza. I reccomend the basil and Mozz. Fillipos is decent. There are two of them (different guys). One on 1st again, and the other is up by 4th and Washington. Brnny Tudinos is great too, up near 5th-6th on Washington. And a great Super-Pizza can be had at Margharitas on the corner of 8th and Wash.


I would avoid Dominos (obviously) and an islamic pizza joint called 7 star (REALLY BAD!!!!). But there are still so many little places in there to find that you would like.


As for that back area, latest word is that it is going to be mostly residential and "6 restaurants". What a waste. We do not need any more restaurants. We need more mall-space (And I mean traditional outdoor shopping plazas and the like). All we have now is main street wiich is 90% realty agencies, cell phone stores, restaurants and bars.

Oh, word is also out on the Toll Brothers website about their development at MAxwell Place (right around the corner from me). They are selling, with no details on the SF, 1 bedroom places for a half mil and 2 bedroom for $900K.

It is rediculous. Luxury my butt!!!!

macmini
March 11th, 2006, 07:49 PM
It is rediculous. Luxury my butt!!!!
If you think thats rediculous Ninjahedge then I'm sure you'll be happy to know that one bedrooms with direct views of NY are going for 700,000 - 800,000. An 2bd are well over 1mil and taxes for some units 12k but from the renderings it looks nice.

http://maxwellplace.com/media/residences/landscape_aerial.jpg

ablarc
March 11th, 2006, 08:12 PM
http://maxwellplace.com/media/residences/landscape_aerial.jpg
Big, fat clunkers. Ought to be mix of slender towers and lower-rise on small footprints.

Elephantine. I bet the NIMBYs don't like them, and I bet they're the NIMBYs' children.

Marv95
March 12th, 2006, 04:09 PM
Hoboken is expensive but nice, on the east side of town. You go toward the projects by Jackson Street, totally different story.

ablarc
March 12th, 2006, 04:17 PM
^ Isn't it time they tore those down?

JCMAN320
March 12th, 2006, 04:31 PM
^Why so no one can afford to live in Hoboken. Just for the super rich. I hope they replace them with affordable housing so those people can still enjpy Hoboken.

Ninjahedge
March 31st, 2006, 01:18 PM
If you think thats rediculous Ninjahedge then I'm sure you'll be happy to know that one bedrooms with direct views of NY are going for 700,000 - 800,000. An 2bd are well over 1mil and taxes for some units 12k but from the renderings it looks nice.

http://maxwellplace.com/media/residences/landscape_aerial.jpg

Well, take that view, go left a block, and that is where I live.

I have been watching this develop since day one. +/-$900K for a 2BR.

They are already pre-ordered out by a bunch of real estate peeps who wnat to flip. I hope they all get burned.

Ninjahedge
March 31st, 2006, 01:26 PM
^Why so no one can afford to live in Hoboken. Just for the super rich. I hope they replace them with affordable housing so those people can still enjpy Hoboken.

Oh, you mean like the Church Towers. The rent controlled low income housing that has a parking lot with Cadillacs and Lexus's just sitting there for the poor minimum wage workers to drive to work in?

The projects themselves are very bad. 7 foot fences all around the lawns so that people do not, well, use them. They made the same mistake they do with all projects. They stuck them all together. It is like day and night if you drive through Hoboken over in that section.

The best way to encourage and assimilate these people is make them feel like they belong rather than they are entitled to something they aren't. Build the projects, but make them comparable to the surrounding area AND make them more dispersed so as to not isolate and segregate them from the rest of the town.

There are other things that could be done, but not on a city level (such as only offering these places to people who help construct them ala houses for humanity, etc etc).

People have a tendency to appreciate things more when they have to work to get them, not when they are given to them, and that goes for all socioeconomic classes, not just the poor.

But that is off the subject.

Bottom line: The projects suck, they are too isolated and only concentrate the disparity. The suckiness is not the fault of the people living there, although they DO contribute to it (most of the car damage, such as smashed mirrors, broken antennas, key-ing and the like are from teens in these projects) the main cause of the deplorable situation is the town of Hoboken, and probably Hudson county, for their typical myopic way of "helping" the poor.

czsz
March 31st, 2006, 06:38 PM
The rent controlled low income housing that has a parking lot with Cadillacs and Lexus's just sitting there for the poor minimum wage workers to drive to work in?

What's with those project parking lots? The ones in Manhattan ar filled with ridiculously expensive cars as well. Do project residents sell the rights to their spots? I'm not ready to believe they actually own those cars.

antinimby
March 31st, 2006, 09:05 PM
I think fancy cars are status symbols in those communities. Psychologically and socially, poor people feel better about themselves and also to get respect from their peers by having expensive things. A down payment and monthly payments can get you the nicest cars.

ablarc
March 31st, 2006, 10:13 PM
poor people feel better about themselves and also get respect from their peers by having expensive things.
So do the rest of us.


A down payment and monthly payments can get you the nicest cars.
But let me get this straight: they can afford expensive things and the nicest cars. Those are poor people, right?

.

What do you call people who can't afford expensive things and the nicest cars?

antinimby
March 31st, 2006, 10:53 PM
So do the rest of us.More so for poor people.


But let me get this straight: they can afford expensive things and the nicest cars. Those are poor people, right?Poor does not mean they are without means. People manage, however difficult it may be for them, to get expensive things. Is it the wisest use of one's limited income? No, but self-esteem, pride and respect is very important when the rest of your life is bleek. In the ghettos, it is not uncommon to see designer clothes and shoes and a lot of jewelry in addition to the nice cars.


What do you call people who can't afford expensive things and the nicest cars?The middle class. ;)

ablarc
April 1st, 2006, 12:47 AM
The middle class. ;)
LOL!!!

Zoe
April 1st, 2006, 02:40 PM
I used to live on the same block as Church Towers. A lot of the people that live in that building got in from knowing someone. My neighbors said that a lot of city workers live in that building. The Fire chief and others in the city of that rank I also heard at one time or another lived there.

ablarc
April 1st, 2006, 05:16 PM
Fool's gold?

At the end of the day you're still living in public housing.

Ninjahedge
April 3rd, 2006, 01:03 PM
What do you call people who can't afford expensive things and the nicest cars?

Immigrant Laborers. :o (Um, since when is a : o symbol a smileyface???)

Ninjahedge
April 3rd, 2006, 01:07 PM
I used to live on the same block as Church Towers. A lot of the people that live in that building got in from knowing someone. My neighbors said that a lot of city workers live in that building. The Fire chief and others in the city of that rank I also heard at one time or another lived there.

I heard something similar. Between the towers down on 2nd street and river to the church towers there are a lot of people that got in from knowing someone.

As for the cars and stuff, a lot of them are minimal on bling-age so they do not seem to be cars that were deliberately bought for show. But you are right. I see guys that are driving pimped escalades through the city that do not look like they can afford lunch at Burritoville. People lease and buy beyond their means. Why do you think our average credit card debt is so high?

Hoboken411
April 19th, 2006, 04:53 PM
Hey Ninja, this is where you ended up? (FKI previously from HobokenChat)...

I've been running this new site (Hoboken411.com (http://hoboken411.com)) and there have been some posts regarding the Housing bubble and the overdevelopment in Hoboken/Jersey city.

How long can it last? You check the MLS listings and it only shows 500 or so on the market in Hoboken. I find that to be BULL. With all the new construction plus existing units for sale, I'd guess to say that number is more like 2000.

Hoboken411 got mentioned on this Bubble Tracking site. (http://bubbletrack.blogspot.com/2006/04/more-on-hoboken-housing-bubble-plus.html)

What is going on? Corporate Greed? Buyer/Seller anxiety? Peer pressure?
The costs are WAY out of line, they should be 2.5x annual income.. not 10x or higher. I can imagine 4x at most for a top of the line place.

There will be a bigger correction then they predict. They can only fudge the statistics for so long, no?

Take a look and share your thoughts please.

Oh, and if anyone one care to allow me to take some pictures of their units at the Zephyr, I'd appreciate it.

zephyrgirl
April 19th, 2006, 06:18 PM
"Oh, and if anyone one care to allow me to take some pictures of their units at the Zephyr, I'd appreciate it."

seeing as you're not a fan of the zephyr (from your posts on the other site regarding it & 700 grove) what pray tell would you do with said photos of the zephyr interior? just wondering/confused why anyone would oblige after you sort of trashed it?

JCMAN320
April 19th, 2006, 06:27 PM
Zephyr is in Jersey City.

Hoboken411
April 19th, 2006, 09:21 PM
Sorry if I came across as "trashing" them. I'm sure they're nice properties, that wasn't my point. You know the housing market is a very hot topic these days, and perhaps the more discussion that takes place it can shed more light on what the situation is, as well as what we, as members of society are thinking, what motivates us, where we get our data, etc. Life is a learning process. It's nice to know what others are thinking, in my opinion.

Although there are personal and editorial observations and opinions on the site, we invite conversation as well and provide information about the locations, so people viewing can see more than just a random rant. I guess it's one step beyond a phone book or directory. And it's not one-sided, as you can see by the welcoming of comments.

I know they're in JC, but the close proximity to Hoboken makes it relevant. The site will expand to the surrounding cities and towns over time.


Thanks and have a great week.

injcsince81
April 19th, 2006, 10:32 PM
Sorry if I came across as "trashing" them. I'm sure they're nice properties, that wasn't my point. You know the housing market is a very hot topic these days, and perhaps the more discussion that takes place it can shed more light on what the situation is, as well as what we, as members of society are thinking, what motivates us, where we get our data, etc. Life is a learning process. It's nice to know what others are thinking, in my opinion.

Although there are personal and editorial observations and opinions on the site, we invite conversation as well and provide information about the locations, so people viewing can see more than just a random rant. I guess it's one step beyond a phone book or directory. And it's not one-sided, as you can see by the welcoming of comments.

I know they're in JC, but the close proximity to Hoboken makes it relevant. The site will expand to the surrounding cities and towns over time.


Thanks and have a great week.

Hoboken411 - you are railing about "corporate greed" on your site which you are pushing here.

Are you also driven by greed?

I don't go to wirednewyork.com to be spammed by you.

Go away (or post like everyone else and don't push your blogs).

Hoboken411
April 19th, 2006, 10:49 PM
First of all, my site is non-profit.

Secondly, I referenced the posts because they were relevant to the topic at hand. I just stumbled upon this site, and posted innocently. If I expected to be chastised by the senior members of the site, I wouldn't have posted. Pardon me for expecting a more welcoming group.:confused:

Is this a forum to boast about JC and surrounding areas or is it receptive to open discussions regardless of viewpoint?

Believe me, I'm not the only one with certain opinions, there are countless others that feel similarly.

And there are other sources outside of this board that some people may find interesting. Considering "reference" SPAM is a bit conceited, no?

I happen to find this board very interesting, regardless of whether I agree with what's being stated.

If you think I'm here to "promote" something, you're wrong. I'd like to hear what others have to say. Plain and simple.

But I won't mention any blog anymore, I'll just quote without pointing reference to them. But it doesn't hurt to look around from time to time.

Thanks for the receptive welcome.

Ninjahedge
April 20th, 2006, 09:12 AM
Actually H411, some of these people that are "welcoming" you are not the meat and potatoes of this site....

That being said, you also have to realize, from the very get-go that this is not (for the most part) a heated site. Peolpe do not rant at each other (witha few exceptions). The very things that drove me from the other site are the things that keep me coming back here.

So long as you keep that in mind, there shouldn't be much of a problem.

As for what is going on at the Zephyr, I have no clue. I have not been following that one. As for development in Hoboken and the paucity of listings, I am wondering if it is a controlled release, or, as in most cases, the houses and units are "pre-listed" and sold before they are even officially on the market.

The "flipper" crew is starting to want (most of them real estate agents themselves) and we should start to see more of an emergence of available housing as the market slows, and possibly gluts with teh completion of Maxwell Place, the buldings along Observer, and the whole slew of Box-Condos going wp out by the old former warehouse district (near 10th and Madison).


My major dissapointment in all of this is the lack of quality construction on most of these developments. They all smack of fast-track design-build projects that put in a marble countertop and jacuzzi tub to jack the price up by $50K-$100K and call it "luxury" while at the same time their generic windows and doors have their sealant start to fall out 5 years after construction.

Add to it the fact that I have seen, and heard NOTHING about infrastructure improvement. Unless, of course, you count that useless traffic light by the Path station as "infrastructure", in which case we probably spent too much. ;)


On that note, Welcome to the forum!

JCMAN320
April 20th, 2006, 12:39 PM
I'm welcoming you Hoboken 411, I was just saying that Zephy was in JC thats all. :) In all seriousness welcome to the forum bro.

Hoboken411
April 21st, 2006, 10:03 AM
cool. thanks.

TimmyG
May 10th, 2006, 02:57 PM
Does anyone know what's going on with the old shell of a building on 15th street in Hoboken? It's the ten floor building near the Lipton Tea buildings that has been an empty shell for a number of years. I have noticed workers there lately. It looks like they are cleaning off the outside. My guess is, it's going to be more apartments like the Lipton Tea buildings are now.

NYatKNIGHT
May 10th, 2006, 04:20 PM
It's about time, that shell of a building has been an eyesore for way too long.

TimmyG
May 11th, 2006, 07:51 AM
Hoboken OKs garage plan in rush to sell


Thursday, May 11, 2006 By BONNIE FRIEDMAN

JOURNAL STAFF WRITER
HOBOKEN - The City Council approved a "compromise" plan for the 1-acre municipal garage site last week, sparking a mad dash to sell the property in time to infuse $5 million into the city coffers before the end of the 2006 fiscal year.
"We tried to put together a plan that is broad enough to attract developers and narrow enough to let the city do what it needs to do," said Lane Bajardi, chairman of the Observer Highway Advisory Committee. "This is not the end of the process; it is the beginning of the busiest part of the process."
The ordinance was adopted May 3; a day later, officials had already posted a request for proposals on the city's Web site - which must be received by 11 a.m. on May 26.
In order to use the revenue to plug the budget, the city must complete the sale by June 30.
The RFP calls for a 240-unit complex that will stand seven stories, with a nine-story component on the southwestern portion of the lot.
The ground floor level calls for 10,000 to 15,000 square feet of ground floor retail, community services, artists' studios, or "certain other uses to provide convenient shopping and services to the surrounding community."
In addition to winning a 25-year tax abatement, the developer must enter into a 24-month leaseback agreement, giving the city time to relocate its municipal garage to another location.

Ninjahedge
May 11th, 2006, 08:50 AM
Fire at Helmers last night at about 4:30.

From what I could see (from my window) looks like it was on teh 2nd floor and went upwards from there.

http://abclocal.go.com/wabc/story?section=local&id=4162056#

TimmyG
May 11th, 2006, 11:39 AM
Fire rips through Hoboken building (from the Jersey Journal)

A woman and her cat were trapped on the fourth floor of a burning building this morning in Hoboken, as 20-foot flames on the fire escape blocked her exit, officials said.

Officials are unsure how the fire started at the four-story apartment building on 11th and Washington streets but heavy flames, smoke and water damage left the tenants temporarily homeless, said Battalion Chief Joseph La Bruno.

The fire started at 4:42 a.m. in a second floor unit above Helmer’s restaurant, reports said.

The fire quickly spread to the top three stories but firefighters were able to prevent the blaze from reaching other attached buildings, said Deputy Chief August Schwarz.

Flames as high as twenty feet burst out the windows and the smoke could be seen throughout Hoboken, said La Bruno.

In the midst of fighting the blaze, La Bruno heard a woman screaming from the top floor of the building, he said.

