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dbhstockton
January 7th, 2003, 08:41 PM
I was just in the Wintergarden and I noticed how bad-ass Jersey City is starting to look. *Just a couple more *serious commercial skyscrapers and it would have a skyline that could rival most in the US, or North America for that matter (except for Chicago and NY, of course).

I know there's an old post about the status of projects in JC. *Would anyone like to revive it here? *I'd really like to know.

Here's one good site, to begin with: http://www.jcedc.org/

Jude1017
January 8th, 2003, 02:19 PM
Hey. I was in New York last night, and I nocited how Jersey City's Skyline is really growing. *Growing up there, even before the Newport Tower was built really makes me amazed at how much this skyline has transformed. *I am dissapointed at reports that they have scaled down the height of the Goldman Sachs Tower. *Orignally it was planned to be 876 ft. *Now some are saying it is topped out around 791 ft. *This is BULL. *We need more taller buildings in Jersey City. *Does anybody know of anymore buildings planned for Jersey City??

billyblancoNYC
January 8th, 2003, 03:25 PM
Hopefully not. *JC building symbolizes Jersey continually leeching from NYC. *It's been going on for years and it makes me sick. *I guess there's nothing much to do. *Hopefully the city finally wakes up and makes Bkln, LIC and elsewhere in the 4 "other" boroughs more attractive. *We'll see.

dbhstockton
January 8th, 2003, 04:23 PM
1. *It makes sense to have a financial center on Jersey's side of the Hudson. *It is essential for the regional economy. *Like it or not, there's a large pool of wealthy financial services workers for whom JC is a much easier commute. *This cannot be ignored. *Even the planned transit improvements at the new WTC will only do so much, and they're years off (no NJ Transit, for one thing). *We need to keep these workers in the region. *They're human beings. *They will get fed up and take their tax dollars to Charlotte.

2. *This is America. *Competition is the foundation of our economy. *A thriving New Jersey waterfront with lower taxes forces NYC to get its act together and *ante-up. *This is a good thing for the region. *

3. *JC symbolizes that traditional "leeching" relationship you refer to being reversed. *The jobs are in Jersey now. *Some are even living in Manhattan and commuting to Jersey.

4. *Brooklyn and LIC have the disadvantage that they're on Long Island and therefore people have to get through NYC to get to them. *I'd like New Yorkers to stop thinking of the other side of the Hudson river as New Jersey and start thinking of it as the rest of the continent. *The river can be a formidable economic barrier. *NYC needs a good relationship with NJ for that reason. *New Jersey has the highest per-capita income in the nation and is the most densely-populated state in the union. *It cannot be ignored or belittled.

5. Yes, I'm from New Jersey.

(Edited by dbhstockton at 4:25 pm on Jan. 8, 2003)


(Edited by dbhstockton at 4:27 pm on Jan. 8, 2003)

TLOZ Link5
January 8th, 2003, 05:03 PM
A competetive NJ would be really good for the economy overall. *New York will be forced to, as Stockton said, ante-up to stay on the ball. *It's not like having some jobs in the suburbs is a bad thing; the *Chicago metropolitan has 60% of its commercial jobs in the suburbs, and it's still going strong.

Jersey City's CBD, however, lacks many of the amenities that Midtown, or even Downtown for that matter, already provide. *From what I hear there aren't as many restaurants or stores, and very little housing. *(I got this from the Post, BTW so don't flame me or anything if I'm dead wrong.)

Maybe Newark will get some newer, taller skyscrapers, also. *The Midatlantic-National building has been the tallest for over 70 years, and it's only 465 feet tall!

Jude1017
January 8th, 2003, 08:55 PM
Maybe Newark doesn't have any new taller buildings because of Newark Airport. *(Which officially is in Elizabeth, NJ) *Jersey City has some new restaraunts along the river. *They now have a "Pizzaria Uno" right under the Harborside Financial building. *Plus, they have many new sushi places (too meet the needs of the yuppies.) *Newport Mall is there. *There are lots of stores. *The new housing is going up right behind the Goldman Sachs building, and the new Marbella apartments, which I believe is 40 floors. *I love Jersey City, but it will take a long time before it ever reaches the "skyline map"

amigo32
January 9th, 2003, 03:28 AM
More power to JC. If NYC's mayor does not want to capitulate, somebody has to fill in the voids. *Bloomberg said something yesterday about making NY a "first-class product", well *he better GET ON *IT, it seems that he dosen't want to spend money or make concessions to keep business firms around. *This is amazing to me! *Talk about shooting yourself in the foot. Maybe he is playing hardball, but can he afford to?

NYatKNIGHT
January 9th, 2003, 11:37 AM
Jersey City, like Brooklyn, has grown with New York from the very beginning as part of the regional powerhouse. You can't ignore its significance in helping to keep New York as America's premier city. They know their place, they aren't trying to take down New York, but it would be stupid if New Jersey didn't capitalize on the businesses that choose to leave New York. Thank goodness it's right there, right across the river.

This hatred for anything and everything about New Jersey is not only unfounded, but it alienates almost half the people in our own metro area who in the end are on our team. We need them and they need us. You may not know this by reading these skyscraper boards, but take it from someone who has lived in other parts of the country; New York City as well as New Jersey both have generally terrible reputations. It does us no good to promote that.

http://www.wirednewyork.com/skyscrapers/30hudson/images/30hudson_liberty_state_park_28sept02_s.jpg

billyblancoNYC
January 9th, 2003, 12:00 PM
Everybody's entitled to their opinion. *All I know is Jersey is continually trying to use tax breaks and it's dirt cheap, worthless land to take things from NY. *They even tried to lure the NYSE! I'm not saying it's smart for them to do it, but as a die-hard NYer it irks me - plain and simple.

Yeah, they are a fairly wealthy state, so is CT. *Why? *B/c of NYC. *NJ is one big suburb - North to NYC and South to Philly. *So sure, NJ is densely populated - it's not a huge state and it's in a prime position between 2 real cities.

True, it is better to be there than in Oklahoma, or somewhere like that, but would as many people be in NJ if they weren't pushing so hard to take from NY?

It also says something about American companies - maufacturing goes to China, etc and why do we need to have an office in a prime location? It's all about EPS, baby! *NYC is 7th in the world for office cost, much less than 1/2 that of London, yet businesses still seem to run to London, Paris, etc. *I dunno, maybe it's just me.

C'mon Jersey lovers, tell me that I'm wrong and ignorant!!!

NYatKNIGHT
January 9th, 2003, 12:42 PM
I think you just proved it.

billyblancoNYC
January 9th, 2003, 01:46 PM
I preoved what? *That people from Jersey love it so much that they actually consider it an extention on NY. *

TAFisher123
January 9th, 2003, 02:38 PM
Why shouldnt new jersey lure companies (or leech) from nyc city, it called competition, get over it...there nothing illegal, stop crying....NYC downtown has offered business tons a tax breaks and perks

TLOZ Link5
January 9th, 2003, 03:11 PM
Quote: from Jude1017 on 8:55 pm on Jan. 8, 2003
Maybe Newark doesn't have any new taller buildings because of Newark Airport. *(Which officially is in Elizabeth, NJ) *Jersey City has some new restaraunts along the river. *They now have a "Pizzaria Uno" right under the Harborside Financial building. *Plus, they have many new sushi places (too meet the needs of the yuppies.) *Newport Mall is there. *There are lots of stores. *The new housing is going up right behind the Goldman Sachs building, and the new Marbella apartments, which I believe is 40 floors. *I love Jersey City, but it will take a long time before it ever reaches the "skyline map"


Impressive. *And I mean that, as well. *But JC will still have a ways to go.

Isn't there also a 900-footer right across the Hudson from BPC, that's been on-hold for a while? *I heard about that in Skyscrapers.com, but I'm not completely sure about it; could you clarify this?

Heh, maybe JC can be a twin city to New York in a decade or so? *New York will still be the more prominent twin, but it would be an interesting concept.

billyblancoNYC
January 9th, 2003, 03:30 PM
As I said previously, I'm not saying that they SHOULDN'T leech, but as a NYer I said that I'm not a big fan of it.

Why are all you Jersey lovers so touchy? *You have a wonderful state, full of great things and great people.

JeffreyNYC
January 9th, 2003, 04:11 PM
I had to laugh when reading some of these posts. As someone who basically has lived many years in NYC. as well as many other parts of the world, I see NY/NJ as the same metro area. I can't believe there is all this discussion and distinction because of a river dividing 2 land masses!
As I see it, I love JC and am glad to see things being spread out over Jersey (and I don't mean urban sprawl) as well as LIC, Brooklyn and wherever else in the NYC. metro. We all depend on eachother. JC downtown could pratically be another borough of NYC. it's as urban as anypart of the outer boroughs as well as just as nice!
The rivers are dividing *lines between areas but this idea to fight over it and see things as "so different" on the other side just seems so provincial to me!
The Goldman Sachs building is beautiful! Let's be happy it's been built on "our" metro area!

dbhstockton
January 9th, 2003, 06:09 PM
Thank you Jeffrey! *Well said.

Billy, maybe reading this thread closely will help you understand why us Jersey folks are touchy about this subject ("Jersey lover" is pushing it a bit. *I just live here and think New Yorkers owe more respect to the Garden State). *We don't like to be seen as only detracting from your glorious city, and we see your attitude as bigotted. * It's not all quiet bedroom commuties out here. *We contribute to the regional economy as well. *Where would NYC be without NJ's modern port facilities, refineries, manufacturing, transortation network, etc? * *Moreover, suburbs are suburbs. *If you want to avoid offending us, don't say anything about New Jersey that you wouldn't also say about Westchester, Nassau, or Suffolk counties.

amigo32
January 9th, 2003, 10:20 PM
Interesting rivalries, but they are not unique to NY. *KC has similar competitiveness between the two halves of its metro. *The wealthy side (Kansas) has "leeched" jobs and business from the poorer side (Missouri) for decades which irritates some on the MO. side, (prosperity envy) while The MO. side has more national notoriety, which irritates some on the KS. side. Also, they have been trying to pass a bi-state tax for a few years now to upgrade the stadiums, (which are on the MO. side), and the Kansas half always votes it down. *The most oft given reason for voting no is that they don't want to pay taxes for Missouri property.
Sounds like squabbling children, dosen't it?

billyblancoNYC
January 10th, 2003, 10:24 AM
Intersting about the KC situation. *

As far as NY/NJ it's a matter of hometown pride, really. *Everyone, I think, knows NY is a metro area for various reasons. *But, there's nothing wrong with loving your hometown and wanting everything in it/for it. *You know what I mean?

Any rivalry steeped in reality and understanding can't be bad - both sides would step up.

As far as Nj being the same as Westchester and LI, this might be true, but NJ is another state with more of a "winner take all" mentality (ie. take breaks, etc), so there is more of a competition between NJ and NY that NYC and NY suburbs.

amigo32
January 11th, 2003, 03:43 AM
Well, I wasn't trying to "intrude" on NY. *I saw striking similarities in how the communities interact with each other, and I thought that it was worth mentioning as a comparison point. *All metro areas have their "hometown pride", this is why they fight with each other. *I guess I was trying to make the point that all of this inter-metro bickering is really pretty silly, when you look at it. *Generally, whatever benefits one part of a metro area will eventually translate to the rest of the metro area over time. *As long as the area is interconnected it is part of a *"whole"! *Fragmenting that whole is just plain stupid. *"United we stand, divided we fall". *I guess that I just don't understand your exclusionary attitude towards JC. *Please! Correct me if I am misinterpreting your posistion.

(Edited by amigo32 at 4:36 am on Jan. 11, 2003)

yanni111
January 11th, 2003, 10:52 AM
i like the development in JC, its nice to look across the river and see basically another entire skyline there, it makes the whole region more impressive by having even more skyscrapers outside of manhattan. The Goldman Sachs building was really shining and pretty in the sunlight a couple days ago when i saw JC from West st. Does JC development take away from NYC? yes it takes away possible projects but even with stuff going up there in the last few years look at all the new projects going of in NYC, there have been tons of new projects in manhattan and theres many rising now theres more than enough to pass around

Agglomeration
January 11th, 2003, 01:11 PM
Hey don't forget competition from Stamford CT. They have plenty of big corporate buildings going up. The only restraint is a height limit of 360 feet or so. Like Jersey City though, it doesn't have much else in the form of amenities.

JCDJ
January 23rd, 2003, 10:06 PM
"I love Jersey City, but it will take a long time before it ever reaches the "skyline map"
- Jude 1017

Jersey City's first major modern office buildings began to rise in the 70's and late 80's. In a best skyline (in the world) poll in 2000[http://www.library.tudelft.nl/~egram/skylines_old.htm] , we (Jersey City) were ranked # 80 something. 2 years later in 2002 [http://www.library.tudelft.nl/~egram/skylines.htm] , we rose to #69. We rose almost 20 ranks in 2 years, and we've only had a skyline since the 70's.

(In case your wondering YES, New York City was #1 by large number of votes.)

Also, 3 of our buildings were nominated for the skyscraper.com award. (Plaza 5 Harborside, and Liverty View Towers East and West)

(Edited by JCDJ at 10:08 pm on Jan. 23, 2003)


(Edited by JCDJ at 12:44 am on Jan. 24, 2003)

JCDJ
January 23rd, 2003, 10:38 PM
The difference between CT and New Jersey though, is that New Jersey is much closer, so relocation isn't as much of a hassle.

As for LEECHING issues, I have quite a few things to say about that.

For one thing, I don't find anything wrong with the competition between NY and NJ, (including, but not limited to, architecture, construction, revenue, home pride arguements) healthy competition means healthy growth.

It is impossible to say with any logic that New Jersey is leeching off of New York. For one thing, Jersey City only tries to lour buisinesses planning on relocating.

- Where does new york get it's industrial supplies?
- Where do a significant percentage of NY workers come from?
- What STATE connects New York to the rest of the continent?
- And finally the part that any New Jersey native with any type of Jersey pride hates, where does New York send all of its garbage? (Hopefully after the TV Tower, this garbage agreement can be cancelled due to heightened revenue)

So if you think that New York got where it is by itself, remember all of the ways New Jersey has helped it. And now, we're helping New Yorkers be able to work and/or live in a place where they're not overburdened by excessive taxes. If anything, these new buildings we have are well-deserved after all that we've done for New York

and if you refuse to accept that, think about this, what land mass do you think Manhattan and Long Island drifted from soon after the Pangea days? New York? I think not.

dbhstockton
January 23rd, 2003, 11:21 PM
I'm with you, but you crossed the line with the geological reference there. *Manhattan sort came up from underground, rather than drifting into place -- I believe it's made of igneous rock. *And Long Island is only, what, 10,00 years old. *It's glacial till deposited after the last ice age. *

Sorry, had to be done. *Anyone else with Geology 101 under their belt feel free to correct me.

JCDJ
January 23rd, 2003, 11:51 PM
Either way, by common sense, New York City dare I say it, SHOULD technically be considered part of NJ due to it's lack of proximity from New York State in comparison.

JCDJ
January 24th, 2003, 01:33 AM
An excerpt from

"New York vs. New Jersey:
A New Perspective"

http://www.mitchellmoss.com/articles/nynj.html

"Still, probably no regional issue has received more attention than the often-repeated charge that New Jersey is stealing jobs from New York City. This charge has little basis in reality. When New York City lost more than half a million jobs from 1969 to 1977, most of these jobs, which included manufacturing as well as headquarters jobs, did not flow to New Jersey. The apparel industry went to the non-union South or to low-wage nations in Asia, and New York City's large commercial banks built data processing and clerical facilities on Long Island. Of the corporate headquarters that left Manhattan between 1974 and 1987, eleven went to New Jersey but twenty-one moved to Connecticut.(3) Ironically, when New York City's problems were at their worst, no one blamed Connecticut, Long Island, or the Third World as the source of the city's problems.

In the post-fiscal crisis period, approximately 400,000 new jobs were created in New York City, fueled largely by business and consumer services. During this economic resurgence, New Jersey also prospered. However, New Jersey's economic boom has not been at the expense of New York. A study by George Sternlieb and Alex Schwartz of Rutgers University revealed that 80 percent of the firms that had moved facilities into New Jersey's "growth corridors" had relocated from elsewhere in the state. (4) Of course, these are statewide figures and for the nearby Meadowlands, located just six miles from Manhattan, one-third of the firms surveyed had emigrated from New York. This, however, does not diminish the importance of recognizing that New Jersey's economic success has largely been due to the growth of indigenous firms.

The author would like to thank Sarah Ludwig, Dick, Netzer asnd Emanuel Tobier for their helpful comments. This paper was made possible in part by finds granted by the Charles H. Reverson Foundation. The Statements make and views expressed, however, are solely those of the author.

1. Erwin Wilkie Bard, Port of New York Authority. New York: Columbia University Press, London: P.S. King & Staples, Ltd. 1942, p.16.

2. Cited in Bard, p.23.

3. Regina R. Armstrong and David Miller, "Employment in the Manhattan CBD and Back-Office Locational Decisions," City Almanac, Vol. 18, No. 1-2, June/August, 1984: The Economist. May 9, 1987.

4. George Sternlieb and Alex Schwartz, New Jersey Growth Corridors, Center for Urban Policy Research, Rutgers University, 1986.

5. Kate Ascher. "Down to the Sea Again: The Resurgence of the Trans-Hudson Ferry," Portfolio. Spring, 1988, Vol. 1., No. 1.



Originally published in Portfolio, Summer 1988
Volume 1, Number 2
The Port Authority of NY and NJ. 1988


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

(C) 1999 Mitchell Moss"

http://www.mitchellmoss.com/articles/nynj.html

(Edited by JCDJ at 1:35 am on Jan. 24, 2003)


(Edited by JCDJ at 1:36 am on Jan. 24, 2003)

Kris
January 24th, 2003, 07:08 AM
Quote: from JCDJ on 11:51 pm on Jan. 23, 2003
Either way, by common sense, New York City dare I say it, SHOULD technically be considered part of NJ due to it's lack of proximity from New York State in comparison.

What nonsense. If anything, northern NJ is a mainland appendix of NYC. Now quit deluding yourself.

Kris
January 24th, 2003, 07:10 AM
Westchester and LI are not farther than NJ.

ZippyTheChimp
January 24th, 2003, 09:53 AM
dbhstockton is right. You were doing ok until the geological references. There is evidence that the ancient Hudson ran in a channel west of the Palisades, then turned eastward at Raritan Bay. That would put JC, Bayonne, Hoboken, etc on "our side" of the river.

Dammit, we want our land back.

dbhstockton
January 24th, 2003, 10:18 AM
In fact, the Meadowlands was a sea until relatively recently on a geologic time scale. *All the more reason for that ridge of JC, Weehawken, etc. to be part of New York. *It would have been part of the archepelago that included Manhattan and Staten Islands.

Oh, and let's not forgot the Dutch colony of New Netherland, which included parts of northern New Jersey before the British took over and set up the proprietary colonies of East and West Jersey. *Maybe they should have kept the old boundares. . .

NYatKNIGHT
January 24th, 2003, 11:06 AM
That's right, New Netherlands extended from the Connecticut River to the Delaware River so today's NY, NJ, and western Conn. and Mass. were the same Dutch colony. When the British took over NJ was granted as gifts to Lord Berkeley and Sir George Carteret. That simple gesture had huge repercussions.

It doesn't make much sense today why New York City is is so narrowly attached to New York State, but historically it was all about the Hudson River. There are plenty of Upstaters who want to split away from NYC, LI, and Westchester. If that happened, I think the southern NY state would be even better if it annexed New Jersey! That way we wouldn't have to change the flag.

"Westchester and LI are not farther than NJ."
Of course not, they touch NYC without a river between. However, NJ is closer to Manhattan than are Westchester and LI.

Kris
January 24th, 2003, 11:55 AM
"That way we wouldn't have to change the flag." I don't understand this remark. Because of critical mass?

NYC became tied to upstate with the Erie canal.

JCDJ
January 24th, 2003, 12:16 PM
"What nonsense. If anything, northern NJ is a mainland appendix of NYC. Now quit deluding yourself." - Christian Wieland


Yeah, that makes sense, a small island ruling a large land mass more than 5 times larger than it. Take a look at a map.

Either way it doesn't make a difference, the point was that New York and New Jersey are interdependant and any benefits New Jersey gets from New York is well deserved after centuries of supplying workers and industries.

Are there any geologists in the house?

Kris
January 24th, 2003, 12:18 PM
Who cares about land area? Look at the power relation, dummy.

Kris
January 24th, 2003, 12:22 PM
NYC is comprised of five boroughs, not just the island of Manhattan. Take a look at a map.

NYatKNIGHT
January 24th, 2003, 12:22 PM
If New York divides in two, there would be 51 states, but if one of them were to annex New Jersey there would still be 50 states and the American flag wouldn't have to change (and wreck the perfect symmetry of the star pattern). ;)

NYC became tied to upstate in the early 1600s with the fur trade. Albany was the inland trading post, New Amsterdam was the coastal port. They were closely linked by business, culture, and government from the very beginning. The Hudson River was the connection. Construction of the Erie Canal didn't begin for another two hundred years, and yes, strengthened the tie.

Kris
January 24th, 2003, 12:31 PM
I thought you meant the NY State flag. I doubt Downstate could annex more than northern NJ.

The history is interesting. I don't think the state should split because Upstate has become a burden and thinks Downstate is (how dishonest and absurd, by the way). It might rebound and has nice natural escapes from the city.

(Edited by Christian Wieland at 1:05 pm on Jan. 24, 2003)

Eugenius
January 24th, 2003, 01:38 PM
Population-wise, New York City and New Jersey are roughly equal, both being around 8 million. *So the question of annexation is kind of mute - it would probably be a "merger of equals."

Kris
January 24th, 2003, 02:21 PM
I don't see how southern NJ is tied to the city.


(Edited by Christian Wieland at 2:27 pm on Jan. 24, 2003)

NYatKNIGHT
January 24th, 2003, 02:25 PM
Let Pennsylvania have South Jersey, they always wanted a shoreline. On second thought, screw them, we'll take the length of the shore. Give them Camden County.

Agglomeration
January 24th, 2003, 05:50 PM
If it came to that, if the 5 boroughs broke away from upstate, we could also invite Nassau, Suffolk, Westchester, Rockland, Putnam, Orange, Sullivan, Ulster, and Duchess in New York, and Fairfield, Litchfield, and New Haven counties in Connecticut, plus Hudson, Essex, Union, Bergen, Passaic, Sussex, Morris, Warren, Hunterdon, Mercer, Somerset, Middlesex, Monmouth, and Ocean counties in New Jersey into the fold. The result could be a 31-county new state bigger than any state except California, highly centralized, opposed to sprawl, culturally diverse, and economically vibrant, with a population exceeding 21 million. All the counties listed here, plus the five boroughs, essentially make up New York Metro. *

dbhstockton
January 24th, 2003, 06:10 PM
A lot of Armchair Napoleons here, plotting NYC's imperial expansion...

Ptarmigan
January 24th, 2003, 08:15 PM
Jersey City skyline is impressive for a city it size. Its skyline will make it more interesting for sure with New York's skyline. Still, I think New York will have more amneities then Jersey City. New York and New Jersey will always have to help each other ecomically, when times are good and bad.

Kris
January 25th, 2003, 04:42 AM
The suburban counties would never join. They are content to be to a certain extent independent from the city and sprawl. They would never accept to be politically ruled by it.

JCDJ
January 25th, 2003, 02:33 PM
"Who cares about land area? Look at the power relation, dummy.
NYC is comprised of five boroughs, not just the island of Manhattan. Take a look at a map."

- Christian Wieland

Whether you're talking about Manhattan or all of the other borughs, or even Logn Island with it, they still pale in comparison to the size of New Jersey.

As for power relation, where would New York be without all of the services New Jersey offers? Also, do you really think one city has more power than a whole state? That was the point I was trying to make, that NYC depends on the workers and industries of New Jersey, but you apparantly want to make the discussion out of any lirrelevant mistake that I make in my posts.

As for calling me a "dummy", what are you, 6?

Kris
January 25th, 2003, 02:53 PM
One can insult (which you have just done - thereby contradicting yourself) at all ages when appropriate. And you can be as delusional as you want about the great state of New Jersey, you're only fooling yourself. If NJ didn't exist, NYC would import workers and services from other places as it does anyway. There is nothing unique about NJ to depend upon. It also isn't as powerful as NYC (not just any city) and would be so much less without it. Once more, they are not equals. Get over it.

JCDJ
January 25th, 2003, 03:56 PM
My intent wasn't to convince arrogant close-minded people of anything, I'm just trying to inform open-minded, people who aren't self-centered of the importance of their neighbors. And shine some light on a place which is often forgotton and even insulted despite its greatness and importance to NYC.

If you really want to be this plainly blind and think that New Jersey's proximity, workers, and transportation, has nothing to do with New York's success, then go ahead and think that.

Kris
January 25th, 2003, 04:02 PM
Don't be a baby. NJ was getting its due respect in this thread and on this forum until you came and said, "New York City dare I say it, SHOULD technically be considered part of NJ". It still gets the respect it deserves, just not beyond its actual status. NYC owes to NJ due to their proximity and the fact that no city is autonomous. That's about it.

(Edited by Christian Wieland at 4:44 pm on Jan. 25, 2003)

JCDJ
January 25th, 2003, 04:11 PM
I'm not talking about on this board, I'm talking about in general, I KNOW that most of the people on this board aren't arrogant, those are the people I was talking to. I'm not the one trying to turn this into some kind arguement.

TLOZ Link5
January 25th, 2003, 06:03 PM
Jersey City's first major modern office buildings began to rise in the 70's and late 80's. In a best skyline (in the world) poll in 2000[http://www.library.tudelft.nl/~egram/skylines_old.htm] , we (Jersey City) were ranked # 80 something. 2 years later in 2002 [http://www.library.tudelft.nl/~egram/skylines.htm] , we rose to #69. We rose almost 20 ranks in 2 years, and we've only had a skyline since the 70's.

(In case your wondering YES, New York City was #1 by large number of votes.)

Hong Kong, second; Chicago, third; Tokyo, fourth; Shanghai, fifth...

Heh, Pyongyang (?) ranks 75th. *It wasn't even on the list last poll. *Aside from the Ryugyong, the Juche Tower, perhaps the Koryo Hotel and the TV mast, there aren't many distinguishing characteristics of its skyline—or lack therof.

Caracas should have been higher; it's only at 78th.

Riyadh (90th) definitely should have been higher. *Taipei (54) should have been a bit lower.

And why, pray tell, was Fort Worth even on the list?

JCDJ
January 25th, 2003, 07:11 PM
I went to the Mack- Cali website, and they have some rough CG representations of upcoming Harborside Financial Center Buildings.

http://www.mack-cali.com/development/development_projects/harborside.phtml

And in the city polls, How do you vote for cities?

JCMAN320
May 13th, 2003, 10:09 PM
why are people trashing my city im 16 and i love it here and lived here all my life an im heavily into the redevelopment of the city. Jersey City deserves every right to build. Were trying to come into our own as a major city. i dont understand why people cant accept that. jersey city has played a major role in the history of this area and the economic success. we just want to be a succesful city

(Edited by JCMAN320 at 10:19 pm on May 13, 2003)

TLOZ Link5
May 14th, 2003, 07:20 PM
No one's trashing Jersey City, JCMAN. *A lot of us like it a lot; it's just that some of us New Yorkers like to make fun of NJ in general ;)

JCMAN320
May 14th, 2003, 09:12 PM
I understand. Thanks tloz for responding, some of my friends live in brooklyn and one friend on the upper westside and staten island. They wale on me every time I see them beacause Im from Jersey:)
(Edited by JCMAN320 at 9:13 pm on May 14, 2003)


(Edited by JCMAN320 at 9:19 pm on May 14, 2003)


(Edited by JCMAN320 at 9:19 pm on May 14, 2003)

Kris
June 24th, 2003, 10:27 PM
http://meccapixel.com/images/large/0306/03062405.jpg

TLOZ Link5
June 25th, 2003, 12:26 PM
An 800-foot, 59-story tower is in the pipeline for the Harborside Financial Project and has since been approved, according to ss.com.

And a 637-foot, 37-story office tower is proposed for 90 Hudson Street.

There's also something here about a 900-foot, 52-story office tower on the waterfront that's been on-hold for as long as I can remember. *"American Financial Exchange Tower?"

Finally, there's HarborSpire, a two-tower residential project with a 55-story building and a 50-story one.

NYatKNIGHT
June 25th, 2003, 12:29 PM
I was actually doing some work in Jersey City yesterdayand got a first hand look at the huge amount of new residential and office buildings under construction.

http://galleries.soaringtowers.org/albums/NYatKNIGHT/119_1910_IMG.sized.jpg


The Hudson-Bergen light rail on Essex Street. *

http://galleries.soaringtowers.org/albums/NYatKNIGHT/119_1922_IMG.sized.jpg

Kris
June 25th, 2003, 05:38 PM
The light rail system is a nice development that benefits the whole metro area. One more, a little up the river:

http://meccapixel.com/images/large/0306/03062501.jpg

(Edited by Christian Wieland at 5:48 pm on June 25, 2003)

JCMAN320
June 27th, 2003, 04:37 PM
Hotel, apartment building to rise east of Grove St. PATH

Friday, June 27, 2003

By Maria Zingaro Conte
Journal correspondent

The area around the Grove Street PATH station is one step closer to a major change with the Jersey City Planning Board's approval of a preliminary site plan for a new 34-story hotel and apartment building.

Located just opposite the PATH at Newark Avenue and Marin Boulevard, the building is to include a 170-room hotel, 18,000 square feet of retail space, 525 apartments and a 577-car parking garage.

The City Council gave its approval to the project in March as part of the redevelopment plan for the area. The project has also received strong support from the Downtown Special Improvement District, the area's business association.

This week's proceedings drew no reaction from the several area residents who came to the meeting Tuesday night to hear the application, and the plan was passed unanimously with few comments from the board.

Groundbreaking for the new building is planned for next spring, according to Jeffrey Persky, one of the principals of developer Jamm Realty Corp., a subsidiary of the Bridgewater-based firm Schenkman/Kushner. Construction is expected to take about 18 months.

The development will mean a slight reorientation of Newark Avenue east of Grove Street, according to landscape architect Thomas Bauer of Melillo & Bauer Associates in Point Pleasant Beach. Following construction, travel on that portion of the street will be limited to buses and at some times the road will be closed to traffic and serve instead as a pedestrian walkway, Bauer said.

Approval of the site plan required the board's OK for Jamm Realty to consolidate 31 properties into one large parcel. All told the site - currently home to several parking lots, low-rise buildings and tracts of undeveloped land - will measure nearly 70,000 square feet.

The footprint of the new building will be shaped like a bent T. At the intersection of the two arms will be "the real heart" of the structure: a semicircular drop-off area and driveway facing Christopher Columbus Drive, said architect Peter DeWitt of DeWitt Tishman in Manhattan. Just off of this plaza will be the entrances to two mirroring lobbies, one each for the residential and hotel portions of the building.

Additionally, the driveway will lead into the parking garage situated along Morgan Street on the structure's north side. Much of the building's remaining street level space will be occupied by the retail stores.

The building will step up gradually from five stories on its west side to the full 34 stories on the east, DeWitt said. The structure will also narrow as it rises in a design meant to ease the transition between Jamm's building and others in the neighborhood, particularly the three-story, 19th-century building at the corner of Grove and Newark.

The neighboring structure provided other design cues, too.

"It will be essentially a red brick building with bands of light buff and charcoal gray," DeWitt said of the hotel/apartment building. "We use the different colors to break the facade up so that it reduces its apparent size."

Inside, the residential part of the structure will contain a mix of one-and two-bedroom rental units, while the hotel will offer a recreational facility, including a swimming pool.

South of Newark Avenue, surrounding the PATH station, will be a small paved park. Bounded by low walls, it will contain a kiosk, flowering trees and movable outdoor furniture.

"The reason we liked it paved in the most part is because of the great numbers of people who will frequent this place," Bauer said. "We've created a palette, if you will, that will provide a flexibility in the landscape for the neighborhood to energize this how they see fit."

Landscaping will also be used to camouflage the rooftop of the six-story parking garage, Bauer said.

Approval of the final site plan is expected once several conditions set by Planning Department staffers - such as providing detailed designs for the kiosk and guaranteeing storage space for maintenance equipment - are met. West side

In other business, the board voted 7-0 to approve a final site plan for the construction of 14 three-family houses at Sip, Emerson and Logan avenues on the city's west side, just north of Holy Name Cemetery.

The development will also include 42 parking spaces. Developer Charles Groeschke of CLG Associates in Jersey City assured worried area residents that the buildings are not meant to be low-income housing. Instead, he said, they would be sold as luxury housing at fair market rate, estimated at about $400,000 each.

"We are taking a chance in this endeavor to improve the neighborhood and create a new cornerstone," he said.

kram
June 27th, 2003, 06:21 PM
You know, the same situation exists in the Washington/Baltimore Metropolitan area, previously my residence. It is now over 7million people 4th in the nation (compared to NYC metro's 21 million, including you guessed it NJ) and the exact same rivalries exist. Washington, with its governmental / international / transient style loves to use Baltimore as its playground but doesn’t take it seriously. Baltimore on the other hand with its Industrial / Provincial / Blue Collar background thinks DC looks down on them. Washingtonians love to go to Baltimore Oriole games but hate the Ravens. Baltimoreans blame Washington for steeling their Basketball team. They view Washington as a leech of Maryland funds and work force. High Tec Companied abound in DC, and Baltimore hates that they have a hard time luring them. 15% of the work force lives in one city and works in the other (45 miles apart). This "my place is better that your place is so weak" one can not see the forest for the trees. I love NYC, NJ, Jersey City, LIC you name it. Its time to realize all the things around

TLOZ Link5
June 27th, 2003, 06:44 PM
Interesting comparison, Kram. *It's certainly true that rivalries exist between cities and their suburbs—or, in the case of Washington and Baltimore, twin cities.

TLOZ Link5
June 27th, 2003, 06:46 PM
I've heard from some news sources that downtown JC is somewhat desolate if you factor out all the new office development—not many residential or worker amenities, few shops or restaurants, etc. *A columnist in the Post a while back said that downtown JC was only marginally better than downtown Dallas. *Is that necessarily true?

JCMAN320
June 27th, 2003, 08:03 PM
Thats not true I go down there all the time. We have a large mall called Newport, new residences have gone up, and there are a large amount of shops and restaurants in the area that have gone up since that coloumn was published, especially in the newport area. Quite a few have gone up around Exchange Place as well.

Kris
July 4th, 2003, 05:41 AM
July 4, 2003

New Condos Move Inland From Water in Jersey City

By RACHELLE GARBARINE

Housing development is marching inland from the Hudson River waterfront in Jersey City, its focus changing to condominiums rather than the rental apartments that dominate the water's edge.

Evidence of the shift are two sizable condo projects — one under way, the other planned — on Montgomery Street, west of the shoreline.

The larger of the projects is a 113-apartment complex named Montgomery Greene for its location at the corner of Montgomery and Greene Streets, two blocks from the riverfront. Construction is to start in December on its 19-story tower with 108 apartments and a connecting six-story building with five full-floor lofts.

The new structures will replace the parking lot and two vacant brownstones now on the site. KOR Companies of Wall, N.J., in a joint venture with Time Equities of Manhattan, is developing the $41 million project, which will also have a 124-car garage and ground-floor stores.

The other building, with 46 condos now on the market for sale, is at Montgomery and Grove Streets, eight blocks from the shoreline. A seven-story building is rising on the site, formerly occupied by part of the Majestic Theater, which was built in 1907. The old theater's rear lobby, which is to be refurbished, will be the entrance to the new building.

The theater's front lobby is in a three-story building on Grove Street that, as part of a larger project, is being renovated along with three adjacent buildings dating from 1897 to 1930. The ground-floor space is being rented to retailers, the theater is being marketed to small non-chain users and the upper levels are initially being shown to service users like doctors, according to Exeter Property Company, the developer of the $20 million project.

By the end of the year, several other condo projects are expected to be under way on and around Montgomery Street, totaling 200 apartments, said Robert P. Antonicello, a principal of the ACI Group, a real estate services company in Jersey City. In addition, a 34-story, 523-apartment tower is planned along with a hotel on a site across Newark Avenue from the Grove Street PATH station. Its developer, Schenkman/Kushner Affiliates of Bridgewater N.J., has not yet decided whether the housing will be rental or condo. Construction is to start next spring.

Mr. Antonicello said that for many years developers viewed the city's growth corridor "as the narrow band at the river's edge." Today, he added, little developable land remains on the shoreline, pushing the growth inland. A weakened rental market, he said, was also encouraging developers to put up condos.

He estimated the riverfront rental vacancy rate at 7 percent, up from 3 or 4 percent last year, and said that average rents had fallen by 10 percent, to $24 a square foot annually, or about $2,000 a month. And low mortgage rates, he said, have encouraged people to invest in real estate rather than in the stock market.

Harry Kantor, president of KOR, which is primarily known as a suburban housing developer, said that earlier this year his company bought the Montgomery Greene site, which is near the Exchange Place PATH station and the historic Paulus Hook neighborhood, as a way to diversify. The complex was originally conceived as a rental. But Mr. Kantor said his company redesigned it as a condo to take advantage of the strong for-sale market.

The studio to two-bedroom apartments will have 500 to 1,400 square feet. Initial prices are from $162,500 to $735,000, or $325 to $525 a square foot. Prices for the lofts are not yet set. Sales are to start this fall.

The steel skeleton for the Majestic Theater Condominiums is rising and, along with four renovated buildings, transforming a site across Grove Street from City Hall. Exeter Property was chosen in 2000 as the site's developer by the Jersey City Redevelopment Agency, which foreclosed on the property in 1997.

Eric Silverman, Exeter's president, said that while the project was blocks from the water, it was near the PATH station on Grove Street, which was filling up with restaurants and boutiques, and was in the Van Vorst Park Historic District.

Mr. Silverman said he started the building as a rental but changed to a condo because people, helped by historically low interest rates, "want to invest in the city."

The building will have studio to three-bedroom apartments, with 700 to 1,500 square feet. The building's lobby, once part of the old theater, includes a 35-foot-high domed ceiling and such decorative touches as 13 plaster angels.

Since sales began seven weeks ago, 30 apartments have been sold. Prices have been raised 5 to 15 percent, to $175,000 to $500,000, or $310 to $330 a square foot on average. Completion is expected in January.


Copyright 2003 The New York Times Company

NYC8588
July 21st, 2003, 02:06 PM
Is it just me or does the images posted by NYatKNIGHT on 12:29 pm on June 25, 2003 look like the Two International Finance Centre in hong kong

Fabb
July 21st, 2003, 03:29 PM
We discussed their similarities before, in another thread.
Those pictures are excellent, btw.

moreforme
July 22nd, 2003, 07:22 PM
As a former Manhattanite who was first driven to Brooklyn and then Jersey City, I understand why NYer's as so upset by NJ's "leeching" off of NYC. *Everytime I saw a new tower going up in Jersey City, *I'd wonder with irritation, "Why!? Why not Brooklyn?" *But slowly, I came to realize why. *There's no real competition between Brooklyn and Manhattan, and Manhattan controls the cards. *It took NJ to finally make NYC realize its neglect of Brooklyn. * But it's a little too late. *

Developers and bankers have very little vision. *They need to see somebody else making money before they invest in a place. *Jersey City has, in no way, reached its full potential, but I dare anyone to come visit it and not see it HAS potential. *I had been looking to buy an apartment for a while. *I couldn't rationalized Manhattan's prices and the few neighborhoods in Brooklyn worth living in are overpriced as well. *So I gave NJ a look and found, behind that JC skyline, three historic brownstone neighborhoods built around parks. *(Bet you NYC faithfuls didn't know JC had history.) *I decided to put aside my NJ prejudice (afterall, it is this prejudice that makes Jersey City real estate affordable) and look at merely the facts: *its multiculturalism, beautiful buildings, easy commute, price and growth potential. *Why complain about JC's growth when I can take advantage of it?

Once I made the decision, I also understood the NJ prejudice better. *Because it is so close, it is so EASY to make the jump from NY to NJ. *The barrier is not physical--why is the East River not a barrier?-- *it's psychological! *

As for the *NJ/NY competition, both states are shooting themselves in the foot over the silly brawl. *For decades, big businesses have used this rivalry for their own gain. *They threaten to move to NJ, NYC capitulates and gives them HUGE tax breaks. *Giuliani had given away hundreds of millions of dollars in tax breaks. *Thank goodness Bloomberg, who had been a finance CEO himself and know their game, called their bluff. * *I haven't heard a peep out of those rich companies since. *

Let's face it, NYC has the prestige and the companies that value prestige will stay in NYC no matter what. *No free handouts needed. *But there are some companies that prefer value. *Let them come to NJ. *No need to give away the land. * *Why can't the two states cooperate and not let these companies take advantage of them? *

If NYC would stop hoarding, NJ would not need to steal. *Because NJ, and especially JC, lives in NYC's great shadow it can never be a great city. *I see tons of people, myself included, *taking the path train to spend their money in NYC every weekend. * So, give us a break, why begrudge our attempt to make ourselves self-sufficient?

STT757
July 24th, 2003, 05:04 PM
"I've heard from some news sources that downtown JC is somewhat desolate if you factor out all the new office development—not many residential or worker amenities, few shops or restaurants, etc"

Yeah but if you consider Hoboken as part of the Jersey City Gold Coast that statement is false, Hoboken has excellent restaraunts and night life.

I enjoy going to Hoboken on Friday and Saturday nights, when My girlfriend and I marry (hopefully soon) we hope to get an apartment in Hoboken.

Her father works in Hoboken and owns a couple homes there, however renting an apartment from a inlaw might be wierd.

JCMAN320
July 24th, 2003, 10:33 PM
Yea but think once the residential buildings on the drawing board goes up and PATH between WTC and Exchange Place is restored, I think it will be the way it use to be b4 9/11 when after 6:00 people still stayed around and hung out around da bars and restaurants. Lower Manhattan is also having the same problems as downtown JC no ones around too much after 6:00

Zoe
July 31st, 2003, 02:45 PM
From GlobeSt.com

Luxury Condos Get Site Approvals
By Eric Peterson
Last updated: Jul 29, 2003 *10:12AM

JERSEY CITY, NJ-Local officials have given KOR Cos. the necessary site plan approvals to proceed with a 113-unit high-rise residential condo project called Montgomery Greene in this city's midtown area. Company officials say they expect to break ground next spring, and are targeting a summer of 2005 occupancy.
The 20-story luxury building, which is being designed by the local architectural firm of Lindemon Winckelmann Dupree Martin and Associates, will also include some 4,000 sf of ground-floor retail space, as well as 125 spaces of covered parking. The units themselves will include a mix of loft, studio, one- and two-bedroom residences.

KOR Cos., based in Wall Twp., NJ, is a developer of industrial, office and residential properties. Company officials have not released any cost figures on Montgomery Greene.

JCMAN320
August 14th, 2003, 12:40 PM
Wall Street West
JC keeps attracting financial companies despite wooing from Big Apple
*
By John A. Martins
Reporter staff writer August 03, 2003

GOLD COAST GLORY - Waterfront employees making their way home from work on a typical evening use the trains, buses and light rail cars that make up the area's multi-faceted public transportation system.

Business advocates in Lower Manhattan are trying to lure Jersey City companies back to New York, but firms in the financial services sector are continuing to set up shop along New Jersey's Gold Coast.

Recently, the staff at both the New York Economic Development Corporation and the Alliance for Downtown New York unveiled an aggressive mailing campaign to increase awareness about the various benefits of doing business in Lower Manhattan. Targeting small and medium-sized businesses across the region, the mailing campaign included 326 mailings that went out specifically to companies in New Jersey, the majority of which are located along the Hudson River.

But financial firms are continuing to resist the lure.

Boston-based Fidelity Investments, the largest mutual fund company in the nation, celebrated the establishment of its ninth regional site at Jersey City's Harborside Financial Center Monday in a ceremony overlooking the Jersey City waterfront from the 10th floor of Harborside's Plaza 5 building. Government officials like Gov. James McGreevey, Hudson County Executive Tom DeGise and Jersey City Mayor Glenn D. Cunningham were in attendance.

Citing the many fiscal incentives and other attractions that make New Jersey - and Jersey City - so attractive to business leaders, Fidelity executives said that putting roots in Jersey City just made sense.

"Jersey City is successful because you have adapted to a new way of doing business," said David Weinstein, an executive vice president at Fidelity. "We were attracted to [Jersey City's] labor pool, its telecommunications infrastructure and its proximity to New York City's capital markets."

Such compliments are music to the ears of local officials and planners, who say that they have for years worked hard to make Jersey City a viable option for companies looking to expand or relocate operations across the Hudson River.

But officials and planners in New York City aren't particularly thrilled about Jersey City's accolades.


SETTLING A SCORE

Brian Evans, a spokesperson at the Alliance for Downtown New York, declined to comment last week on the progress of the Big Apple's nascent marketing campaign, stating that it's too soon to tell how much interest the mailings generated.

But insiders on both sides of the river have said that a rivalry between the two states has raged for more than 10 years, a situation most describe as a contest to see who can attract the most profit-generating businesses.

Since 1996, the state has offered tax incentives to companies who either relocate or expand to New Jersey through the Business Employment Incentive Program [BEIP], said New Jersey Economic Development Authority spokesman Glenn Phillips. The program allows qualified businesses to earn up to 80 percent of the personal income tax withholdings from the new jobs created when they moved to the state.

And although the program has served the state well in the seven years it has been in use, Phillips said that interstate competition for businesses is an inevitable fact of regional life.

"There's competition among a lot of states with businesses," Phillips said. "We certainly recognize that New York and Pennsylvania will be trying to attract businesses. But New Jersey has a lot to offer. We have a great workforce and we're strong in the financial services sector and in high technology."

Officials say it is precisely that strength in the financial services sector that state and local governments have seized in their business retention and acquisition plans.

"We want New Jersey to be business-friendly and aggressively seek the financial services sector," McGreevey said last Monday. The best way in which to do that, he added, was to continue with New Jersey's tradition of facilitating both regulatory reforms and business support strategies.

Jersey City has taken the lead throughout the state in its efforts at reigning in regional financial businesses, through both state-sponsored programs and local tax abatement issuances. Since 1996, more than 30 New York-based businesses were awarded approximately $362 million in BEIP grants for either relocating or expanding to Jersey City.

As of last week, 11,192 new jobs had been created.

"[Fidelity's presence in Jersey City] is a significant sign of the potential being realized within our city as a true business destination," Mayor Glenn Cunningham said in a release. "Jersey City, called Wall Street West by many, is more than just a viable option; it is a smart alternative to other locales for establishing corporate infrastructure."

In addition, the increase of business activity isn't solely attributed to the strongly active economy in the years preceding the Sept. 11 terrorist attack, McGreevey said. Approximately 39,000 jobs were created in New Jersey since February 2003 through 449 projects that receive more than $750 million in financial assistance.


HUDSON'S ALLURE

Although Monday's ceremony marked Fidelity's intention to operate a regional site in Jersey City, the company has been present in town for more than two years. The company had kept a contingency site open at Harborside as normal procedure during its tenure at New York's World Financial Center.

"Operations at Harborside made sense before 9/11," Weinstein said Monday. "After 9/11, when we were forced to work in a temporary space for 14 months, it reinforced our thinking."

"Jersey City made sense for a few reasons," Weinstein added. "One is that it's both diversified from our Lower Manhattan operations but close to it. You have different power grids and traffic patterns. We were also very attracted to the business incentives in Jersey City, and being in the Enterprise Zone is very important. Those incentives are valuable."

Two hundred and eighty employees currently work at Fidelity's Jersey City location. And 90 more employees are expected to relocate to the waterfront by the fall through Fidelity's recent acquisition of Correspondent Services Corporation [CSC], a subsidiary of UBS Financial Services, Inc. The CSC employees will be relocating from their previous facility in Weehawken.

"We like to be in areas where there's a good labor pool that's specialized in our type of business," Weinstein said. "All you have to do is look around in Jersey City. Yeah, there are lots of competitors. But the employees in this region have been well-trained."

Fidelity also operates five investor centers in the state, with locations in Morristown, Millburn, Paramus, Princeton and Red Bank.

And although Weinstein said the company wasn't in a position to choose between New York City and Jersey City in selecting the location of its newest regional site, he acknowledged the fact that governmental bodies - from the state to the municipal level - do in fact compete with each other in harnessing businesses.

"It's nice to have different states and communities fighting over us," Weinstein added. "They know we have really good, well-paying jobs that attract people. We just don't want to move [our New York headquarters] anymore. We ended up doing both things; we're in Lower Manhattan and Jersey City. That diversifies our interests."

"We're very pleased to be here," Weinstein added.

Zoe
August 26th, 2003, 10:45 AM
*
State Square
$31M MXD Set to Rise in Journal Square
By Eric Peterson - Globe.st
Last updated: Aug 25, 2003 *03:21PM

JERSEY CITY, NJ-Ground has been broken for State Square, a 12-story building that will combine 130 apartments and 15,000 sf of ground-floor retailing when it's completed in about 18 months. The complex, which will rise on the site of the old State Theater in this city's Journal Square district, will include 30 low-income units within its apartment component and will have an eight-story, 395-car parking garage.
The developer of State Square is a consortium whose principals include the Alpert Group, Applied Development Co., Panepinto Properties and former Congressman Frank Guarini. The project is also getting assistance from the New Jersey Housing Mortgage Finance Agency.

"We are extremely pleased to launch this project," according to principal Joseph Alpert, who notes that State Square marks the first new construction project in Journal Square in some 20 years.

"Journal Square has already received substantial capital improvements over the past three years," Alpert says. "We believe we have come up with an important missing piece in the overall effort to revive Journal Square--providing a place for people to live in the downtown area."

State Square will also be situated near one of the largest transportation hubs in the metro area, including the Port Authority of NY/NJ's Journal Square station for the PATH light rail system.

matt3303
August 30th, 2003, 12:19 AM
Great point yanni. When in downtown looking at JC, it makes you feel like you're really in an urban jungle---that the city just doesn't "end" at the river. We need places like JC to keep the whole region growing and compete with economic machines like Hong Kong. While I agree trying to take the Stock Exchange and Statue of Liberty away from NYC is bad-natured and it's things like that that make us hate each other. Also, most tourists see JC and think it part of New York.

JCMAN320
August 30th, 2003, 04:56 PM
ARMY TRANSFERS LAND TO THE CITY
Golf course part of plan for area's renewal

Wednesday, August 20, 2003

By Matt Porio
Journal staff writer

Hudson County golfers, still waiting for a planned Bayonne course, are a big step closer to playing in Jersey City.

The Hoboken-based Applied Company put up $8.5 million for the 50 acres of vacant land at the Army Reserve Center, where a private 18-hole golf course and residences are planned near the Port Liberte waterfront in Jersey City, according to Barbara Netchert, assistant executive director at the Jersey City Redevelopment Agency.

The Army Reserve Center will retain 20 acres of property that contain buildings and other facilities.

Jersey City Mayor Glenn D. Cunningham called the land transfer a "win-win for everyone" yesterday afternoon, following a ceremony for transfer of the property that included Army representatives and U.S. Rep. Robert Menendez, D-Hoboken.

Jersey City residents, he said, will benefit from taxes paid on the property, while Army reservists who live in the Reserve Center will benefit from improvements to the facilities that can be paid for with the $8.5 million purchase price.

According to Menendez, the land transfer "has been a long time in the making," referring to legislation passed in 1987 that authorized transfer of a large portion of the property to Jersey City and the state of New Jersey.

"Today was a great sense of accomplishment," Menendez told The Jersey Journal yesterday afternoon.

As part of the deal, Applied agreed to leave a swath of the land undeveloped as a possible realignment route for a section of Highway 185, which now has a sharp "hairpin curve" that could be straightened out if the highway is extended through the property, Netchert said.

According to Netchert, the developer, who could not be reached for comment, is already engaged in environmental evaluation of the area, which will probably take another year to 18 months.

She said it will probably be at least three to four years until development at the site is completed.

The 20 acres of the site retained by the Army houses units of the 77th Regional Readiness Command and overlooks New York Harbor and the Statue of Liberty.

According to the Army, it served as a vital facility during the Cold War, and several members of the reserve units that occupy the site have been deployed for action in Iraq.

"The base has always been a good neighbor," Cunningham said. "We all come out of this feeling good."

JCMAN320
August 31st, 2003, 03:22 PM
ETHNIC NEIGHBORHOODS: A SERIES
Paulus Hook serves a gateway, a turning point in city's history

By John A. Martins
Reporter staff writer August 24, 2003

Note: This article is the first in a new series by the Jersey City Reporter called "Ethnic Neighborhoods."

Since their beginnings, the communities in Jersey City have been in constant flux.

Groups of people have come and been displaced by powerful or subtle forces. Even in the city's pre-Revolution days, when Dutch settlers regularly fought with the indigenous Native American tribes, Jersey City life was characterized by movement.

Like many other communities across the country, Jersey City was shaped by various external factors. In pre-industrial times, when New York first began to grow as a megalopolis, Jersey City has existed in its shadow. Legal battles that decided ownership of waterfront property and port rights were won and lost, and both towns tried vigorously to grasp their share of the global commerce that the Hudson River and New York Harbor provided.

Historically, people under the stress of famine and war were lured to Jersey City's shores by the hope of a better life. Ethnic groups settled in neighborhoods like Harsimus Cove and West Bergen, and each tried, over time, to assert its place as a power-player in the city. From humble beginnings as low-wage factory workers, some of the city's oldest families can boast sons and daughters who have risen to very enviable statures as commercial leaders and government officials. Jersey City's past is a story driven by the American dream.

That trend, having grown stronger and stronger as the years went by, continues.

Now that Jersey City is experiencing a decidedly new and important era of its history, a period often referred to as a "renaissance" that began in the 1980s and continues to the present, it is important to take a look at the city's past to glean insight into what lies ahead. Like the tidal waters that surround it, Jersey City ebbs and flows.

OLD GATEWAY

The first region to be called Jersey City, Paulus Hook was named for a mid-17th century Dutch West India Company agent named Michael Paulusen. Originally a small island separated from the mainland by a marsh on the north and a creek on the west, it was connected to the mainland when a Dutch farmer by the name of Cornelius Van Vorst filled in the marsh and built a causeway over the creek. Paulus Hook is now bound by the Hudson River on the east, Marin Boulevard to the west, Christopher Columbus Drive to the north and the Morris Canal on the south.

The area was used for years as a departure point for ferries to and from New York, and only in the early 1800s did businessmen begin to see Paulus Hook's potential. Alexander Hamilton, who served as treasury secretary under George Washington, formed the Associates of Jersey Company in 1804 to lease the land and develop it as a suburb of Manhattan.

Adjacent to the thriving rail, industrial and commercial businesses on the waterfront, it grew in the 19th century into a dense mixed-use neighborhood that featured ornate private rowhouses for the city's wealthy, and tenement buildings for the city's not-so-fortunate residents. There were also businesses catering to every imaginable need.

The area is rife with historical milestones: DeWitt Clinton invented the steam engine at a building on Grand and Greene streets. Legendary New Jersey Gov. A. Harry Moore was raised in Paulus Hook. The southwest corner of Washington and Grand - on which now stands the Cornelia F. Bradford School - was the original site of the Mayor's Mansion and the first Jersey City Post Office.

As its industrial role grew with the success of companies like American Sugar and Colgate-Palmolive, the neighborhood was transformed into a primarily working-class enclave of Eastern European immigrants from countries like Russia, Poland, Ukraine and Germany.

Residents worked nearby at either the railroads or Colgate-Palmolive or further away at Kearny's Western Electric and New York's meatpacking plants.

HOME FOR EASTERN EUROPEANS

"Paulus Hook was always a great melting pot," says Barbara Bromirski, a fourth-generation member of a Polish family that runs a funeral home on Warren Street. "It was primarily Eastern European, and before that it was German and Irish."

Because the area was so compact, a tightly-knit community emerged. Churches dotted the landscape of brick row-houses. There was a tavern on almost every corner. Felix "Phil" Orzechowski owned a tavern at 64 Morris St. he liked to call "The House of All Nations."

"Everybody knew everybody who lived in the Paulus Hook area because all the children went to school together," Bromirski said. "We went to all different churches, but you socialized together. In the evenings, when the men came home from work, after you ate supper, everyone would sit out on their stoops. Brooklyn and Jersey City are the only two places in the country that use that word. The mothers would sit out there, the kids would play together, and everyone would keep an eye on everyone's children."

Added Bromirski, "Years ago, we had in the Paulus Hook area three butcher stores, four candy stores, two ice cream parlors, a dry cleaners and two bakeries (one was cake and bread and the other was strictly bread rolls and bagels). Every night, half the neighborhood would parade down to the bakery and buy hot, fresh rolls. We had a number of small, family-operated restaurants. Like the [still-existing] Flamingo, where you walk in and everyone knows you. It's sort of our own version of 'Cheers,' where everyone knows your name. We had a drug store. Mr. Cohen had a hardware store. The Strausses had a delicatessen. Mrs. Pinkus had a dry goods store."

Grounded by a set of four corner parks at the intersection of Grand and Washington streets, the neighborhood contained characteristics of both a big city and a small town. People were known mostly by nicknames.

"Everyone downtown had a nickname," Bromirski said. "We, as funeral directors, only found out these people's real names when they died."

"You could've lived in Paulus Hook your whole life and never have set foot outside," she added.

The close-knit character of the area persisted until the 1960s, when the same American dream that brought the Eastern Europeans to Paulus Hook also enticed them away from the bustling city, often toward the suburbs.

MASS EXODUS

"All the families moved away," Bromirski said. "People moved away because this was definitely a working-class neighborhood. They started to get wealthier and they moved out of town. They were all blue-collar workers and as they had children, and their children started growing up, they moved out into the suburbs to give their children something better than they had. They thought moving to the suburbs was going to be better. Even to this day, they come back and visit and say they wish they still lived in Jersey City. The first thing they'll say is 'We had it so good here. Nobody was rich, nobody really had much of anything, but we didn't know it. But we enjoyed it! Everyone got along.' "

As years of neglect caused buildings to empty and wither away, the dense neighborhood became sparse, almost desolate. The King Gussie Flats, 80 units of housing over three buildings at Washington and Sussex streets, were taken down in the late 1960s. Multi-family buildings became parking lots. Companies started to move operations elsewhere. Even Colgate-Palmolive began to slowly phase out its operations. The neighborhood became an eyesore, and it seemed as if no one cared for it much.

GROWTH SPURRED BY ACTIVISM

What turned the neighborhood around in the 1970s, however, was the vigilance of three city residents, said Bill Bromirski, Barbara Bromirski's brother and a former longtime Planning Board commissioner.