“She was standing near the window and I thought she was holding a baby in her arms,” said La Bruno. “I don’t know if she was panic-stricken . . . there were 20-foot flames coming out of the window onto the fire escape two floors down. She couldn’t get down that way.”

La Bruno said firefighters rescued the woman using a ladder and saw it was a cat, not a baby, she had bundled in her arms.

She was taken to a nearby hospital for smoke inhalation, said La Bruno.

Other tenants in the building escaped on their own and many have been given shelter by the Hudson County Chapter of the Red Cross, said La Bruno. Three firefighters also sustained minor injuries, said Schwarz.

North Hudson Regional Fire and Rescue and Jersey City fire departments helped Hoboken firefighters extinguish the blaze by 6 a.m.

Carly Baldwin

Zoe
May 13th, 2006, 03:50 PM
The building you are asking about on 15th is part of the Hudson Tea Building project. It will be converted into residences and there are 2 or 3 other buildings that will be built where some of those parking lots are now between 14 and 15th.

TimmyG
June 2nd, 2006, 10:14 AM
(From the Jersey Journal)


Radio tower removal begins



Friday, June 02, 2006

HOBOKEN - NJ Transit will begin demolishing the radio tower on the Hoboken Terminal today, making way for a replica of the clock tower that stood on the terminal when the building was constructed in 1907.
"The plan to reconstruct the historic tower is great news for the City of Hoboken," Mayor David Roberts said. "I have long been an advocate of historic preservation and restoration, and I applaud every effort to celebrate Hoboken's past, as well as one of our community's most historic landmarks."
NJ Transit officials expect to have the radio demolished by Monday, weather permitting.
In the fall, NJ Transit will erect the steel framework for the new clock tower, modeled after the 1907 design by artist Kenneth Murchinson. Officials expect the new clock tower to be completed by next summer.
"Replacing Hoboken Terminal's clock tower is a milestone in our effort to transform the facility to better serve residents, visitors, and customers," NJ Transit Executive Director George Warrington said.
The replacement of the clock tower - which was weakened by a storm and removed in 1950 - is part of a $53.9 million restoration project to restore the terminal to its original design.
BONNIE FRIEDMAN

TimmyG
June 21st, 2006, 08:51 AM
Hoboken sets vote on redeveloping 15-block area



Wednesday, June 21, 2006 By BONNIE FRIEDMAN

JOURNAL STAFF WRITER
HOBOKEN - The City Council is expected tonight to designate 15 blocks in the southwestern portion of the city as an area in need of redevelopment - the latest in a string of new redevelopment zones.
The vote comes one day before the state Assembly is likely to vote on a bill that would significantly curb the power of municipalities to take private property.
But Mayor David Roberts said the 13-acre area - bounded by Paterson Avenue and Observer Highway to the north, and Jersey City to the south and west - would likely meet the more stringent criteria.
The 31 properties within the area comprise a mix of industrial and commercial uses, surface parking, stacked car storage, vacant lots, two residences and a holding area for police horses and other animals.
Roberts said the city will look to create mixed-use commercial and residential, improve the streets and sidewalks, and add trees and open space.
But unlike another longtime redevelopment zone in the northwest, Roberts said the city will not look to award the entire 15-block area to a single developer, choosing instead to encourage individual property owners to develop smaller sites.
"This is not a hostile takeover of private property to a second private developer," Roberts said.
The decision to allow for numerous redevelopers fits with the proposed Assembly bill.
John Buonocore, an attorney specializing in eminent domain lawsuits, faulted the administration for failing to simply re-zone the district.

Ninjahedge
June 21st, 2006, 08:58 AM
Crap.

What they need over there is a set of SOCCER FIELDS! Nevermind "rows of trees" and all that crap. We have enough places to walk up and down and have sunbathers lie there doing nothing. We need a legit sports area for all the people here. FCS, we only have one small basketball area in the main park and one soccer field that used to be just an open grass area (Sinatra Park).

What we need is a rec field. One with some cameras and fences (unfortunately) but a rec field none-the-less.

Zoe
June 21st, 2006, 10:49 PM
I agree with you. Open space is what the town needs. The Northwest area is really starting to look lame with those entire city block developements that have been going up back there. I fear more of the same

Ninjahedge
June 22nd, 2006, 08:53 AM
I agree with you. Open space is what the town needs. The Northwest area is really starting to look lame with those entire city block developements that have been going up back there. I fear more of the same

You mean those rubber-stamp full-block condos?

One of the worst, in regards to space, is that one right by the HS park. They built it so close to all the property lines you can graba kid off the swingset from your balcony.

OTOH, you have the east side, which is building the "great wall of Hoboken".

I am just wondering when they are going to build ones completely out in the Hudson.

ablarc
June 22nd, 2006, 04:33 PM
Open space is what the town needs.
Parking lots are open space. Replace parking lots with parks.

The parking can be put in handsomely-styled multi-story garages with ground floor shops.

Ninjahedge
June 22nd, 2006, 05:10 PM
Parking lots are open space. Replace parking lots with parks.

The parking can be put in handsomely-styled multi-story garages with ground floor shops.


Heh.

Heheh.....

HAHAHAHAHAHAAAHAHAAA!!!!!


Oh, sorry. Trying to get Hoboken to build parking lots is like trying to get politicians to be honest and serve their electorate....in Hoboken that is.

Anyway, they have lots of open lots here and there, one of the most obvious being right next to the PATH station. They have a small lot and an abandoned 2 story row-building that is just doing nothing. If the PA just sold that building with teh stipulation for a shared parking space in a new lot to be built at that corner it would help a lot of things.

First, the lot would be close to the train station, the path, and close to the Turnpike/Holland tunnel.

People, if they wanted to, could opt to take the TP down to Hoboken and park at the station for rush hour. This would also make it easier to ask the state for extra $$ to fix up Observer Highway to enable things like new pavement and timed lights that would facilitate such a traffic pattern.

It would also reduce the amount of people that would try to do things like spot surfing on the local roads.

So long as the lot itself was regulated to reasonable charges (say in lieu of a percentage of their tax) it could help the area signifiantly.

Include the plaza level as you are saying (at least along that first little strip there, I forgot its name...) would also be nice, but sometimes that is difficult to accomplish (the ramp needed to get to the upper floors does take some space)....


I just wish they take some time and think about what the area needs and how they can get it with as little burden to the taxpayer as possible. They have a lot of money being made in real estate in this tiny little town, they should concentrate on how some of it could be spent to keep Hoboken a desirable area for a long time coming, not just for the last throws of the bubble and before the pre-fab units start to evidence their "workmanship".

ablarc
June 22nd, 2006, 07:49 PM
^ When you use the word "lot" do you mean "garage"? There's all the difference in the world between the two. One can be an integral, productive and efficient use of land in the city, the other is invariably a destructive waste: the very absence or amputation of the city.

Ninjahedge
June 23rd, 2006, 08:51 AM
Abl, is there any real reason for focusing on the little somantics used in my presentation?

Lets move on with this, K? You know what I am talking about, don't get me started with nit picking (we know where that usually ends up)... ;)

ablarc
June 24th, 2006, 08:41 AM
Abl, is there any real reason for focusing on the little somantics used in my presentation?

Lets move on with this, K? You know what I am talking about, don't get me started with nit picking (we know where that usually ends up)... ;)
Sorry you thought I was nit-picking; I went to some pains to explain why I thought it was important to distinguish a lot from a garage.

For decades the Census Bureau referred to suburbia as "urban." We all know the damage that caused. Among other things, it encouraged use of the oxymoronic term, "urban sprawl." Thank God, that's over, and the culprit is now correctly identified.

Just so, parking lots are bad and parking garages are OK. All they have in common is storing cars, but otherwise they're opposites.

Btw, at the risk of setting you off, it's "semantics." ;) :)

lofter1
June 24th, 2006, 11:54 AM
... focusing on the little somantics ...

The emerging artistic movement of SOMA (http://www.drugs.com/cons/Soma.html) + Detroit Rock (http://www.romanticsdetroit.com/)

http://www.romanticsdetroit.com/music/images/xlittle-white-lies-front.jpg (http://www.romanticsdetroit.com/music/little-lies.html)

Ninjahedge
June 24th, 2006, 05:21 PM
nit nit nit

TimmyG
June 28th, 2006, 11:32 AM
Hoboken moving to take block for new park near Light Rail


Tuesday, June 27, 2006 By BONNIE FRIEDMAN

JOURNAL STAFF WRITER
HOBOKEN - The City Council is expected to adopt a resolution tomorrow night that will allow the city to begin the process of taking an entire block in the southwest - part of Mayor David Roberts' plan to add 20 acres of park land to the Mile Square City.
The administration's move to acquire the 4-acre parcel - which serves as a parking storage facility and abuts the Hudson Bergen Light Rail at Observer Highway between Marshall Drive and Harrison Street - comes one week after dozens of angry residents flocked to a City Council meeting to oppose designation of a redevelopment zone in that portion of the city.
Roberts said he hopes this latest action will show he is committed to adding sorely needed parks.
"I need to demonstrate to the neighborhood and the people of Hoboken where the parks are going to be," said Roberts, who crafted the plan alongside Councilman Ruben Ramos. "I believe the public will have a higher level of tolerance to new development when they are able to enjoy an upgrade of the neighborhood in general."
According to the resolution, the property - which is owned by Academy Bus Company - is assessed at $4.2 million.
Once the resolution passes, city officials can begin reviewing environmental records, titles and appraisals in anticipation of eventually taking the property through eminent domain.
Roberts said he isn't expecting a drawn-out battle with Academy, given that the company owns large swaths of property throughout the city.
One of the other properties Roberts is looking to take is also owned by Academy and sits near the Light Rail at 15th Street.
Representatives at Academy Bus Company did not return phone calls seeking comment.
The other properties Roberts is eyeing are an 81/2-acre site at Jefferson and 13th streets, and a 6-acre site just east of the future Maxwell House Park.
The new southwest park is the first of four properties the administration is looking to acquire with revenue from the sale of the city's municipal garage on Observer Highway.

Ninjahedge
June 28th, 2006, 11:50 AM
Maxwell House Park is on the river. How far east can you go?

Are they thinking of the drydock? Or the land that is part of the Maxwell House development.

Man, Toll Brothers is nito EVERYTHING now! I would have more respect for them if they would have done things like show renderings of the buildings proposed rather than smiling models nowhere near the site and spending $$$$ on a storefront downtown that costs more than a condo.

As for the parks, I see where they are proposing, and I am all for it. But they also need to do a bit more commercial development around the Shop Rite. All these buildings going in and there are little, if any new restaurants, shops, or other stores in the area. The development going up right next to Shop Rite looks like a slightly sunken garage at ground floor with little, if any windows or storefront development. It will be yet another box to join all the other boxes up in that area.

Roberts et. all. need to think of the long term here or we will just have "Yuppie Short Term Storage" in hoboken until the pre-fab condos start to deteriorate and all the flippers divest their holdings.

TimmyG
June 28th, 2006, 12:44 PM
Maxwell House Park is on the river. How far east can you go?
Maybe it means the little tongue of land where the construction workers park their cars now. I think there is a sign near the development showing that as a park.

Ninjahedge
June 28th, 2006, 02:17 PM
You mean another sunbathers parking lot.

:(

TimmyG
June 28th, 2006, 03:05 PM
You mean another sunbathers parking lot.

:(

Probably. I would be surprised if it had a playing field.

hello
July 3rd, 2006, 07:40 AM
fire on 14th between bloomfield and garden (above shuttered la scala) - anyone have details/info? seemed helmers-style. big, maybe from second floor.

hello
July 3rd, 2006, 07:52 AM
My first place was in Hoboken when I moved to the NYC area. I *hated* it. Absolutely hated it.

Sure, the brownstones were pretty, the waterfront nice, and all of the asian-fusion restaurants palatable, but the people, my god, the PEOPLE!
These are the people who are either too scared to live in New York or too name-obsessed to live in Queens or Brooklyn, or Harlem or somewhere else. The town was so homogenous in the worst way possible. Hoboken types are generally one of the following:

1. the B.A. degree white girl from suburban philadelphia, suburban new jersey or somewhere else. likely went to villanova, northeastern, or another second-tier university. was probably in a sorority. sticks largely to manhattan west of 6th ave. if possible.

2. the frat-boy young wall street worker who only lives there to meet type 1. Can be seen starting fights at an overpriced bar where they serve beer in really large mugs with really large TV's showing really large football players.

Needless to say, I was neither, so I moved to Brooklyn and don't regret it. I didn't move to New York to live in a place like Hoboken... it was basically suburban Dallas with brownstones and a subway.

lol, needs an update. families, families, families. many more established professionals (vs. newly-minted wall-st-ers). and now, indeed, evidence that some residents work in midtown manhattan (vs. wall st).

TriHobo
July 3rd, 2006, 08:38 AM
HOBOKEN - A four-alarm fire in a 14th Street building damaged two apartments and injured a firefighter yesterday, Battalion Chief John O'Brien said.
Firefighters arrived on the scene at 9:15 a.m. and controlled the fire within 25 minutes, but not before major damage was done to the second-floor apartment where the fire started, O'Brien said.
The fire also spread to an apartment on the third floor, while the restaurant below, La Scala Ristorante, suffered water damage and the entire building sustained significant smoke damage, O'Brien said. All the tenants in the eight-apartment building were displaced, he said.
A firefighter suffered a hand injury trying to force open a door, he said.
The cause of the fire was still being investigated, O'Brien said.

hello
July 3rd, 2006, 08:43 AM
oh many thanks.
still under investigation. if it started in an apt., maybe less chance of arson :confused:
the restaurant has been closed for a while i thought, so then i wondered...

Zoe
July 3rd, 2006, 03:50 PM
I happened to have been walking my dog in front of the St Louis when that fire started. It looked like the fire was based around the AC unit from the 2nd floor window. Heavy smoke, it filled the entire lenght of 14th street to the bridge.

hello
July 3rd, 2006, 05:10 PM
I happened to have been walking my dog in front of the St Louis when that fire started. It looked like the fire was based around the AC unit from the 2nd floor window. Heavy smoke, it filled the entire lenght of 14th street to the bridge.

amazing.

TimmyG
July 10th, 2006, 08:02 AM
65-acre redevelopment planned by NJ Transit



Monday, July 10, 2006 By BONNIE FRIEDMAN

JOURNAL STAFF WRITER
HOBOKEN - Residents are fighting to stave off development in the Mile Square City - but the biggest expansion in the city's history could be coming and local officials may be powerless to stop it.
NJ Transit recently began studying the Hoboken Terminal and the 65 acres that straddle Hoboken and Jersey City in anticipation of upgrading facilities and installing transit-oriented development.
As a government agency, NJ Transit is exempt from city zoning laws, meaning the agency is free to build as it pleases - a nightmare scenario for residents already overwhelmed by high-rise towers.
So far, NJ Transit and local officials appear to be working together to come up with a blueprint.
Last month, the City Council - acting on an invitation from NJ Transit - authorized the planning board to conduct a preliminary study of the site for possible redevelopment.
"I believe we will achieve the best results for both NJ Transit and Hoboken by working together," said Jim Zullo, senior director of real estate for NJ Transit.
The 65 acres abutting the Hudson River consists of a train terminal, active storage yard, maintenance facility, train watch facility, electrical substation, train shed, bus lanes, light rail station, PATH station, ferry terminal and parking facility.
Last year, NJ Transit hired LCOR, a real estate development company based in Philadelphia, to conduct a "concept plan" to determine what, if any, operations can be consolidated or moved.
"We want to maximize economic return on this property," Zullo said. "The revenues could be put back directly into this facility and improving transfers between modes. We think, for both Jersey City and Hoboken, there are real economic benefits."
But with two plans in the works for the site, no one is sure which one will become the driving force for redevelopment.
Hoboken Councilman Peter Cammarano, who is also a planning board member, thanked NJ Transit for including the city in development discussions but acknowledged that the relationship may not always be without wrinkles.
"If they are talking about building 500 and 1,000 units, that is something we should all take a long hard look at," he said. "It's a delicate balancing act. On the one hand, we've been invited to participate in the process and we are going to do that with the redevelopment plan process. We will let NJ Transit and LCOR know what we have in mind."

TimmyG
July 16th, 2006, 01:29 PM
Two plans, one plot: Should former mercury site be firehouse, or assisted living?

By: Michael D. Mullins, Reporter staff writer 07/16/2006

Mayor David Roberts and Councilman Michael Russo have different ideas on what to do with the hazardous Grand Street site that once sent tenants and neighbors fleeing from mercury contamination.

The plot of grassy land, located at 720 Grand St. between Seventh and Eighth streets, is currently owned by the Environmental Protection Agency, which decontaminated the site and found homes for the displaced tenants..

Twenty out of the 29 former residents were found to possess high levels of mercury in their systems

General Electric, which had owned the factory that manufactured industrial mercury vapor lighting at the site, was held responsible for the subsequent contamination and provided $ 15.5 million of the total $35 million it cost to clean up the site. The EPA provided the rest.

Although the EPA plans to sell the property at market value, it has said that it would take into consideration the city's plans of using the site for a municipal building that would benefit its residents.

For public safety, or seniors?
Since July of 2001, Mayor David Roberts has expressed interest in building a centralized public safety facility there. The complex would include at least two fire engines, emergency rescue equipment, and Hazmat equipment for a chemical or biological disaster.

However, the present police station at First and Hudson streets would stay where it is.

If the mayor is successful, two of the city's current firehouses will be relocated to the new facility, due to deterioration at their current sites.

But Councilman Michael Russo has proposed building a senior housing development with assisted living there. "There is no assisted living housing for seniors in the city, and we need one," said Russo. "Seniors who cannot live independently shouldn't have to leave Hoboken or have to wait at home for a help aid to arrive."

Russo feels that the younger members would also benefit from having a facility close by that could provide care for their aging parents or grandparents.

Another possibility Russo suggested was for the city to work with a private investor who would be interested in purchasing the property for such a purpose.

There are currently six senior housing facilities in Hoboken.

Of the six, Marion Towers, Columbian Towers and Columbian Arms are run by a private development company, while the other three are run by the federally subsidized Hoboken Housing Authority.

An official at the Housing Authority said Thursday that there is approximately a 15-month wait to get into the HHA's senior buildings.

Maurice DeGennaro, the former chairman of the board for Columbian Tower Development Company, which built both the Columbian Towers in 1984 and Columbian Arms in 1991, is currently seeking the city's approval to expand the towers by 80 units.

DeGennaro currently manages the Towers at 76 Bloomfield St., where he says people are still waiting to get in from a 162-person list from 2002.

"The city needs more senior housing," said DeGennaro.


Mayor's idea
In the past, Roberts has suggested that the fire stations on Second and Jefferson streets and Eight and Clinton streets should be closed rather than have the city spend several million dollars in an attempt to restore them.

Fred Bado, the city's Director of Community Development, says the reason for the deterioration is years of misuse, being that many of the fire stations were originally built to house a horse and buggy and not to support a fire truck weighing over a ton.

Thus, the trucks would go in the new central facility.

But Michael Russo said that he thinks Roberts' facility should go somewhere else.

Russo suggested moving it to one of the less developed areas in Hoboken, such as the southwest or northwest part of town.

"I agree with his plan; I don't agree with his placement," said Russo, who would like to see the creation of a "central command center" that includes both the police and ambulance corps in addition to the Fire Department.

Coincidentally, a rumor has said that the Police Station on First and Hudson streets would be relocated. Although the city has not abandoned the possibility of relocating the police headquarters, which currently requires renovations, Bado feels the present location better serves the needs of the city because of its proximity to City Hall and the PATH Station.

As both politicians wait to see if the city is able to acquire the property, Russo plans to ask his fellow council members at the next meeting to consider making a request for the EPA to remove the fence at the property. That way, it could be used as a temporary park.


Michael Mullins can be reached at mmullins@hudsonreporter.com


©The Hudson Reporter 2006

Ninjahedge
July 17th, 2006, 09:09 AM
Um, if people all over the state have to move to different towns to be able to get "assisted living", why should Hoboken be any different?

This is all vote pandering.

And besides, I do not feel comfy putting grandma and grandpa in the Mercury Lounge for the ret of their lives anyway. It is tough to say what would be best, but crying for assisted living is not one of them (with the only reason being the people having to move out of Hoboken. Not any other hardship, just moving to Weehawken, JC or some other neighboring town with a retirement home).

TimmyG
July 19th, 2006, 08:42 AM
5-screen theater for Hoboken

Wednesday, July 19, 2006 By BONNIE FRIEDMAN

JOURNAL STAFF WRITER
HOBOKEN - Break out the popcorn, movies may be returning to the Mile Square City.
Mayor David Roberts says he's reached an agreement with the developers in the Northwest Redevelopment Area to build a five-screen theater on 14th Street between Grand and Adams streets.
The theater - which could open as early as next summer - would be the city's first moviehouse since Hudson Street Cinemas closed last fall.
"This is the biggest single issue people have called me on," Roberts said. "Our residents are going to have a theater in town, in walking distance."
Since plans for the movie theater were not part of the original 1998 redevelopment plan, the City Council is expected to vote on the zoning change at its August meeting.
Fred Bado, director of community development, said it will be a two-story, 600-seat theater, roughly 200 feet wide and 50 to 60 feet long.
Ursa/Tarragon, the developer in the Northwest, will build the theater and then rent it to an operator.
Michael Sciarra, a principal of Ursa/Tarragon, said he is in negotiations with a major company that operates theaters in New Jersey and New York, and that the theater will likely include restaurant and retail offerings.

Ninjahedge
July 19th, 2006, 09:26 AM
5-screen theater for Hoboken

Wednesday, July 19, 2006 By BONNIE FRIEDMAN

JOURNAL STAFF WRITER
HOBOKEN - Break out the popcorn, movies may be returning to the Mile Square City.
Mayor David Roberts says he's reached an agreement with the developers in the Northwest Redevelopment Area to build a five-screen theater on 14th Street between Grand and Adams streets.
The theater - which could open as early as next summer - would be the city's first moviehouse since Hudson Street Cinemas closed last fall.
"This is the biggest single issue people have called me on," Roberts said. "Our residents are going to have a theater in town, in walking distance."
Since plans for the movie theater were not part of the original 1998 redevelopment plan, the City Council is expected to vote on the zoning change at its August meeting.
Fred Bado, director of community development, said it will be a two-story, 600-seat theater, roughly 200 feet wide and 50 to 60 feet long.
Ursa/Tarragon, the developer in the Northwest, will build the theater and then rent it to an operator.
Michael Sciarra, a principal of Ursa/Tarragon, said he is in negotiations with a major company that operates theaters in New Jersey and New York, and that the theater will likely include restaurant and retail offerings.


So instead of the crappy little 2 screen that charged you $6.50 (and later 7) for the almost-latest Adam Sandler flik, we get one that will show 5 of the latest Keanu Reeve - Saundra Bullock fliks for $9 a pop.


The only reason I went to the theater in Hoboken was the double combo of "right around the corner" and the fact that it was so much cheaper than the city. Otherwise.... :P

amaluu729
July 19th, 2006, 11:31 AM
Sorry for the remedial question, but what is the transit time from Hoboken to Times Square/Midtown?

Schadenfrau
July 19th, 2006, 11:40 AM
Probably about 40-45 minutes.

RandySavage
July 19th, 2006, 11:44 AM
Walk from Times Square (42nd) to 33rd St. Path Station: 10 min.

Path Train from 33rd to Hoboken: 18 min.

If you catch the 33rd st. PATH right when you enter the station you could probably be in Hoboken 30 minutes after leaving Times Square. You'll probably wait 10 minutes or so in the station.

Ninjahedge
July 19th, 2006, 12:10 PM
Bus goes right into PA. On non-rush hours it takes about 15 minutes. Walk to TS from PA? About 5 min.

During rush, commute is usually about 20 minutes, but could be +++ if there is a lot of traffic....

Zoe
July 19th, 2006, 12:40 PM
You can also take the ferry which is 10 minutes to the midtown terminal. From there you would take a free bus and it depends on traffic (10-15 minutes).

STT757
July 19th, 2006, 01:43 PM
Probably about 40-45 minutes.

I can drive to Times Square from my House in 40-45 minutes, and I live 35 miles South in Monmouth County.

Schadenfrau
July 19th, 2006, 01:48 PM
That's because you don't leave your car idling for 15 minutes like a PATH train, STT757.

Ninjahedge
July 19th, 2006, 02:48 PM
It all depends on the time of day.

At 4am I can get into TS in my car in 12 minutes, but that is also going all green on the lights as well....


One other important thing to realize:

Ferry is the most expensive, followed by bus, and PATH is the cheapest.

Ferry is something like $4 e.w., bus $2.30, and PATH $1.50.

TimmyG
August 10th, 2006, 11:05 AM
Still 'step-down,' but taller

Wednesday, August 09, 2006 By BONNIE FRIEDMAN

JOURNAL STAFF WRITER
HOBOKEN - The redevelopment plan for the city's municipal garage site on Observer Highway is back - and it's bigger than ever.
Fred Bado, the city's director of community development, said the revised plan for the 1-acre site will add as many as three stories to the original blueprint, which called for a building with a "step-down" design - the lowest portion of the building topped out at seven stories, the highest, on the southwest corner, at nine.
The revised plan envisions a similar "step-down" design, but now the building's height will range from nine to 12 stories.
In May, the City Council unanimously approved the original garage-site plan - which was developed using the recommendations of a 16-member resident advisory committee.
But that plan only drew two bidders - Metro-Ran LLC and Applied Development/Cali Futures LLC - both of which were substantially less than the $30 million figure Mayor David Roberts was hoping for.
The City Council eventually rejected both of those bids, arguing that both failed to meet bid specifications - which included coming in 10 to 15 minutes late.
Lane Bajardi, president of the Observer Highway Advisory Committee, called the new plan "the mayor's rush back to square one."
"The mayor's actions are disrespectful and regrettable," he said. "Despite our sincere efforts to work with him, the mayor is showing he has no interest in truly forging development solutions with the citizens of Hoboken."

JCMAN320
August 10th, 2006, 11:34 AM
Hoboken's new slogan should be; Hoboken where we cater to the rich and shit on the little guy.

stache
August 10th, 2006, 12:11 PM
We can apply that to large portions of this planet.

Ninjahedge
August 10th, 2006, 01:41 PM
Actually, the Mayor may have a point for negging these guys.

1) If a bid is lower than the estimates given by the architect and engineer, it may be a deliberate underbid or not include something (something was overlooked)
2) The people who bid no it, only two (which is unusual) may have certain ties that are a bit too obvious for the Mayors liking (Speculation).
3) The attitude/prep of the bids/bidders may not be up to snuff. You advertise for a nanny and expect to pay $20 an hour and you get only two applicants, both charging $10, but one is a heroin addict and the other looks like the crypt keeper, you may not be inclined to hire either....

MikeKruger
August 10th, 2006, 03:23 PM
:p someone mentioned that people who are afraid to live in Manhattan move to Hoboken. I can see Manhattan as being stressful and Hoboken does look ...quaint in comparison.
I've lived in a big European city as a kid but it was not as condensed as Manhattan and since I came to the states I got used to having a lot of space, and quiet neighbourhoods, around me.
I plan to move to Manhattan next year, and I don't know yet if it will be in the quiet-er UWS or the festive downtown. I love going out in the Village SoHo and LES but I don't know if actually living there would prove to be annoying. I've heard people saying it's not worth living in the Village because there's too much commotion all the time.

NYatKNIGHT
August 11th, 2006, 01:59 PM
^Depends on which street you live on. Once again, I'm going to say it's the opposite. I don't think there is any street on the UWS that is as quiet as most streets downtown. It's not all St. Mark's or Bleecker, despite the typical perception.

MikeKruger
August 14th, 2006, 10:47 AM
^Depends on which street you live on. Once again, I'm going to say it's the opposite. I don't think there is any street on the UWS that is as quiet as most streets downtown. It's not all St. Mark's or Bleecker, despite the typical perception.

hey, you got me, that's where I usually go :)

TriHobo
August 14th, 2006, 12:18 PM
Hoboken vote: Hands off two businesses


HOBOKEN - The City Council voted down introduction of a controversial ordinance that would have taken two businesses in the Northwest Redevelopment Zone, prompting cheers and applause from neighborhood residents prepared for a fight.

"We are excited about working with the city of Hoboken," said Tom Stumpf, a representative of U-Store-It, one of the two businesses on Grand Street that had been in danger of being taken through eminent domain. The other property is a factory.

The three "yes" votes at Wednesday's meeting came from council members Christopher Campos, Theresa LaBruno and Ruben Ramos. Council members Theresa Castellano and Michael Russo abstained, and Nino Giacchi, Peter Cammarano and Michael Cricco, as well as Council President Richard Del Boccio, voted no.

Last month, state Superior Court Judge Carmen Messano ordered the council to vote one way or the other after the redeveloper - Ursa/Tarragon - filed suit against the city claiming it violated a 1998 redeveloper contract requiring the city to seize both businesses.

Cricco, who represents the area and who originally supported the condemnation, said he had a change of heart after listening to the residents opposed to the eight-year old redevelopment plan.

"(Ursa/Tarragon) should have done this (filed suit) a long time ago," Cricco quipped.

Michael Sciarra, a principal of Ursa/Tarragon, said he did not know what his next move would be, or what the stalemate would mean for the community center, swimming pool and movie theater planned for the area.

"Basically, we believe our contract and the good faith we expected was sort of blatantly disregarded for purely short-term political reasons," Sciarra said. "We have to re-evaluate our position on plans that we are not obligated to do but what we had hoped to do to benefit the city.

Mayor David Roberts said the city has an obligation to follow through with the contract for which it has already reaped benefits.

"We are drifting into a court decision, and I don't relish the position that we are in right now," Roberts said

TriHobo
August 14th, 2006, 12:19 PM
Adding 3 stories a no-go

Residents applaud vote

HOBOKEN - To cheers from the audience, the City Council narrowly voted down introduction of an ordinance that would have added three stories to the proposed building at the municipal garage site on Observer Highway.

Following the 5-4 vote Wednesday night, members of the Observer Highway Advisory Committee - a 16-member group of residents that signed off on the original proposal - applauded the verdict.

The original plan for the 1-acre site called for a 240-unit building with a "step-down" design ranging from seven to nine stories, while the latest design called for a building ranging from nine to 12 stories.

In May, the council unanimously approved the original site plan, but that plan only drew two bidders - Metro-Ran LLC and Applied Development/Cali Futures LLC.

Both were substantially less than the $30 million Mayor David Roberts was hoping for. The plan had been to use roughly $13 million of that to close a budget gap and pay off debt. The city wound up taking out bonds to close this year's $5 million gap.

Lane Bajardi, president of the Observer Highway Advisory Committee and a nearby resident, said he believes planners overestimated the worth of the site.