"Joe Duffy, Ted Conrad and Owen Grundy raised the consciousness of historic districts in Jersey City," Bill Bromirski said. "It was their ball-busting that made us see the significance of our brick row-houses. Their efforts kept the neighborhood stable until all the development began to happen."

That activism soon began to pay off extremely well. Savvy businesspeople in New York began to see a potential goldmine in Paulus Hook's old-world buildings and narrow streets. Professionals who worked in Lower Manhattan coveted the shorter commute and began to buy homes in the area. Entrepreneurs looking to get rich on rental income soon followed suit.

The first condo conversion in Jersey City happened on Montgomery Street near Washington Street. In the early 1970s, developer Arthur Goldberg turned the old New Jersey Guarantee and Trust Company into a luxury apartment building. Even former County Executive Robert Janiszewski (who recently resigned from office during a corruption scandal) lived there for a time.

Developers began to buy up property to build huge towers - both residential and commercial - on the waterfront. Although ferry service to New York from Paulus Hook had been discontinued in the 1960s, New York Waterway saw the nascent community as a potential market and opened up shop. The early- to mid-1980s saw people moving back into the neighborhood, instantly giving it a much-needed boost.

"The major residential buildings brought a lot of life to an otherwise dead area," said Ron Smith, owner of the Light Horse Tavern on Washington and Morris streets. "People again started to value the neighborhood. It was a closer commute to Lower Manhattan than the upper west or east sides of Manhattan. People were looking for value. And the prices were much better here than they were in New York."

The people on Paulus Hook's streets went from old-world factory workers with blue collars to fast-walking, fast-talking professionals.

Development further north along the waterfront accelerated Paulus Hook's regeneration, but banking crises in the late 1980s caused the construction to come to a screeching halt.

NEW GATEWAY

When he moved to Paulus Hook in 1989, Smith said that the "bubble had just burst." Real estate prices in the neighborhood kept declining until about 1992, the year Smith calls the trough of that particular economic cycle. As the economy was both stabilized and fueled by the national craze in the technology industry, the flow of investment money returned to Paulus Hook.

Things went undeniably well for the rest of the 1990s until the recession that started before 9/11 was put into full motion by the terrorist attacks. Smith, however, thinks the current economic depression is just another cycle in the economic history of Jersey City.

"In the next 12 to 18 months, you'll see things picking up," Smith said.

Smith says Jersey City's position as "Wall Street West" - the designation given to the Exchange Place area of Paulus Hook because of all the financial services companies with operations there - is what will ultimately change the face of the city. Its infrastructure, proximity to roadways and airports and desirable work force will make Jersey City one of the most dynamic communities in the state. And when that happens, Smith said, Paulus Hook will be the biggest winner of all.

"The significance of the development along the waterfront and what's happening west of Warren Street is only going to make Paulus Hook more desirable as a historical district, [especially because] of its trees, bricks and stone walkways," Smith said. "You have so much history here. In five or 10 years, this is going to be one of the most desirable areas in the state. It's going to be like Society Hill in Philadelphia or Charlestown in Boston."

And that means more people with more money. If rents and property values continue to shoot upward, Paulus Hook will become the city's silk-stocking district. The wealthy professionals who work on Wall Street in New York - or at Wall Street West - moving into the neighborhood will shape it into an exclusive, high-income enclave.

©The Jersey City Reporter 2003 *

JCDJ
September 12th, 2003, 11:21 AM
"I've heard from some news sources that downtown JC is somewhat desolate if you factor out all the new office development—not many residential or worker amenities, few shops or restaurants, etc. A columnist in the Post a while back said that downtown JC was only marginally better than downtown Dallas. Is that necessarily true?"

-TLOZ Link5

That's the main difference between Jersey City and most other cities with a comperable Skyline (Albuqueque NM, Newark NJ, etc.). Most other cities have a large designated area for concerts and whatnot. Jersey City needs one of those. A concert area like that is planned for the base (or near the base) of the Goldman Sachs building, but I don't know if that's changed since they scaled it down. During July 4th there are occasional concerts on constructed-on-the-spot stages, but not much other than that.

That's a qualm many downtown residents have, Just North of the already existing developments in the Newport area (accross from I think, where Columbus St. is in Manhattan ), there's a new large area being fit for construction, the people who live there already want more green space (parks public places, etc.), but the developers want to add residential High Rises, and I think office buildings may be in the mix there.

However, things are changing, Many of the old warehouses(eyesores) of the early 20th Century and earlier, are being demolished or turned into affordable housing, (or in the case of one, it has a sign that says "Class A Office Space") which is making more areas more friendly and inhabitable.

What Jersey city does have is impressive though, almost every office building has at least 6 restaurants or shops on the base floors. The Flamingo on Greene and Montgomery, 20 + shops and stores in the roughly 4- 6 square block Newport area (outside the Mall), and planty on the Southern end of Downtown in the small townhouses area.

So while in some areas that lack amenities are changing, there are other places that are richly full of them.

dbhstockton
September 12th, 2003, 04:20 PM
Liberty Park is a good potential venue. It's well-situated, it has light-rail access, and there's a vast amount of space. I've seen them set up a temporary grandstand there (its was one July 4th, like you said); maybe they could make a permanent structure. It would have the skyline and the Statue of Liberty as a backdrop! Fantastic!

Kris
September 27th, 2003, 01:50 AM
IN THE REGION | NEW JERSEY

Rental Units Rising at Journal Square in Jersey City

By ANTOINETTE MARTIN

http://graphics7.nytimes.com/images/2003/09/28/realestate/njzone.184.jpg
The 12-story State Square building is the first new construction in Journal Square in Jersey City in 15 years, occupying the site of the old State Theater movie house. The building will contain 130 apartments, 15,000 square feet of retail space at ground level, and a parking garage.

JOURNAL SQUARE, with its bustling PATH train station, its ethnic restaurants, its dozens of little shops, an Art Deco Loew's movie theater and a statue of Jackie Robinson, is the acknowledged heart of Jersey City's downtown area. A building now going up will add some homes to that heart.

In the first new construction at Journal Square since an office building opened in 1988, a 12-story, 130-unit rental apartment building is being built on the site of the old State Theater movie house, which was set aside for redevelopment some years ago.

The apartments will be a mix of one-bedroom and studio layouts, with 30 units reserved for low-income occupants, said David Barry, president of the Applied Development Company of Hoboken, part of a consortium doing the construction with financing from federal, state and local redevelopment funds. The 100 other units will be leased at market rates.

The new building, called State Square, will have an eight-level parking garage at its core and 100,000 square feet of retail space at its base — with shops on John F. Kennedy Boulevard in the front of the building and on Sip Avenue at the rear.

The 395-car garage, which city planners say will provide much-needed relief to congested Journal Square, will have an entry ramp on Kennedy Boulevard and an entry ramp and an exit way on Sip Avenue.

Inside the building, one hallway — a "single-loaded corridor," Mr. Barry said — will serve both shoppers leaving their cars in the garage and those who live in the building.

"The city wanted to see parking there for the merchants in Journal Square," Mr. Barry said. "But they didn't want to have parking visible from Kennedy. So, the design we came up with is all apartments on the Kennedy side and on the four floors above the garage."

The design for the Sip Avenue side will "blend in" with the neighborhood, said Joseph Alpert, president of the Alpert Group of Fort Lee, another principal in the $31 million project.

"Journal Square has already received substantial capital improvements over the past three years," Mr. Alpert said, "new and renovated office space, commercial stores and restaurants, the newly renovated Loew's theater and several buildings belonging to Hudson Community College.

"We believe we have come up with an important missing piece in the overall effort to revive Journal Square, providing a place for people to live in the downtown area."

BESIDES Applied, which has completed a number of high-profile urban projects in the last few years, and Alpert Group, the consortium includes Panepinto Properties, Harwood Properties and a former district congressman, Frank Guarini.

The Journal Square redevelopment effort was started almost a decade ago, with the busy PATH commuter station as the catalyst, Mr. Alpert said.

Local architecture fans have also been raising funds and working with City Hall all that time to restore the Art Deco Loew's building as a nonprofit arts and entertainment center. Four years ago, the square was refurbished with a pedestrian area featuring fountains, old-fashioned lampposts and the statue of Jackie Robinson — who broke baseball's color line, playing his first major league game at Jersey City's old Roosevelt Stadium in 1946.

Ground was broken last month for the apartment building, at 2 Journal Square, a block south of the Kennedy overpass. The foundation is laid, and the pilings are in place. The entire job will take about 18 months, Mr. Alpert said.

The State Square project will be the first housing with a Journal Square address, he noted, although there are single-family and multifamily homes and two renovated older apartment buildings in the surrounding neighborhood.

Construction financing for the project was arranged with $20 million from a combination of taxable and tax-exempt bonds issued by the New Jersey Housing and Mortgage Finance Agency, a $600,000 federal loan funneled to the project by Jersey City and $600,000 through another state housing construction loan program.

Mr. Barry said the redevelopment site was "ideally located" near one of the Port Authority's largest metropolitan transit hubs. "From Journal Square," he said, "commuting by public transportation is possible to Manhattan and Newark on the PATH trains, the buses, the ferries and every town in Hudson County on the Hudson-Bergen Light Rail." New York Waterway ferry service is provided from Port Liberté in Jersey City, where Applied built the Port Liberté apartment development.

But in Journal Square, Mr. Barry said, "we are kind of pioneering a new area, bringing the first residential redevelopment downtown."

"Our company," Mr. Barry said, "is many times the first one into the pool, so to speak. With this project, we create a market in that square. When our building is done and leased, and we're getting the rents up, banks and lenders will be more open to other projects on other lots where the property may be underutilized."

NOT that the project developers want to significantly change the character of Journal Square. "It's important to keep that retail element," Mr. Barry said. "It's a nice place to walk and shop, and that's one of the great things about Journal Square.

Applied, which redeveloped the historic Essex and Sussex Hotel in Spring Lake as condominiums last year, is at work on several new phases of its Port Liberté development. Mr. Barry said 1,650 condos would be built at Port Liberté, starting with 57 high-end town homes right on the Hudson riverfront.

In the oceanfront community of Long Branch, Applied is redeveloping a 16-acre property, where it is building 100,000 square feet of retail space and 320 rental units. And it is a co-developer, with Matzel & Mumford, of Beachfront North, a 15-acre parcel where town houses and condos are under construction.

Applied, which built and manages the Shipyard residential complex on the Hoboken waterfront, is also working on another apartment tower there, to be called the Sovereign. In addition, Applied built the Palisades waterfront apartment tower in Fort Lee, which opened last year.


Copyright 2003 The New York Times Company

JCMAN320
October 21st, 2003, 08:42 PM
Tuesday, October 21, 2003

Slowly, the 34-story Harborside Financial Center Plaza 5 waterfront office tower is starting to fill up.

Mack-Cali Realty Corp. announced yesterday that 20,664 square feet has been leased for 15 years to the U.S. Treasury Department's Office of Thrift Supervision. This brings the 1 million-square-foot tower to 58.3 percent occupancy.

The Office of Thrift Supervision is the main regulator of all federally chartered and many state-chartered thrift institutions, which include savings banks and savings and loan associations. It was established within the U.S. Treasury in 1989, and has four regional offices located in Jersey City, Atlanta, Dallas and San Francisco.

"This lease demonstrates both the appeal of Harborside to a diversity of businesses as well as our continuing ability to secure long-term leases with credit-quality tenants," said Mitchell E. Hersch, chief executive officer of Mack-Cali.

Among the tenants in the $150 million, 480-foot-tall Plaza V, on Greene Street between Morgan and Pearl, are SunAmerica Asset Management Corp., Forest Laboratories, Inc., Fidelity National Financial and others.

- Agustin C. Torres

kliq6
October 24th, 2003, 02:24 PM
the competion is fine between these two city, the problem is that while Jersy City builds, NYC debates about the Far West Side development, if they think 40 million square feet of office space can be built then i say build it. NJ is moving ahead while NYC trys to convince companies to relocate to Brooklyn and LIC. Dont they get it, its still in the city and those areas costs and taxes are still higher then Jersey City, so why bother relocating there

Kris
October 25th, 2003, 04:42 AM
October 26, 2003

POSTINGS

In Jersey City, Medical Center Is to Become Apartments

By RACHELLE GARBARINE

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Jersey City Medical Center buildings are to house 1,200 rental and condo units.

When the Jersey City Medical Center finishes vacating its cluster of tall buildings in March, a second chapter is to begin for the battered Art Deco landmark, which rises on a promontory of the Palisade Cliffs in the center of the old port city.

The plan is to convert eight brick and terra cotta buildings, 8 to 22 stories high, into 1,200 market-rate rental and condominium apartments and 100,000 square feet of commercial space. There will also be a preschool, an art and music center, a library and a museum on the medical center's history. Three low-rise medical center structures are to be razed for a garage for at least 800 cars.

The 14-acre complex's distinct Art Deco profile, with stepped setbacks on the upper floors, is to be preserved. So will its two-acre front lawn, said George Filopoulos, president of Metrovest Equities of Manhattan, which the Jersey City Redevelopment Agency named last month to redevelop the 11 city-owned buildings in the complex.

The medical center, which is on both the State and National Registers of Historic Places, was built from 1928 to 1941. The now mostly vacant complex is considered too old and too big, and the hospital is relocating to a new home downtown, at Grand Street and Jersey Avenue.

Suzanne Mack, executive director of the redevelopment agency, said Metrovest's plan "is sensitive to the complex's historic elements and in the community's best interest."

Mr. Filopoulos said that prices in the complex, which offers views of Manhattan, are to be determined. The $200 million redevelopment, for which Mark Lipton and RKT&B are the architects, is to be completed in stages, from 2005 to 2007. The work is to include installing new mechanical systems and restoring the buildings' crumbling facades. Features such as terra-cotta panels with designs of fragmented circles, chevrons and zigzags will be preserved or recreated, as will decorative grillwork that edges the setbacks at the top of the buildings like a lacy border.


Copyright 2003 The New York Times Company

Zoe
October 25th, 2003, 10:15 AM
This is a good sign. Those buildings have been creepy up til this point. I have freinds that go clear out of their way to avoid that hospital based on its looks alone. The new hospital is built close to the light rail between the Goldman Sachs building and Liberty Science Center, and looks state of the art. New investment into these buildings could really turn that area around (which is only a few blocks from Journal Square)!

Ninjahedge
October 30th, 2003, 04:55 PM
July 4, 2003

New Condos Move Inland From Water in Jersey City

By RACHELLE GARBARINE

Housing development is marching inland from the Hudson River waterfront in Jersey City, its focus changing to condominiums rather than the rental apartments that dominate the water's edge.

Evidence of the shift are two sizable condo projects — one under way, the other planned — on Montgomery Street, west of the shoreline.

The larger of the projects is a 113-apartment complex named Montgomery Greene for its location at the corner of Montgomery and Greene Streets, two blocks from the riverfront. Construction is to start in December on its 19-story tower with 108 apartments and a connecting six-story building with five full-floor lofts.

The new structures will replace the parking lot and two vacant brownstones now on the site. KOR Companies of Wall, N.J., in a joint venture with Time Equities of Manhattan, is developing the $41 million project, which will also have a 124-car garage and ground-floor stores.

The other building, with 46 condos now on the market for sale, is at Montgomery and Grove Streets, eight blocks from the shoreline. A seven-story building is rising on the site, formerly occupied by part of the Majestic Theater, which was built in 1907. The old theater's rear lobby, which is to be refurbished, will be the entrance to the new building.

The theater's front lobby is in a three-story building on Grove Street that, as part of a larger project, is being renovated along with three adjacent buildings dating from 1897 to 1930. The ground-floor space is being rented to retailers, the theater is being marketed to small non-chain users and the upper levels are initially being shown to service users like doctors, according to Exeter Property Company, the developer of the $20 million project.

By the end of the year, several other condo projects are expected to be under way on and around Montgomery Street, totaling 200 apartments, said Robert P. Antonicello, a principal of the ACI Group, a real estate services company in Jersey City. In addition, a 34-story, 523-apartment tower is planned along with a hotel on a site across Newark Avenue from the Grove Street PATH station. Its developer, Schenkman/Kushner Affiliates of Bridgewater N.J., has not yet decided whether the housing will be rental or condo. Construction is to start next spring.

Mr. Antonicello said that for many years developers viewed the city's growth corridor "as the narrow band at the river's edge." Today, he added, little developable land remains on the shoreline, pushing the growth inland. A weakened rental market, he said, was also encouraging developers to put up condos.

He estimated the riverfront rental vacancy rate at 7 percent, up from 3 or 4 percent last year, and said that average rents had fallen by 10 percent, to $24 a square foot annually, or about $2,000 a month. And low mortgage rates, he said, have encouraged people to invest in real estate rather than in the stock market.

Harry Kantor, president of KOR, which is primarily known as a suburban housing developer, said that earlier this year his company bought the Montgomery Greene site, which is near the Exchange Place PATH station and the historic Paulus Hook neighborhood, as a way to diversify. The complex was originally conceived as a rental. But Mr. Kantor said his company redesigned it as a condo to take advantage of the strong for-sale market.

The studio to two-bedroom apartments will have 500 to 1,400 square feet. Initial prices are from $162,500 to $735,000, or $325 to $525 a square foot. Prices for the lofts are not yet set. Sales are to start this fall.

The steel skeleton for the Majestic Theater Condominiums is rising and, along with four renovated buildings, transforming a site across Grove Street from City Hall. Exeter Property was chosen in 2000 as the site's developer by the Jersey City Redevelopment Agency, which foreclosed on the property in 1997.

Eric Silverman, Exeter's president, said that while the project was blocks from the water, it was near the PATH station on Grove Street, which was filling up with restaurants and boutiques, and was in the Van Vorst Park Historic District.

Mr. Silverman said he started the building as a rental but changed to a condo because people, helped by historically low interest rates, "want to invest in the city."

The building will have studio to three-bedroom apartments, with 700 to 1,500 square feet. The building's lobby, once part of the old theater, includes a 35-foot-high domed ceiling and such decorative touches as 13 plaster angels.

Since sales began seven weeks ago, 30 apartments have been sold. Prices have been raised 5 to 15 percent, to $175,000 to $500,000, or $310 to $330 a square foot on average. Completion is expected in January.


Copyright 2003 The New York Times Company

Hudson Point and North Pier were the two I worked on.

There are developments going in all the time, but the place is still pretty dead when it comes to things to do. If you are 16 it is fine to hang out at the mall, but there are still very few attractions.

Coming from Hoboken, I van say that Hoboken has more Yuppie diversions, JC is turning into more of the "downtown" feel. I hope it continues, but I just wish they didnt build SO BIG so close to the water. When I first moved in, I could actually SEE the Statue of Liberty from what is now "Sinatra Drive", but the great seawall of JC is now blocking all vistas south.

Kris
November 1st, 2003, 05:12 AM
November 2, 2003

IN THE REGION | NEW JERSEY

Thinking Small in Subleasing in Jersey City

By ANTOINETTE MARTIN

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The view of Manhattan from Harborside Financial Center in Jersey City is a feature promoted by its brokers.

CHARLES SCHWAB & COMPANY made the decision before the gleaming glass 19-story, 577,000-square-foot office tower built to its specifications on Jersey City's waterfront was even complete: go to Plan B.

It was not that the building itself, Plaza 10 at Harborside Financial Center, had somehow fallen short. It was that the San Francisco-based brokerage house's need for it shrank in the economic downturns of late 2000 and 2001, as the structure was going up. Schwab had signed a 15-year lease for the entire structure, built and owned — until recently — by the Mack-Cali Realty Corporation. It put the entire building up for sublease in late 2001.

After the Sept. 11 attack on the financial district in New York, two large financial service companies moved in: Mizuho Bank, a Japanese bank taking 107,000 square feet, and Instinet, an electronic brokerage service arm of Reuters, taking 144,000 square feet. The rest of Plaza 10 — 326,000 square feet — remained vacant, though, as the economic slump went on, new buildings continued to rise on the Hudson riverfront, and more and more sublease space was thrown onto the commercial office market.

Last spring, Schwab and its brokers — Cushman & Wakefield and Handler Real Estate Services — decided it was time for Plan C: break up the floors of the building, if necessary, and recruit smaller tenants aggressively — offering them all the amenities Schwab had built into Plaza 10, as well as architects and builders to customize a tenant's space and a big break on the rent. Schwab's long-term lease is for $34 per square foot annually, but sublease deals of about $25-a-square-foot are being offered, for terms as short as five years or less.

Schwab's real estate director, Paul J. McDevitt, said Cushman's broker-analysts came up with the approach. "Cushman recommended that this low-hanging fruit was being ignored by others," Mr. McDevitt said. "We thought we would take the opportunity to go after it."

Jersey City has traditionally been sought after as a site for large administrative and back-office operations for Manhattan financial services firms and other corporations. But the market for such big-fish tenants has slowed drastically in the last several years.

"UBS Paine Webber, over at the Newport Office Center VII, a stone's throw away, is in virtually the same situation as Schwab," said Richard Donahue, a Cushman broker, referring to the fact that that company has had a half-million square feet of space available for sublease for almost two years.

He also mentioned a Goldman Sachs building nearing completion at the harborfront. Goldman Sachs has said it will occupy all of its own building, but brokers expect it will occupy only a fraction of it. Also, Lehman Brothers has 375,000 square feet on the market for sublease in Jersey City, he said.

When these mammoth firms, and others, came to Jersey City in the 90's, "the market was hot as a pistol, with virtually no vacancy," Mr. Donahue said. "But financial service firms are not in an aggressive growth mode any longer — is that an understatement, or what?"

Last summer, Schwab and Cushman held a large reception for real estate brokers to begin the new pitch to smaller users. "Mr. McDevitt made it irresistible for brokers to bring deals," said a Jersey City realtor, Skip Dolan, who heads Dolan Realty, which deals primarily with small-office tenants. "He said: `We will not be undersold.' "

"I didn't let any grass grow under my feet," Mr. Dolan said. "I brought over eight tenants, and there are six transactions pending."

Mr. Donahue, who is handling the Schwab subleasing for Cushman, said deals with five new tenants had closed in the last six weeks, and two more were on the brink.

The seven deals will fill only 13 percent of the available space. "But we have momentum," Mr. Donahue said. "Obviously, it takes more time and work to fill a large office space with smaller tenants, but we are discovering there is a real market in it."

THE new tenants at Plaza 10 include Park Avenue Capital, which will relocate from Park Avenue at 57th Street in Manhattan, taking 3,500 square feet; Unigestion Ltd., a Swiss financial firm opening its first United States office, taking 4,521 square feet; and Perr & Knight, an insurance company based in Pacific Palisades, Calif., opening its first East Coast location and taking 4,181 square feet.

Two other tenants are relocating from within Jersey City: Arlington Hill Investment Management, taking 5,120 square feet, and Welgrow International, a shipping company, taking 3,972 square feet.

Lease terms on the five new deals range from five to 15 years.

One factor making the deals easier, Mr. Donahue said, is that Mack-Cali no longer owns the building, although it continues to manage it. Mack-Cali owns five other office buildings totaling more than three million square feet of Class A office space at Harborside Financial Center. Its agreement with brokers had been that any potential tenant shown space at Plaza 10 also had to be shown available space in the other buildings as well.

Plaza 10 was sold on Sept. 29 to a Manhattan-based investor, IStar Financial, for $194 million. Real estate executives believe that is the highest price ever paid for a building in the area but noted it is still a bargain by Manhattan standards. The purchase price came to $336 per square foot. Last year, 399 Park Avenue, a trophy property in Manhattan, sold for more than $600 a square foot. The landmark G.M. Building recently sold for more than $800 a square foot.

"When Mack-Cali sold," Mr. Donahue said, " the benefit for us was that it became wonderfully easy to go after tenants our own way. The complications with Mack-Cali disappeared." Mr. Dolan said he now told potential tenants for the Schwab building that "all tenants are being treated like 100,000-square-foot tenants."

"Smaller companies needing space don't have the people in house to do a build-out when they sign the lease," Mr. Dolan said. "They don't have time to hire a contractor, an architect, etc. But Schwab is providing those things. If a tenant needs X number of private offices, a server room, a pantry and a certain size bullpen for its employees, they make their reqests — and within a few days' time, they get a set of plans."

Paul Spiegel of Handler, the brokers working with Cushman, said the Schwab property raises the bar as to what is available to smaller tenants in the New York metropolitan area. The building offers space with substantial glass, partitioning and tenant-controlled air-conditioning, since the systems were installed floor by floor.

If all that were to be available to a small tenant in Manhattan, it would almost certainly cost more than what Schwab is charging now, Mr. Spiegel said.

In addition, he said, the Jersey City building has an added amenity: the view. "The best views of Manhattan, the Empire State Building and the George Washington Bridge are from the Jersey side of the Hudson," Mr. Spiegel said. "Everybody knows that."

Mr. Donahue said he could not speculate on how long it might take to fill up the building, small tenant by small tenant. "All I know," he said, "is that this is working, after a long period of things that weren't working, so we're going with it."


Copyright 2003 The New York Times Company

JCMAN320
November 13th, 2003, 10:44 PM
Liberty Science Center to expand
$17 million OK'd project details sketchy

Thursday, November 13, 2003

By Rudy Larini
Newhouse News Service

A state agency laid the groundwork yesterday for the first major expansion of the 10-year-old Liberty Science Center in Jersey City.

Members of the state Economic Development Authority approved borrowing $17 million to finance the design of the new Science Center exhibit space, the addition of 1,000 parking spaces and the renovation of the nearby railroad terminal building along the Hudson River in Liberty State Park.

When construction of the Science Center expansion begins in about a year, exhibits in the science center will be relocated to the terminal building for the estimated 22 months of construction, according to Tom Vincz, an EDA spokesman.

Dina Schipper, the Science Center's communications director, referred all questions about the expansion project, including its effect on attendance, to the EDA.

"The EDA is running the project," she said, adding the venture is still in a very preliminary stage.

"We don't have an architect, we don't have plans and we don't have a sense of what is going on," she said. "There is really nothing to talk about yet."

Vincz said the expansion is "consistent with the goals and mission of the Science Center."

"It is a cultural fixture and a learning resource for New Jersey schoolchildren, and more and more it is becoming a destination for families on day trips," he said. "That's where a lot of their attendance is coming from."

He said the Science Center has the highest attendance per square foot of any similar science museum in the country.

Walk-in admissions are running 17 percent ahead of projections for the current year, he said, with 186,028 visits compared with the projected 159,530. He did not have figures for class trips to the museum. The science center has attracted a total of 7 million visitors since it opened in 1993.

Vincz said the actual expansion, with an estimated cost of roughly $85 million, will add new exhibits to the center's three themed fields of health, inventions and the environment. Each theme occupies a floor of the 160,000-square-foot building, which has hundreds of interactive exhibits and the nation's largest IMAX dome theater.

"This will bring in more world-class exhibits and continue the mission of being a valuable resource for New Jersey," he said.

He said he did not know what portion of the existing Science Center, if any, would remain open during the expansion or if all exhibits would be relocated to the railroad terminal.

"It's not clear how that transition will take place," Vincz said. "All that remains to be worked out."

He added the expansion will include an upgrade of current exhibits.

"There's always a continuing emphasis on keeping the exhibits up to speed," he said.

JCMAN320
December 6th, 2003, 09:49 AM
No Corporate Logo for Tallest Building
Goldman Sachs pulls its Planning Board bid

Saturday, December 06, 2003

By Douglas R. Stivers
Journal correspondent

Financial giant Goldman Sachs, which is constructing the state's tallest building on the Jersey City waterfront, has abandoned plans to crown the skyscraper with a several-stories-high sign, ending a controversy stirred by the proposal.

After carrying the application over for several Planning Board meetings, the company finally withdrew its submission Tuesday, when the plan would have faced a straight up or down vote.

"We've never put our logo on any office building, and we're not going to put it on this one," said Bruce Corwin, a spokesman for the company.

The proposal had drawn fire from several neighborhood residents and its prospects with the Planning Board appeared dim.

Although a letter Goldman Sachs submitted to the board before Tuesday's meeting indicated that the company reserved the right to resubmit the proposal - as it still does - Corwin's statement seemed to negate that possibility.

Planning Board members has asked the city planning staff to amend the Colgate-area redevelopment plan to specifically bars such signage.

"We felt putting those crown signs up is not consistent with the master plan," board member Leon Yost said. "We're still asking staff to look at amending the redevelopment plan."

According to Yost, the redevelopment plan for the area states that such signs are permitted if the board grants a waiver to the applicant, a condition he interprets to mean it is not allowed under normal circumstances.

However, in an effort to remove any ambiguity, Yost said the board felt more comfortable amending the plan to insert language that specifically bars the signs.

The board had balked in September when Goldman Sachs ap- proached it with the idea of adding its name to the top of the building, on Hudson Street.

Former Planning Board member Jeffrey Kaplowitz, who attended the Sept. 23 meeting, was more blunt in his assessment.

"It's a disgrace," he said at the time. "You don't see anyone putting a sign on top of the Empire State Building."

In other business Tuesday, the board:

Put off a decision on a request to subdivide one lot into two at 222 and 224 Beacon Ave. when neighbors objected and board members found inconsistencies in the developer's application.

Granted Winograd Development preliminary approval to redivide 11 lots into eight at 519 to 5371/2 Martin Luther King Drive to construct seven attached two-family houses with the eighth lot reserved for a driveway and parking. Following extensive testimony, the board said the project would be a great boon to the area.

Granted the Newport Association Development Company a one-year extension to construct a 23-story, 414-unit full-service hotel.

Approved the conversion of a warehouse at 37 Edward Hart Road to office space, in accordance with the Liberty Harbor Redevelopment Plan.

Approved a proposal to subdivide four existing lots into five new lots at 313-319 First St.

Told a property owner who violated city regulations for a minimum setback for 24-28 Wales Ave. to make adjustments to the property before returning to the board on Jan 13.

Journal staff writer: Jason Fink contributed to this report.

Copyright 2003 The Jersey Journal.

JCMAN320
January 3rd, 2004, 07:29 PM
How to revitalize Journal Square?

Princeton graduate students offer vision, will make presentation

By: Dave Hoffman
Reporter staff writer 12/21/2003

A Princeton University study says that improved pedestrian avenues, enhanced streetscapes, and a greater perception of safety are some ways to revitalize Journal Square.

Six students enrolled in an Urban and Regional Planning workshop at the Woodrow Wilson School of Princeton conducted the study and prepared a planning report in conjunction with the Jersey City Economic Development Corporation recently.

The Urban Planning Workshop is a required course for sophomores seeking a two-year Masters degree in Public Affairs. The program accepts students with two to four years of work experience. This year's students were selected from across North America, including, California, Mexico, the Midwest and the East Coast.

Having worked in the field, the six students offered valuable planning services at no cost to the city.

"It is considered one of the best training institutions for people who are going to be involved with city planning," said EDC employee Colin Egan. "We got the best and the brightest for free." Egan is the Director of the Friends of the Loews theater renewal project.

There will be a public in-depth presentation of the study on Jan. 13.

The course is taught by Professor Paul Buckhurst, a professional urban planning consultant who has taught at Princeton for 20 years. EDC Urban Enterprise Zone Director Roberta Farber previously worked with Buckhurst on similar projects in Paterson.

"Princeton contacted me because we had worked together before," Farber said.


A target for improvement

The study encompassed a 24-block area spanning from Newark Avenue to Montgomery Street, and Summit and Tuers avenues to Tonnele and Garrison avenues.

Formerly a central business district, Journal Square is now one of four areas targeted for revitalization as a Special Improvement District (SID). Some of the area's unique features are the PATH station, which makes it a hub for transportation, and its Urban Enterprise Zone demarcation, which offers tax incentives for area businesses.

The students considered several goals from the city's 2000 Master Plan.

"They looked for ways to encourage more people to spend time in Journal Square so they'll patronize the businesses and organizations," Farber said.

The research consisted of conducting building analysis and land use surveys, meeting with community leaders, and reviewing current and old plans for the area. They looked at existing structures, open space, transportation, the workforce, and the shopping environment.

"We talked with a lot of people with an interest in the future of Journal Square," said Buckhurst, "We met with the mayor, city councilpeople, city agencies, the planning department, the engineering department."

Other interested parties included Hudson County Community College, Hartz Mountain, which owns a number of Journal Square buildings, and Friends of Loews, who are involved with promoting the historic Loews Theater. The students also met with the SID leaders, including McGinley Square, which is within the boundaries of the study, but in considered a separate SID.

With so many organizations in the area, the students had an abundance of development plans to work with. "There are plans that have not been implemented," said Farber. "They looked at all different plans, and with those in mind, they set out to see what was doable on the square. [They looked at] redevelopment plans, old plans for Hotel on the Square, plans for the open space center of the train station, and parking."



A meeting of the minds

"We see Journal Square as an ethnically diverse neighborhood poised to become an active commercial center and exciting cultural destination with a vibrant nightlife," the students said in a brochure presented to community leaders at the Loews Theater on Dec. 10.

Members of the City Council, EDC, SID and other organization leaders attended the presentation, focusing on the students' preliminary findings.

The students are now preparing a detailed report and will hold a detailed presentation for business owners, residents, and other community people.

"Our hope is that we produce a written report that will be useful in terms of city actions," said Buckhurst. "This is a vision plan, to say 'Hey, here are some ideas.' Some can be looked at immediately, and some will take a longer time to follow through."

Farber said that student studies typically produce a mixture of practical and pie-in-the-sky ideas.

"This has been very real," said Farber. "The have a lot of doable projects that can come out of the information they presented."

Farber particularly liked a proposed walkway going over the square from the PATH Train to the Loews Theater, and the improvement of several underused alleyways in the area.

"There are several alleyways off the Loews and the square which could be pedestrian friendly," she said. "They could be used for outdoor dining. People use them to walk through, but they're not pedestrian friendly. They're dark and can be slightly deserted. People just haven't been using them, making for more traffic elsewhere."

Buckhurst has brought the workshop to Jersey City before. In 1985, the class created guidelines for mixed use development at the Colgate Site. In 1987, they did a redevelopment study on Hoboken Avenue, and in 1991, they did a renovation proposal for the Majestic Theater performing arts center.

"It is happening now, nine years later," said Buckhurst. "Whether they saw our report, I don't know."


©The Hudson Reporter 2004

JCMAN320
January 25th, 2004, 09:03 PM
Hudson rises: 2003 - The year in development
Tom Jennemann
Reporter staff writer 12/28/2003

NEW TENANTS - Hoboken's waterfront continues to flourish. This year, Marsh and McLennan moved 1,200 employees into the city's Waterfront Corporate Center.

Development continued to thrive on Hudson County's waterfront in 2003. Office, commercial, and residential buildings in Jersey City, Hoboken and West New York have been completed, and there are shiny projects inland to match. Whether it's the first new construction in Journal Square in nearly two decades, or the reuse of the Yardley Soap Factory in Union City, or the mix of affordable and market rate units on Hoboken's west side, Hudson County developers are once again paying attention to long-forgotten neighborhoods.


Jersey City

Over the past decade, the development boom on the Jersey City waterfront has been driven almost entirely by corporate projects. While the expansive redevelopment plan has been successful in attracting globally respected anchors like Lehman Brothers, Goldman Sachs and American Express, some residents have been concerned there has not been enough housing to support the commercial element. They argued that without the proper mix of housing and office space, Jersey City risked becoming a "ghost town" after 5 p.m.

This year marked several new trends. One is that while plans for new large-scale commercial office space have cooled somewhat, the number of residential projects has seen a dramatic increase.

Maybe even more importantly, for the first time in decades, developers are planning residential projects in the downtown area, including converting office buildings and constructing new mixed-use towers on blighted properties.

In August, the Applied Development Corporation broke ground on a $31 million 12-story, 130-unit rental apartment building at the old State Theater movie house at Journal Square. It is the first new construction in Journal Square since an office building was finished there in 1988. The project will take about another 12 months to finish, and will feature 100 market-rate units and 30 affordable units.

An Historic Downtown Jersey City project is situated across the street from City Hall. The project, with 46 condos now on the market for sale, is at Montgomery and Grove streets, eight blocks from the shoreline. The seven-story building was formerly part of the Majestic Theater, which was built in 1907. The old theater's rear lobby, which is currently being refurbished, will be the entrance to the new building.

The theater's front lobby is in a three-story building on Grove Street that, as part of a larger project, is being renovated along with three adjacent buildings dating from 1897 to 1930. The ground floor space is being rented to retailers, the theater is being marketed to small non-chain users, and the upper levels are initially being shown to service users like doctors.

Grove Street II, another Historic Downtown project, after two years of discussion and alteration, the Jersey City Planning Board passed the Grove Street Redevelopment Plan in early March. While site plan approval is still needed, the plan will include a high density, mixed-use development with a new 34-story hotel and apartment building. It will rise opposite the downtown PATH station, located between Grove Street and Marin Avenue.

The developer for the project is Schenkman & Kushner. "The project will have a 500-unit residential portion," said Peter DeWitt, the project architect. "In addition, there will also be a 160-unit hotel complex."

Both portions of the development will be combined into what DeWitt called a "building envelope," allowing the residence and the hotel to have a common set of entrances. "On the ground floor, there will be 17,000 square feet set aside for retail space," DeWitt added.

In Historic Paulus Hook, another large-scale project is Montgomery Greene, aptly named for the corner of Montgomery and Greene streets. The 20-story luxury building will contain 113 condominium units, comprised of lofts, studios and one-bedroom and two-bedroom layouts, as well as approximately 4,000 square feet of ground floor retail space. Construction is expected to commence in the spring of 2004 and be completed by the summer of 2005.

Waterfront development is also starting to benefit the rest of Jersey City. Goldman Sachs will be fully financing a $5 million project on Martin Luther King Drive with a charitable contribution. The project will create 21 condominiums at 412-420 MLK Drive that will range in price from $60,000 to $130,000. Located adjacent to a Hudson-Bergen Light Rail stop and within walking distance of the King Drive Shopping Plaza, the housing complex is just one of a series of recent Ward F projects aimed at reviving a neighborhood that for 20 years has suffered from high crime rates and abandoned properties.

"We're making this a golden neighborhood, spike by spike by spike," Cunningham said when announcing the project. "That's where we're heading. We could not have done it without Goldman Sachs."

On the waterfront

In September, Goldman Sachs topped off its building in the Colgate Section of the Jersey City waterfront. According to a Goldman Sachs official, the firm will start phasing in employees in April.

The modern, blue-tinted 876-foot building is the state's largest, replacing the nearby 101 Hudson St., which at 592 feet tall, used to be the state's tallest.

Earlier this year it was reported that the firm has decided to cut its original projection of 4,000 employees to 2,000 and had nixed plans to relocate its entire equities division from lower Manhattan.

In May, Liberty Towers, which is only steps away from the Goldman Sachs construction, opened. The project was the latest finished component in the 24-acre redevelopment area once occupied by Colgate-Palmolive, the toiletries company. The towers are twin 37-story rental buildings with 648 apartments. Fisher Development Associates of Purchase, N.Y. developed the $100 million project.

Three million more square feet of office space is planned and four other housing developments, smaller than Liberty Towers, are underway or planned on the former Colgate property.

Garden State Development and Roseland Properties' work has begun on the Marbella Apartments along Washington Boulevard. The 40-story luxury apartment complex will have 412 units. Studios will be between 800 to 900 square feet, while two-bedroom units will be about 1,200 square feet. The complex is expected to have a retail space capacity of 5,600 square feet.

Gulcrapek
January 25th, 2004, 09:38 PM
Begun work on Marbella? I saw it 4-6 months ago and it looked finished...

GoogleJC
January 26th, 2004, 10:27 AM
Construction started in 2001 Marbella is finished they started leasing apartments in December.

JCMAN320
January 26th, 2004, 03:54 PM
typo by paper

Ninjahedge
January 29th, 2004, 04:27 PM
"some residents have been concerned there has not been enough housing to support the commercial element. They argued that without the proper mix of housing and office space, Jersey City risked becoming a "ghost town" after 5 p.m. "

Yeah, so?

Honestly, compared to some of the stuff I have seen out by the Science Center, i would prefer a buisness ghost town after 5 than the alternative.

The area does not need to have all residential. You build residential OUTSIDE the buisness district. Brooklyn buisness, Midtown and Wall Street all look kind of lonely (depending on where you go) after hours. Jersey City should follow the same thing. Place some things outside to encourage people to build in the surrounding areas.

make a good buisness and cultural center and you will get more people wanting to libe closer. You will get gentrification.

But whatever.

NYatKNIGHT
January 29th, 2004, 05:22 PM
Wall Street looks lonely after hours and that's a good example for Jersey City? Urban Planners are desperately trying to change Downtown for a reason, a 24/7 community makes a thriving urban core. Jersey City should try to have its own identity beyond being an extention of the NYC office market by day and a ghost town at night.

But whatever.

STT757
January 29th, 2004, 10:31 PM
Hoboken is Jersey City's answer to "Night life".

Pottebaum
January 29th, 2004, 11:13 PM
Brooklyn buisness,Midtown and Wall Street all look kind of lonely (depending on where you go) after hours.


lol, Isn't Midtown home of Times Square :P :wink:

TLOZ Link5
January 29th, 2004, 11:36 PM
He said "depending on where you go." There are plenty of areas of Midtown that aren't all that happening after dark.

JCMAN320
February 24th, 2004, 01:40 PM
WEST DISTRICT MAKEOVER
Mayor unveils preliminary $6M plan for block-wide police-fire complex

Monday, February 23, 2004

By Michaelangelo Conte
Journal staff writer

Aproposal to build a new $6 million police and fire station in Jersey City's West District was unveiled by Mayor Glenn D. Cunningham at a community meeting last week.

Cunningham was careful to say the plan is in a very preliminary stage, and even if that plan is the one that is implemented, it could still be two to three years before construction would begin on the Emergency Response Complex at Communipaw and Jackson avenues.

"The police station is very aged and no longer fills the needs of the police department, and we need a new firehouse also," Cunningham said to the roughly 40 residents attending Wednesday night's meeting in the basement of the Miller Branch of the Jersey City Public Library. "It is a key investment in the community and will be an anchor for Martin Luther King Drive."

The mayor touted the project as a way to improve safety and raise area property values. He said construction of the state-of-the art facility would allow police officers and firefighters to vacate the century-old buildings they now occupy on Communipaw and Monticello avenues.

Cunningham said construction of the facility would be an investment into an area of the city largely overlooked by developers. He also said it would be possible to move the city Human Resources Department into the building by adding an additional story.

"Everyone contributes to this city, and I want to give back to everyone," the mayor said. "We want every neighborhood to be a golden neighborhood. Most development has taken place Downtown, so we have to dig in and make resources available to all of the city."

The new facility would occupy the entire city block bounded by Communipaw Avenue to the north, Seidler Street to the west, Clinton Avenue to the south and Jackson Avenue to the east, officials said.

Police facilities would occupy most of the Communipaw Avenue frontage. Fire Department Engine Company 20 and Rescue 1 would access the facility on Seidler and Jackson avenues, utilizing a drive-through garage with doors at each end, officials said.

There are 39 lots on the proposed site, with 17 of them owned by Jersey City and 22 privately owned. Four lots are vacant but 18 have structures on them. Twelve of the structures are residential and six are commercial, officials said.

Most of the questions posed by residents at the meeting related to how the city would purchase the privately-owned properties, and what would happen to residents living in the proposed development area.

If the proposed project were to move forward, Cunningham said, the city would use its power of eminent domain to force the private owners to sell to the city. But he assured residents that the city would help relocate those living on the site, and give the owners fair prices for their property.

Councilwoman Viola Richardson, a former city police officer, spoke at the meeting. Her opinion of the current West District Police Station? It's "the pits."

"It's not fit for human habitation," Richardson said. "It's not a healthy workplace for our police officers and firefighters."

Fire Department Director Jerome Cala said the current fire station dates back to the early 1900s.

"It's obsolete and it's too small for the new heavier, larger fire apparatuses," he said.

The new complex, about a block from the current police and fire stations, would be paid for out of the city's capital budget, Cunningham said.

A study of the soil on the land was completed in November and officials will now review that to determine if remediation is needed and feasible, he said.

Michaelangelo Conte covers law enforcement. He can be reached at mconte@jjournal.com.

Copyright 2004 The Jersey Journal.

JCMAN320
February 24th, 2004, 01:41 PM
WEST DISTRICT MAKEOVER
Mayor unveils preliminary $6M plan for block-wide police-fire complex

Monday, February 23, 2004

By Michaelangelo Conte
Journal staff writer

Aproposal to build a new $6 million police and fire station in Jersey City's West District was unveiled by Mayor Glenn D. Cunningham at a community meeting last week.

Cunningham was careful to say the plan is in a very preliminary stage, and even if that plan is the one that is implemented, it could still be two to three years before construction would begin on the Emergency Response Complex at Communipaw and Jackson avenues.

"The police station is very aged and no longer fills the needs of the police department, and we need a new firehouse also," Cunningham said to the roughly 40 residents attending Wednesday night's meeting in the basement of the Miller Branch of the Jersey City Public Library. "It is a key investment in the community and will be an anchor for Martin Luther King Drive."

The mayor touted the project as a way to improve safety and raise area property values. He said construction of the state-of-the art facility would allow police officers and firefighters to vacate the century-old buildings they now occupy on Communipaw and Monticello avenues.

Cunningham said construction of the facility would be an investment into an area of the city largely overlooked by developers. He also said it would be possible to move the city Human Resources Department into the building by adding an additional story.

"Everyone contributes to this city, and I want to give back to everyone," the mayor said. "We want every neighborhood to be a golden neighborhood. Most development has taken place Downtown, so we have to dig in and make resources available to all of the city."

The new facility would occupy the entire city block bounded by Communipaw Avenue to the north, Seidler Street to the west, Clinton Avenue to the south and Jackson Avenue to the east, officials said.

Police facilities would occupy most of the Communipaw Avenue frontage. Fire Department Engine Company 20 and Rescue 1 would access the facility on Seidler and Jackson avenues, utilizing a drive-through garage with doors at each end, officials said.

There are 39 lots on the proposed site, with 17 of them owned by Jersey City and 22 privately owned. Four lots are vacant but 18 have structures on them. Twelve of the structures are residential and six are commercial, officials said.

Most of the questions posed by residents at the meeting related to how the city would purchase the privately-owned properties, and what would happen to residents living in the proposed development area.

If the proposed project were to move forward, Cunningham said, the city would use its power of eminent domain to force the private owners to sell to the city. But he assured residents that the city would help relocate those living on the site, and give the owners fair prices for their property.

Councilwoman Viola Richardson, a former city police officer, spoke at the meeting. Her opinion of the current West District Police Station? It's "the pits."

"It's not fit for human habitation," Richardson said. "It's not a healthy workplace for our police officers and firefighters."

Fire Department Director Jerome Cala said the current fire station dates back to the early 1900s.

"It's obsolete and it's too small for the new heavier, larger fire apparatuses," he said.

The new complex, about a block from the current police and fire stations, would be paid for out of the city's capital budget, Cunningham said.

A study of the soil on the land was completed in November and officials will now review that to determine if remediation is needed and feasible, he said.

Michaelangelo Conte covers law enforcement. He can be reached at mconte@jjournal.com.

Copyright 2004 The Jersey Journal.

Gulcrapek
February 24th, 2004, 05:18 PM
I think the trend nowadays is to combine police and fire stations. Not sure if that's good or bad.

Pilaro
March 6th, 2004, 10:33 PM
I think the Goldman Sachs Tower looks very similar to Two International Finance Center in Hong Kong, this tower was designed by Rocco Design Limited. Just much shorter.

http://www.emporis.com/en/il/pc/?id=100614&aid=8

Kris
March 26th, 2004, 01:29 AM
March 26, 2004

RESIDENTIAL REAL ESTATE

In Jersey City, Condos Are to Rise Near Light Rail Line

By RACHELLE GARBARINE

Three 1940's industrial buildings that sat vacant for years in Jersey City have been bulldozed to make way for a $40 million development of moderately priced condominiums, in the first phase of a developer's plan for almost 700 homes.

Ground was broken last month on the development, a block from the Westside Avenue Station of the Hudson-Bergen Light Rail Line, that will include 172 condominiums, from town houses to apartments and lofts. They are to rise over the next two years on four acres on the south side of Claremont Avenue in a former industrial neighborhood close to the Newark Bay/Hackensack River waterfront and Route 440, a main retail corridor.

The housing is the initial phase of a 15-acre project that the developer, Cathartes Investments of Boston, plans to continue on the north side of Claremont Avenue and stretch to Route 440. The entire project, to be called the Community at Westside Station, will have up to 500 more residences, as well as retail and office space.

The project's first phase also supports Jersey City's plan to redevelop its other coastline, away from its reviving Hudson River waterfront, or Gold Coast, and bring development into neighborhoods in the city's western half.

Robert Cotter, Jersey City's planning director, said that what is called the Bayside Development Plan focuses on a two-square-mile area that has neighborhoods of two- and three-family homes and vacant, underused and environmentally tainted sites. The goal, he said, is to improve the existing neighborhoods and to replace the dormant sites over time with a mix of uses to create a pedestrian-oriented neighborhood, with a refurbished Route 440 as its spine.

The plan envisions up to 17,000 residences, 110 acres of parks and plazas, seven million square feet of office and retail space and educational facilities including elementary schools and a performing arts center. Mr. Cotter said the plan would advance "in small bites, with two or three of the areas most susceptible to change being redeveloped in the next few years."

He said his agency was working with a number of developers, as well as with New Jersey City University, which wants to develop the 22 acres it owns in the area as a western campus. One of the developers is Cathartes, which expanded into the metropolitan New York area about four years ago.

Mark Barer, the Cathartes project manager, said his company got involved with the Claremont Avenue site because of its experience in underdeveloped urban areas. He cited the 600,000 square feet of offices and several hundred lofts it developed in Boston's Seaport district before that area turned around.

Mr. Barer said that among the factors supporting development in western Jersey City are the rebirth of the city's Hudson River waterfront, pushing growth westward; the nearby project being developed by K. Hovnanian Companies of Edison, which began in the 1980's, has 1,020 town houses and is adding a final 380-unit stage, and the nearby light rail line. The line now runs throughout Bayonne, Jersey City and Hoboken and eventually will extend to Bergen County. Other attractions, Mr. Barer said, were the city's grant of a 20-year tax abatement for his company's project, and its long-term vision for the area.

Initial prices of the apartments will be in the low $200,000 to low $300,000 range, said Ted Hanley, president of Integrated Real Estate Resources of Jersey City, the project's sales agent.

Eighty-four of the first residences will be built over the next year. They are to include town houses with two and three bedrooms and 1,400 to 1,500 square feet and two-bedroom apartments with 974 to 1,010 square feet. The remaining 88 residences will be lofts with 800 to 1,400 square feet in two mid-rise buildings, construction of which is to start this summer.

Minno & Wasko of Lambertville, N.J., has designed the project to be a traditional urban neighborhood that blends with the rest of the city. Many of the homes will have garages in the back and porches, balconies or stoops in the front to encourage neighbors to socialize, Mr. Barer said.

Mr. Hanley added that with the rail line nearby, which provides access to PATH and ferry stops to Manhattan, residents will not need cars for work or recreation.

Copyright 2004 The New York Times Company

GoogleJC
March 29th, 2004, 05:12 PM
The Jersey Journal

Jersey City

Newark Ave. development plans get smaller

Monday, March 29, 2004

By Julia M. Scott
Journal correspondent

A massive development planned for Newark Avenue between Grove Street and Luis Muñoz Marin Boulevard is being scaled down a bit, architects for the project told the Jersey City Planning Board last week.

Dubbed Grove Pointe and scheduled to open in fall 2006, the building will now be 29 stories at its highest point, instead of the originally proposed 34 stories, because plans for a hotel have been eliminated for marketing reasons, project manager Joseph Punia of the Bridgewater-based firm Schenkman/Kushner said.

Grove Pointe will still house 525 residential units - 67 condos and 458 rental apartments - but the garage capacity will be reduced from 600 parking spots to 535, Punia said. But future residents will have a rooftop pool and deck to look forward to.

As part of the project, developers will revamp a one-block section of Newark Avenue and the triangular park area at the entrance to the Grove Street PATH station, directly across from the building. Newark Avenue will be redone to feel like a pedestrian plaza, but the road will be strong enough to handle bus traffic, Punia said.

The commission voted 6-0 Tuesday to approve the changes. Construction is scheduled to begin this fall and take about 24 months, Punia said.

In other business, amendments to the Water Street Redevelopment Plan included adding a square block between Mallory Avenue and West Side Avenue and between Claremont Avenue and Pollock Avenue, minus a small section near Grant Avenue, to the designated redevelopment area.

Within this eight-acre block, the redevelopment plan included requiring a dog run if any residential units are built in the southwest section of the block. The construction of four new streets within the newly designated section were also outlined by city planner Douglas Greenfeld.

The board voted 6-0 to recommend the city council to declare the area in need of redevelopment.

The board also voted 6-0, with commissioners Gregory Malave and Larry Eccleston absent, to:

Approve an amended site plan for the Columbus Towers at 303 Warren St. to include a semi-circular drop-off instead of a full roundabout.

Amend the Morris Canal Redevelopment Plan to bar new liquor stores from setting up shop in the area.

Approve the conversion of four ground floor apartments to professional medical offices at 40 Newport Parkway.

Approve preliminary and final site plans to construct three new two-family homes at 94, 96 and 98 Ege Ave. to be sold at market rate with the condition that the backyard, which borders the Hudson-Bergen Light Rail, have a fence at least 8 feet high.

A Verizon Wireless application to install a rooftop cell antenna was carried to the April 20 meeting at the request of the applicant.

JCMAN320
April 25th, 2004, 01:20 PM
Jersey City goal: Attract tourists
Mayor's wife named to head new council

Saturday, April 03, 2004

By Michaelangelo Conte
Journal staff writer

Jersey City Mayor Glenn D. Cunningham kicked off a campaign to popularize the city as a tourist destination yesterday, naming his wife, Sandra Bolden-Cunningham, as head of the new Council on Arts & Tourism.

"We have heard the phrase that Jersey City's waterfront is the Gold Coast, but we believe the gold is not only on the coast but in Jersey City itself, and we believe that gold is ready to be mined by tourism," Bolden-Cunningham said.

Formation of the CAT was announced at a breakfast with about 200 area business leaders and artists on the ninth floor of the Hyatt Hotel at Exchange Place, against the backdrop of sweeping panoramas of New York City and the Hudson River.

At the program's unveiling, New Jersey Commerce & Economic Growth Commission Director the Rev. William Watley presented Cunningham with a check for $25,000 to pay for preliminary expenses.

City spokesman Stan H. Eason said the CAT is an all-volunteer group that will seek grants in the hopes of hiring paid staff members at some point. CAT officials passed out a questionnaire to those at the meeting, seeking their input.

The questionnaire asks:

When you think of Jersey City, what comes to mind?

Are you interested in becoming a member of the CAT Steering Committee to further develop our agenda?

How can CAT help your business/industry become a focal point for visitors or tourists?

Bolden-Cunningham said those at the meeting would be asked to volunteer their time and perhaps money to the endeavor.

The focal point of the breakfast meeting was a short video that delineated important historical events in Jersey City from the 1600s to today and focused on recent development in the city as well.

Among those in attendance was DoubleTree Club Suites Director of Revenue Management Judith Bichsel Newman, and she lauded the tourism initiative.

"We've been waiting for something like this, and we hope it can create interest to get the attention we need," said Bichsel Newman. "If you want to do something cultural, come to Jersey City."

In fact, Bolden-Cunningham touted Jersey City as a place in which 50 languages and 100 dialects are spoken in the schools, and a place she called New Jersey's most diverse.

Also touted as a tourist attraction was the character of the city's historic neighborhoods, including Paulus Hook, famous for being the site of a Revolutionary War battle.

The city's arts community was also listed as a draw for tourism, as was Ellis Island, the Statue of Liberty, Liberty State Park and the Liberty Science Center.

The city's role in the effort to assist New York during the Sept. 11, 2001 terrorist attacks was also cited, as was the nine-story Sept. 11 memorial, which city officials hope to have constructed by the fall.

Cunningham said the city is the site of the first European settlement in New Jersey and he noted that the Underground Railroad passed through.

Jersey City is also the location of the state's four tallest buildings, he said, including the Goldman Sachs office tower, which is the tallest.

Speakers also cited the Hudson River Waterfront Walkway being built from Bayonne to Fort Lee and the ferries, bridges and PATH trains that make New York City easily accessible.

Jersey City Planning Director Robert Cotter also gave a presentation in which he discussed recent development in the city and projections for future growth. Watley closed his address on that topic as well.

"The New Jersey Growth Commission is pleased to stand in partnership with you as you show how a community can have a turnaround season," Watley said. "We salute you, Jersey City, New Jersey, perfect together."

Copyright 2004 The Jersey Journal.

JCMAN320
April 25th, 2004, 01:34 PM
Jersey City has been named one of the 12 Best Walking Cities in the Nation. Click link to take you to website. Jersey City second most expensieve place to live in the country and one of the 12 best walking cities in the country, hmmm I like this. :D

http://www.prevention.com/cda/feature2002/0,2479,s1-6862,00.html

Gulcrapek
April 25th, 2004, 02:00 PM
Sometime I should explore a little more there. The only place I've walked through is the southern Downtown area, and both times it was accompanied by freak storms.

JCMAN320
May 7th, 2004, 11:05 PM
Staff is wowed by new JCMC
Med Center's move is planned for May 16

Wednesday, May 05, 2004

By John Martins
Journal staff writer

Registered nurse Monica Paton delicately ran her hand along the countertop of a nursing station on the third floor of the Jersey City Medical Center's Wilzig Hospital yesterday, savoring the fresh smoothness of an unspoiled surface.

A Post-it notepad in hand, she went to a nearby medication closet to continue assigning empty cabinets and drawers to various pieces of new medical equipment. Unused patient transport monitors, with their pristine LCD screens and plastic coverings, sat idle on another counter. A locked drawer bore a note with the word "syringes" written in capital letters.

Paton, a 10-year veteran of Jersey City Medical Center's nursing staff, moved about the hospital's third-floor pediatric intensive care unit with a sharp attention to detail. Her seriousness, however, barely obscured the fact that she was thrilled to be there.

"This is very exciting to come to a new place," Paton said. "It's like if you move to a new house. Everything is new."

Paton's sense of excitement was shared on all floors of the new hospital yesterday as nurse managers and other hospital personnel walked the empty hallways for unit orientations and equipment drills. Those exercises were part of the hospital's ongoing preparations for the May 16 move from its current hospital, which will be the largest hospital move in state history.