"Anyone who says the planners made an error should ask the planners," said Bajardi.

Disappointed by the council's vote, Roberts said he's gone to great lengths to maximize the potential profit on the building, which will provide funds for open space and other amenities.

"I have an obligation to work harder to try to find areas of consensus," Roberts said.

"I will double my efforts to come up with a plan that maximizes the amount of city benefits and lessens the amount of bulk and density in neighborhoods."

Ninjahedge
August 14th, 2006, 01:25 PM
"I will double my efforts to come up with a plan that maximizes the amount of city benefits and lessens the amount of bulk and density in neighborhoods."

I think he misstated himself there.

He will look for whatever will get him and the municipality the most $$.

And I misinterpreted the last time this was said, i thought the bids were for development contracts, NOT for how much THEY were willing to pay for teh site itself.

I think what they should be looking at now would be how much the city could get what it needs in exchange for teh land that is being offered. Any land along Observer is not as good as it may sound due to the VERY loud rail station/yard right across the street from it (had a friend that lived across and said it was very noisy all day long from idling engines).

Anyway, As for the Storage place? I don't know. I shudder to think of what they were planning on putting in there (another box-condo development?). But that storage building is an eyesore, and they never take care of the grounds (like sweeping their own sidewalks to be free of the gravel THEY used instead of grass around the building.).

I just hope that the developers realize that hoboken is still a hot market, but for over $500K for 1000SF, you have to start SERIOUSLY looking at what you qualify as "luxury" and realize that it is more than stainless steel appliances, marble countertops, whirlpool tubs and prefab exteriors....

TriHobo
September 5th, 2006, 09:35 AM
Homes With a View

By ANTOINETTE MARTIN

WHEN he was 10 years old and growing up in a cold-water flat in Jersey City (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/classifieds/realestate/locations/newjersey/?inline=nyt-geo), William Sinclair decided to buy the Empire State Building. Every day, he looked at it, lusted after it and became more determined to have it.
“I want to be on top of the world,” he told himself, “and that’s it.”

More than 65 years later, Mr. Sinclair, who is retired after running his own electronics manufacturing company, has finally grabbed hold of his glistening dream. He is not actually buying the skyline showpiece — but he is buying a superb skyline view. He will be able to look right across the Hudson River at the Empire State Building, day and night, from the living room of his condominium on the 26th floor at the top of the Hudson Tea Building in Hoboken.

The cost for Mr. Sinclair’s nonpareil panorama is $1.6 million.
“This is way better than what they got in Manhattan (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/classifieds/realestate/locations/newyork/newyorkcity/manhattan/?inline=nyt-geo),” he cackled while talking about his new place, currently being renovated, as the Tea Building is converted from rentals to condominiums. “All they got to look at over there is Jersey. And compared to what they pay, this is an incredible steal.”
That kind of thinking comes into play at every price point among home buyers seeking a view of the Manhattan skyline, say developers who are busy creating literally thousands of units with a view.

In Jersey City, Hoboken and “Gold Coast” towns like Edgewater, Weehawken and West New York, buildings with a vista, or at least a glimpse, are proliferating as if there were no tomorrow.

In one sense, there is not. When the western riverbank is built out, “that’s it,” as Mr. Sinclair would say — at least until developers turn their attention to the towns atop the Palisades.

At river level, many developers are even now compelled to focus on second-best sites, those that don’t offer views of icons like the Empire State, the Chrysler Building or the Statue of Liberty, and don’t include the George Washington Bridge or Verrazano-Narrows Bridge sparkling through the night, and might show off just a sliver of river and a more anonymous edifice or two.

This is good news for buyers who do care about cost, some developers are quick to point out.

“Maybe one view is a Picasso,” said Benjamin D. Jogodnik, who oversees project development in Hoboken and Jersey City for Toll Brothers, “but if you don’t have the resources to own a Picasso, or don’t care to, it’s now possible to get a perfectly good view for a price in the low $500,000’s.”

On a hard-hat tour of 700 Grove, his company’s 12-story building going up 10 blocks inland of the South Hoboken ferry terminal and PATH station, Mr. Jogodnik showed off several unfinished 11th-floor units, including a one-bedroom place priced at $519,990 with a dynamic view of downtown Jersey City and a modest view of downtown Manhattan.

Even on the same floor, prices vary widely, depending on space and the viewable vistas: a 1,400-square-foot, two-bedroom, two-bath unit with a glorious panoramic view stretching from Midtown to the Statue of Liberty is priced at $779,900. A 1,200-square-foot, two-bedroom, two-bath unit with a view across a landscaped courtyard and the streets of Hoboken to downtown Manhattan is priced at $659,990.

One floor below, the same designs cost $25,000 and $20,000 less, respectively.

So far, developers report the market for moderately priced units with views is much softer than that for high-priced units. Two-thirds of the apartments at the relatively moderately priced 700 Grove are sold after a year of marketing, while at Toll Brothers’ higher-priced Hudson Tea Building, all but a smattering of the converted units sold out rapidly.

At Maxwell Place, envisioned as the “crown jewel” of Hoboken condos, according to Mr. Jogodnik, the first of two buildings is now under construction by Toll in concert with Pinnacle Custom; its ultraelegant units with interiors by Michael Graves (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/reference/timestopics/people/g/michael_graves/index.html?inline=nyt-per) and the best available views of Manhattan, priced at $1 million and up, were 100 percent sold out while the shovels were still shiny.

Harrison T. LeFrak, managing director of the LeFrak Organization, which began building rental towers at its Newport development in Jersey City a quarter-century ago, suggested that the concept of moderately priced views is somewhat new in the Gold Coast marketplace.

As more and more buildings rise, and obscure one another’s sightlines to the city, things are evolving, Mr. LeFrak observed.

At Newport, LeFrak Organization is building the first of two 28-story towers for the Shore Club Condominiums project. The building is rising at the corner of River Drive and Newport Parkway, due east of the Holland Tunnel entrance, one block in from the river.

Right now, all floors above the fifth have straight-on views eastward to Lower Manhattan and north toward the George Washington Bridge. But numerous other Newport buildings present obstacles looking south.

All 220 apartments in the tower have been sold at prices ranging from $420,000 to $1.3 million, and about 90 of the units in the second tower, to be built just north of the first, have been sold too. The buildings, quadrilaterals whose sides are not parallel, will both feature large terraces of 60 square feet or more in each apartment, so that even those units without great window views, and those in the far back of the structure, capture a satisfying slice of the skyline.

Two years from now, however, the picture will change. LeFrak will begin building the Aqua, a 330-foot-high 31-story rental property, between the Shore Club and the river. Also, the builder announced last spring that it will build the Ellipse — a glass and steel elliptical tower with 325 apartments, to stand 460 feet tall, on a pier at the end of 14th Street, one block north of the second Shore Club building. LeFrak has eight other buildings north of the Shore Club in its plans.

The best strategy in a changing marketplace? Harry Kantor of the KOR Companies, which built the 19-story Montgomery Greene condo complex in Jersey City, said the right answer is always to buy high — the highest floor and the highest price you can afford.

“This is waterfront property — a diminishing commodity, increasingly rare,” Mr. Kantor said. “Those things that are rarest tend to appreciate more rapidly. From an investment and value point of view, there’s no question that you should go as high as you can.”

On the other hand, observes Christopher Winslow, who directs marketing for the Tarragon Corporation, many people simply cannot swallow spending an extra five figures to get a few more degrees of perspective.

At Hudson Park, Tarragon’s nearly complete high-rise in Edgewater, the price differential is about $10,000 per floor. A two-bedroom, three-bath unit on the ninth floor would be priced at $500,000 to $600,000, he said; on the 15th floor, the same unit would cost $60,000 more.

All units in the glass-and-steel building are priced at roughly what a comparable apartment in New York City (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/classifieds/realestate/locations/newyork/newyorkcity/manhattan/?inline=nyt-geo) would sell for, he said.

“In terms of the view of Manhattan, the higher you go, the more foreground you clear,” said Mr. Winslow, whose company posts video that pans across the panorama of actual views at onehudsonpark.com (http://onehudsonpark.com/), its Web site. “Up high, you lose a little river, but get more city. Lower down, the river appears wider.”

In the end, Mr. Winslow asserted, it comes down to personal taste. “What’s your lifestyle? Where do you need to be? That’s how you choose a view

TimmyG
September 24th, 2006, 10:37 AM
Get out a tub of buttery popcorn, Gummi bears, and a large soda, because some drama is unfolding regarding the city's proposal to rezone a block of northern Hoboken to build a new movie theater.

One of the major items on Mayor David Roberts' agenda is to bring a movie theater to the city. In July, Roberts announced that local developers are negotiating with a major company to bring a five-screen movie theater to 14th Street, between Adams and Grand streets.

At Wednesday night's City Council meeting, the governing body introduced an ordinance that would amend the Northwest Redevelopment Plan to change the zoning to allow Ursa Development and Tarragon Development Corp., partners who are the designated developers for much of the Northwest Redevelopment area, to build the theater.

According to Jack Arseneault, the attorney for Ursa/Tarragon, the development partners are in the final stages of negotiations with Clearview Cinemas, which specializes in urban movie theaters, to operate the business.

Last fall, the city's only movie theater, Hudson Street Cinemas near the PATH station, closed.

But worth another 100 Units?

But what caught the attention of several council members was that the new zoning, according to the city Director of Community Development Fred Bado, will also allow the developers to build up to 100 additional units of residential housing adjacent to the theater.

The block directly faces the former Henkel Chemical Plant property. In the original redevelopment plan, the block was zoned as a non-residential "buffer area."

"Small theaters need something to offset the cost of development, and in this instance, it is the additional [residential] square footage," Roberts said.

The mayor added that the additional housing allowance is worth it to bring the city a much-needed amenity.

Arseneault echoed the mayor's statements and added that a movie theater like this one does not generate a great deal of cash flow, so some compromises need to be made.

"This is something that we have been working on for over a year to make happen," Arseneault said.

Rocky relationship

But while the mayor is in full support of the plan, the relationship between the City Council and Ursa/Tarragon has grown somewhat tenuous.

Ursa/Tarragon has been threatening the city with a lawsuit because the city has declined to condemn the properties of two working Grand Street businesses so that Ursa can build 150 units of mostly market-rate residential housing there.

Ursa/Tarragon has charged that the City Council broke its developer's agreement and that the city has a contractual obligation to condemn the U-Store-It storage facility and Kwitman & Son, a home furnishing factory.

The council members who voted against the condemnation said that they did not believe it was right to seize the property of two businesses just to hand them over to a private developer.

Update on Community Center

Also, several City Council members said they are worried that Ursa/Tarragon could renege on its commitment to build a new $10 million community center and swimming pool.

In July of 2005, principals for Tarragon/Ursa Development Group presented preliminary plans for the 26,000 square-foot community recreation center, including exercise rooms, lockers and showers, a dance studio, and community activity rooms, which would be built on 11th Street, between Monroe and Madison streets.

The property where the center would be built has been cleared, but according to Bado, construction has not begun.

Ursa/Tarragon is currently seeking to be named as the redeveloper for an additional 11-acre redevelopment area along the city's west side that would be a mix of residential buildings, retail space, and open space.

The mayor said that this designation is what is holding up the beginning of construction of the community center.

Councilman Rubin Ramos Jr. said Wednesday night that Council's recent vote not to condemn the Grand Street properties has also "let some of the air out of the balloon" as it relates to the community center.

Arseneault said that Ursa/Tarragon still has every intention of building the community center. "We are absolutely committed the community center," he said, but he did note that the center is certainly linked to the company being designated as the developer for the additional 11-acres redevelopment area, which he called Northwest Green.

He added that once Ursa/Tarragon is designated, the community center will be the first building they will construct.

"Before the first shovel goes into the ground [for any residential housing], we will start construction on the community center and pool," Arseneault said.

Arseneault also said that Ursa/Tarragon plans on including nearly 5 acres of open space in their Northwest Green project, although some critics are concerned that the open space will only be landscaped areas for the residents of the new buildings, and not active recreational space.

Enough givebacks?

Councilman Peter Cammarano, who said that he is in favor of bringing a movie theater to Hoboken, said that the proposed upzoning of the property to include additional residential units in troubling on several fronts.

He said if the city is going to increase the zoning of the Northwest Redevelopment area, then it should be as vigilant as possible to make sure that they are getting everything they can from the developer.

"They are holding us under the sword with threats of a lawsuit and [with the community center], but now they want us to modify the [redevelopment] plan to give them 100 additional units?" Cammarano asked after the meeting.

Councilman A. Nino Giacchi added that with concerns over the possible lawsuit and doubts about the community center, this could be a good opportunity to gain leverage with the developers.

No parking for theater

Another item that the City Council has to consider is if a movie theater is even wanted in that area. The zoning amendments would not demand parking for the theater.

Roberts said that that the rationale is that this would be "an urban theater," where the vast majority of patrons would walk to the movies. He noted that the entire city is within walking distance of the proposed site, and there is a light rail station just a couple of blocks away.

He added that it will be modeled after other urban theaters, like in New York City.

But 5th Ward Councilman Michael Cricco, who is the councilman for the area where the theater would be located, said that a number of residents don't want the theater. He said that they are worried about traffic and parking problems that it could cause.

Matt Cornelius, a Grand Street resident, said that his condo association and others in the area are collecting signatures for a petition voicing their opposition to the movie theater.

He said that his neighborhood is not like Manhattan.

We hope you'll enjoy the show

A public hearing and a final vote on the zoning changes could happen at the next City Council meeting on Oct. 4 at 7 p.m. at Hoboken City Hall.


©The Hudson Reporter 2006

ablarc
September 24th, 2006, 10:52 AM
But 5th Ward Councilman Michael Cricco, who is the councilman for the area where the theater would be located, said that a number of residents don't want the theater. He said that they are worried about traffic and parking problems that it could cause.

Matt Cornelius, a Grand Street resident, said that his condo association and others in the area are collecting signatures for a petition voicing their opposition to the movie theater.

He said that his neighborhood is not like Manhattan.
If you think that it is and if you think that it isn't... you're right.

JCMAN320
October 5th, 2006, 02:55 PM
Hollywood on the Hudson

The Mile Square City is gearing up for next year's Hoboken International Film Festival, a chance for independent flimmakers to showcase their talents.

Mayor David Roberts will hold a press conference today at 2 p.m. to give details about the festival, which will run from June 1-7, 2007. The festival, formerly known as the New Jersey International Film & Screenplay Festival, welcomes features, documentaries, short films and television pilots. Cash prizes will be awarded.

The press conference will be held at City Hall, Newark and Washington streets

millertime83
October 11th, 2006, 01:20 PM
By Tom Jennemann 10/08/2006
After about an hour of hearty debate, the Hoboken City Council approved zoning changes that will allow developers to build a five-screen movie theater at 14th Street, between Adams and Grand streets.

Ursa Development and Tarragon Development Corp., partners who are the designated developers for much of the city's Northwest Redevelopment area, announced plans in July to bring a movie theater to Hoboken.

Their plan had the full support of Mayor David Roberts, who believes the theater would be a valuable community amenity. Because of the unique dimensions and other requirements for a movie theater, the City Council had to amend the zoning of the Northwest Redevelopment plan.