The tours given yesterday gave staff members a close look at their new workplaces. Locker rooms were revealed in unlit hallways. Consultation suites, replete with new furniture, were unveiled with the simple flick of a switch.

Patient care technicians and clerks jumped around their new workplace yesterday with the giddiness of a child, calling dibs on work stations and lockers.

"We're just ecstatic," said Jeanine Porter, a data entry clerk who has worked with the hospital for 16 years. "I can't wait to move."

Porter, who works in the medical/surgical unit, sat at a nursing station in the hospital's east wing as her manager, Peggy Petrucelli, acquainted the team with the workspace. Her colleagues joked that the desk Porter sat at was made especially for her, to accommodate her small stature.

When Petrucelli said their workspace was actually in the west wing, Porter and others joshingly ribbed their manager, saying they preferred the views of the east. They pointed to the Statue of Liberty, visible directly to the south from patient rooms, and Lower Manhattan, visible from the window at the end of the hallway.

The newness of the space and its spectacular views, however, weren't the only features that piqued employee interest. Amenities that have become standards in modern hospitals, like private patient bathrooms and separate elevator bays for staff and patients, will be new to JCMC staff.

"It's never pleasant to convince someone to use a bedpan and then have to truck it away," said Therese Borruta, a nurse manager in pediatrics. "In the old building, we had four stalls for the whole pediatric unit. Now, we have full bathrooms in the two-bed rooms and commodes in the ICU bays."

The issue, however, is not so much a matter of convenience as it is of professional standards. Technological advancements in the health care industry have transformed how doctors and nurses do their jobs, Borruta said, and the old JCMC buildings have hamstrung the hospital's efforts at following that trend.

"Health care delivery has outgrown the capabilities of the old Medical Center buildings," she said. "I don't think there's one person who isn't excited about (the move)."

One technological improvement the Wilzig Hospital will have is a wireless telemetry system to monitor patients' cardiac activity. Before, telemetry monitors were attached to the wall and nurses had to go to the patient to check the monitor.

Now, telemetry monitors will be attached to the patient and transmit data to a centralized computer system. The heart rate of a patient on the third floor can be checked by a nurse on the seventh.

"There's a certain 'wow' factor coming in here," Borruta said. "It's just night and day."

Yesterday's orientations supplemented an already rigorous preparation schedule the hospital has implemented to prepare the staff for the move. Nurses and other personnel have taken a battery of safety courses to ensure patients are kept stable in the transition.

Hospital administrators are planning to begin the May 16 move at 6 a.m. Jersey City police officers will cordon off the streets from one site to the other to ensure that the transfers are unimpeded. Street closings will be announced at a later date.

The hospital is bringing in ambulances from across the county to assist in the move, which should be completed by that evening.

The emergency room at the new Medical Center will open at 6 a.m. that day, but the emergency room at the former hospital will remain open until all the patients are transferred.

The Medical Center has a hot line to answer questions about the move, with information in English, Spanish, Arabic and Hindi, at (201) 915-2525.

John Martins can be reached at jmartins@jjournal.com.

Copyright 2004 The Jersey Journal

JCMAN320
May 18th, 2004, 03:21 PM
Helping tourists through Jersey City
Artists come out to hear initiative, ask about their role

Ricardo Kaulessar
Reporter staff writer 05/09/2004

C.A.T.ALYST FOR PROMOTING JERSEY CITY - First Lady Sandra Bolden Cunningham and Mayoral Spokesman Stan Eason listen to audience members at meeting last week in the Jersey City Museum on the city's proposed Council of Arts and Tourism (C.A.T.)
A meeting took place last week at the Jersey City Museum to introduce the city's initiative for a new arts and tourism bureau to promote Jersey City as a tourist destination and economic center.

The Council of Arts and Tourism (CAT) is an initiative started by Mayor Glenn Cunningham and First Lady Sandra Cunningham to promote Jersey City's historic landmarks and arts and entertainment venues.

This meeting, the second in a series of meetings that the city plans to have, was organized to present the initiative to members of the arts community.

But the meeting also served as a forum for city officials and the public, especially many of the artists in attendance, to talk about other issues, including the continued viability of the city's arts community.

After a 10-minute promotional video of Jersey City as "New Jersey's Shining Star," there was a question-and-answer period led by Sandra Cunningham. Also present for questions were the mayor's spokesman, Stan Eason, and the president of the Jersey City Economic Development Corporation (where the base of operations will be located), Gene Nelson.

Sandra Cunningham said that the city was looking to make itself not a "place of golden waterfront but of golden neighborhoods." She said she believed that the artist community would play an important part in promoting the Jersey City as a tourist destination.

One artist who currently has a space at 111 First St. said that there should be new artist spaces being created. Stan Eason commented that there were seven artist work/live units created in a new residence that opened at 140 Bay St., and a soon-to-be opened building at 150 Bay Street will have at least twice as many.

John Howell, a landscape photographer who once resided in Jersey City and is now based in South Jersey, said that in order for Jersey City's arts community to be appreciated by the public both in the city and elsewhere, there would have to be more communication between artists and the galleries and museums that showcase the artists.

"There needs to be an arts liaison with the museum curators throughout the state," said Howell, who recounted his frustration at dealing with the Jersey City Museum in the past.

Other audience members mentioned that the city has the opportunity to create a special arts and entertainment district on par with New York City's SoHo, the Brooklyn section of Williamsburg, and other artist areas across the community. They said the city should also attract those corporate employees who work in Jersey City but find very few venues that keep them from going to Manhattan.

"Dallas has spaces for artists, an area called Deep Ellum where there's galleries, restaurants," said Michelle Dupey, Public Information Officer for the Jersey City Public Library. "It's brought people to an area they've never visited before."

EDC President Gene Nelson said that as someone who grew up in Jersey City and has worked in places such as New York City and Washington, D.C., he wanted a flourishing arts community to be a vehicle for promoting the city and creating further economic opportunities.

During the meeting, Sandra Cunningham told audience members that they could submit business cards, as the city was forming a steering committee that would determine the direction the CAT would take. Many after the meeting were impressed by what they heard.

"I think it's a good start. A lot of artists were here to listen to the city's proposal, and we'll see where we go from here," said Kathe Frantz, an artist who currently has a space in 111 First St.

"I think it's a great effort by the city, but there's more that need to be done," said Meredith Lippman, an artist who during the meeting addressed the issue of affordability for artists not only in downtown Jersey City but in all parts of the city.

Eason after the meeting said that there would be several more meetings before the council was officially formed, but there wasn't a timetable set for promoting the city as tourist destination and economic center.

©The Hudson Reporter 2004

JCMAN320
May 20th, 2004, 04:10 PM
City of Jersey City
Office of Emergency Management
GLENN D. CUNNINGHAM
MAYOR
CITY HALL
JERSEY CITY, NJ 07302


May 19, 2004
For Immediate Release Eugene Drayton
Coordinator
(201) 547-5681
Fax: (201) 547-6542

JERSEY CITY – The city's efforts to form an office of homeland security took a giant step forward after contracting a security firm to structure its operations and the implementation of terrorism training programs for emergency responders.

The city of Jersey City was recently informed it would receive $2,405.72 for the Calendar Year 2003, a State and Local All Hazards Emergency Operations Planning grant issued by FEMA, the Federal Emergency Management Agency.

The grant is earmarked to augment operations provided by Jersey City regarding its Office of Emergency Management.

"This is a significant grant, one that recognized Jersey City's critical infrastructure and the efforts we have already undertaken to better prepare our emergency response personnel to all types of emergencies," said Gene Drayton, Director of the Office of Emergency Management. "We can use this money to further our training curriculum."

The firm of Buckley Petersen Global, based in Allendale, has been contracted to structure the office of homeland security in Jersey City. The firm, headed by James Buckley and Ed Petersen, who combine more than 60 years of law enforcement experience at both the federal and state levels, lists a number of large entities as references of their services, including; Verizon, Sotheby's Major League Baseball, NFL, NBA, MCI WorldCom, the Federal Reserve and Goldman Sachs.

Shortly after September 11, 2001, where Jersey City and its emergency response personnel distributed heavily to the rescue and recovery efforts in lower Manhattan, Mayor Glenn D. Cunningham recognized the need for the establishment of an office of homeland security within the city. Buckley Petersen Global will develop the schematics for the office and perform critical infrastructure assessment studies.

"Jersey City is the financial engine of the state and we have various critical infrastructures that include transportation networks and fiber-optic trunks. And with our proximity to so many ports and New York, we are definitely a city that needs to work that much harder to protect ourselves from the unexpected," Cunningham said.

The SLAHEOP grant will pay for much needed training in preparation for the formulation of the office. OEM officials recently reviewed strategic preparedness curriculum hosted by Buckley Petersen Global.///

JCMAN320
May 25th, 2004, 07:19 PM
Road repairs elicit questions
Neighbors ask about viaduct projects near Holland Tunnel

Ricardo Kaulessar
Reporter staff writer 05/23/2004

THE ROAD TO PROGRESS - Rehabilitation of The Holland Tunnel's 14th Street Roadway is one of two projects that over the next four years will pose problems for Holland Tunnel commuters from 14th Street to Highway 139.
Starting in the spring of 2005, driving near the Holland Tunnel may be challenging for commuters, as upcoming construction projects could create lengthy delays on local roads.

The major project will be the rehabilitation of the 12th and 14th streets viaducts in Jersey City by the New Jersey Department of Transportation. The project is intended to strengthen the viaducts, which were built in the 1930s and 1940s. Both viaducts support the 1.5-mile long NJ 139 roadway that consists of two levels.

On the lower level are four lanes, two east and two west, providing a connection between the tunnel and the Pulaski Skyway. The upper level, also known as Hoboken Avenue, provides four lanes of arterial service to and from the Holland Tunnel into Jersey City.

The projects will include rehabilitation efforts such as the re-decking of the entire roadway surface and super and sub-structure repairs. A seismic retrofit, which is a strengthening of the foundation of the viaduct, will be undertaken.

For commuters driving on the viaducts, it is evident that the structure is showing its age as the concrete is beginning to crumble in various parts and dirt has darkened the walls.

But the project, to be done in six stages with the rehabilitation of the 14th Street Viaduct starting in February 2005, has been cited by city residents and politicians as posing severe problems with traffic, safety and noise in downtown Jersey City.

The viaducts project will coincide with the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey's project currently underway to improve the roadways leading out of the Holland Tunnel. Sidewalks, curbs, drainage, lighting, traffic signs and signals along 14th Street from the New Jersey exit area to Jersey Avenue will be addressed.

The same rehabilitation work will also be made to Jersey Avenue from 14th to 12th streets. Also, 14th Street between Provost Street and Marin Boulevard will be widened to two lanes to accommodate traffic coming into the Newport Mall. According to Port Authority officials, that project will end by spring of 2005.


Some parties concerned

A meeting was held in the City Council caucus room at City Hall last week to bring together parties that wanted answers regarding these projects.

Residents who live near the Holland Tunnel, members of the City Council, and representatives from the state Department of Transportation, the Port Authority and the Jersey City Police Department were in attendance for a presentation of the projects.

Lawrence Vogel, the NJ DOT project manager for Hudson County, said, "We're putting a shoulder structure on the 14th Street Viaduct, an additional lane during construction." He said the first stage of the construction would take about a year.

Ernest Hutchins, the engineer for the project, explained that while it will easier to mitigate the flow of traffic on the 14th Street side, it will be more difficult to control traffic on the 12th Street Viaduct during construction, since five lanes of traffic coming from the NJ Turnpike and Route 139 will merge to create fewer lanes.

Vogel also said that there would be partnering with the Jersey City Police Department for traffic control. A total of $2.6 million has been earmarked by the NJ DOT for payment to the officers projected over a three-year period or longer.


Neighbors ask questions

Stephen Gucciardo of the Hamilton Park Neighborhood Association wondered how traffic will be monitored in the city as he figured many commuters will be using local streets to bypass the construction.

"Commuters are going to drop off at the exit to Grand Street before to avoid the traffic," said Gucciardo, who lives on Pavonia Avenue and was worried about speeding. "Will you allow for certain routes to be closed off [to commuters]?"

Vogel responded that there would be a meeting among NJDOT officials later in the week to discuss traffic issues.

Councilpersons Maldonado, Mariano Vega and Council President Harvey Smith also suggested that the NJDOT should look into paving the local roads such as Monmouth Street and Coles Avenue that lead into the Holland Tunnel and into Hoboken, since they will be handling larger volumes of traffic, and this will show that NJDOT can be a "good neighbor" during the construction.

When Vogel was asked if there was work going to be done at night, he said that there was.

Robin Pinkowitz, an aide to Ward E Councilman Junior Maldonado who resides on Tenth Street (a couple of blocks from the tunnel entrance), wondered about the noise factor and how it will be handled.

"It's like an echo chamber...where we hear every detail," said Pinkowitz about the area where she resides.

Pinkowitz had also recalled a previous project by the NJDOT done near the Holland Tunnel that employed the use of water cannons, and she recalls how she immediately called the police.

Maldonado asked if there was a NJDOT project similar to the one being proposed for the viaducts for him to study in terms of noise and traffic. Vogel said there was none at the present time.

Vega also inquired about the NJDOT communicating with the public through advertising (both for English and Spanish-speaking persons) and setting up hotlines, a website, and meetings in the near future to inform people about the project.

Vogel responded that the NJDOT is working with a public relations firm to work on a campaign.


The Port Authority speaks

Representatives from the Port Authority of NJ/NY were also on hand to listen to the presentation on the viaducts and speak about their project. The Port Authority has started preliminary work in preparation for the larger project of improvements to the roadway leading out of the Holland Tunnel's 14th Street exit in Jersey City.

Robert Eadicicco, representing the Port Authority on the Holland Tunnel project, said that it is expected to be completed in April 2005. Eadicicco also said the first part of the project will be to ensure the widening of the roadway so that there are six lanes of traffic, and the second part will be taking out the island dividers that are located 10 feet from the corner of the individual cross streets.

Also, there will be new traffic lights, the paving of cross streets such as Jersey and Manila Avenues from 12th and 14th Streets, and improvements to drainage. While the councilmen in the room and the community representatives for the most part praised the Port Authority for their efforts in outreach to the residents regarding the 14th Street Roadway project, there were still unresolved questions.

Mariano Vega brought up the issue of pedestrian safety as he pointed out that those senior citizens and children who live in the Holland Gardens area have to contend with traffic lights that change too quickly.

When the Port Authority representatives brought up that the lights have a countdown that allots a few seconds for pedestrians, Vega responded, "if you're a senior citizen, the countdown is just telling you that you're going to get hit faster."

He also mentioned that there were talks between the city and the Port Authority about a pedestrian bridge to cross 14th Street. The Port Authority has said that there are still considering that project, but are right now concentrating on the roadway project first. They hope to meet with the city in the future regarding that topic.

©The Hudson Reporter 2004

JCMAN320
June 2nd, 2004, 04:32 PM
Planning Board meeting revisits JC Powerhouse Arts District
City feasibility study of long-proposed downtown area

Ricardo Kaulessar
Reporter staff writer 05/29/2004

The Powerhouse Arts District in Jersey City that has been two years in waiting is a step closer to reality.

The district was originally proposed in a report by the Urban Land Institute (ULI), a Washington D.C think tank that studies urban land use and was commissioned by the city to develop a plan to revise an eight-block area near Exchange Place known as WALDO (work and live district overlay).

WALDO was designated as an area where abandoned warehouses and factories would be transformed into artist live/work spaces, arts and entertainment related-retail and exhibition spaces to create a center that would attract income to the Downtown area, particularly from businesspeople in Newport and Harborside.

However, WALDO never came to fruition because of a lack of development. Developers felt hemmed in by restrictions dictating the type of housing and retail to be built in the district, particularly the requirement that 51 percent of residential units should be reserved for artists.

As a result, panel members of the ULI spent six days in March 2002 visiting with business and property owners and local artists, studying WALDO and the general Downtown area, and consulting with city's Planning Department and other city officials to come up with the Powerhouse Arts District report.

The report proposed that developers allot at least 10 percent of housing units to low to moderate income households, with some housing set aside for artists, and that current occupants and business owners have first rights to buy or rent any subsidized live work space. The report also recommended that the city should adopt a redevelopment plan that would make improvements to the Powerhouse Arts District.

Before any redevelopment could occur, there had to be a study of the physical and economic conditions of the area to determine if it is in need of redevelopment. In April 2002, the City Council adopted a resolution to authorize a study of the area to determine if it needed redeveloping.


Presentation of redevelopment study

After two years and much anticipation from the Jersey City artist community, the study report was presented last week at a special meeting of the Planning Board held in the City Council chambers.

Maryann Bucci-Carter, supervising planner for the city, presented the study in front of the board. Bucci-Carter read from the study that outlined the physical survey of the area, a block-by-block analysis, the criteria for determining the need for redevelopment, and a review of the features of the study area. Also included in the report were a map of the area and a list of each block and lot numbers of the locations, with a physical description of the specific property.

The report states, "The Study Area, not including rights of way, contains approximately 12.5 acres of real property [and] is industrial in character. The area has older or no sidewalks, which are overgrown with weeds in many areas. Many of the roadways are in such deplorable shape that they appear to be unpaved with no curbing or utility service."

There are three areas demarcated in the map that encompass a majority of land from Washington Street to Manila Avenue. Bucci-Carter and the Planning Department also presented a booklet of photos showing various locations in need of redevelopment, such as abandoned houses, lots and structures.

Harold Seide, an attorney for Lloyd Goldman, the owner of 110 First St. and 111 First St., which fall within the study area, objected to the redevelopment plan on the grounds that it would deter developers from starting new projects.

However, Elizabeth Onorato and Edward Fausting, both artists who have studios at 111 First St., presented to the Planning Board a large-scale printout of over 70 photos they took of the building to show why a redevelopment plan is vital to the Powerhouse Arts District area.

The photos depicted a building plagued by a lack of decent plumbing, and with broken windows and other damages. Onorato and Fausting made the case that this building and many others in the area are in disrepair and would benefit from redevelopment.

A crowd of approximately 50 people attended the Planning Board meeting, many of whom were local artists who came to hear the presentation of the report.

The Planning Board announced at the meeting that another meeting will be scheduled for June 15 at the Jersey City Museum to hear more public comment about the study and consider recommending that the City Council adopt a redevelopment plan at an upcoming City Council meeting.

©The Hudson Reporter 2004

JCMAN320
June 6th, 2004, 04:04 PM
Colleges joining corporate buzz of Jersey City
Sunday, June 06, 2004

BY KELLY HEYBOER
Star-Ledger Staff

Where the world sees growing throngs of corporate workers rushing about Jersey City's waterfront office buildings, the state's colleges and universities see thousands of potential students.

Within the crowds might be a middle manager looking for a graduate degree and a promotion. Perhaps a bored office worker eager to take a few classes and consider a career change. Or a young city resident who wants to earn an undergraduate degree close to home.

As the boom in Jersey City continues, the city is growing into New Jersey's hottest higher education market.

The city's three existing colleges -- Hudson County Community College, New Jersey City University and Saint Peter's College -- all have ambitious expansion plans in the works.

They soon will be joined by the University of Phoenix, a for-profit school that spent years lobbying the state to license it to offer degrees on a waterfront campus due to open later this year.

And now, Rutgers University is planning to open its doors in Jersey City. The state university's business school will open a satellite campus at Harborside Financial Center at Exchange Place this fall.

With its growing real estate market, proximity to New York City and mass transportation, setting up in the state's second-largest city made sense, said Howard Tuckman, dean of Rutgers Business School in Newark and New Brunswick.

"I've had Jersey City in the back of my mind for five years," Tuckman said. "Watching the development on the waterfront, you don't have to be Albert Einstein. This is a developer's dream."

Once Rutgers and the University of Phoenix move in, Jersey City will have five colleges and universities. (Newark, the state's largest city, has four.)

Jersey City officials say more college students and professors will bring more business to area restaurants and shops. Expanding Jersey City's campuses into surrounding neighborhoods also may help revitalize neglected corners of the city.

Bob Cotter, the city's planning director, said the idea of Jersey City as a college town is not far-fetched.

"I don't see it being an Ivy League, leafy sort of place," Cotter said. "But it's an urban campus."

The new Rutgers and the University of Phoenix campuses will be unmistakably urban.

The University of Phoenix, which specializes in offering courses for working adults, plans to open its campus in 20,000-square-feet of office space on Pavonia Avenue in Newport Centre. The university will have no sports teams, dormitories or student center. Instead, it will offer accelerated evening and weekend courses for workers who want to earn undergraduate degrees. It hopes to enroll 200 students its first year.

Rutgers also will open its satellite campus this fall in rented office space currently being converted into classrooms at 34 Exchange Place. The university, which has similar satellite campuses in Morristown and Hopewell, plans to start by offering master's level courses in business administration. The university hopes to initially attract about 35 new students, then expand to offer other business education and certificate programs.

Rutgers will hold information sessions about the new campus at 5:30 and 7 p.m. Wednesday at the Hyatt Regency in Jersey City.

Bill Bruckner, an account manager at Jersey City-based Pershing, is weighing whether to enroll in the Rutgers MBA program this fall. Rutgers' reputation and flexible class schedules are tempting, he said. But the location of the new campus, less than five minutes from the financial company's offices, is "probably the biggest attraction," said Bruckner, 30.

Seton Hall University also is looking to get into the Jersey City market. The university is talking with local corporations about offering business classes via a television hookup from its South Orange campus, a spokeswoman said.

Officials at Jersey City's existing colleges say they are not worried about the competition.

"The Jersey City/Hudson County market is large enough and diverse enough to absorb a large number of higher education providers," said Carlos Hernandez, president of the 9,400-student New Jersey City University.

While the competition is concentrating on the waterfront, NJCU is looking to expand its 46-acre Kennedy Boulevard campus into Jersey City's "other waterfront" on the west side of the city. The public university is working with the city to find ways to develop a 700-acre tract on the Newark Bay, Hernandez said.

Neighboring Saint Peter's College already has branched out of its Kennedy Boulevard campus to begin offering classes near the waterfront and inside several corporate offices.

The 3,000-student Catholic college also is searching for space to set up a permanent campus on the waterfront to attract the same students Rutgers and the University of Phoenix are eyeing.

Eugene Cornacchia, the college's provost, said Saint Peter's welcomes the competition in a city where it has been for 132 years.

"It shows Hudson County is the place to come if you want to get an education," Cornacchia said.

At Hudson County Community College, enrollment has increased more than 110 percent since 1992 thanks to increasing demand and new programs. Glen Gabert, the two-year college's president, expects enrollment will double again in the next 10 to 15 years.

The 6,400-student county college will open a $25 million classroom building in Journal Square next summer. In 18 months, the school plans to break ground on a campus on the light-rail line in neighboring Union City.

The new universities in town will mean only more students for everyone, Gabert added. Hudson Community already has agreements to help graduates transfer to Rutgers and the University of Phoenix's new campuses.

"They are going to help us and we are going to serve them. ... This could actually increase all of our enrollments," Gabert said.

"There is enough ignorance out there for all the colleges to flourish," he added, with a laugh.

Kelly Heyboer covers higher education. She can be reached at kheyboer@starledger.com or (973) 392-5929.

Kris
June 14th, 2004, 11:32 PM
June 15, 2004

With Pride and Warmth, Jersey City Welcomes New Hospital

By RONALD SMOTHERS

JERSEY CITY, June 14 - Nearly 70 years ago, President Franklin Delano Roosevelt was greeted by a cheering crowd estimated at 200,000 people as he delivered $7 million in aid to spur construction of the new complex of buildings for the Jersey City Medical Center.

The city-run charity hospital, like so many projects at the time, had succumbed to the collapse of the financial markets in the Great Depression and, as Roosevelt put it, help "for the small-income families in times of sickness" was in jeopardy.

On Monday, the ribbon was cut on the new Jersey City Medical Center. Now a private, nonprofit hospital, it is again struggling in the financial markets, and it still serves primarily small-income families, with nearly 70 percent of the patients charity cases or Medicaid recipients.

This time it was federal loan guarantees, state grants, state land acquisition and municipal assistance that were cobbled together over 18 years to pay the $217 million cost for new construction.

"We don't have a stand-alone creditworthiness," said Dr. Jonathan M. Metsch, president and chief operating officer of the hospital, which is part of the nonprofit Liberty Health care system, a group formed by consolidating a number of small and financially troubled hospitals into one system during the 1980's. "But the government loan guarantees say that we are the safety-net hospital in the area and that we are providing a service that is essential."

Monday's ribbon-cutting ceremony for the 350,000-square-foot, seven-story steel-and-granite structure did not attract the presence of a president. In 1936, Roosevelt, popular and heading into re-election, kicked off work on the seven-building, Art Deco medical complex of 20-story buildings with 1.1 million square feet of space that mimicked the grandeur of Rockefeller Center.

This time around, there was less pomp, but the feelings ran deep.

For Gov. James E. McGreevey, it was literally a return to the place where he began. Mr. McGreevey was born in the Jersey City Medical Center's Margaret Hague Maternity Ward, named for the mother of Frank Hague, the longtime Jersey City mayor. Mr. McGreevey's mother had worked as a nurse at the hospital.

"It's a tremendously warm feeling being here," the governor said, smiling as he talked about the time he spent in the city until he started school. "There's hardly three degrees of separation between me and the people here today."

Also attending was Representative Robert Menendez, who hospital officials said had championed the fight for the federal loan guarantees, making construction of the new medical center possible. Building a new hospital in an urban area when many hospitals are downsizing or consolidating was not an easy thing to sell to Congress, he said.

But in the end, he said, the hospital won the help for a building to deal with "those in the dawn of life, those in the shadows of life and those in the twilight of life."

The theme of the ceremony on the lawn of the 15-acre hospital on Monday, under a broiling sun, was that the hospital was "the miracle in Jersey City." Speaker after speaker highlighted its improbability, and even Dr. Metsch said that there were "eight or nine times when I thought it was dead."

The building actually opened on May 16 when staff began moving patients from the old complex near the heart of downtown Jersey City to the new structure near the waterfront, overlooking the Lower Manhattan skyline and the Statue of Liberty.

James McLaughlin, chairman of the board of the medical center, said that little else but the board table and some chairs was worth moving from the old building to the new high-tech, state-of-the-art center.

Copyright 2004 The New York Times Company

JCMAN320
June 17th, 2004, 03:36 PM
Hey guys just wanted to throw this out there. On the waterfront in Downtown Jersey City, at the new Paulus Hook Terminal at the base of the Goldman Sachs Building, Liberty Helicopters has opened a heliport at the terminal for leisure helicopter rides. There are now two heliports for the public, Wall Street heliport and now Paulus Hook. Check out the site. Another plus for the great city of Jersey City. www.libertyhelicopters.com

DJWK
July 6th, 2004, 05:56 PM
Are there leisure helicopters taking off from Paulus Hook? Because that's what I thought when I first went down there, but Paulus Hook isn't specified on the map, so I thought maybe it was just a plug since they have the heliport there. If anyone knows please tell me :)

Bernie
July 6th, 2004, 07:20 PM
July 4th views

http://www.entephoto.com/DSCF0038%20copy%202.jpg

http://www.entephoto.com/DSCF0216%20copy%202.jpg

Bernie
July 9th, 2004, 06:39 PM
Sunset July 8

http://www.entephoto.com/DSCF0632_s.jpg

Gulcrapek
July 9th, 2004, 06:51 PM
Great shots..

Kris
July 27th, 2004, 09:36 AM
SHANGHAI ON THE HUDSON

by PAUL GOLDBERGER

Jersey City wants to be like lower Manhattan, only neat and clean.

Issue of 2004-08-02
Posted 2004-07-26

If you stand on Eleventh Avenue in the upper Thirties and look south, the new forty-story Goldman Sachs building in Jersey City, on the other side of the Hudson, appears to be at the end of the street. The intimate connection created by the optical illusion (Manhattan starts angling eastward at about Twenty-third Street) works both ways. If you stand at the corner of Grand and Washington Streets in Jersey City, a couple of blocks from the waterfront, the river has pretty much disappeared, and the Woolworth Building looks as if it were just a short walk away. The Goldman Sachs tower, which was designed by Cesar Pelli, is the tallest skyscraper in New Jersey, and, with its graceful profile and elegant glass façade, the most beautiful. You could also say that it is one of the most important new pieces of architecture in lower Manhattan. To just about everyone except the tax authorities, the Jersey City waterfront is a part of New York. Pelli’s tower is the anchor of a new city, a kind of Shanghai on the Hudson, that has sprung up over the past decade on what was once industrial land. It is an enormous complex—by far the largest cluster of skyscrapers in the region outside Manhattan.

Pelli has come closer than most architects to figuring out a way to design a skyscraper that expresses both height and dignity and doesn’t seem to be an imitation of the romantic towers of the nineteen-thirties. He started out making buildings, such as the tower above the Museum of Modern Art in Manhattan, that were attempts to reinvent the skyscraper as a pattern of glass, and he moved on to buildings, such as the World Financial Center and Carnegie Hall Tower, that leaned too heavily on older skyscraper forms. Now he has transcended both his first modern period and his retro period. Like the tower Pelli just finished for Bloomberg on the upper East Side, the Goldman Sachs building mixes a classic modern look with soft, flowing lines. The building’s profile is telescoped, and its corners are cut into a series of small steps, which both reduces the visual impact of the tower’s bulk and provides a plethora of corner offices. The façade consists of a pattern of metal lines set over glass, making for a rich, warm texture. The building is the only grace note on the Jersey City skyline.

It took a long time for Jersey City to reach the point where someone would want to put up a building as good as this one. The first developer to realize that you could exploit Jersey City as an extension of Manhattan was Sam LeFrak. In the late nineteen-seventies, LeFrak built Gateway Plaza, a set of concrete towers in Battery Park City that have none of the architectural gentility of the rest of the complex, which was constructed later by other developers under a different master plan. After dropping out of the Battery Park City project, LeFrak joined forces with Melvin Simon, a shopping-center developer who was seeking a partner to build a mall in Jersey City. LeFrak shifted his attention across the river, and in the mid-eighties, on a portion of the Jersey City waterfront he named Newport, he built not only the giant shopping mall that Simon had envisioned but also a cluster of high-rise residential towers and some glass office buildings. It is a dreary assemblage, but it was a big hit. Compared with real estate in Manhattan, the towers were inexpensive to build and inexpensive to rent, and LeFrak could promise tenants all the shopping they wanted, along with spectacular river views, one transit stop away from Wall Street—or just a few steps away from their desks, if they happened to work for the financial firms that had moved their back offices into Newport’s commercial buildings.

The Newport towers—among which are two named the Southampton and the East Hampton—were placed behind gated guardhouses around a small central plaza in front of a huge parking garage. Newport is less a city than a suburbanite’s idea of what a city might be if all the unpleasant people went away. The buildings float in space, disconnected from one another, and the streets seem designed to ease the movement of traffic rather than the movement of pedestrians. (Not that the traffic moves so well. The routes through the place are confusing, and traffic is often backed up.)

More ambitious developers followed LeFrak, as well as corporations like Goldman Sachs, which looked to Jersey City during the peak of the nineteen-nineties boom, when projections indicated that its workforce would grow to thirty thousand people by the end of the decade, and there seemed to be no place in lower Manhattan to put all of them. The company’s headquarters, at 85 Broad Street, had filled up, and employees were spread out in several other buildings downtown. The Jersey City site had room for expansion and spectacular views, and it was handy. It is easier to get to Jersey City from Wall Street than to much of the rest of New York, even though you have to cross a state line, not to mention a vast psychological barrier. Ferries connect it to several different points in Manhattan, and the trip takes about as long as it does to go under the river on a path train, and a lot less time than to drive through the Holland Tunnel. The Jersey City waterfront is one of the few parts of the New York City region that are nicer to reach by mass transit than by limousine.

As Jersey City grows, you can sense a yearning to make a real city, even though it looks as if it were being put together by someone who has never been anywhere other than a mall, or perhaps an airport. The Goldman Sachs building, which is on the site of an old Colgate factory at Paulus Hook, at the south end of the Jersey City waterfront, is more than a mile from Newport, at the north end. In between there is a set of office buildings called the Harborside Financial Center; a long, low Hyatt hotel on a pier stretching out into the Hudson; and a few more condominiums. The office buildings encompass all of the architectural clichés of the moment—a bit of neo-traditional cast stone here, a bit of neo-modern steel and glass there. Most of them are mediocre, but no more so than office towers elsewhere. The problem is how little, in the end, they add up to.

In a great or even a good city, the whole is usually more than the sum of its parts. In Jersey City, the parts and the whole are essentially the same thing, an incoherent splatter of buildings. It is not easy to traverse the place on foot, even if you don’t mind walking the equivalent of thirty Manhattan blocks, because the streets don’t always connect—a lot of the time there aren’t any streets. There are parking lots and open spaces and vacant lots and garages, many of which are set on wide streets that aspire to be boulevards but which look more like highways. The intersection of Hudson Street, the first street in from the waterfront, and Exchange Place comes the closest to feeling as though it might be a real city corner, but it lacks energy. The Newport mall sucks up much of the retail activity. There is a riverfront promenade of sorts, but it isn’t nearly as well designed or as well landscaped as the one at Battery Park City. Its chief asset, besides the water itself, is the New York skyline.

As the Goldman Sachs building was rising, the company’s executives learned that many of their highest-ranking employees thought of Jersey City as Siberia, and a plan to send some of the firm’s powerful trading departments to the new building collapsed. This spring, lower-level support departments such as technology and real estate began moving into it, and a lot of the space originally intended for financial executives remained empty. The most significant long-term effect of the building may be that it changed the view Goldman Sachs has of New York. It was thought that the company still needed a new main headquarters building in lower Manhattan, but the old Financial District, which is centered around the Stock Exchange, was abandoned, and plans were made for a new tower in Battery Park City, on the New York side of the Hudson. Goldman’s new New York building, which is being designed by the firm of Pei Cobb Freed, is opposite the Jersey City skyscraper. Workers will presumably shuttle back and forth across the river between the two towers. “We call this our Venice strategy,” Lloyd Blankfein, the president of Goldman Sachs, said to me.

The pleasantest way to move along the Jersey City waterfront is by climbing onto what is officially called the Hudson-Bergen Light Rail System, which is to say a trolley. “Light rail” is an appealing form of mass transit for cities today, since it requires relatively little infrastructure—no subway tunnels or elevated tracks—and it brings in federal subsidies. This one connects the mall, the path stations, and Liberty State Park, just to the south. The trolley is uncrowded most of the time, and one suspects that many of the passengers are using it not as a form of mass transit but to reach their cars, which have been parked an inconvenient distance from the pseudo urban center.

Just to the west of the waterfront district, blocks of renovated brownstones have created a small but solidly gentrified quarter not unlike many parts of Brooklyn. But this pleasing, small-scale urbanity has not made its way into the new waterfront area any more successfully than the energy of Manhattan has. The new waterfront has the ambitions of Manhattan, but its real nature seems to lie somewhere much deeper in New Jersey, in its suburban heart.

The waterfront literally has no depth—it extends only a few blocks in from the Hudson—and it has no conceptual depth, either. Since it is also a place where some of the office workers live and shop, it ought to feel more like a real city, but instead we have a place with no center other than a suburban mall and, at least until Goldman Sachs came around, not a single building that could be considered a notable piece of architecture.

Why isn’t this place better? What makes Jersey City attractive to tenants—the fact that it is shiny and new and free of the messiness of New York or, for that matter, Newark—is the very thing that condemns it to a kind of terminal banality. Cities are heterogeneous by their very nature. They are built around public places, the most important of which are streets, and they are resistant to too much order. Great cities are eccentric and surprising. The only quirky thing on the whole Jersey City waterfront is the immense octagonal Colgate clock next door to the Goldman Sachs tower. The clock is left over from the days when the site was a factory complex.

Jersey City doesn’t measure up in any way to the big-time expansions of great financial districts, places like Canary Wharf in London and La Défense in Paris, which have a kind of bombastic power. The tall buildings of Jersey City emanate an aura of prosperity and vigor when you look at them from the other side of the Hudson, but, when you cross the river and get close, these new skyscrapers seem to offer little but a stark, prim cleanliness. For a lot of people, it seems, that is enough.

www.newyorker.com

Zoe
July 27th, 2004, 11:06 AM
Wow, talk about writing with an agenda.

Johnnyboy
July 27th, 2004, 12:40 PM
I heard that the Statue of Liberty actually is not part of New York City. is it part of Jersey city then?

I hope Jersey City does grow faster. This competition between NYC and JC is stupid. Both cities get richer from the growth of each other. Anyway, JC will never go over New York skyline. JC will pobably even never build a building taller than NYC tallest building.

kliq6
July 27th, 2004, 03:10 PM
The only problem is the NY and NYC dont ever wake up, they always raise taxes and make it impossible for business to stay here, thus JC keeps rising.

Maybe NYC shoyld stop giving developers Liberty Bonds to convert good office space in Lower Manhattan so these firms cant rent space here when they have to grow.

TLOZ Link5
July 30th, 2004, 03:13 PM
You mean the conversion of OBSOLETE, prewar office space. Ninety Washington Street aside, all of the buildings that are undergoing or have completed residential conversion are from the 1930s or earlier.

Pottebaum
August 4th, 2004, 01:33 PM
Maybe, instead of spending money on housing projects, NYC could construct office projects :P :wink:

Kris
August 11th, 2004, 06:31 AM
August 11, 2004

OUR TOWNS

Between Art and Commerce, Taking a Stand

By PETER APPLEBOME

http://graphics7.nytimes.com/images/2004/08/11/nyregion/20040811_town.jpg
Bill Rodwell, a sculptor, in an entrance at 111 First Street in Jersey City, an artists' haven being considered for residential redevelopment.

Jersey City — IN the beginning, everyone agrees, it was like an uncertain journey to the end of the earth - a ruined industrial landscape of half-deserted 19th-century warehouses and grimy streets, with the air accented by the occasional smell of a burning car or a stray trash fire.

In the beginning, everyone also agrees, it was quite magical - every nook and cranny, it seemed, harbored a surprise: an abandoned David Hockney painting, a room with a 15-foot high mound of old carriages and wheels, thousands of square feet of left-behind granite, mounds of surplus teddy bears, tobacco-drying racks and exotic fabrics.

Now, 15 or so years later, the mammoth red brick fortress at 111 First Street has gone from a place at the jagged edges of a struggling city to an unruly assemblage of perhaps 100 artists in the midst of a real estate dream world of shiny new office towers and condos.

Along the way, it has become a symbol of the funky, iconoclastic side of this city's quite remarkable renewal. The issue being fought over now is this: Do the artists get to stay in the neighborhood they helped create, or does this become the urban version of a suburban subdivision named for fauna and flora that were destroyed so it could be built?

There's still both darkness and magic at 111 First Street. Filled with warrens of artists of every stripe, the hulking building sprawls over 328,000 square feet of oak plank floors and exposed pipe making up an entire city block.

It has Stygian bathrooms and an air of prehistoric disrepair. But walk into the studios behind every door and there's magic everywhere: the dreamlike photographs Ed Fausty makes largely from the world at 111 First, the delicate tiles at Lisa Portnoff's Riverside Tileworks, the van Gogh-like swirls of energy at Elizabeth Onorato's studio, inspired by her study of physics.

Sooner or later, the real world of the real estate boom had to impinge on 111 First. After a three-year ratcheting-up of hostilities over rents and repairs, the time has come. Lloyd Goldman, whose New Gold Equities owns the building and a smaller one at 110 First, across the street, has begun dismantling the smaller one. He has also begun a repair project to knock 50 feet off the giant smokestack in the middle of 111 First.

His development plan calls for a 20-story residential building at 110 First and a redevelopment of 111 that would combine artists' studios and living quarters at the edges of the property with another 20-story tower growing out of its center.

"The landlord and the tenants are on the same side,'' said Michelle Berliner, director of development for BLDG Management, the agent for New Gold Equities. "They want to maintain an artists' community, and so do we."

But after proposals that would have doubled many rents, and after assorted squabbles in recent years, the artists figure that there would be nothing so tenuous as their existence at below-market rates in a high-dollar residential complex. They have proposed forming a nonprofit organization, 111 ArtsFirst, to own and operate the building as a place where artists can live, have studios and operate galleries or education spaces.

"We need a divorce as soon as possible,'' said Bill Rodwell, a sculptor who heads the building's tenants association. "They want us out by hook or by crook. We've got cops in the buildings, alarms on the doors; it's like we're under siege."

He and the other tenants know their history - that artists are usually better at discovering hip places than managing to stay there once they're discovered. But this isn't a wholly one-sided battle. The city has found various ways to support the artists, and the tenants have their own well-regarded development consultant.

The city is considering a long-awaited plan to establish a historic district in the area, which would severely limit what developers and property owners could do. And 111 First has become enough of an admired institution that an attempt to dismantle it would be political poison - it's the artists, not the building owners, after all, who are throwing a big party on the steps of City Hall on Saturday, with music and an art bazaar.

THE battle over 111 First is just part of the larger question of whether to move forward with the Powerhouse Arts District, which has been in the works since the mid-1990's. There's a lot of money at stake, but there's a lot of civic pride, too. The artists don't have the millions it will take to buy and redevelop 111 First, but there are development groups like the New Jersey Housing and Mortgage Finance Agency that might be able to provide financing for a nonprofit to run the building, allowing New Gold to make a decent return from 111 First and build its tower across the street.

That might not happen. But after 15 years, if the artists have learned anything, it's that it will take more than magic and art for them to stay in Jersey City's arts district.

E-mail: peappl@nytimes.com

Copyright 2004 The New York Times Company

JCMAN320
August 29th, 2004, 01:34 AM
SCHOOL CITY
Jersey City's colleges offering courses on waterfront; Rutgers coming, too
Thursday, August 26, 2004

By Kelly Heyboer
Newhouse News Service

Where the world sees growing throngs of corporate workers rushing about Jersey City's waterfront office buildings, the state's colleges and universities see thousands of potential students.

Within the crowds might be a middle manager looking for a graduate degree and a promotion. Perhaps a bored office worker eager to take a few classes and consider a career change. Or a young city resident who wants to earn an undergraduate degree close to home.

As the boom in Jersey City continues, the city is growing into New Jersey's hottest higher education market.

Three of the city's colleges - Hudson County Community College, New Jersey City University and Saint Peter's College - all have ambitious expansion plans in the works.

The University of Phoenix, a for-profit school that spent years lobbying the state to license it to offer degrees on a waterfront campus, has also opened a campus in the Newport section.

And now, Rutgers University is planning to open its doors in Jersey City. The state university's business school will open a satellite campus at Harborside Financial Center at Exchange Place this fall.

With its growing real estate market, proximity to New York City and mass transportation, setting up in the state's second-largest city made sense, said Howard Tuckman, dean of Rutgers Business School in Newark and New Brunswick.

"I've had Jersey City in the back of my mind for five years," Tuckman said. "Watching the development on the waterfront, you don't have to be Albert Einstein. This is a developer's dream."

Once Rutgers moves in, Jersey City will have five colleges and universities. (Newark, the state's largest city, has four.)

Jersey City officials say more college students and professors will bring more business to area restaurants and shops. Expanding Jersey City's campuses into surrounding neighborhoods also may help revitalize neglected corners of the city.

Robert Cotter, the city's planning director, said the idea of Jersey City as a college town is not far-fetched.

"I don't see it being an Ivy League, leafy sort of place," Cotter said. "But it's an urban campus."

The University of Phoenix, which specializes in offering courses for working adults, opened its campus in 20,000 square feet of office space on Pavonia Avenue. The university has no sports teams, dormitories or student center. Instead, it offers accelerated evening and weekend courses for workers who want to earn undergraduate degrees.

Rutgers will open its satellite campus this fall in rented office space currently being converted into classrooms at 34 Exchange Place.

The university, which has similar satellite campuses in Morristown and Hopewell, plans to start by offering master's level courses in business administration. The university hopes to initially attract about 35 new students, then expand to offer other business education and certificate programs.

Bill Bruckner, an account manager at Jersey City-based Pershing, was weighing whether to enroll in the Rutgers MBA program this fall. Rutgers' reputation and flexible class schedules are tempting, he said.

But the location of the new campus, less than five minutes from the financial company's offices, is "probably the biggest attraction," said Bruckner, 30, during an interview earlier this summer.

Seton Hall University also is looking to get into the Jersey City market. The university is talking with local corporations about offering business classes via a television hookup from its South Orange campus, a spokeswoman said.

Officials at Jersey City's existing colleges say they are not worried about the competition.

"The Jersey City/Hudson County market is large enough and diverse enough to absorb a large number of higher education providers," said Carlos Hernandez, president of the 9,400-student New Jersey City University.

While the competition is concentrating on the waterfront, NJCU is looking to expand its 46-acre Kennedy Boulevard campus into Jersey City's "other waterfront" on the west side. The public university is working with the city to find ways to develop a 700-acre tract on Newark Bay, Hernandez said.

Neighboring Saint Peter's College already has branched out of its Kennedy Boulevard campus to begin offering classes near the waterfront and inside several corporate offices.

The 3,000-student Catholic college also is searching for space to set up a permanent campus on the waterfront to attract the same students Rutgers and the University of Phoenix are eyeing.

Eugene Cornacchia, the college's provost, said Saint Peter's welcomes the competition in a city where it has been for 132 years.

"It shows Hudson County is the place to come if you want to get an education," Cornacchia said.

HCCC to expand

At Hudson County Community College, enrollment has increased more than 110 percent since 1992, thanks to increasing demand and new programs. Glen Gabert, the two-year college's president, expects enrollment will double again in the next 10 to 15 years.

The 6,400-student county college will open a $25 million classroom building in Journal Square next summer. In 18 months, the school plans to break ground on a campus on the Hudson-Bergen Light Rail line in Union City.

The new universities in town will only mean more students for everyone, Gabert added. Hudson Community already has agreements to help graduates transfer to Rutgers and the University of Phoenix's new campuses.

"They are going to help us and we are going to serve them . This could actually increase all of our enrollments," Gabert said.

"There is enough ignorance out there for all the colleges to flourish," he added with a laugh.

Copyright 2004 The Jersey Journal. Used with permission.

NYatKNIGHT
September 15th, 2004, 03:43 PM
Has anyone noticed the roof of this tower (on the right) in Jersey City at night? It does a little light show....

http://www.worldgallery.cs-future.com/images/RIMG8979.jpg
Photo borrowed from hkskyline at skyscraperpage.com in one of his New York City photos (http://www.skyscraperpage.com/forum/showthread.php?s=6b6f1d778e8a234d26d3e5254a5ff893& threadid=54460) threads.

kliq6
September 15th, 2004, 07:05 PM
its plain and simple, New Jersey invests in firms and offers great deal, NYC wastes prime development sites on apartments for the rich. In the end this will continue they already are the financial capital of the world.

z22
September 17th, 2004, 04:14 PM
Has anyone noticed the roof of this tower (on the right) in Jersey City at night? It does a little light show....


I saw the new buildings in Newport have light show on their roof. Pretty much red, white and blue. I don't like them to be honest. They look cheap.

NYatKNIGHT
September 17th, 2004, 04:57 PM
Oh, I saw all white lights. Yeah, it seems out of place and maybe a little tacky, but it livens up the shoreline over there a bit.

JCMAN320
September 19th, 2004, 01:32 PM
You know what guys sorry Jersey City isn't as rich as Manhattan, thats all we can afford and alot of people over here like it. So say whatever you want because nothing we do ever seems to please you guys and you always have a problem with what we do, so if you dont like it, tough.

NewYorkYankee
September 19th, 2004, 07:34 PM
You know what guys sorry Jersey City isn't as rich as Manhattan, thats all we can afford and alot of people over here like it. So say whatever you want because nothing we do ever seems to please you guys and you always have a problem with what we do, so if you dont like it, tough.

:roll: Does someone need to relieve the wedgie??

JCMAN320
September 19th, 2004, 10:19 PM
Nice one. :D Hey say what you want ok, I'm just tired of someone always bashing Jersey City to make kind of pathetic point that Manhattan is the end all to be all.

Gulcrapek
September 19th, 2004, 10:21 PM
Nobody has been, at least not here...

Johnnyboy
September 20th, 2004, 04:30 PM
You know what guys sorry Jersey City isn't as rich as Manhattan, thats all we can afford and alot of people over here like it. So say whatever you want because nothing we do ever seems to please you guys and you always have a problem with what we do, so if you dont like it, tough.

Nice said. Jersey city does its best with what they have and although they can't compare with Manhattan, Jersey City has a great skyline wich will keep expanding till god knows when.

z22
September 21st, 2004, 12:32 AM
You know what guys sorry Jersey City isn't as rich as Manhattan, thats all we can afford and alot of people over here like it. So say whatever you want because nothing we do ever seems to please you guys and you always have a problem with what we do, so if you dont like it, tough.

I don't have a problem with Jersey City. I just don't like the light show on those two buildings in Newport. Especially for the NOC VII building. I really like that building. It looks good with JC skyline in day time. But the light show just does not fit JC skyline at night. In my opinion, when the office space got filled up, the office lights on the building alone will make it better without the light show. By the way, I did not compare JC to Manhattan either.

BrooklynRider
September 21st, 2004, 09:42 AM
Nice one. :D Hey say what you want ok, I'm just tired of someone always bashing Jersey City to make kind of pathetic point that Manhattan is the end all to be all.

This is WiredNewYork.com, it is not WiredJerseyCity.com. There is a common thread running through out this site that connects all the forum members - a love and appreciation of New York. If you're sick of hearing about New York or comparisons between Jersey City and New York, why not go to a site dedicated to Jersey City. You're acting like a person who hates apple trees, but hangs out all day in an orchard.

JCMAN320
September 21st, 2004, 02:31 PM
Nicely put. Listen I repsect all of your opinons I'm just gonna leave it at that befoe this gets too ugly. Also just one last thing, I just don't understand why some people have to go out and pick apart a city that has come a very very long way and has achieved so much. I would just like someone to give us some repsect thats all. I'm not yelling or nothin I just would like to know why.

NYatKNIGHT
September 21st, 2004, 04:43 PM
How was Jersey City picked apart or bashed in any way? If anything I was turning attention towards Jersey City, wondering what everyone thought of the new lights on that building - that's all. We critique buildings in New York too.

So no hard feelings - let's move on.

In fact, the Jersey City skyline looks fantastic now, especially at sunset. I'm ready for another tower to rise over there. What are the best prospects? Anyone?

JCMAN320
September 21st, 2004, 09:29 PM
Your right I would like to apologize my pride sometimes gets the better of me. Sorry

Dynamicdezzy
September 21st, 2004, 10:31 PM
now that theres a sense of harmony.... I dont think Jersey city is a threat at all. on the contrary it helps NYC stay on its toes. i just always had the illusion that NYC and Northern Jersey could work more closely together. If the NY-NJ metro area worked together it could probably function better. What other cities have tried such a thing?? Looking at Jersey City (the financial district), DownTown Brooklyn, and Lower manhattan they are all so close to eachother, practically pointing at one another. It would be wonderful to one day see a skyline in combination of the three. something that would be nice to have would be a modernized subway (monorail??? or maglev>>might be out of the question) between NYC and Hudson County, maybe even With Newark.

Zoe
September 22nd, 2004, 12:34 PM
The PATH is looking to expand its pilot of testing their readers that accept both MTA Metrocards and PATH Quickcards.

As far as harmony... They all affect each other like it or not. A significant portion of the NYC workforce lives in NJ (I think I read it was about 1/3), likewise a growing number of people that live in NYC work in Hoboken and JC. Whether it is through healthy competition, joint projects like the freight tunnel, or companies locating data centers in disbursed locations throughout the metropolitan area, they all help and affect one another. They share the same airports, waterways, rail lines and highway systems and work together very nicely. I am more concerned about loosing business to other metropolitan areas and overseas than I am within the same community. Our transportation system is such that no matter whether a job is located in Brooklyn, LIC, JC or Newark, I will have no problem getting there; I will still pay taxes to one state, and my payroll taxes and income I generate for the company will be paid in another.

Johnnyboy
September 22nd, 2004, 04:17 PM
now that theres a sense of harmony.... I dont think Jersey city is a threat at all. on the contrary it helps NYC stay on its toes. i just always had the illusion that NYC and Northern Jersey could work more closely together. If the NY-NJ metro area worked together it could probably function better. What other cities have tried such a thing?? Looking at Jersey City (the financial district), DownTown Brooklyn, and Lower manhattan they are all so close to eachother, practically pointing at one another. It would be wonderful to one day see a skyline in combination of the three. something that would be nice to have would be a modernized subway (monorail??? or maglev>>might be out of the question) between NYC and Hudson County, maybe even With Newark.
True. If Newark would enter this connection better, who knows what growth would happen thought the area. Newark has a huge airport and harbor. Newark should get in

NYatKNIGHT
September 22nd, 2004, 05:10 PM
Newark is connected by PATH and NJ Transit/Amtrack. The airport and harbor are part of the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey.

Johnnyboy
September 22nd, 2004, 05:54 PM
o. i did not know that. thanks for informing me about it.

Dynamicdezzy
September 23rd, 2004, 01:22 AM
I ment in terms of: "let me take the "10" train from LIC to down town newark, or takin the "Y" train from downtown brooklyn to Jersey City and St. George Terminal." I always thought they would make the subway run over hudson county and down to staten island from manhattan and also from brooklyn. I would hate to live in SI.

JCMAN320
November 18th, 2004, 02:46 PM
Greenway Trail leads to Powerhouse Arts District

Thursday, November 18, 2004

By Bonnie Friedman
Journal staff writer

Art lovers and outdoor enthusiasts toured the newly-designated Powerhouse Arts District Sunday afternoon, one of several weekend activities designed to coincide with the East Coast Greenway Alliance's seventh annual meeting held last week in Jersey City.

Joshua Parkhurst, vice president of the Jersey City Landmarks Conservancy, took tour-goers on a walk through the many 19th- and early 20th-century warehouses that have come to define the district.

"The Greenway is not just a trail," Parkhurst said. "The idea is that it leads to neighborhoods."

The East Coast Greenway Alliance is a non-profit organization working to build a 2,600-mile off-road trail stretching from the Canadian border of Maine to Key West, Fla.

Rita Finstein, a resident of New Brunswick and a member of the Union County hiking club, spent the weekend exploring the Brennan Court House, the Paulus Hook neighborhood and the Powerhouse Arts District.

"I knew Jersey City was changing but I didn't realize how attractive it's become," Finstein said. "Some of the new buildings really conform in style to the historic neighborhood."

The tour included stops at the A&P, one of the first buildings constructed with reinforced concrete; Butler Brothers, the largest building in the six-block zone; and the embattled 111 First St., a former tobacco factory where some 70 artists continue to rent studio spaces despite ongoing disputes with their landlord.

Estella Haferling, a New York City resident and member of the Society for Industrial Archeology, said she is considering moving across the river after taking the tour.

"I love this stuff," Haferling said. "It's like 'Brave New World'. These structures are my love."

JCMAN320
November 24th, 2004, 10:31 AM
Stepping Out of Manhattan's Shadow
By JENNIE GREEN

Published: November 21, 2004

Phil Mansfield for The New York Times

Yes, there is a Starbucks in Jersey City. But there's only one, directly across the street from the Pavonia/Newport PATH Station in the glimmering heart of a revived Hudson River Waterfront, whose glass-plated office towers and luxury high-rises stand proud and tall; these days not so much in the shadow of Manhattan's famous skyline but rather as a kind of graceful western extension.

Yet coffee aficionados need not worry, as a variety of tasty brews can be found around town. The Hard Grove Cafe on Grove Street, for example, is a Cuban-American diner with gold foil palm trees that serves café con leche rich and piping hot.

The aggressive development of Jersey City's waterfront and downtown districts that began roughly a dozen years ago, after a false start during the 1980's, has resulted in what some might refer to as an urban renewal of legendary proportion. But that didn't stop Julie Kaufman, who has lived in Jersey City since 1988, from recalling the bad old days: "First of all, Exchange Place didn't exist," she said, referring to a new PATH station in the city's financial center. "And the Pavonia/Newport PATH station was a total wasteland that you didn't walk across; you ran. There were hookers on the streets and drug deals going down right out in the open."

Despite a vigorous and successful campaign by developers and city officials to "put Jersey City on the map," many people, including New Yorkers who live only a few miles away, continue to have little sense of the place.

Sure, the Goldman Sachs building, Harborside Financial Center Plaza and the Newport development can be seen from the west side of Manhattan, but the glitzy new buildings in the waterfront area, built first to accommodate dot-com companies and then back-office divisions of major financial institutions, are merely the tip of the iceberg.

Jersey City is as sprawling as it is diverse, and the fact that some real estate agents have taken to calling it "the sixth borough" is not entirely accidental. Like Brooklyn, Jersey City is huge and encompassing of many neighborhoods, or sections, each of which has developed a particular character over time.

Historic downtown, for example, is not only within walking distance of the newly gentrified waterfront, it is also home to a significant portion of the city's brownstone row houses, which were built around Van Vorst Park and Hamilton Park at the end of the 19th century. Jersey City's downtown and waterfront were the areas most ravaged by poverty and decay during the decades after World War II. Yet these areas were the first to be remade.

"At any point during the 1970's you could have bought a whole side of Van Vorst Park for $100,000," said Dan Frohwirth, director of real estate for the Jersey City Economic Development Corporation, a nonprofit organization that functions as a liaison between developers and the city. "Now you're going to pay over a million for a house with recessed lights and a Sub-Zero refrigerator."

In contrast, Jersey City Heights is a densely populated residential neighborhood in the northernmost part of the city. Most of the Heights housing consists of detached two-family dwellings, with some low- to mid-rise apartment buildings. Greenville, on the southern tip of the city, has single-family houses built in the early 1900's, and the Country Village development, which comprises two-family detached and attached houses built in the early 1960's.

The newest development in western Greenville is an exclusive waterfront community called Port Liberté, which has become increasingly popular among affluent families.

And this is only the beginning. Also within Jersey City is the Martin Luther King Bergen/Lafayette neighborhood, a notoriously decrepit underclass stronghold that has suddenly turned up-and-coming because of its desirable brownstone row houses and proximity to downtown Manhattan via the Hudson-Bergen Light Rail Transit. And Journal Square has recently become a focal point for commercial and residential developers, largely because of its precious PATH station.

Michael Berney, an agent at Liberty Realty, which started in Hoboken and expanded to downtown Jersey City three years ago, said: "Jersey City is so hot right now with the waterfront and downtown basically finished, that a natural expansion has occurred. Potential buyers who previously wouldn't consider anything outside of Hoboken are now more than open to Jersey City."