Ursa/Tarragon are in the final stages to lease the property to Clearview Cinemas. The concept would be to build an "urban theater," where the vast majority of patrons would walk to the movies or arrive by mass transit. With this in mind, the new zoning would mean that the theater would be built with no parking.


http://oascentral.zwire.com/RealMedia/ads/adstream_nx.ads/www.poweronemedia.com/300X250.html/@Topx (http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/) var bnum=new Number(Math.floor(99999999 * Math.random())+1); document.write(''); http://bannerads.zwire.com/bannerads/bannerad.asp?ADLOCATION=4000&PAG=461&BRD=1291&LOCALPCT=50&AREA=489&VERT=6146&NAREA=403&barnd=3505 (http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/) At Wednesday night's public hearing, several people who live in the neighborhood expressed concerns about parking, traffic, location, and the theater's long-term viability.


No parking


For several of the speakers, parking was a big issue.

John Curley, a lawyer for URSA/Tarragon, said that having no parking is "the industry standard for an urban theater of this type."

But not everyone agrees. Jane Song, who lives near the site, said that she is "skeptical that the movie theater will work without some form of parking."

Hoboken resident and Hoboken Housing Authority Commissioner Perry Belfiore said the movie theater is "going to exacerbate the problem in a city that is already suffering."

Councilman Michael Cricco, who was the only council member to vote against the rezoning and in whose ward the theater will be built, said he was presented with a petition signed by dozens of residents who live in the neighborhood and don't want the movie theater there.

"I have to vote with my constituency," Cricco explained as his reason for not supporting the rezoning.


Theater's supporters respond


Councilman Peter Cammarano responded that he supports the plan not including parking spaces. He said having parking would only entice "vans full of kids" from out of town to come to Hoboken. Encouraging people to walk to the theater is a good thing, he said.

He added that he is not buying the argument that the location on the city's northwest side will keep other Hoboken residents from going to the movies. He said that people who currently live in that area regularly walk to Washington Street to have a dinner at a restaurant.

Councilman Christopher Campos noted there are two large parking garages on 15th street that can accommodate people that come from out of town.

Councilwoman Theresa LaBruno, who has been one of the biggest advocates for the theater, said that a city that has a growing number of young families deserves its own theater.


Long-term viability


There were also several members of the public who questioned whether the theater can be a success, given past failures. Last year the small Hudson Street Cinemas near the PATH station closed, and that is in a much more centralized location, some argued. "I don't believe this movie theater is going to be a success," said Hoboken resident Bob DuVal.

But Councilman Ruben Ramos Jr. noted that the Hudson Street Cinemas were dilapidated. He said the new facility will be comfortable, with state-of-the-art equipment.

Ursa/Tarragon Attorney John Curley added that Clearview has a business model that has been successful in other urban areas.

"Clearview Cinemas would not come into a market if they thought they were going to lose money," Curley said.


Additional residential zoning there


As part of Wednesday night's ordinance, the City Council also rezoned two other parcels of land for which URSA/Tarragon is the designated developer. The parcels directly face the former Henkel Chemical Plant property. In the original redevelopment plan, the block was zoned as a non-residential "buffer area."

The new zoning will now allow the developers to build residential as well as retail structures on that area. City Director of Community Development Fred Bado has said that the new zoning could allow the developers to build "up to 100 additional units" of residential housing.

Roberts said that the additional residential zoning is an allowance to offset development costs for the theater.

©The Hudson Reporter 2006

Ninjahedge
October 11th, 2006, 02:41 PM
Bleh.

A theater would be nice, also small amenities like a bowling alley or something would also be welcomed, but here are the facts:

Vans full of kids will come into Hoboken for the theater regardless of whether or not they have parking, so that reasoning is invalid.

Parking is needed EVERYWHERE. If this place brings in 30-40 people a night just for the theater, in cars, there goes the balance. Weekends are already bad, now add a non-drinking social event and you will have more cars regardless of what everyone "feels" the impact will be.

People going to see a $10 movie will not want to pay $10-$20 for a few hours of parking.

The non-central location of the theater will make it so that only 1/4 of the people IN Hoboken will walk there, or indeed ever go. People do indeed walk Washington Street to go to the restaurants, but they do not come from the path station and walk to Amanda's or Augistinos and they sure as HELL do not walk all the way up to Frankie and Johnnies.

They should have taken this opportunity to make a lot that would service the area up there for any future developments. You put a 2 story lot with a moderate dig-out, you are not talking about much space lost. This theater should be multi-story and hopefully keep a higher standard than the mini-cinemas that seem to have taken over suburbia.

If they had some smarts, they would realize that there are VERY FEW RESTAURANTS in that corner of town and that if they pushed, and provided a parking garage level or two, they could have leased out to a few major players (such as TGIF or the like). The less people have to travel between movie and dinner, the more they will like it, and the more they will be willing to pay rather than driving out to Secaucus (5 minutes) to pay $7.50 for a movie ticket. ;)

TimmyG
October 11th, 2006, 03:01 PM
This theater will be out of the way for most residents. The develpors claim that no parking is the norm for urban theaters, but there is a big difference between this location and a Manhattan theater.

Ninjahedge
October 11th, 2006, 03:27 PM
The developers just want the most bang for teh buck, and no developer wants to try to put a parking garage at the bottom of an odd space above (the column layout changes due to different needs and it can get to be a real hassle.)

They just want to build a quick and dirty box on the site, cash their checks and run away.

Spoon
October 11th, 2006, 04:01 PM
The developers are also getting approval to build 100 additional condos on a "buffer" area based upon the original plan. They whipped up this theater thing and are just trying to push it through to build these extra condos. Personally no one goes over to that area of hoboken ever except to go to shoprite. The theater will fail. I would like a beautiful new movie theater and bowling alley just like the next guy but this will not work.

I take the light rail to the newport mall movie theater in JC. That theater is gross but atleast it is easy to get to. We don't need a movie theater in that area of town just like we don't need 100 more condos.

btw...on a side note now that i mentioned shoprite. Everyone always argues that we don't have enough parks in Hoboken (which we don't) but you notice that the shoprite parking lot is bigger than almost every park in Hoboken. It is never close to full and just a giant waste of space.

Ninjahedge
October 11th, 2006, 04:48 PM
Spoon, go there on a Sunday afternoon/evening and you will see how full it gets both inside and outside.

I do agree though, that space should have been nuilt with maybe a parking garage, or a garage on the roof of the SR. (Problem with roof parking is that it is a lot of weight, especially in winter, and the salt does a number on it as well. You would be prone to leakage and it would be much more expensive to build!).

I think that area should have avoided over-condo-izing. They need a secondary town center for all the people living near there. You walk through and there are almost no restaurants or anything else besides condos condos condos.

We need a modern fire department, a bowling alley, some small shops and a few restaurants out there to balance the load. Right now it looks like you are just going into so people storage unit (almost none of these condos have any apprecialble setback or park space!)

Although I know that cleanup on some of these sites was more expensive, this area was not taboo. I fail to see why they had to let so much in without asking for the things that were needed (such as a first story retail).

ablarc
October 14th, 2006, 01:14 PM
I fail to see why they had to let so much in without asking for the things that were needed (such as a first story retail).
Zoning?

Where I live, that would be the answer.

millertime83
October 16th, 2006, 12:38 PM
btw...on a side note now that i mentioned shoprite. Everyone always argues that we don't have enough parks in Hoboken (which we don't) but you notice that the shoprite parking lot is bigger than almost every park in Hoboken. It is never close to full and just a giant waste of space.

well I guess people will have somewhere to park if they go see a movie then :)

I just wish they'd open the old theater back up. Who needs another bank?


Bleh.

A theater would be nice, also small amenities like a bowling alley or something would also be welcomed


There is a bowling alley in Hoboken, actually. . . It's in the basement of the Howe Center at Stevens. Just not open to the general public.

JCMAN320
October 18th, 2006, 10:14 AM
Hoboken set to shrink WWII memorial, with vets' backing

Wednesday, October 18, 2006
By CHARLES HACK
JOURNAL STAFF WRITER

HOBOKEN - A City Council vote today could reduce a proposed waterfront World War II memorial to half its size.

Local veterans groups already have said they support shrinking and simplifying the memorial in order to reduce the amount of city money slated to be spent on it.

The council will vote on whether rescind a Sept. 6 approval for a budget for the project of $750,000. Council members had believed that this would be entire cost of the project, officials familiar with the project said.

However, the budget would only cover the cost of the base. Adding a statue to the project will increase the cost closer to $1.2 million, according to project architect Dean Marchetto.

By the time the cost of labor, benches and other items were added, costs could reach $1.4 million, Councilman Michael Russo said.

Mayor David Roberts said the groundbreaking is scheduled for Veterans Day - Nov. 11.

He said costs had escalated after pressure to move the statue from to its original location at Third Street at the waterfront walkway to its present location in Sinatra Park.

The Hoboken veterans agreed to reduce the scale of the brass statue and simplify the design to bring it within the amount City Council members thought was going to cover the entire project - $750,000.

The statue honors the 146 Hoboken soldiers who died in World War II.

Ninjahedge
October 18th, 2006, 11:50 AM
And by the time they add the cost for the celebration party and Hors de vors......

Ninjahedge
October 18th, 2006, 11:55 AM
well I guess people will have somewhere to park if they go see a movie then :)

I know, but that is teh hard part. If you build a theater that you want to have enough people GO to to support itself, you have to have a parking garage. It will not work in a town like Hoboken to believe that people will somehow use the light rail to watch a movie.

People drive to NEWPORT FCS!!!!!.


I just wish they'd open the old theater back up. Who needs another bank?

That place was a dive, but a good cheap place to see fliks. And you are right about banks. I think we have about 17 of them, although BoA is trying to buy them all up anyway.


There is a bowling alley in Hoboken, actually. . . It's in the basement of the Howe Center at Stevens. Just not open to the general public.

I know.... I have...um....inspected it from time to time. It is quaint, but you have to know an alum to get in. It is fun to do from time to time, but they really need more places like that in Hoboken.

More tennis courts, bowling alleys, etc etc. Things for people to do besides watch basketball leagues that they would get creamed in playing on an undersized central park.

Spoon
October 18th, 2006, 05:35 PM
I was going to write a whole rant here but essentially.

Hoboken lacks everything except condos.

I live in this town and i think it is fantastic and wouldn't live anywhere else currently in NJ. Maybe JC in like 5 years but not yet.

That being said we do lack basic things. I find myself leaving Hoboken a lot for the city and for JC to do basic things and buy basic things. the town is so walkable and so compact that it would be fantastic if we just had the essentials that we could walk to.

It's essentially a village that depends upon it's bigger neighbors.

JCMAN320
October 18th, 2006, 10:54 PM
I agree Spoon. I have heard that same sentiment over and over again. I have a foreign exchange student living with me and he said that Hoboken just feels like an extension of JC it doesn't even feel like a sperate town.

Ninjahedge
October 19th, 2006, 09:26 AM
I was going to write a whole rant here but essentially.

Hoboken lacks everything except condos.

I live in this town and i think it is fantastic and wouldn't live anywhere else currently in NJ. Maybe JC in like 5 years but not yet.

That being said we do lack basic things. I find myself leaving Hoboken a lot for the city and for JC to do basic things and buy basic things. the town is so walkable and so compact that it would be fantastic if we just had the essentials that we could walk to.

It's essentially a village that depends upon it's bigger neighbors.

I agree. That whole backside development around ShopRite should have been turned into another town center.

We already have Washington Street as the Bar/Restaurant/Cell Phone/Retailer avenue, we have "The Ghetto" back in the lower dead presidents, what we need is the Village in the upper dead presidents.

We do not need any bg box stores, but my (now) wife is surprised that we do not have any stores like the Gap or BR in Yuppie Central. (Not that those stores in particular would be anything I would really want, but I can see them being successful).

Instead, they are building condos to the max lotspace and airspace money can bribe and trying to stick as many marble countertops into cheaply made prefabs to pass their pressboard cabinet kitchens off as "luxury".

We need more parks, recreation, and other varied stores. SHop Rite was a great start, but we need more.

Spoon
October 19th, 2006, 05:04 PM
We do not need any bg box stores, but my (now) wife is surprised that we do not have any stores like the Gap or BR in Yuppie Central. (Not that those stores in particular would be anything I would really want, but I can see them being successful).

Instead, they are building condos to the max lotspace and airspace money can bribe and trying to stick as many marble countertops into cheaply made prefabs to pass their pressboard cabinet kitchens off as "luxury".

We need more parks, recreation, and other varied stores. SHop Rite was a great start, but we need more.

I agree Nnjahedge. I see those "yuppie" stores doing really really well in Hoboken so it is strange why they aren't there. Those stores whole core audience lives in one square mile. A lot of the Hoboken purists will moan about that but I mean some more actual retail would be nicer than more banks and real estate offices.

See link below. It seems one developer went bankrupt building his big box condos in Hoboken. Anyone want to buy a half completed project for pennies on the dollar?

http://hoboken411.com/archives/1451#comments

Ninjahedge
October 20th, 2006, 10:47 AM
Did you read the comments?

The kids from that area are a problem. That development will not be able to get many just because of its location. Everyone cries "discrimination" any time someone mentions this, and they point out the drunken out-of-town "yuppies" that pollute Washington street, but they fail to see that this is a problem that will not go away.

We have to find some way to improve education in Hoboken so that the latest batch of residents (myself included, although I have been there 10 years now) have some incentive to stay and raise their families there.

We also have to make these guys in the projects feel like they have some opportunities themselves that otehrs in other areas do not have. Not a sens of "you SHOULD feel lucky" but that they DO feel lucky.

They have cheap housing in an area that has a huge tax base. They can get great fields and other things if they just get up and start asking for more community spending rather than spending on them in particular.

The older the town gets (long term residents) the more we can actually have a consolidated voice to ask for the things we want and need rather than letting the politicians and certain other "special interests" do what they want with the town.

So many different issues.

millertime83
October 25th, 2006, 01:24 PM
I agree Nnjahedge. I see those "yuppie" stores doing really really well in Hoboken so it is strange why they aren't there.
http://hoboken411.com/archives/1451#comments


American Apparel is opening next to the southern Starbucks on Hudson St. Isn't that a store like that?

Spoon
October 25th, 2006, 05:48 PM
American Apparrel is just an overpriced T shirt store with very clever marketing that is popular in hipster areas of big cities. For example there is a very popular store in the Lower East side of Manhattan.

I did notice a lot of overpriced boutique type mens stores opening up which is nice but I make enough money to buy a J Crew Blazer for 150 (still overpriced) just not one for 350.

I just think diversity in retail is a good thing. (restaurants, realtors, cell phone stores aren't enough) I'm not one to shop at those yuppie stores often but I do when I need a pair of pants or a shirt. I never shopped at Jos A. Banks in my life but they opened one in Hoboken and since it opened I've definitely spent over $500 there on work cloths b/c it's the only option we have in this city.

TimmyG
October 29th, 2006, 03:41 PM
W Hotel 10/29/06

http://i105.photobucket.com/albums/m230/TimmyG_04/PICT0004.jpg

Spoon
October 30th, 2006, 03:18 PM
The W hotel definitely wins my turtle speed award. I remember there was talk of a hotel over 5 years ago and that hole has been in the ground I would say around a year.

i think the first structure finished on the waterfront was 1998. it's now 2006 and I don't see a full buildout until after 2008. Why such a delay. Over 10 years to throw up 1 apartment building, 1 hotel and 3 office towers (12 floors).