Checking the latest Hudson County Multiple Listing Service report, he continued: "There's been a 17.69 percent average price increase on all sales in Hudson County between 2003 and 2004. Year to date, the number of closed sales has also gone up 27.5 percent. Suddenly there are bidding wars."

In Jersey City, where the real estate market is inexorably linked with the New York market, three features that most frequently attract urban home buyers are square footage, parking and outdoor space. At the upper end of the Jersey City market ($750,000 to $1.5 million), a buyer may purchase a downtown brownstone in good to mint condition, or a spacious condominium in a luxurious waterfront building with countless amenities. One such apartment that recently hit the market for $1.25 million is a 1,667-square-foot penthouse with an additional 1,500 square feet of private rooftop terrace space in a Washington Street building called the Sugar House.

Many choices also exist in the $300,000 to $600,000 range. One is a two-family house in Jersey City Heights for $440,000, with an annual property tax bill of $5,103.

Despite the fact that much Jersey City property has doubled in value since 1994, first-time home buyers need not be discouraged. According to a recent Multiple Listing Service report, there were a total of 115 available properties for less than $200,000 apiece in all of Jersey City. Most of these were one- and two-family houses in Greenville and Journal Square, one-family houses in Bergen/Lafayette and Jersey City Heights, and mostly one-bedroom but some two-bedroom condominiums all around town.

For families, the biggest question about Jersey City can be said in a word: schools. Like systems in other densely populated urban areas, this one has a history of being strained by overcrowding, underfunding, high dropout rates and a multitude of other problems faced by districts that serve large numbers of disadvantaged children. Evidence can be found in the 2002-03 district SAT scores of 413 for math and 392 for verbal, compared with statewide averages of 518 and 500, respectively.

But there are options. Between Jersey City and neighboring Hoboken there are at least four charter schools (Grades kindergarten through 8), three private schools (Cornerstone School in Jersey City and Stevens Cooperative School and Mustard Seed School, both in Hoboken) and too many parochial schools to count.

Ms. Kaufman sends her children to the Learning Community Charter School, a public school on Grand Street in Jersey City. "The classes are small and the child-centered Bank Street method of education they use is really effective," Ms. Kaufman said. "Already, our third and fourth graders have tested above the statewide average."

Jersey City is booming, but that doesn't mean it's a panacea. Jersey City property taxes run higher than New York City's, and some of the land remains polluted by obsolete manufacturing plants. Also, the place is too rambling for one pulsating hub like Washington Street in Hoboken or Seventh Avenue in Park Slope to emerge.

Stephen Becker, who is 36 and single and has lived within walking distance of his waterfront office and the Grove Street PATH station for 10 years, has recently become the happy beneficiary of sushi restaurants, upscale bars and chain retailers like Pier 1 and Target.

Still, when asked where in Jersey City he likes to go out for an evening of socializing or entertainment, Mr. Becker, who works for EquiServe replied, "Manhattan or Hoboken."

At the same time, old neighborhoods have started to gel in new ways. Ms. Kaufman, who never expected to stay in Jersey City for the long haul of family life, can't imagine living anywhere else. "Both of my children," she said, "know every single person who lives on our block.''

JCMAN320
December 6th, 2004, 08:03 PM
Jersey City mulls partnership in Bergen-Lafayette
Partnership mulled for Morris Canal area

Monday, November 29, 2004

By Molly Bloom
Journal staff writer

An innovative partnership between a developer and a community association could bring a $25 million residential and commercial project to Jersey City's Bergen-Lafayette neighborhood.

The proposal would give the community group, the nonprofit Morris Canal Redevelopment Area Community Development Corp., funding for the creation of neighborhood programs, as well as a say in the project, with the opportunity to provide input into the planning process.

The Jersey City Redevelopment Authority voted Tuesday to consider approving the $4.5 million partnership between the Morris Canal group and Landmark Developers. The JCRA will vote on approving the partnership at its Dec. 21 meeting.

Under the proposal, Landmark Developers of Jersey City would spend up to $4.5 million to buy and perform an environmental cleanup on the property at 100 Monitor St., which is currently owned by the JCRA. Any leftover funds - perhaps as much as $1 million - would then go to the Morris Canal association to fund community programs, said Ted Rosen, the organization's attorney.

Landmark Developers would then redevelop the property at 100 Monitor St. as well as other properties it already owns at 317-319 Pacific Ave. and 406-420 Communipaw Ave. The proposed developments would include both residential and commercial space, with 57 of the approximately 197 units designated for affordable housing, said Frank Cretella, president of Landmark Developers.

For the Morris Canal community corporation, the agreement is a triumph for a group that has often felt sidelined from redevelopment decisions. "This deal is unique in that it puts the community in control," said Leonard Joseph, a Morris Canal community corporation board member. "It lifts the burden of the city to always meet the needs of the citizens or the community groups."

However, the proposal isn't a done deal yet. At Tuesday's meeting, JCRA board member and City Councilman Steve Lipski questioned whether there was a "conflict of interest" in the Morris Canal community corporation recommending a development deal that would benefit the corporation financially.

"The incentive for the Morris Canal group is not strictly based on the project itself as much as it is to generate capital for their own nonprofit," he said.

Though the Landmark proposal does not differ substantially from previous proposals, the up-front cash component was a significant part for the Morris Canal's community corporation's acceptance of it, Morris Canal community corporation officials said.

Lipski requested that the Morris Canal community corporation present the JCRA board with precedents for the type of development agreement proposed. He also questioned the Morris Canal community corporation's ability to oversee a complex development agreement.

"What authority . does a nonprofit organization have in determining a developer? Do they have the resources to monitor the quality and effectiveness of bringing a project to fruition?" Lipski asked.

Joseph said that the corporation was well-prepared to handle the proposed project. "We have gained so much in terms of learning as we're doing," he said. "We know what residents in the community want. . If we're given the opportunity and tools and access to the process, we can't go any more wrong than the city."

The Abyssinian Baptist Church has also successfully undertaken similar community development projects in Harlem under the leadership of Reverend Dr. Calvin O. Butts III, Joseph said.

"Change scares people," Joseph said. "But we're definitely not reinventing the wheel. We're just bringing the wheel to Jersey City

Gulcrapek
December 18th, 2004, 11:40 PM
Residences at Liberty

Mmmmmm


http://www.nbbj.com/whatwedo/markets/mixeduse/

http://www.nbbj.com/images/main/Liberty.jpg

Gulcrapek
December 22nd, 2004, 02:44 PM
The Phoenix and The Excelsior

http://www.arquitectonica.com/flash.htm

>projects > mixed use > Phoenix&Excelsior

RedFerrari360f1
December 23rd, 2004, 01:23 PM
Lookin good. Not styles you generaly see in NY.

JCMAN320
January 21st, 2005, 01:21 PM
OK for major redevelopment
Community group, developer to partner in Bergen-Lafayette

Thursday, January 20, 2005

By Molly Bloom
Journal staff writer

The Jersey City Redevelopment Agency has unanimously approved an innovative partnership between a community group and a developer to build a $25 million residential and commercial project in the Bergen-Lafayette neighborhood.

The redevelopment agreement - approved Tuesday night by the agency's board - between a community group and a developer is the first of its kind in the city, officials said.

Construction on the three sites included in the proposal - 100 Monitor St., 317-319 Pacific Ave. and 406-420 Communipaw Ave. - could begin as early as next year, said Board Chairman Junior Maldonado, who is also a City Council member.

At its meeting, the JCRA approved a resolution designating Landmark Developers and the Morris Canal Redevelopment Area Community Development Corporation as redevelopers for the sites.

Under the agreement, Landmark Developers of Jersey City would spend up to $4.5 million to buy and conduct environmental cleanup at 100 Monitor St., a lot near both a Hudson-Bergen Light Rail station and Liberty State Park that is currently owned by the JCRA.

Any leftover funds - perhaps as much as $1 million - would then go to the nonprofit Morris Canal group to fund community programs, said Ted Rosen, the group's attorney.

The proposed agreement would also give the Morris Canal group a voice in the planning process, Rosen said.

"We're really excited to be able to bring some of the money from redevelopment back to the community," he said.

Landmark Developers would then redevelop the property at 100 Monitor St. as well as the other two properties, which it already owns.

The proposed developments would include both residential and commercial space, with 57 of the approximately 197 units designated for affordable housing, said Frank Cretella, president of Landmark Developers.

At Tuesday's board meeting, JCRA officials said they would keep a close eye on the project.

"We probably will hold this group to a higher standard than the usual . because of the uniqueness of the situation," said Barbara Netchert, the agency's assistant director.

Board member and City Councilman Steve Lipski, one of several members who have questioned whether there is a conflict of interest in the Morris Canal-Landmark agreement, was not at Tuesday's meeting.

But yesterday he again suggested that the Morris Canal-Landmark Developers partnership raised ethical and legal questions.

"Isn't there an inherent conflict of interest that members of the same group criticized other developers who came before us and at the end, the developer they chose is, in essence, rewarding them with millions of dollars," he said.

But because the JCRA approved the designation of the group, the development will move forward.

"The agency has spoken," Lipski said. "For whatever reasons, they went ahead with it, and I respect the decision of the agency."

JCMAN320
January 25th, 2005, 12:51 PM
Developer trading park space for permission to add floors

Tuesday, January 25, 2005
By Molly Bloom
Journal staff writer

The developers of a residential tower in Downtown Jersey City, set to begin construction in the spring, will donate land for a park between First and Second streets in exchange for permission to build taller than was originally planned.

Eric Silverman, of Washington First URC, and Ed Brown, of Athena, presented revised plans to the city Redevelopment Agency board last week for a 32-story tower on Washington Boulevard and First Street, in the Hudson Exchange Redevelopment area.

Previous plans for the building included fewer stories. The project has been approved by the Planning Board and was presented to the JCRA for review, though that agency was not required to vote on it.

The building would include 200 apartments, 10,000 square feet of retail space and 50,000 square feet of office space. All the space will be rented at market rate, said Silverman, who is a principal of Exeter Properties, a residential developer with 25 buildings in the Hamilton Park neighborhood. The company also plans to build housing on the site of St. Francis Hospital, on McWilliams Place, which it bought last week.

The groundbreaking on the Washington Boulevard building will begin in late spring and construction will be completed by winter 2006, according to plans presented to the board.

The brick-faced building was designed to "replicate the warehouse feel" of the neighborhood, said Silverman. One sharp corner of the building will be sheathed in glass and the ground-level parking garage will be fitted with arched metal grates.

Developer Vincent Wilt of Morgan Point LLC presented the board with plans for a building with 84 apartments above ground-floor retail space on a triangular site between Morgan Street, Steuben Street and Luis Muñoz Marin Boulevard.

Wilt is a principal of the Hoboken-based Greentree construction, which is currently renovating a 90-year-old refurbished warehouse at 140 Bay St. in Jersey City.

The Morgan Point building, which is in the Powerhouse Arts District Redevelopment Area, will feature loft-like market-rate apartments selling for about $400 per square foot, Wilt said. It will feature a "stepped-down" design, with eight stories on one side stepping up to a total height of 12 stories, he said.

JCMAN320
January 26th, 2005, 10:17 AM
West Side growth spurt is envisioned
NJCU officials: It all starts with ambitious plan for West Campus

Wednesday, January 26, 2005
By Maria Zingaro Conte
Journal staff writer

Jersey City's West Side is poised for a major overhaul and officials at New Jersey City University believe a redevelopment effort their school is about to undertake will be the project that gets the bulldozers moving.

The university plans to redevelop its 21-acre West Campus site and is expected to receive the blessings of the Jersey City City Council tonight, which will vote on whether to deem the site as an area in need of redevelopment.

The council is also expected to introduce an ordinance accepting the redevelopment plan for the area. The Planning Board gave its approval to the plan last week.

NJCU's redevelopment will be among the first steps toward implementing the broader Bayside Redevelopment Vision Plan, a proposal to redevelop the 75-acre area between Communipaw, Bergen and Stevens avenues and Newark Bay.

"We saw it as an opportunity to work with the city and catalyze the West Side," said Howard Buxbaum, NJCU's vice president for administration and finance.

Buxbaum said the changes are designed to entice students to the university, whose enrollment he said sometimes suffers because of the city's negative reputation among outsiders.

"It's important for our students and faculty to come and feel that they are a part of a secure and safe area," he said. "It's just going to give the place life because urban is hot now."

An annex to NJCU's main campus, which runs along Kennedy Boulevard, the university's West Campus site is bounded by Route 440, West Side Avenue, Carbon Place and the property line of the Home Depot store, which also fronts Route 440.

The school plans to build a performing arts center and three other new educational buildings, over 218,000 square feet of retail space, 400 residential units spread between four additional buildings and parking for 2,000 cars.

The project also will extend Audubon Avenue and Stegman Street, bringing the city's street grid into the development in an effort to encourage access to and through the site from the surrounding neighborhoods.

"With its inviting public edges, human-scaled architectural details and quality academic and cultural venues, the West Campus will be a destination as well as a place to raise a family," the redevelopment plan says.

Most of the land is already owned by the university. A portion of the site is currently used by the university for parking and storage. Another section houses the vacant Baldwin Steel plant.

Although portions of the site have environmental contamination, including some chromium contamination - a result of the land's past industrial uses - the university and Honeywell Remediation are negotiating an agreement to clean up some property, the redevelopment plan says.

The price tag of the redevelopment will be $150 million, including construction of the roads and infrastructure, Buxbaum said. Work is expected to begin in late 2006 and should take about two years to complete.

Several council members have already expressed support for the plan, saying the construction will help to bring the prosperity seen along the Hudson River waterfront to another part of the city.

"I think it's a great plan," said Councilman Peter Brennan. "It's going to really bring a new birth to West Side Avenue . The west side of Jersey City is going to be a boom town."

An earlier redevelopment effort on the West Side was kicked off last year when ground was broken for the Residences at Westside Station, a 52-unit townhouse development that will include retail space, being built at Mallory and Crescent avenues, near the Hudson-Bergen Light Rail station on West Side Avenue.

Maria Zingaro Conte covers Jersey City. She can be reached at mzconte@jjournal.com.

JCMAN320
January 28th, 2005, 11:46 AM
Healy backs abatement on Washington Blvd.

Friday, January 28, 2005
By Maria Zingaro Conte
Journal staff writer

Although Jersey City Mayor Jerramiah Healy pledged during his recent mayoral campaign to oppose new tax abatements for waterfront properties, the mayor said he supports one that was granted Wednesday night by the City Council for a condominium development planned for a piece of Downtown property, two blocks west of the river.

The city council voted unanimously to grant a 20-year abatement for a property at the corner of Washington Boulevard and First Street, where a 204-unit, 24-story condominium building with retail space on the ground floor will be built. Washington First Urban Renewal, LLC whose principals are Jersey City developers Eric and Paul Silverman, will develop the property.


Healy - who during his campaign for the November election argued that developers no longer need financial encouragement to build on the waterfront - said yesterday through his spokeswoman, Maria Pignataro, that he did not consider the Washington Boulevard property part of the waterfront.

Healy noted that the project sits just outside the Powerhouse Arts District - an area of old warehouses being targeted for redevelopment - and could boost efforts to revitalize the area.

"Abatements aren't the evil they are portrayed to be," the mayor said in a statement read by Pignataro. "It will bring needed investments and jobs to Jersey City and I don't have a problem with this abatement."

The abatement requires the developer to pay 16 percent of the building's annual gross revenue to the city in lieu of taxes each year for 20 years. Current tax payments are estimated at just over $1 million a year. For each year of the abatement, the developer must also pay an annual 2 percent administrative fee along with a 5 percent fee to the county.

Though the amount means more money will go directly to the city, the developer pays less in taxes overall because full county and school tax payments are not required.

Speaking during a hearing on the abatement, Jersey City resident Yvonne Balcer, a vocal opponent of tax abatements, objected to the deal, saying the tax incentive was unnecessary because developers were all too eager to build in the area.

"This is Downtown and all of Downtown is considered prime real estate." she said.

Councilwoman Kathleen Curran is among those who support the deal.

"Overall this project will benefit the city. It is going to create jobs, not just temporary, but permanent jobs." she said. "It is not on the water. It is Downtown, but it is not on the water. It does not have a beautiful view."

James McCann, the attorney for the project, said it had received support from the city's tax abatement committee because the developer will donate a half-acre of the property to the city for open space, rather than use the land for parking.

"He elected not to do that. That is one of the reasons the abatement was granted." McCann said.

In other City Council business, another tax abatement was awarded to an 84-unit condominium building slated for Jersey Avenue at 18th Street, close to the Hoboken border. The abatement was granted by a 9-0 vote, but again the deal came under scrutiny.

"Every time you give out a tax abatement, you take away money that could be going to the Board of Education," said Daniel Sicardi.

The council defended that deal, noting that residents there had fought to oppose the construction of a big-box retail store project, preferring to see residential development encouraged there instead.

JCMAN320
February 12th, 2005, 03:28 PM
OK for 330-foot residential tower

Saturday, February 12, 2005
By Douglas R. Stivers
Journal correspondent

The Jersey City waterfront will see another residential tower, following the approval Tuesday night of a 330-foot-tall building on the border of the Powerhouse Arts District.

The building will be constructed at 94-108 First St., in the Hudson Exchange Redevelopment Area. The developer will also be constructing a public park adjacent to the building and will provide a dog run for area pets.

The application, first submitted a year ago, saw a redesign of the project's tower, which made it taller and more slender.

The planner for the project said this, as well as other design features, will provide a natural transition from the taller residential towers to the north to the warehouse structures to the south.

A subdivision of four lots into three and construction of three two-family homes on those lots also received Planning Board approval.

Despite reservations about the design features of the proposed units, the Planning Board granted approval to construct the buildings, at 236-240 Beacon Ave. and 241 Laidlaw Ave.

Commissioner Pat Donnelly said: "Where is the creativity by these architects?"

Other commissioners echoed her comments, saying that many of the homes in Jersey City are becoming cookie cutter projects.

The board did ask the applicant to increase the rear yard setback, provide fencing for the rear and sides of the property, and to submit revised plans before proceeding with construction.

In other business, the board gave its glowing support to the restoration and rehabilitation of a mixed-use building at 522 Ocean Ave. When complete, the building will house two retail units and six residential units above.

ASchwarz
February 12th, 2005, 03:36 PM
JCMan, I appreciate your updates on JC real estate. It's really exciting to see the prosperity in Manhattan extend out to Brooklyn, Queens and the Jersey waterfront. I hope the upcoming Jersey City projects are better architecturally than Newport, which leaves a bit to be desired. Overall, JC seems to be booming like crazy, which is wonderful.

JCMAN320
February 12th, 2005, 06:37 PM
No problem. I know the whole thing with Newport but that's what we had to pay to get it all started. I have seen alot of the new projects a lot of them rival most of the modren buildings being built in Manhattan currently and some actually look better than those being built in Manhattan. Your right the whole city is booming, Downtown, the West Side, Journal Square, and the Medical Center area as well as the area around Liberty State Park is on its way with three residential towers and a golf course. We are gonna be a hell of a city in 7 more years if we aren't all ready.

TLOZ Link5
February 12th, 2005, 06:46 PM
Perhaps by the 2010 Census, Jersey City will surpass Newark as the largest city in the state.

JCMAN320
February 12th, 2005, 11:02 PM
Nothing would give me greater joy lol. I think that actually will happen if we keep this pace.

tone99loc
February 13th, 2005, 12:58 AM
Is Journal Square really booming? I drop by the area every now and then (family on Newark Ave), and the whole area always seems just eh...no evidence of a boom, but maybe I'm mistaken...

JCMAN320
February 13th, 2005, 01:10 AM
The Hudson County Community College has finished renovating one building on Sip and are currently building a new 5 story Culinary Arts Institute on Newkirk St, and they are finishing off that new 12 story apartment building on Kennedy Blvd. They are using the old Jersey Loews theater for theater, performances, and old movies again and the Stanley is going to be used for a performing arts school, the Jehovahs Witnesses sold it. The court house as well has been used for several performances. Those old buildings along the plaza area will be razed for a new type of building used for the college and other retail and offices.

JCMAN320
February 16th, 2005, 10:46 AM
'Transit Village' tag gives Journal Square shot at more funding

Wednesday, February 16, 2005
By Ken Thorbourne
Journal staff writer

With the awarding of a $100,000 planning grant, Jersey City was named the state's 15th "Transit Village" yesterday - a designation that puts the city in line to receive additional funding for economic, housing and commercial projects in and around the Journal Square transportation hub.

"The designation brings us attention," said Mayor Jerramiah Healy, who was handed a cardboard replica of a check by state Department of Transportation Commissioner Jack Lettiere and Department of Community Affairs Commissioner Susan Bass Levin. "It will bring investment . more state aid."

Begun in 1999, and underwritten by $1 million a year in state funding, the Transit Village program encourages municipalities to develop housing and various commercial enterprises around transportation depots to reduce traffic congestion, air pollution, and other problems arising from poorly planned, sprawling communities. Later in the day, New Brunswick was also named a Transit Village.

Noting the revitalization of the Loew's Jersey Theater and a new housing complex rising within a quarter mile of Journal Square, Healy said he would like to see the Square "cleaned up a bit" and "maybe have a little more police."

Even as new families have moved into the area, helping to stabilize housing stock in the community, the Square itself remains a haven for panhandlers and is a shadow of its former self, when three local theaters attracted residents and visitors to the center of town each night.

During the event, just around the corner, workers were removing goods from a corner store at 22 Journal Square - one of 10 establishments put out of business in November when city inspectors found the building unsafe.

Rep. Robert Menendez, D-Hoboken, and state Assemblyman Vincent Prieto Prieto, D-Secaucus, also attended yesterday's press conference.

"Transportation is about economic development, quality of life . the air we collectively breathe, creating new jobs as we create new businesses," said Menendez, a senior member of the House Transportation Committee. "It takes transportation as a catalyst to achieve all these things."

tone99loc
February 16th, 2005, 09:56 PM
thanks for the updates on JS JCMAN...

JCMAN320
February 20th, 2005, 01:17 PM
No problem. Anytime anyone needs to know anything about JC just let me know.

Kris
February 26th, 2005, 09:48 AM
February 27, 2005

POSTINGS

A New Lease on Life for Jersey City Complex

By ANTOINETTE MARTIN

http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2005/02/27/realestate/27post.184.jpg
ART DECO DESIGN The former home of the Jersey City Medical Center will be converted to residential and commercial use. Developers plan to preserve the complex's Art Deco-style lobby, middle. Residents will have spectacular views of the Manhattan skyline.

http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/dropcap/j.gifersey City

BUILT during the Great Depression by dint of an irresistible force named Frank Hague - the prevailing political boss here for a period of 40 years - the eight colossal buildings of the Jersey City Medical Center now stand empty and sorry-looking on a rise near Journal Square that overlooks Manhattan and the Statue of Liberty.

The last tenant in the complex - its general hospital - moved to a new building across town 11 months ago.

Now, a new lease on life is about to take effect for the two-million-square-foot complex. Work is set to begin in June on a $350 million renovation that will create 1,200 apartments, both rentals and condos, along with a central courtyard featuring a restaurant, a grocery store and shops.

The Art Deco-style buildings are to be restored in all their original ornate detail, according to the developer, Metrovest Equities. But because they are not directly on the waterfront, they will be less expensive than the modern towers that have risen by the Hudson River over the last decade.

"The cost of a one-bedroom apartment will be about the same as what a studio costs on the waterfront," said George Filopoulos, president of Metrovest, which is based in Manhattan. "The cost of a two-bedroom will equal the cost of a one-bedroom near the water," which he estimated to be in the mid-$300,000's.

At the medical complex - which is being renamed the Beacon - prices for the 314 one-bedroom apartments that will be created in the first phase of construction will start in the mid-$200,000's and rise to the low $300,000's, according to Mr. Filopoulos.

"Eventually, there will be a number of spectacular penthouses and larger apartments here," he said, adding that no decision had been made on what proportion of the units would be rentals.

"First," he added, "we are going to focus on the large group that has been shut out of the market for a number of years" - meaning those who want to own condos in Jersey City but can't afford waterfront prices.

The neighborhood around the complex on Montgomery Avenue near Baldwin Street has long been down at the heels. Several subsidized housing projects - slated for demolition at some unspecified future date - occupy the surrounding streets, along with faded Victorians and 1920's-era row houses. The medical center, by contrast, epitomizes the elegance of vintage public buildings.

"This place was pure splendor and grandeur," the current mayor, Jeremiah T. Healy, said as he accompanied developers from Metrovest on a recent tour through several of the monumental structures arranged in an enormous rectangle east of the revived Journal Square. "It could never be recreated - but it can be restored," he said. "When it is, there will be nothing like it."

Mr. Filopoulos emphatically agreed. "These structures could never be rebuilt and nobody would try, because of the lavish amounts of space - grand entrances and 25-foot ceilings, wide hallways with marble walls, theater space and solariums, plus the ornate detail of the interior and exterior," he said. "That would all be cost prohibitive."

"All those things," he added, "will equate to extensive amenities for the tenants of the restored buildings."

The eight structures, ranging from 8 to 22 stories, cannot be destroyed or significantly altered because they were placed on the New Jersey and National Registers of Historic Places about 20 years ago. Officials from the Jersey City Redevelopment Agency, who also attended the recent private tour, said they worked for years to find the right developer to restore the buildings and relaunch the entire neighborhood, in the same way that development of apartment towers on the waterfront and skyscrapers downtown transformed those districts over the past decade.

"The buildings are connected to the heart of Jersey City history," Mayor Healy said. "People care about them."

Like former Gov. James E. McGreevey and countless other New Jerseyans of a certain age, Mayor Healy's oldest son, Jeremiah, was born here, in the Margaret Hague Maternity Hospital.

Frank Hague served as mayor from 1917 to 1947 after building a political machine based on street-gang muscle. During the New Deal, he wielded his influence with President Franklin D. Roosevelt to garner public works financing to fuel construction of the third-largest medical center in the country. The maternity hospital building was named for his mother.

Nearly as soon as the monumental complex was complete in 1941, local historians say, it was clear that it was too large for the city's needs. On Sept. 11, 2001, however, it sprang to service as a regional medical center, processing hundreds of emergency cases at a time. For decades before that, though, it was recognized as a money-losing boondoggle, and most of its space had been vacated by the 1980's.

The hospital was put on notice several years ago that it too would have to leave after a redeveloper had been selected to rehabilitate the entire complex.

Today, the buildings have some crumbling walls and broken-out ceilings, and generally show the heavy wear associated with serving the public for more than 50 years.

On the other hand, their Art Deco ornamentation remains nonpareil - exterior terra cotta panels encrusted with fancy flora and fowl, gilt chevron-and-diamond shapes over doorways, exquisite geometric design along beamed ceilings, art-glass windowpanes, elaborate light fixtures and brass railings - and even a collection of Deco-style furniture left in the grand entrance hall that remains in such excellent shape that is has served as the set for several period movies, including "Quiz Show" and "The Royal Tenenbaums."

Mr. Filopoulos said that before submitting a redevelopment plan for the complex, his architects had to measure every inch of the place and take inventory of every detail to create a new set of blueprints.

"What exists here is unique," he said, still sounding awed two years after plans were submitted. "And it will live on."

Copyright 2005 (http://www.nytimes.com/ref/membercenter/help/copyright.html) The New York Times Company (http://www.nytco.com/)

JCMAN320
February 26th, 2005, 02:57 PM
Now it's time for the midtown of our city to shine with Journal Square coming back and the medical center coming back, the midtown area of the city will be just as desirable as the waterfront. This is also a historic area with Bergen Church and it's cemetery that date back to the 1660's and the Apple Tree House where George Washington and General Lafayette discussed plans under an apple tree in the back yard over tea for the Revolutionary War. We have beautiful Lincoln Park with many small Victorian Mansions here too, not too mention its in the area where our city was first founded back in 1663.

JCMAN320
February 26th, 2005, 03:10 PM
Here are some peaks at future projects...

77 Hudson St.
http://www.77hudson.com
http://www.emporis.com/en/wm/bu/?id=100719

Harborside Plaza 6 and 7 (6 is the little building to the left)
http://www.emporis.com/en/wm/bu/?id=101574

Newark Ave. Apartment Building and Hotel
http://www.emporis.com/en/wm/bu/?id=190407

Gulcrapek
February 26th, 2005, 10:36 PM
77 Hudson needs a redesign, and Dewitt Tishman should be barred from practice. They already screwed one block of JC, a big apartment building that's just nasty. I think it's called the Sierra or something like that. This new one is actually the best work I've seen of them.

tone99loc
February 27th, 2005, 01:15 AM
thanks for those sneak-peeks JC -- I am real exicted about the Newark and Grove bldg <-- if it ever gets built, I really think it can transform the area....

Is an 800 ft 7 Harborside realistic? I can't imagine that getting built anytime soon; there is already a glut of office space....

NewYorkYankee
February 27th, 2005, 10:26 AM
It says Harborside is already approved. Im glad, it will really add to the skyline! I think the JC and NY skylines compliment each other well.

JCMAN320
February 27th, 2005, 04:41 PM
The Apt. Building on Newark and Grove is about to get underway, they have a fence around the area with trucks and buldozers in there so they should break gorund this spring, and I agree with you ILUVNYC the Jersey City Waterfront skylne and Lower Manhattan's skyline compliment eachother very well. Also tone your right it won't get built until the office market comes back so lets hope that's real soon!!!