Is it because it is all being done by the same developer? Is it because of the market? Is it b/c of Hoboken politics?

millertime83
November 1st, 2006, 01:14 PM
http://hoboken411.com/archives/1085

investordude
November 4th, 2006, 12:08 AM
I agree the W hotel is taking too long to build, but here's some hype about the slow motion development to cheer everyone up: http://www.nytimes.com/2006/11/05/realestate/05njzo.html?ref=realestate

JCMAN320
November 27th, 2006, 04:24 PM
14-story building, school, eyed for north Hoboken

HOBOKEN — A developer wants to turn a Park Avenue block into a large-scale, 14-story residential building that will have space for a K-8 school on the ground floor, according to city's Zoning Board of Adjustment.

The plan calls for 200 residential units, 378 parking spaces, the school and retail space along 1409-1427 Park Ave.

Sources familiar with plan say Elysian Charter School is currently in negotiations with the developer about moving into the space, but the two parties are far apart when it comes to a leasing price.

Currently, Elysian operates out of two buildings and the space would allow the school to consolidate under one roof. School officials would not confirm or deny the negotiations.

The developer, 1415 Park Avenue LLC, will ask the Zoning board tomorrow for preliminary site approval and a number of variances. The meeting is scheduled for 7 p.m. at City Hall.

Among other things, the developer is seeking a variances from the current zoning requirements that limit building heights to 80 feet or eight stories.

The site plan calls for a 14-story building or roughly 140 feet.

The developer would not comment on the proposal.

Jarrett Renshaw

Ninjahedge
November 27th, 2006, 05:30 PM
It would depend on how they handled it there. That area is up past 14th street on Park, so it would be in the area with the new concrete/prefab parking structure that is being built with only a 6-8 foot sidewalk between it and the street (concrete canyon anyone?).

If they did a good job with it, I would have no problem with a 14 story there. It is further back from the shoreline, so it would not obstruct anyones view that the great wall-o-condos has not blocked already. My only caution is stand-off distances. Also, how the hell are they going to fit a school in that space with all the necessary facilities?

I think these developers really do not know how difficult it would be to try to fit a school, parking garage AND retail underneath a residential building. They should do a design study to see if this is even feasible before even agreeing to talk about it.

JCMAN320
December 11th, 2006, 09:13 AM
New studio building gets go-ahead from Hoboken

Monday, December 11, 2006
By CHARLES HACK
JOURNAL STAFF WRITER

HOBOKEN - The City Council overruled the Planning Board in a Wednesday vote to allow Water Music recording studio to build itself a 112-feet-high building in return for providing a unique arts space in the Northwest Redevelopment Area.

The planning board had approved the project, but recommended the building should top off at 100 feet.

Even that building would have been considerably higher than the northwest development plan, which allows for a maximum occupied height of 65 feet, officials said.

Councilman Michael Cricco said the owner of the music studios, Rob Grenoble, who was developing the site, should be given a green light because he is giving back a $3 million amenity by providing a 12,000 square-foot arts space to Hoboken.

"This is something that the county has been dying for," Cricco said - a sentiment echoed by nearly every council member.

The development at 931 Madison St., would provide seven stories of residential development - including penthouses - on top of the two-floor studios, according to architect John Nastasi.

A partially open arts space would be sandwiched between them, incorporating a theater for an audience of about 140 people, according to Luis Mayroga, an architect who worked on the project. It would also include 2,200 square feet of gallery space.

A screen would enclose the area to make it usable in colder weather.

Nearly 100 artists and supporters showed up to the council meeting to support the development, with many waving placards and several saying that these facilities are needed to keep Hoboken a vibrant artistic community.

"I don't think there was a single speaker against it," said Councilwoman Terry LaBruno. According to Water Music, the studios have hosted big names including the Dave Matthews Band, U2, Cyndi Lauper and Peter Buck of REM.

The final plan must now go back before the Planning Board, according to the developer's attorney.

-------------------------

With the Powerhouse Art District coming alive in Jersey City with art galleries and recording studios, the Monroe Center for the Arts and now Water Music recording studios coming to Hoboken, and then soon to be built Hudson River Perfroming Arts Center on the waterfront in Weehawken as the center piece for our cultural greatness, Hudson County is quickily emerging as the epicenter for arts and music here in New Jersey a great rival to NYC interms of the arts with Jersey City having one of the largest Artist Studios Tours outside of Soho in the Northeast!!!!

Ninjahedge
December 11th, 2006, 05:23 PM
Good idea, but it would have been better if tehy did not build all those waterfront towers in the first place.

Having a few towers that were not totally obstructing the cliff or the buildings on top would be better back there than all along the waterfront blocking everyone's views.

As for an Arts center? I don't remember too many people calling for that. One thing Hoboken has to realize is that it does not have to compete with NYC or JC when it comes to things like this. It is too easy to get to these places from there.

What they should be focusing on are things like scholastic facilities and sporting facilities. Give the kids something to do besides hang out on the stoops and get into trouble.

Hell, give US something to do that we do not have to drive 30 minutes to get to!!! ;)

ablarc
December 11th, 2006, 06:56 PM
A partially open arts space would be sandwiched between them, incorporating a theater for an audience of about 140 people... !!!
Hey, 140 seats !!!

millertime83
December 12th, 2006, 12:32 PM
just tear down CVS and put back the 3,000 seat theater that used to be there

Ninjahedge
December 12th, 2006, 01:33 PM
Which CVS?

There are a few of them ya know... ;)


I wonder what they are planning for the plot on 14th where the Shell station was... That is a busy area and could use something like a PEDESTRIAN shopping plaza or something...

My bets are on yet another form-factor condo like the ones behind it.... :P

millertime83
December 15th, 2006, 01:02 PM
the one on Washington St. and Newark where there used to be a 3,000 person theater called The Fabian. It was torn down in the 60s for "urban revitalization."
There's pictures of it on the walls in the 13th street breezeway by the Historial Museum.

here's a picture
http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/attachment.php?attachmentid=3208&stc=1&d=1166206283

Ninjahedge
December 15th, 2006, 05:14 PM
They have such an opportunity with that space!

Even if tehy do not bring back thetheater, taking that building and making the HUGE sidewalk space there usable with a small pedestrian mall or eating court would be so good.

Add to it the parking lot (yes LOT) on observer.

While that would be a HORRIBLE location for a resiential building (a friend lived in the one a bit down the road and the RR noise was VERY prominent), it would be good for another shopping venue or even, >gasp< A PARKING GARAGE NEAR THE PATH STATION AND HOLLAND TUNNEL!!!!!!

I would like to know the full story behind why some of these locations have not been used to their full potential. Why build a garage on 9th and then piss off the original owners/operators so that you have to pay them to train your new operators when you could build one where most of the people use it, and could stand to get the most profit?

Something hasn't been told to us....

Spoon
December 16th, 2006, 01:57 AM
yeah that parking lot has been there forever. They are doing construction on the empty spot across from that one. I think someone said that it was going to be applied companies headquarters??

My guess is that the asking price for the land is way to expensive due to it's amazing location so when a developer runs his pro forma nothing works unless you build like 10 stories or something and that will never happen in that location.

The Barnes and Noble / CVS spot to me is weird too. It's 1 story, ugly as sin and in a great spot. I'm with you on repositioning what that is. That whole area by the train terminal has so much potential. Hopefully they do something amazing with it, but probably not. It is Hoboken where the local government seems to mess up everything.

millertime83
December 20th, 2006, 01:30 PM
as for the actual RR property, Hoboken has no say, and NJTransit is looking to build it up.

Ninjahedge
December 20th, 2006, 01:47 PM
It would be nice if they found a way to take that strip and maybe make it into another retail strip....

Find some way to buffer the train station from the rest of the community.

And I wold also like to see that TINY parking lot next to the bus station combine with that condemned boarded up building and make something like a decent sized commuter parking lot. Hell, even a drinkers parking lor would be fine! We need more parking to make these roads more easily passible for everyone!

ablarc
December 20th, 2006, 06:04 PM
^ No real city EVER needs a parking lot.

Parking yes, but never a LOT.

A wretched and corrosive use of land.

(Hang your head for even thinking it.)

Hoboken is a real city. It'll be much improved when the last parking LOT vanishes.

Garages are fine if they have ground floor shops.

Ninjahedge
December 21st, 2006, 09:15 AM
Mistyped, meant garage.



Picky picky picky!!!!! :rolleyes:

Spoon
December 21st, 2006, 11:48 AM
I hope NJTransit hires someone like Madison Marquette to come in and really do an amazing redesign of the Hoboken Train Station area. Make it into a retail / farmers market / condo / parking muli purpose thing. That would be awesome but it will never happen. That would probably cost a fortune.

The train station although beautiful is really depressing.

ablarc
January 6th, 2007, 09:45 PM
...really do an amazing redesign of the Hoboken Train Station area. Make it into a retail / farmers market / condo / parking muli purpose thing.
It certainly has the volume of foot traffic.


That would be awesome but it will never happen.
Why not?


That would probably cost a fortune.
You have to spend money to make money.

Ninjahedge
January 8th, 2007, 02:59 PM
I have said this before and I will say it again.

The traffic light was a waste of time and cash.

What they should do is close off the whole corner there. From Hudson Street and Hudson Place, round the corner to River Street and Newark.

Make both Newark between River and Hudson no parking and 2 way, and do the same for Hudson from Observer up to Newark.

Put a traffic light at the corner of Newark and Hudson.

Now you have an entire enclosed pedestrian area, aside from the bus station. You also do not have to "protect" the terminal from attack as no cars would be able to get within 500 feet of it, so those ugly barrers go away AND all the municipal vehicles don't get a free lot to park in. (And ruin the view).

You have your fairs and farmers markets down there, right by the path/bus and riverside. Run them that extra tiny litle strip of Sinatra Dr if you need more space (behind the post office) up to the main drive and the park.

But no, lets spend $750K on a timed traffic light, bright lights for the bus station and raised bumps to allow the blind people to trip over just like the rest of us...... :p

Spoon
January 10th, 2007, 01:49 PM
Ninjahedge's comments are exactly what I'm talking about. We all know that this is an amazing location and has potential that is limitless. yes the footraffic is there and there is a direct rail link right to it which makes it great for a destination.

The whole we put up a metal fence and put some new metal on the bus depot hood so we fixed things up doesn't cut it. It looks horrendus and I also noticed why do all those people get free parking behind those barracades. That is waterfront property and it being used as a parking lot. Oh yeah lots of homeless people camp out at night on the property to where those cars park b/c it is so desolate and not being used properly.

When you get off the path Hoboken's first impression isn't that applealing b/c that area isn't used properly and you can see it.

I say it won't happen b/c Hoboken seems to always half ass things and the developers they hire do the same. Maxwell Place for example is not shaping up to what everyone thought it would. Corners cut and bad designs etc...

Ninjahedge
January 10th, 2007, 04:07 PM
You mean you do not like the 6' high fence/concrete wall around the mini-"park" and all of its tank-stopping cylindrical tree "planters'?

Come on! All they need is Astroturf and it would be perfect


When is the next town meeting?

Zoe
January 10th, 2007, 10:14 PM
The next city elections can't come soon enough.

Once and for all the people of this town have got to vote out this good ol' boy network that only represents their own self interests and the crappy developers that they are so cozy with. If they don't get a real city administration in next election, one that reflects the wants of the population that pay most of the city tax bill, I am afraid we will see an exodus begin.

Ninjahedge
January 11th, 2007, 09:24 AM
Not yet. People have not been there long enough.

Also, notice Hoboken is starting to become stroller-ville?

While this is nicer than a bunch of kids hanging out on your stoop, it highlights the fact that this town was never constructed, or restructured with babies in mind.

It will be interesting to see how they are accomodated.

As for voting out the OBN... It would be difficult in light of the fact that 50% of the people in Hoboken probably do not officially "live" in hoboken (taxes, whatever) and even less vote. On top of that, when you see the same crews simply shuffle to a different party from one election to the next, you never know who to vote for...

I have actually thought of running, but I do not want anyone putting skeletons IN my closet just so they can "discover" them...

ablarc
January 19th, 2007, 08:11 PM
^ Aw, go on and run. You're just what Hoboken needs!

Ninjahedge
January 22nd, 2007, 09:27 AM
I know, I am so level headed and magnanimous, I am surprised that they have not elected me without my knowledge!




Wise arse. :p

meer
January 22nd, 2007, 08:18 PM
There may be a spot opening up for you soon, Ninjahedge.

http://www.nytimes.com/2007/01/22/nyregion/22mbrfs-HOBOKENCOUNC_BRF.html?_r=2&oref=slogin&oref=slogin


Manhattan: Hoboken Councilman Charged With Drunken Driving

By ANAHAD O’CONNOR (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/reference/timestopics/people/o/anahad_oconnor/index.html?inline=nyt-per)
Published: January 22, 2007

A Hoboken city councilman has been arrested and charged with driving while intoxicated, the police said yesterday. The councilman, Christopher Campos, was stopped on the West Side Highway near 43rd Street in Manhattan just after 3 a.m. on Saturday for running a red light, the police said. Officers administered a Breathalyzer test to Mr. Campos because they smelled alcohol, the police said, adding that he failed the test. Mr. Campos spent the night in jail and was arraigned and then released.

STT757
January 22nd, 2007, 09:00 PM
I would run, but I smoked pot and never exhaled. ;)

macmini
January 23rd, 2007, 01:23 PM
From nj.com:

"Documents seized from Hoboken construction code office

Hoboken’s Construction Code official, Alfred Arezzo, is under investigation by the state Department of Community Affairs, according to several sources.

Investigators from the DCA took a number of documents from the city’s construction office two weeks ago. However, the nature of the investigation remains unclear.

Calls to Arezzo, the DCA and Mayor David Roberts' office were not immediately returned today.

Jarrett Renshaw"

Ninjahedge
January 23rd, 2007, 01:41 PM
I hope these things are disclosed and leave the construction authority wide open for the next few years. Too many rubber-stamp "Wall-o-condo" developments have been sprouting up in a town that has a problem with something as simple as a balcony.

I can partially sympathise with the officials though, seeing possibly billions in construction going up around you, you would like to get a good finger-full of the frosting on the real-estate cake.

Spoon
January 23rd, 2007, 04:43 PM
You said it Ninjahedge there are condos sprouting up all over the place in this town and there are variances given out left and right and when I went to apply for a roof deck, forget it. It is like the impossible dream eventhough my roof was designed and set up for recreational purposes and is deeded to me.

The process they make you jump through is incredible and essentially it is all based upon 1 guys decision who doesn't approve anything.

Ninjahedge
January 23rd, 2007, 05:07 PM
I was told that the best thing to do for roof deck is get a temporary deck. I believe you can get 4x4 platforms and shim them to the required height to keep the surface level.

I just think that you cannot go overboard, like having furnature left out (mayve get a storage bin and place it up there?) and things like propane are a BIG no-no.


The second big problem with things like roof decks are the fact that you get tax-assessed and could be paying a pretty penny on it...

Oh, one oher thing you may want to look at is instead of simple sheeting and tar, maybe you can put up a gravel-based lightweight paving stone or tile up there. THAT would be a little harder to define directly as construction. You would just ahve to make sure that your roof is rated for the extra dead load, and extra people load or you might have leakage (or god forbid structural failure!).

I would also get a copy of whatever codes and regulations they have on thi sand read through them before you do any of this. If you find a way to put up something that cannot be classified as unsafe or permanent, I do not think you would need the same approvals or permits....




Also, if you DO get these codes, let me know. I have been thinking of something similar for quite a while..... I would like to be able to use our roof space, but not if I have to "rent" it from the city, you know?

Zoe
January 25th, 2007, 09:09 PM
The first condo I purchased here was a top floor unit. It was new construction and I pressed the builder to do the work for me (I paid him of course). He at first didn't want to be bothered but it was worth staying after him. That way when he applied for the CO it was approved along with the building.
Dealing with that construction office is a horrible experience. They belittle the residents who come in to the office. Its a boys club for only the builders and inspectors to hang out in. I am glad to hear that an agency outside of Hoboken city government is taking a look into that office.

TimmyG
February 12th, 2007, 08:41 AM
Helmers' aims for March reopening
Saturday, February 10, 2007 By COTTON DELO
JOURNAL STAFF WRITER

A landmark Hoboken restaurant may reopen next month.
Helmers' Cafe, 1036 Washington St., closed indefinitely in May after a four-alarm fire that began in an upstairs apartment caused extensive water and smoke damage.
Manager and third-generation owner Richard Lueders said he is striving to reopen the restaurant in early March but wouldn't set a precise date.
The building is still enveloped in scaffolding.
The German eatery - serving Old World fare like wienerschnitzel and bratwurst and an extensive selection of lagers and ales - was established in 1935 and has in the Lueders family since 1949.

Ninjahedge
February 12th, 2007, 09:34 AM
Helmers, sad to say, was not a place I would have recommended to anyone looking for good food.

Let me give you an example. A German Restaurant that served Chicken Fingers, Some form of Lo-Main, and I believe something like Lasagna.

The prices were WAY over the top and the food was so-so (the shnitzel was plain and dry, the sausages were so-so with very tough skins.....)

The beer selection was great, but no real specials or events. I hope they correct these things. The place was never BAD, it was just never very GOOD....

threefire
February 14th, 2007, 02:00 AM
There was a lot of talk late last year but it seems to have disappeared.

Is it going to be built? Are they still negotiating (between developer and clearview or who else)? Or has it been pulled?

Any news at all?

Thx

TimmyG
February 14th, 2007, 10:18 AM
Last I heard the theater had been approved by the city council. I don't know if there are any more steps required. It sounds like the developer will be able to build it without parking (a bad idea in my mind). You can read more about it here. http://hoboken411.com/archives/4111#more-4111

macmini
February 14th, 2007, 08:32 PM
Construction Starts for 30-Condo Project
By Eric Peterson (http://www.globest.com/cgi-bin/udt/im.author.contact.view?client_id=globest&story_id=152818&title=Construction&#37;20Starts%20for%2030%2DCondo%20P roject&author=Eric%20Peterson&address=http%3A//www.globest.com/news/840%5F840/newjersey/152818%2D1.html&summary=HOBOKEN%2C%20NJ%2DBijou%20Properties%20is% 20converting%20an%2080%2Dyear%2Dold%20former%20war ehouse%20building%20into%20new%20loft%20residences %20built%20to%20Silver%20LEED%20standards.)

http://www.globest.com/newspics/nej_gardenstreetlofts.jpg


HOBOKEN, NJ-Bijou Properties has started construction for Garden Street Lofts, a project that involves conversion of an 80-year-old, seven-story warehouse building into loft-style residential condos. The project will bring a total of 30 new residences to market, with sales slated to start later this month. Initial occupancy is slated for April 2008.

The building is located at the intersection of Garden and 14th streets in this waterfront city’s Uptown District. The redevelopment of the building also includes 8,300 sf of ground-floor retail space. The project was designed by Manhattan-based Sharples Holden Pasquarelli.

The property is also being redeveloped to Silver LEED standards, according to Larry Bijou, managing partner of the Teaneck-based Bijou Properties. “LEED certification requires documentation of the entire building process, including the recycling and reuse of existing construction materials, development of high-performance energy systems, use of sustainable products, water and energy efficiency, air quality and human health,” Bijou says.

“This is the first residential high-rise of its kind in New Jersey,” Bijou says. “Hopefully, many more will follow to help reflect on the way we live in ever-increasing urban environments.”

Ninjahedge
February 15th, 2007, 09:14 AM
Finally. Looks like it is going up right next to the 7 story parking garage with only 7' curb standoff (creating the Great Hoboken Canyon).

I am all for this development and redevelopment, but they have to stop waiving the codes every time a developer waives money at them.

They seem to not mind things like small curb standoffs, but god forbid they put in balconies. Hoboken leadership needs to revamp their codes before we end up with a bunch of pre-fabs or conversions with only a 5-10 year shelf life. (Walk around Hoboken and see the 2000 pre-fabs and their peeling liners, waterstains from ill-thought drainage schemes, and overall deterioration and you will see what I mean. They are not BAD now, but give them another 5-10).

millertime83
February 18th, 2007, 06:18 PM
New construction coming to train terminal area
City Council designates NJ Transit site as 'redevelopment zone'
By Michael D. Mullins

Just as the Hoboken Train Terminal celebrates its 100th anniversary (see story, p. x), the City Council last week approved a Planning Board study that found the terminal and yard next to it to be in need of redevelopment, but it is not known yet whether the new construction will involve residential units, or will only include retail or office space.

City Community Development Director Fred Bado said last week that both residential and retail construction are likely.

The study that was approved by the council last week, which the Planning Board conducted from June to November, determined that approximately 52 acres of New Jersey Transit's 65-acre Hoboken Terminal and Yard complex are an "underutilized resource." The study declared that "significant portions of the Study Area are in disrepair, vacant, obsolete, [and] unsafe."


After naming 13 areas within NJ Transit's property that the Planning Board felt impacted negatively on Hoboken, the study recommended that the city enter into a development agreement with the transit agency to increase revenue for the city through someday taxing areas of the site that are not used for transit purposes. In other words, if NJ Transit redevelops them for housing or other uses, the city will get the tax dollars. Currently, NJT is exempt from paying local taxes due to the transportation service it provides.


According to Fred Bado, the city's director of Community Development, the study was part of a joint development process between Hoboken and NJT.

Now, the city will hire a planner to prepare a redevelopment plan to submit to the City Council. The plan will outline what the city would like to see built on the property. Once the plan is put into an ordinance and accepted by the council, it can subsequently be implemented by NJT.

Bado mentioned that community involvement will be an essential aspect to the development process so that the city can represent the interests of its residents.

Bado said that the anticipated plans appear to call for a mixed-use complex that will include residential, commercial, and retail space.

NJT Spokesman Dan Stessel responded to Bado's assessment of the future property by calling it a "safe assumption," but would not provide further details.

"NJT hasn't formerly announced any plans," he said, "[but we] are exploring ways to make the terminal work better for its customers and Hoboken residents."


Council divided on matter



Not everyone on the council was supportive of the measure, as seen in the 5-3-1 vote that approved the resolution.

Both 1st Ward Councilwoman Theresa Castellano and 3rd Ward Councilman Michael Russo voted against the resolution and wanted to know more abut the redevelopment process before they endorsed it.

The other dissenting vote came from 5th Ward Councilman Michael Cricco, who felt the city and NJT had not gone far enough in reaching out to the community and getting residential input in the process.

Cricco proposed creating a resident-led committee for the upcoming project.

Councilman-at-Large Peter Cammarano abstained from vote due to what he considered a conflict of interest, because the law firm he works for has NJT as a client.

In response to doubts about public involvement, Bado said, "I know the city and I know the City Council, and we're not going to accept some plan already done. We will have input into [the plan] and we will openly decide what that [plan] is going to be."

Questions were also raised by the public as to why a state agency, which does not need local municipal approval to build on its property, would include Hoboken through the redevelopment plan.

Bado acknowledged that NJT could have used several different agencies to complete the development, such as a state redevelopment agency, economic development administration, or regional improvement authority, but they wanted to work with Hoboken to ensure local input into the process.

Stessel reaffirmed this point this week, saying, "Whenever we undertake a project of this nature, we look for the community to advance any development idea."

Although Bado reinforced the positive aspects of the redevelopment plan, he also acknowledged the complexity involved with constructing a mixed-use building surrounded by a mass transit system and making sure that it does not interfere with the train's operations.

Bado mentioned an idea of putting a deck over the rail yard and building over the redevelopment zone. But later he said it would cost too much money.



The master developer and its history



In October of 2005, NJT announced that it had selected LCOR Inc., a national real estate investment and development company that specializes in transit-oriented and mixed-use development projects, as its master developer for potential Hoboken Terminal and Yard development.

The Pennsylvania-based firm was formed in 1992 and has developed more than 20,000 residential units and over 16 million square feet of commercial space so far.

The recent renovations of Grand Central Terminal in New York City and the Washington Union Station in the District of Columbia as well as the newly constructed "Terminal Four" at John F. Kennedy International Airport can all be accredited to LCOR.

The developer will produce a master plan for the site, which will then go before NJT and the city of Hoboken for approval before being implemented.

Although the specifics are not yet available, the goals of the plan include enhancing operational efficiency between rail, light rail, ferry, bus, and PATH operations, and maximizing economic return through a transit-oriented development based around a mixed-use complex.

TimmyG
February 25th, 2007, 09:37 AM
Uptown high-rise to hold charter school
'Park on Park' garage will close to make way
http://www.zwire.com/images/spacer.gifhttp://www.zwire.com/images/spacer.gifhttp://www.zwire.com/images/spacer.gif By Michael D. Mullins 02/25/2007
http://i105.photobucket.com/albums/m230/TimmyG_04/02elysian25_story.jpg
Hoboken's Zoning Board unanimously approved a proposal last week for a 12-story building at 1415 14th St. that will include donated space for one of the city's two charter schools.

In addition to carving out 180 condos, 371 parking spaces, and some retail space, developer Bijou Properties is donating 46,000 square feet in the building for the Elysian Charter School.

The plot of land is currently shared by the Park on Park Garage and an undeveloped dirt lot located on 15th Street between Garden Street and Park Avenue.

That will mean curtains for the 430-car parking garage, in a city that is strapped for parking. Developer Lawrence Bijou said he did not know exactly when the garage will close, but that ground will be broken on the new project within 12 months.

$100M project
The Hoboken-based firm Dean Marchetto Architects has been hired for the $100 million project, which has not yet been named, according to Bijou.

Twenty percent of the condos will be three and four-bedrooms so to provide living space for Hoboken families. Along the base of the building there will be 30,000 square feet of retail space.

After ground is broken on the project, it will take approximately 18 months to complete, according to Bijou.

Bijou is also converting the former Hostess Cupcake Factory on 14th Street and Park Avenue and currently converting the old "Coconut Building" on 14th and Garden streets, which is now called Garden Street Lofts.

The charter school's entrance will be on Garden Street and will open up to a lobby with a staircase and elevator, bringing students to their classrooms located on the second and third floors.

Much support and some opposition
The measure received an overwhelming amount of support from members of the public attending the meeting, many of whose children are enrolled in the Elysian Charter School.

Hoboken has two charter schools, which were founded in the 1990s by parents and meet state mandates in order to get public school funding.

"If it wasn't for Elysian, we couldn't stay in Hoboken," said Grace Leong, a parent of three, last week. Two of her children are enrolled in the school and her third is in a nursery program at All Saints Episcopal Day School. " decision to donate this area and the board's decision to allow it makes it possible for our children to have their own gym, music room, and community all in one building. It's encouraging to see legislators and developers support local families and education like they did."

Elysian is currently divided between two locations, one at the Rue Building at 301 Garden St. and the other at the former Our Lady of Grace School Building at 422 Willow St.

Although Leong's sentiment was reiterated by several at the Zoning Board meeting, there was some opposition to the project, which required several variances.

Some expressed their concern about schoolchildren crossing the nearby streets, the anticipated increase in traffic caused by new residents, and a greater strain on the already limited parking situation.

In response to the safety issues, both parents and Zoning Board members said that crossing guards would adequately protect children from oncoming traffic, citing the 11th Street crosswalk used by the nearby Wallace Primary School.

Bijou added that there would be a drive-in/drop-off zone for parents to leave their children, as opposed to leaving them on the street.

Both the parking and traffic issues were addressed by the developers who argued, through planning experts, that there would be no significant impact on traffic in the area. They said that many of those who currently use the garage, which has a capacity to fit 430 vehicles and tends to be at 75 percent occupancy, will find other garages located in the area, such as those near the shipyard.

[B]The 'green effect'
In addition to donating space to Elysian Charter, Bijou has also shown consideration for the community by constructing a building that will be the first mixed-use facility in Hoboken, if not the state, to be deemed a LEED Certified Gold-Standard structure for its environmental-friendly design and the sustainable materials being used to construct it.

LEED, which stands for "Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design," is an industry standard used to designate properties that are environmentally safe.

Gold is the highest rating, outside of Platinum, that a structure can receive, which is based on the amount of features a building has that lessens the strain on the surrounding environment.

Some of the features of the proposed building are its "green roof," which will retain water that can be used for landscaping; an interior piping system that filters natural air into each unit without having to open a window, and the overall energy-conserving design that will help tenants save on bills and reduce the impact on the city's infrastructure.

"This is a great way to establish a vibrant neighborhood and build a cohesive, urban environment," said Bijou.

There will also be 20,000 square feet of green space dispersed between three gardens along the rooftops of the complex.

The charter school
Conceived in 1995 by a community group called Mile Square Families, the Elysian Charter School first opened its doors in September of 1997, having been one of New Jersey's original 13 charter schools.

The curriculum of the progressive public school focuses on social responsibility.

It receives most of its funding through the Hoboken Board of Education. However, the school has its own Board of Trustees that handles the curriculum and administration.

The public school currently has 280 students with more than 100 on a waiting list, according to Leong. Students are selected through an annual lottery where names are drawn at random, giving children from every socioeconomic class in the district a chance at attending the school.

The school has, on average, higher test scores than the other public elementary schools in the district, according to Elysian's Director Carol Stock.

Michael Mullins can be reached at mmullins@hudsonreporter.com

Ninjahedge
February 26th, 2007, 10:34 AM
WHat they should be doing is trying to combine the things that are needed most in a city like Hoboken:

1. Living space
2. Parking
3. DAY CARE.

The school would be nice, but they need to explore the possibility of including a large day care facility ON PREMISIS that would allow "Mom and Dad" to drop off Jr downstairs before rushing off to the city for work.

The place would fill up even before plans were made.

millertime83
February 28th, 2007, 01:00 PM
what's dumb about those Hoboken Reporter pictures of the 1415 14th St. Building is that the "before" and "after" pictures are not from the same vantage point.

The "before" is from across Park Ave, and the "after" photo is from across 15th Street with the Hudson Tea Buildings somehow turned into grass.

Ninjahedge
February 28th, 2007, 01:28 PM
what's dumb about those Hoboken Reporter pictures of the 1415 14th St. Building is that the "before" and "after" pictures are not from the same vantage point.

The "before" is from across Park Ave, and the "after" photo is from across 15th Street with the Hudson Tea Buildings somehow turned into grass.

I noticed that.

The conversion going on now just miraculously dissappeared!

ablarc
February 28th, 2007, 08:21 PM
The "before" is from across Park Ave, and the "after" photo is from across 15th Street with the Hudson Tea Buildings somehow turned into grass.
Will they bury the power lines?

Spoon
February 28th, 2007, 11:49 PM
They definitely will not. Hoboken strikes me as so odd b/c it is a city but there are telephone poles all over the place. If you stop and look around it looks incredibly ridiculous to think that. Some of them are right at windown level like 5 feet from the condos.

Essentially the town let developers build million dollar condos all over town without upgrading the sewer or utilities. I can't figure out why.

Even New Brunswick where I use to live has the utilities underground.

JCMAN320
March 14th, 2007, 10:56 AM
Will pedicabs get green light in Hoboken?

Wednesday, March 14, 2007
By CHARLES HACK
JOURNAL STAFF WRITER

HOBOKEN - Pedal powered cabs could hit the streets of the Mile Square City.

And it's making the cabbies nervous.

The City Council's transportation committee will hold a hearing next week to determine whether pedicab operators need anything more than a business license to operate, according to Councilwoman Terry LaBruno.

A couple of entrepreneurs approached LaBruno, chairwoman of the Parking and Transportation Committee - and asked if they could operate pedicabs in the city.

Pedicabs don't seem to be covered by existing taxi regulations, city officials say, and therefore operators would not have to purchase a taxi medallion - which can sell for as much as $250,000.

Some Hoboken residents interviewed recently said they approve of pedicabs as a green alternative to conventional taxis.

"I think it's cool," said Jerry Coggins, 42, who lives on Washington Street. "It's good for the environment."

Others said that they might congest the city streets.

"It would be quaint to have those things pedaling around Hoboken," said Ray Abbiatici, a commuter who was picking up his car near the PATH station to drive home to Basking Ridge. "But then again I see congestion problems. It could be total chaos."

Cabbies waiting in the line to pick up commuters at Hudson Place said they would not welcome more competition in an already crowded field.

"We've already got a lot of competition," said Anton Makar, a yellow cab taxi driver who has worked in Hoboken for two weeks after five years as a cabbie in Jersey City.

There are 53 licenses for cabs in Hoboken, 25 livery licenses, and a unlimited licenses for limousines, a city official said.

In addition, another five cab licenses may be auctioned this year.

LaBruno said she doesn't believe pedicabs would be in direct competition with taxis. She envisions them being used only in nice weather and mainly for tourists and as novelty rides.

In New York, the growing popularity of pedicabs has caused conflict with drivers on the city's crowded streets and Mayor Michael Bloomberg wants to strictly regulate them.

LaBruno said that Hoboken might have to consider similar regulations if pedicabs catch on.

millertime83
March 14th, 2007, 12:55 PM
I hope this happens. Hoboken taxi cabs suck.

Ninjahedge
March 14th, 2007, 01:47 PM
$4 to go a mile.

I can see the points being made, so this one is a toss-up for me. It would be good depending on the price offered.

Spoon
March 14th, 2007, 02:02 PM
I'm for it b/c the Hoboken cabs that line up at the PATH are terrible.

In a place like hoboken which is easy to navigate, flat and very small pedi cabs make perfect sense.

Also they would only operate in the summer. My only concern is them getting around with all the double parked cars and people walking around.

They'll probalby be cheaper than the 5 bucks plus tip to go less than a mile in most instances.

RandySavage
March 14th, 2007, 05:44 PM
^ It's interesting that you mention Hoboken power lines being right outside apartment windows.

When I lived there that was my chief complaint (aside from getting back to Hoboken after a late night in Manhattan). The electromagnetic field given off by the power lines would do weird things to my tv screen and computer monitor (and probably my health). I'm happy to no longer have to deal with Hoboken's power lines.

JCMAN320
March 14th, 2007, 05:47 PM
I don't understand the big deal with powerlines?? I just don't get it. They are powerlines. They are in parts of Brooklyn, Queens, the Bronx, Staten Island and Jersey City.

Ninjahedge
March 14th, 2007, 05:58 PM
They are ugly though, and along Hudson they actually shred some nice looking trees to keep them away from the lines.

Washington street is all underground I believe, but the rest of the town is exposed.

I do not see any MAJOR reason to bury all of them, but in areas like Hudson I think they should bury them. 11th avenue too, (They have in some spots I believe).

As for EM, I dontknow if it is just the wires. You may have been getting weird effect from your cable line itself being too close to the power lines. Standard current lines do not give off a hell of a lot of EM. I would not SLEEP on them, but I would not wrooy about them being 15 feet from you either.

High tension lines? They might have more of an effect though.....

Spoon
March 14th, 2007, 06:05 PM
I just think that the telephone poles look antiquated and take away from the visual look of the city. You just have wires criss crossing all over the place. If you ever really just take a step back and focus on them they look ridiculous all over the place.

In a city so compact that is throwing up super expensive condos all over town it would be nice to upgrade the infrastructure a bit. Replace some sewers, bury some utilities etc...that's all.

ablarc
March 14th, 2007, 06:49 PM
I just think that the telephone poles look antiquated and take away from the visual look of the city. You just have wires criss crossing all over the place. If you ever really just take a step back and focus on them they look ridiculous all over the place.
Agreed, they're especially offensive in a nice looking place like Hoboken or San Francisco.

Scraperfannyc
March 14th, 2007, 11:29 PM
Agreed, they're especially offensive in a nice looking place like Hoboken or San Francisco.

I believe the powerlines in San Francisco are all used to power the electric buses that run throughout the city. Powerlines for electricty/telephones I believe are all underground, but I could be mistaken. Not every street has them, but I think they have an appeal.

Spoon
March 15th, 2007, 12:56 AM
I was just in San Francisco and the wires above head are for the electric buses and the electirc trains. I think those add a cool kind of character actually once you get use to seeing them everywhere.

I think the utilities are underground, or atleast where I were they were underground.

Zoe
March 15th, 2007, 08:24 AM
The power lines should be buried and I hope it is an issue in the next election. Power lines have been suspected in the past of having a potentially harmful effect on children as well but I believe that was related to the bigger lines not typically found in a town. (I admit I do not know what current research now says on the subject). I know some people that have a black power box just a few feet from their bedroom windows. They keep the curtains closed because when they are open, all you can see is a big power box (and they live on the 4th floor).
I would much rather pay to have a tree planted in every spot where a telephone pole now sits. There are many grants available to the city to help pay for this type of investment. Investing in the sewer system is also years overdue. And given that I, like so many others, pay more that $1000 a month to the city in property taxes, I am entitled to have a say or at least real representation on where my taxes are being used.

I have not come across any announcements yet that officially declare that the town was in fact sold to developers without our notification and that our tax money is going to be refunded.

TimmyG
March 15th, 2007, 09:34 AM
Helpful $6M Fed grant eases rich developer's walkway expense
Thursday, March 15, 2007 By CHARLES HACK
JOURNAL STAFF WRITER

HOBOKEN - A $6 million federal grant will help pay for a stretch of waterfront walkway in front of the Maxwell Place condo development - funds that were originally to come from the developer's coffers.
The stretch of walkway, to the east of Frank Sinatra Drive from 12th Street to a few hundred feet south of 11th street, will become part of the Hoboken waterfront esplanade.
The walkway is also incorporated into a 5-to-6-acre park, the centerpiece in the marketing material for the 800-unit luxury condominium complex.
The previous owners transferred title to the city for a public waterfront park in 2001 and agreed to pay for it. The cost of the entire park was estimated at that time to be around $11 million, officials said.
Benjamin Jogodnik, a senior vice president for the developer, the Toll Brothers City Living, said the company will pay the balance of the cost for the park and, under an agreement with the city, Maxwell Place residents will pay park maintenance costs. He refused to provide a current estimate of the cost of the park.
Under state law waterfront developers must have a 30-foot-wide public walkway, part of what the state plans to be a promenade stretching along the Hudson River from the Bayonne Bridge to the George Washington Bridge.
Previously, the developer was to pay for the project. But Fred Bado, the city's director of community development, said the deal was that the developer would pay for it only if grant money wasn't available, and that the city would help secure those grants.
In 2003, Bado said, he applied to the U.S. Department of Transportation for grants for five projects and two were approved - this one and a $2 million improvement project for Observer Highway.
Some aren't happy that a federal grant, instead of the developer's money, is being used to pay for the walkway.
"There is no mention of the fact that this going to come out of my income tax," said Leah Healey, co-founder of the Hoboken Parks Organization.
She said the money would be better spent on other projects around Hoboken.
A representative of the state Department of Environmental Protection said the state requires the developer to provide a public right of way but does not regulate where the money comes from.
When complete, the walkway will include a bicycle path, seating, lighting and landscaping.
The bulk of the developer's park will be on a peninsula that juts into the river, sandwiched between the river and Sinatra Drive, and will include grass, trees, a children's park, a dog run, and an area for activities such as concerts and films.
Developers also plan to renovate a pier for fishing that is near the north end of the park opposite 12th Street. There also are plans for a boating pavilion.
But plans to restore Elysian Field - where it is said the first game of modern organized baseball was played in 1846 - has been downgraded to simply installing a commemorative plaque there, sources said.

Ninjahedge
March 15th, 2007, 10:19 AM
The developers are all full of crap.

They gave a walled in little tuft of grass at one corner of the development and left it at that and are whining that they do not have the funds to do anything else.

The first proposal for Maxwell was a full size field, then a little league field/commemorative park and now it is just a frigging plaque. It stinks.

Most of the developments that are going in are contributing very littlt to the cities coffers which could have been used to pay for RECREATION FACILITIES back in the upper dead presidents rather than cookie-cutter condos.

Well, whatever. If they continue to do this, Hoboken will always be "In Transit" and never get a stable community again. But maybe that is what they want!

millertime83
March 15th, 2007, 12:42 PM
Here is what Stevens had proposed for this area:
http://www.stevens.edu/press/images/...meproposal.pdf (http://www.stevens.edu/press/images/maritimeproposal.pdf)

That would have resulted in a new Elysian Field.


http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/attachment.php?attachmentid=3736&stc=1&d=1173977013

Ninjahedge
March 15th, 2007, 01:57 PM
Money talks.

And Toll Brothers did a lot of talking..... :P

Zoe
March 15th, 2007, 02:01 PM
Looks like in that plan they intend to try and keep that eyesore parking lot next to their plant. I heard a ways back that they pushed for the parking garage below that new building because they ultimately had to give up that land due to the State law for the walkway and that it would have been taken by ED anyways.

That article about Toll Bros has made me sick to my stomach. The Mayor's administration NEVER mentioned that they would seek grants first, then get the developer to pay. I agree with the opponents, there is only so much grant money available for parks and trees in a community. The developer should have never been allowed to procede without this public benefit.

This administration does NOTHING to server the people who live here (unless you want to count an $800,000 elevator in the library; I would love to see those expenses audited).

JCMAN320
March 15th, 2007, 02:24 PM
Arezzo target of state probe

Thursday, March 15, 2007
By JARRETT RENSHAW
JOURNAL STAFF WRITER

HOBOKEN - The state is conducting a criminal investigation of the city's top construction official centering on his involvement in a number of properties and his close ties with a number of contractors.

The criminal investigation of Construction Code Official Al Arezzo comes at the same time as an ethics investigation of him by the state Department of Community Affairs focusing on similar issues.

Mayor David Roberts said yesterday that he has also launched an "internal review" of Arezzo following stories in The Jersey Journal about his interest in property leased by the Police Department for its horse stables. That review will be conducted by an assistant city attorney, said city spokesman Bill Campbell.

Sources inside and outside City Hall say they were questioned by New Jersey State Police officers operating under the direction of the state Attorney General's Office.

The investigators wanted to know more about Arezzo's previous and current property interests, along with his relationship with a group of plumbers, painters and other contractors in town, sources told The Jersey Journal. The Attorney General's Office would not confirm or deny any investigation.

Asked yesterday if he was interviewed by criminal investigators, Arezzo replied, "No comment."

Arezzo owns - or is a partner in - a number of properties in Hoboken, including the Newark Street property where the police horses are kept.

Arezzo, along with part-time city attorney Vincent Lapaglia and developer Pino Morin, who is one of the owners of Hoboken T&M Contracting, are partners in the limited liability company that owns that property.

The city pays Arezzo and his partners $1,000 a month in rent, plus the city pays the company's property taxes and water and sewer bills, which combined is roughly $3,000 a month.

A memo from the city's zoning office shows that Zoning Officer Joel Mestre issued a "one-year temporary use certificate" to the property in July 2004, since the horse stables were not compatible with the zoning requirements.

The certificate was not renewed after it expired in 2005, meaning the horse stable is currently not in compliance with zoning requirements.

Also, in late 2003 and early 2004, Arezzo paid nearly $10,000 less than market value for two parking spots at 1313 Park Ave., according to property records.

In the months before the sale, Arezzo inspected the property and signed off on a number of permits, according to a review of city records. As the city's top construction code official, he inspects and approves permits on hundreds of projects each year.

Arezzo, who does not live at 1313 Park Ave., said he was unaware of the discount.

In order to avoid potential conflicts of interest, Arezzo previously said he uses outside inspectors on his properties.

But a Jersey Journal review of city records shows that the office only used an outside inspector for a two-month period during the past five years, when the city's elevator inspector was on vacation.

Spoon
March 15th, 2007, 02:40 PM
That toll brothers news is just so upsetting. The landscaping they've done so far is so bland and horrible. They didn't use any nice pavers, no fountain, no brick. They stuck some trees in some concerte sewer pipes and stuck them on a lawn. They also have like a 30 foot sidewalk next to their building made of concerete. Can't wait until that thing cracks up and looks great.

Maxwell is turning into a modern day "radiant city" or "garden city" which were models for public housing projects. sweet. good luck whoever bought there.

Ninjahedge
March 15th, 2007, 03:44 PM
And thanks for taking our view.

Not that the Maxwell Plant was that great to begin with!

TimmyG
March 21st, 2007, 12:41 PM
Here are some pictures I took today of the Maxwell development.
http://i105.photobucket.com/albums/m230/TimmyG_04/PICT0174-1.jpg
http://i105.photobucket.com/albums/m230/TimmyG_04/PICT0169.jpg

millertime83
March 21st, 2007, 12:41 PM
Looks like in that plan they intend to try and keep that eyesore parking lot next to their plant. I heard a ways back that they pushed for the parking garage below that new building because they ultimately had to give up that land due to the State law for the walkway and that it would have been taken by ED anyways.

I think you're looking at the city soccer field just south of the Griffith Building. That's not a parking lot.

The garage under the new building is a result of the proposal for a garage under Stevens' DeBaun field being denied by Hoboken about 7 years ago. It would have had an entrance at the end of River Terrace. Under the Babbio center was the only place left on their property to propose one.

Ninjahedge
March 21st, 2007, 01:56 PM
So instead of coming to a compromise, we have to stare at a half finished parking structure for Stevens for 2 years.

They should just put in a provision requiring more than just a blank facade. Something like small retail/concession type facilities along the perimeter and then just allow them to build the damn lot.

Also, closing off some of the roads to student parking would be a boost, but I do not know how they would be able to do that.

And as for the parking lot across the way Miller, I think he is referring to the one by the maintainance building. The lot that is slowly falling into the river? They should get rid of that whole area and rebuild the pier there. Also, scrap the damn soccer field and put it somewhere you do not need netting to prevent your ball from becoming fish-food.

That park woud have made a GREAT venue for concerts and the like (it is very easy to close off, great view of Manhattan, and very easy to get to) but they cave in and make it a socer field that noone can get on because it is booked solid until 2010. :p

We need a set of fields back in the dead presidents by Shop Rite before it becomes 100% condo-ville.

Zoe
March 22nd, 2007, 11:28 PM
Yeah Ninja, that is the lot I was talking about. It's crazy to me that this piece of waterfront is being used for parking cars. The pavement is crumbling and the surrounding fence is an eyesore. Even the sidewalk is terrible, you can barely get a stroller down it and joggers are forced into the street which is dangerous because of the curves in the road there.

I don't really dig what they are proposing for the Pier C design (a volleyball court, talk about fish bait!). I would rather them spend the money to fix and expand that parking lot area to be the size of Pier A.

And speaking of Pier C.... I don't get what is going on with that. The Port Authority was paying the bill as I remember and they have even told the City they have taken too long and are at risk of loosing the money for it. What gives?