JCMAN320
February 28th, 2005, 04:37 PM
16-story 'Shore Club' to be built
City council votes 7-2 for controversial abatement in front of packed crowd

Ricardo Kaulessar
Reporter staff writer 02/26/2005

The ordinance was for the approval of a tax abatement for a project to be built at 20 Newport Parkway.

The building would be 16 stories with 212 market rate residential condominium units; a 7-story parking garage for 542 parking spaces, and one retail unit with approximately 36,300 square feet of space.

James McCann, an attorney for the Shore Club South Urban Renewal Company, LLC (of which James and Richard LeFrak of the Newport Development Company are the principals), said at the meeting that if the council granted the abatement, construction would start as early as this summer and end in 2007.

But this abatement has been controversial from the time it was introduced in the City Council at the previous meeting on Feb. 9.

When abatements are granted, it means that developers pay a percentage of the revenue earned from the development directly to a municipality instead of regular property taxes that change from year to year. The payments are often called PILOTs (payments in lieu of taxes), whereby developers give the money directly to the municipalities rather than paying full taxes for a period of 20 or 30 years.

PILOTs are hotly debated because while the payments are legal under state statute, they allow developers to avoid paying school and county taxes, while regular taxpayers have to bear the costs of both.

Abatements have been designed to draw developers to unused or blighted land. But their critics have argued that in this development climate, they're no longer necessary.

During the public speaking portion of an initial Feb. 9 meeting, two longtime Jersey City residents - Yvonne Balcer and Dan Falcon - spoke out against the abatement, saying the project would be constructed on a prime piece of real estate in an area that is already overdeveloped.

At that meeting, there were only a handful of attendees, but last week's meeting saw a much bigger crowd, many of the individuals finding out through the "JClist" Internet bulletin board that Falcon operates.

Balcer and Falcon again spoke out against the abatement, but were joined a number of other speakers, pro and con.

After nearly three hours of listening to public speaking for and against the abatements, the City Council voted 7-2 in favor of the abatement.
What is an abatement?

The granting of abatements has always been hotly debated. But most developers justify the need by saying their buildings will provide jobs to city residents, and attract a populace who will bring more money into a city and contribute to the city's further economic growth.

In Jersey City, thousands of projects constructed over the past 20 years within the city have been granted abatements. Usually, the request is submitted to the City Council for their approval in the form of an ordinance.

In the case of last week's City Council meeting, there were other abatements for residential condominiums that were approved unanimously by the council with very little opposition from the public.

The City Council has often looked favorably on abatements because the money received has been utilized for closing budget gaps, which council members have stated at past council meetings enables the city to avoid raising municipal taxes.

(In this case, the developers would pay directly to the city an annual charge of $1,344,894 along with a contribution to the city's Affordable Housing Trust Fund in the amount of $373,963.)

No abatement or no jobs

Some residents brought signs protesting the abatement.

Those in support were construction workers who had worked on previous projects in the Newport area, many coming in two buses parked in front of City Hall, and office workers working along the waterfront. They expressed the fear that the project by the Shore Club Company would not be built if the abatement was not approved.

"They need this work.....I hear the horror stories," said Don Capasso of the Jersey City-based Local 14 Building and Metal Trades Union. "This will be a light at the end of the tunnel. These are not just construction workers, but also they're your neighbors."

That prompted a question from Viola Richardson, asking if many of the construction jobs on the project would be filled by Jersey City residents. Capasso said many of the workers on the proposed project would be hired from Jersey City.

Eddie Torres, a construction worker who grew up in Downtown Jersey City, remembers how many developments were built in the mid 1980s in what became known as the Newport section. He said it happened as result of abatements on those projects.

"It gave me a five-year education," he said. "As the buildings got built....I was still able to work and I was still able to make a living."

But speakers against the abatement said the project could still be built without it. They said it would place further taxation upon homeowners and would not bring about further economic growth.

Sam Stoia, a resident of Jersey City since 1992 and a current homeowner in the Hamilton Park section, spoke against the abatement on the grounds that it would be an economic liability.

"There is nothing to demonstrate that this new building will bring new economic life to Jersey City. This building will go up with or without the abatement, and these union employees will be hired regardless," said Stoia.

Warren Curtin, a real estate agent and a homeowner who also resides in the Hamilton Park area, argued that giving an abatement to a developer who could afford to build and pay the normal taxes on a prime piece of real estate was "unconscionable."

A 'Shore' bet

The council voted 7-2 to approve the 20-year tax abatement for the project by the Shore Club Company.

Ward A Councilwoman Kathleen Curran voted in favor on the basis that the abatement would allow for a project by a developer such as LeFrak who has also built several schools and recreation facilities in the Newport area. She said the PILOT payments would help to stabilize city's tax rate.

Ward F Councilperson Junior Maldonado, who represents most of Downtown Jersey City including the Newport area, voted against the abatement, pointing out that project would be built near the Jersey City waterfront, a location with plenty of development taking place.

"I see big projects going up on the waterfront in Hoboken and Weehawken and West New York that are being done without an abatement, and I have to ask, can [the Shore Club project] be done without an abatement?" said Maldonado. "I believe it can be done and will be done."

Maldonado also volunteered his services as a chairman of the Jersey City Redevelopment Agency to help find a developer who would build the project without tax abatement.

©The Hudson Reporter 2005

skl17
March 2nd, 2005, 12:10 AM
What do you guys think about the new condo development "The Foundry" and the area around Liberty State Park?

Thanks!
Sam

JCMAN320
March 2nd, 2005, 06:52 PM
The area around there is known as the Lafayette section of Jersey City. I think the project is great for the area, it along with other old factories in the area are being converted into condos. The area is Jersey City's Harlem. In it's heyday it was a very affluent African American community where doctors lawyers lived and Fredrick Douglass had a move studio there as long with many other famous African Amercians. The area has seen better days, but it is making a turn around with a new park and renovating schools and buildings and building new apartments and homes are replacing housing projects. The area is also going to see a 3 tower apartment highrise come to the area right next to the Liberty Science Center. So in all the area is deffinately coming back. Hopefully this ansewers your questions.

alex ballard
March 5th, 2005, 06:28 PM
Hey JCMAN, any areas in Jersey City where I could get a 1br for 1,000/month or less?

NewYorkYankee
March 5th, 2005, 09:00 PM
Alex, you can find that in Manhattan if you look hard enough.

JCMAN320
March 6th, 2005, 03:00 PM
Yes Alex. There definately should be some in downtown Jersey City look west of the waterfront like from Marin Blvd. on inland. Also the Journal Square area which is undergoing a huge much needed building boom and face lift, is where you will find the most. People who try to move to Downtown Jersey City or Hoboken and can't afford it are moving into that area and it is really in the process of making a complete 360. There are art galleries up there as well as artists and musicians always walking around there. Just let me know if you need more info.

alex ballard
March 6th, 2005, 05:25 PM
Yes Alex. There definately should be some in downtown Jersey City look west of the waterfront like from Marin Blvd. on inland. Also the Journal Square area which is undergoing a huge much needed building boom and face lift, is where you will find the most. People who try to move to Downtown Jersey City or Hoboken and can't afford it are moving into that area and it is really in the process of making a complete 360. There are art galleries up there as well as artists and musicians always walking around there. Just let me know if you need more info.

Do you think any areas will still hold out by 2006-2008? Or is JC gonna go the way of the Village by then? Also, I know PATH is in the Jornal Sq area and the HBLR is along the waterfront, but if I go inland, how do I connect to the city and some shopping/entertainment areas by the waterfront?

JCMAN320
March 6th, 2005, 08:05 PM
Yea the Heights will still hold out as well as Journal Square. The city as whole isn't going to the way of tiny Hoboken or the village in the short of time, were far to large. Only downtown will go the way of the village in that time span, other areas of the city will take a while. To get to the city and the waterfront you can use the PATH. There is a stop at Grove St., the heart of Downtown, then Exchange Place at the waterfront and Newport at the Mall and surrounding development. To get to the city, the PATH goes to WTC after Exchange Place and Christopher, 9th, 14th, 23rd, 33rd and Herald Square after Newport. To get to other areas of the city the numerous bus lines are sufficent and the Light Rail meets with Exchange Place and Newport PATH stations and will take you to the Heights, Liberty State Park with the Liberty Science Center, and other parts of Downtown as well as other parts of western Jersey City by New Jersey City University, and southern Jersey City. Here are some transit links that should be of some service.

http://www.njtransit.com
http://www.njtransit.com/images/hb_final_1031.gif
http://www.panynj.com
Click on PATH Rail System, then system map to give a map of the PATH system and neighborhood of each station.

alex ballard
March 6th, 2005, 09:05 PM
Yea the Heights will still hold out as well as Journal Square. The city as whole isn't going to the way of tiny Hoboken or the village in the short of time, were far to large. Only downtown will go the way of the village in that time span, other areas of the city will take a while. To get to the city and the waterfront you can use the PATH. There is a stop at Grove St., the heart of Downtown, then Exchange Place at the waterfront and Newport at the Mall and surrounding development. To get to the city, the PATH goes to WTC after Exchange Place and Christopher, 9th, 14th, 23rd, 33rd and Herald Square after Newport. To get to other areas of the city the numerous bus lines are sufficent and the Light Rail meets with Exchange Place and Newport PATH stations and will take you to the Heights, Liberty State Park with the Liberty Science Center, and other parts of Downtown as well as other parts of western Jersey City by New Jersey City University, and southern Jersey City. Here are some transit links that should be of some service.

http://www.njtransit.com
http://www.njtransit.com/images/hb_final_1031.gif
http://www.panynj.com
Click on PATH Rail System, then system map to give a map of the PATH system and neighborhood of each station.

Thanks. How do you crack into the JC rental market? Any papers to look at for listings? Is JC in any of the internet apartment guides? Is there stuff to do in JC or is it basically a suburb of Manhattan?

JCMAN320
March 6th, 2005, 10:22 PM
Yes the Star Ledger, Jersey Journal, Jersey City Reporter. They are on the internet just put in the search engine Jersey City Real Estate or Jersey City apartments you'll find a lot of listings. There is PLENTY to do here. By NO means are we a suburb of NYC. We have numerous theater comapnies and art galleries. We have the Powerhouse Arts District that once completed well sure rival anything in SoHo or Williamsburg or even DUMBO for that matter. We have the Jersey City museum, and the Liberty Science Center which is the most visited museum in the state in Liberty State Park which also has the Liberty House is our Tavern on the Green, also has ferries to the Statue of Liberty and Ellis Island as well as second to none views of the whole city and harbor. We have live music perfromances at the beautiful Hudson County Courthouse right next to the Journal Square area with people coming as far as Atlantic City to see the performances. We have beautiful Lincoln Park which is the largest in Hudson County and one of the most beautiful. We have numerous colleges a total of six. New Jersey City University, which is opening a huge new campus right next to ts current one which will spur new development on the westside, Saint Peter's College a Jesuit College which is renowned for our great history and sports department, Hudson County Community College which is known for it famous culinary arts department which has turned out great chefs, University of Pheonix, Seton Hall opened a satellite campus, and Rutgers opened a business college at Harborside Financial Center. The Old Loews Theater at Journal Square plays old movies every week which attracts people from Brooklyn to Newark. Also the beautifully resotred Stanley Theater at Journal Square currently used by the Jehovah's Witnesses for an assembly hall, has been sold is going to be used as a performing arts center and house a perfroming arts school as well. There are so much more I'll put up at another time.

arbeiter
March 7th, 2005, 12:14 PM
I wouldn't say that Journal Square is 'booming'. There aren't many new businesses in that part of town, nor is there any real new construction. Most of the urban renewal came in the 1970's.

It is one of the last affordable places to find an apartment to rent, though. It is definitely receiving an influx of young immigrants and city dwellers that have been priced out of either NYC, Hoboken, or downtown JC.

arbeiter
March 7th, 2005, 12:37 PM
Alex_ballard, I thought I would share with you some of my experiences in the JC rental market. I very nearly moved into JC instead of Brooklyn...

Newport and any new construction in downtown JC will be expensive. $2,000+ for a 2 bedroom.

Downtown JC, Van Vorst Park, Hamilton Park areas, anything near the Grove Street PATH, is easily the most desirable area of Jersey City. Rents are skyrocketing in this area, but you can possibly still find studios for around $1K a month, 2 bedrooms from $12-1800 a month...

Journal Square and JC Heights are a mixed bag. I remember finding 2-bedrooms, renovated, in nice brownstones for just over $1000 a month, and this was last month. Jersey City Heights has very high home ownership, and has different architecture and aesthetics. It is not a very desirable area to live in if you need to work in NYC or visit every day. Journal Square is on the PATH, so it's a lot more desirable in my opinion.

South Jersey City is not very pleasant, and is only accessible to the city via a light rail to PATH transfer.

alex ballard
March 7th, 2005, 04:28 PM
I know JC is your thing, but honestly, once JC basically becomes Hoboken, Is Newark gonna be next? I saw it from the train and it had a lot of new houses.

JCMAN320
March 7th, 2005, 10:43 PM
Im in college stuyding to be an urban developer or city planner so im majoring in urban studies and sociology so trust me when I say this, all of Jersey City will not become like Hoboken. I really don't repsect Hoboken for that matter because I had a lot of friends that we're born and raised in Hoboken, kids whos families have been there since the mid 1800s, kids that I went to school with in my hometown Jersey City, that got pushed out because Hoboken essentially sold it's soul to gentrification and developers that pushed prices so high that families who been there for decades get pushed out their hometown that there ancestors help build. Jersey City will never let that happen because they build affordable housing and have buildings in certain areas that are just for lower and middle income families so the city is affordable for everyone. My ancsestors have been in this city since the 1700s all the way to my family today. So the WHOLE city won't get like Hoboken. Jersey City, if it doesn't already, is going to more resemble Brooklyn in it's structure and setup with it's neighborhoods along with it's cultural mosiac. Jersey City has over 100 natinonalities and over 80 languages are spoken in my city. I hope Newark makes a huge come back, Newark at one time was one of the best cities in America, it had the population that Boston has now close to 500,000. Newark was once. It was a world class city and I think that down the road it will become a great destination once again.

JCMAN320
March 7th, 2005, 10:48 PM
Arbeiter I go to Saint Peter's College and I went to Hudson Catholic which are all in the neighborhood, so I know when the area is on a verge of making a come back. Are you kidding with no new consturction, they just topped of a new 12 story apartment tower on Kennedy Boulevard right in the middle of the Square, which will have store fronts on the bottom. Hudson County Community College is starting to complete it's new 8 story Culinray Arts Institute right down the block on Newkirk from the Turst Company Building. A couple of buildings on the plaza will be razed. The building at the corner of Bergen and Sip across from the Jersey Journal Building will be razed which will alow for new construction along with the old Hotel on the Square that has been borded up for years. There are also plans that are gaining approval for that area that I have seen because I'am friends with the city planner that are down the road for the next couple of years. So trust me Journal Square in 8 years will start to resemble the great neighborhood it once was!

alex ballard
March 8th, 2005, 03:47 PM
Arbeiter I go to Saint Peter's College and I went to Hudson Catholic which are all in the neighborhood, so I know when the area is on a verge of making a come back. Are you kidding with no new consturction, they just topped of a new 12 story apartment tower on Kennedy Boulevard right in the middle of the Square, which will have store fronts on the bottom. Hudson County Community College is starting to complete it's new 8 story Culinray Arts Institute right down the block on Newkirk from the Turst Company Building. A couple of buildings on the plaza will be razed. The building at the corner of Bergen and Sip across from the Jersey Journal Building will be razed which will alow for new construction along with the old Hotel on the Square that has been borded up for years. There are also plans that are gaining approval for that area that I have seen because I'am friends with the city planner that are down the road for the next couple of years. So trust me Journal Square in 8 years will start to resemble the great neighborhood it once was!


Curious: you said something about neighborhoods "coming back". Did JC and the surronding area fall into decline when NYC fell apart during the 70's?

NewYorkYankee
March 8th, 2005, 03:56 PM
What is the population of Newark right now?

TLOZ Link5
March 8th, 2005, 06:09 PM
What is the population of Newark right now?

Around 280,000, though at its peak it was around 450,000. It's been gaining population since the last census, though.

NewYorkYankee
March 8th, 2005, 06:50 PM
Gracias, and how about JC?

alex ballard
March 8th, 2005, 07:12 PM
Around 280,000, though at its peak it was around 450,000. It's been gaining population since the last census, though.

Think it's hit 300,000 by now?

JCMAN320
March 8th, 2005, 09:32 PM
Yea your right it's getting close to 300,000 it's currently 250,000. Ansewering Alex's question, Jersey City hit the decline exactly the same time as NYC in the 70's but the city has come back stronger than ever.

Ninjahedge
March 9th, 2005, 01:09 PM
JCM, don't start with the whole "selling your soul" thing.

Hoboken was known for YEARS as the town you would not let your kid go to. It had a LOUSY reputation in so many other towns it was not funny.

Now a bunch of yuppies find the place, realize how convenient it is, and start pushing prices up.

I feel bad for some that got forced out because of rising costs, but there is a problem as well. Some that stay have pride for their city, others are just being territorial and refuse to sell their collapsing UNSAFE structure because they feel it is somehow their DUTY to stay.


Strange how people in the town accept the tax dollars and all the additional funding comeing from this gentrification, but still hate those that are bringing it. Like somehow that money would have magically come about without anybody changing anything.

Areas of Hoboken are, lamentably, turning into total white-bread. But for the most part, run down factories and abandoned TOXIC SITES (yes, the heavy metal and chemical content in 90% of hoboken is high enough to require special cleanup for projects such as Pier A.)


Although I do not like the prefabs, or the outrageous price developers are commanding for "luxury", the old Dock/Train Depot/Bar town of Hoboken is not missed by many.






As for JC. There is good, bad, and certainly ugly there. Development is coming nicely, but they are doing things that many can consider unacceptable by the same standards you chose to use to describe Hoboken. The Arts warehouses being one of them. I hear that the people living/squatting there are being forced to leave because of plans for a new development.

While this is indeed sad, if you have ever been in there and looked at some of the building conditions AND the courtyard filled with plumbing fixtures and rusting scrap metal, you can't help but think that this MIGHT be for the better.

But it will, as you implied, create another SOHO. A place where the artists squatted until it was popular and they could not afford to live there anymore.





Sorry if I sound negative. Work gets to me. That and the position of being someone watching a lot of this happening as I live there and not being able to do much more about it than post on a BBS.

TLOZ Link5
March 9th, 2005, 03:40 PM
Think it's hit 300,000 by now?

Doubtful. The 2000 Census had Newark's population at 273,000, so at the moment it's added around 7,000 people in the last five years. Every annual census estimate since 2000 has shown an increase in population, but at the moment the growth is too slow to have passed 300,000.

Jersey City, as of the 2005 Census estimate, has just about 240,000 people.

JCMAN320
March 9th, 2005, 04:48 PM
Listen I aint tryin to start a fight, but in regards to Hoboken gentrification, Hoboken is ONE square mile so of course it would happen over night and touch every corner. Jersey City is 15sq miles so of course it's gonna take longer than Hoboken. It is unforntunate what happened I was leading the fight to have them stay, but the developer is hindered because of the Historic Designation of the building and area and the city is fighting him from knocking it down. Also many artist have also signed with city to move into that area over 10o will move in other buildings. Trust me it isn't an eyesore that area one bit.

Ninjahedge
March 10th, 2005, 09:15 AM
Are we talking about the warehouse buildings down by the factory (across the street) with the crumbling stairways, bricked over windows, fire escapes that are falling off the facade and such?

Seriously man.

Also, the ones that had things like bathroom facilities built right inside the front doors of some of the units, or right in the middle of the living rooms?


These places are code nightmares. God help them if a fire actually starts, seeing how 90% of the flammable stuff IN there is actually the inhabitants and their belongings!!!!


But that is like what SOHO, TriBecca, and the East Village were like at one time. Since it was cheap living, these guys could afford it. And, like some lucky places, THESE low income individuals moved in instead of other less appreciable types.

They became hip, and naturally hip+cheap = development.



Anyway, Hoboken was not transformed "overnight" like you said. It is smaller by far than JC, but still. As early as 1995 it was only starting to turn over. And now, 10 years later, people are STILL dissapointed with the lack of parks, public recreation, and schooling. As such, the formula still stands.

Yuppies move out of mom and dads. They come to hoboken, meet someone, get married, have a kid and move out when the kid turns 2-3.

That age is getting older as more yuppies stay and programs are implimented, but it is still a long way from repairing Hobokens scholastic track record OR the transient nature of any "gentrified" individuals moving in and out of Hoboken.



Anyway, it does not really matter. I am not a huge fan of Hoboken either (I have been there about 8 years now). I just don't like it when people make too many blank statements about an area.

There is plenty to hate about both cities, we don't need to make stuff up.

Leave that to the NYers and their JerseyPhobia. ;)

JCMAN320
March 10th, 2005, 03:32 PM
Listen I've lived here my entire life this is my hometown I think I know a little bit more about it than you and I don't like it when you make blank statements about my city. There are three of the warehouse that have been renovated, and 111 First is going to be renovated and saved by the city. Jersey City has more historic buildings and sites that are on the National and State Historic Register list, actually more than any other city in the state. My mother was on the cities Historic Preservation Commitee so I know quite a bit about this area cause she was helping perserving the area. Some of those warehouses along with the Powerhouse (not a factory) are on that list and that whole area is a historic district. That Powerhouse dates back to 1904 and was used for the Hudson Manhattan Railroad (todays PATH). It is most likely going to be turned into a peforming arts center. Have you even gone into the district or just looked at from Washington St, I think if you do go into the district you'll be pleasently suprised.

Also, now there gonna put a W Hotel there. No one who lives in Hoboken and wants to have their family visit them can afford to have their family stay there. Yet another thing in Hoboken that is just for the rich.

Ninjahedge
March 10th, 2005, 06:11 PM
Listen I've lived here my entire life this is my hometown I think I know a little bit more about it than you and I don't like it when you make blank statements about my city. There are three of the warehouse that have been renovated, and 111 First is going to be renovated and saved by the city. Jersey City has more historic buildings and sites that are on the National and State Historic Register list, actually more than any other city in the state. My mother was on the cities Historic Preservation Commitee so I know quite a bit about this area cause she was helping perserving the area. Some of those warehouses along with the Powerhouse (not a factory) are on that list and that whole area is a historic district. That Powerhouse dates back to 1904 and was used for the Hudson Manhattan Railroad (todays PATH). It is most likely going to be turned into a peforming arts center. Have you even gone into the district or just looked at from Washington St, I think if you do go into the district you'll be pleasently suprised.

Also, now there gonna put a W Hotel there. No one who lives in Hoboken and wants to have their family visit them can afford to have their family stay there. Yet another thing in Hoboken that is just for the rich.


Look, I don't care if you built the entire city with your bare hands, the warehouses I was in were not safe for human habitation.

I was there, I saw them with more than a passerby's eyes. I will take pictures of it if you want.

I do not care if the powerhouse dates back to the creation of mankind. It is an ABANDONED POWER GENERATION FACILITY!

(looking at the stacks, I would say coal. Looking at the schmutz, i would also say coal, but that may be from the surrounding area, and not it).

Just because something is old does not make it "historical" you know. We have plenty of historical landfills around, but that does not mean the garbage stinks any less.

I have been in the district, walked there, alone, at night. Not exactly welcoming.

Also, the road down to the Science Center is another eye opener. I always like to see metal bars enclosing front porches, they look like holding pens.

Also, I have driven through and walked through the BD and surrounding area. Presto's is GREAT!

I think the mall stinks.

I like the (is that the post office?) PO, but it needs cleaning/ rennovation.

I think some of the buildings near areas like Lincoln Park are great. They are very similar to the building style of some of the better buildings in Hoboken (Pre-War, high ceiling, etc...)

So I know where you are coming from.

But I am also very critical.


As for the W, you know what that place was before the W? Almost what it is now. An empty lot. A dirty disgusting area that used to park cars until they started closing off areas that were deemed "unsafe" because they were collapsing.

I am not in favor of the waterfront development. The "great wall". They could have made the buildings on river street have open pavilions instead of coming all the way out to the building line. It would have been very nice.

I do not like Trinity, 340 or the other bars that are opening, trying to become like the next SOHO.

I do not like 333 River street being allowed to build full height right at building line on the street, it is very cold and imposing.


Etc etc etc.


I may not have been born here, but I also go out and talk to some of the people who have. Some interesting stories you get.

JCMAN320
March 10th, 2005, 09:13 PM
Fair enough. Let put this to bed. By the way Johnston Ave, the road to LSC is going to have a 3 tower luxury apartment complxex built on their by the LSC so it'll change Lafayette as a whole is going to come back.

Zoe
March 10th, 2005, 11:43 PM
Also, now there gonna put a W Hotel there. No one who lives in Hoboken and wants to have their family visit them can afford to have their family stay there. Yet another thing in Hoboken that is just for the rich.

I can't wait for this hotel to be built, I live in Hoboken now, and yes my family will stay there when it opens.
Hoboken is not just made up of yuppies, the projects, and people from "the old neighborhood". There are now people in their 30's and 40's living here that have money. Hoboken also has a US Senetor a Congressman, and professional sports figures living here. Yes it is now expensive and will continue down this path; it does have a perfect view and is a stones throw away from the greatest city in the world, what do you expect?!!

JCMAN320
March 11th, 2005, 01:44 AM
We have famous people living here too, we have congressman and senators that live here as well that doesn't mean anything. We have a great rich history and we were the first permanent settlement in the whole state. The projects and the people from the old neighborhood are all pushed to the back of Hoboken at the base of the JC palisades. They have been pushed out from Hoboken proper. Soon that area will fall way to yuppies and developers because there gonna build expensive places back there. C'mon Hoboken ever heard of affordable housing.

Ninjahedge
March 11th, 2005, 09:31 AM
Yes it has.

It has rent control. Call up Carol Mclaughin at city hall (201)-420-2396 if you are in an older building in Hoboken and paying a pretty penny.


the irony of your statement JCman is that a lot of the residents and owners IN Hoboken have moved out, but are keeping the places and renting them at illegal rates to the yuppies moving in.

They can make more money by moving out to JC, keeping the Hoboken place and charging 1200 an apartment for them, so they do it.

So the people that lived there from a long time ago, the ones that bought instead of rented, they are more to blame than any others in this. A lot of old Hobokenites are not being forced out by the outsiders. It is their own neighbor or resident landlord that is doing it.......

Zoe
March 11th, 2005, 10:56 AM
You totally missed my point being that the town is not just yuppies. I'm sorry for the people who can no longer live here due to the old slum buildings that was their housing stock being demolished for updated, safe, building-code compliant condos.
As much as one would hope, economics you can not escape. Real world economics apply in NYC, Madrid, Moscow, grandma's house in Kansas and yes even in Hoboken and JC. You can't expect to live less than a half mile from the epicenter of the capitalist world with a perfect waterfront view of it and not have the property values affected. This is true of LIC, JC, Hoboken, Weehawken up to the GWB, Dumbo, ect.... Those areas all had days before where they were much more prosperous. The slump they all faced was a limited time opportunity. Hopefully the people from the old neighborhood took advantage of the many US programs that help people of that income demographic you’re speaking of into home ownership. If they did, then they are now very well off.

JCM, I really do enjoy your postings about JC. Do not take me as adversarial.

arbeiter
March 11th, 2005, 04:12 PM
Arbeiter I go to Saint Peter's College and I went to Hudson Catholic which are all in the neighborhood, so I know when the area is on a verge of making a come back. Are you kidding with no new consturction, they just topped of a new 12 story apartment tower on Kennedy Boulevard right in the middle of the Square, which will have store fronts on the bottom. Hudson County Community College is starting to complete it's new 8 story Culinray Arts Institute right down the block on Newkirk from the Turst Company Building. A couple of buildings on the plaza will be razed. The building at the corner of Bergen and Sip across from the Jersey Journal Building will be razed which will alow for new construction along with the old Hotel on the Square that has been borded up for years. There are also plans that are gaining approval for that area that I have seen because I'am friends with the city planner that are down the road for the next couple of years. So trust me Journal Square in 8 years will start to resemble the great neighborhood it once was!

It's still small potatoes compared to the downtown area in terms of development. I never said Journal Square would not turn around, but it further out, slightly less convenient to the city, and full of lower-quality development compared to Van Vorst and Hamilton Park areas. I like JSQ, but it's not going to be anything like downtown JC or Hoboken for years to come, if ever.

JCMAN320
March 12th, 2005, 12:21 PM
Thanks guys for the sparing sessions Lol. Lets put differences aside. I view everyone here as a friend just a lil stessed right now guys in my life. sry. Heres a new post guys on JC!

Liberty Harbor North wins its first abatements in 7-1 vote
Friday, March 11, 2005

By Maria Zingaro Conte
Journal staff writer

Another major Downtown development in Jersey City moved one step closer to completion this week with the City Council's approval of three new abatements for the massive Liberty Harbor North project. The abatements come as the first phase of the project is about to kick off.

In all, the development will transform 80 acres of vacant waterfront land in Jersey City into a community of 6,500 units of market-rate housing, one million square feet of hotel space, 750,000 square feet of retail space and 4.5 million square feet of office space.

The site, along the Tidewater Basin just a half-mile west of the Hudson River, is bounded by Grand Street, Luis Muñoz Marin Boulevard and Jersey Avenue. Former North Bergen Mayor and Jersey City-based businessmen Peter Mocco is the developer.

The first phase of construction, for which the abatements were granted, will begin on the northern-most section of the property on the south side of Grand Street, effectively joining the new neighborhood to the well-established community across the road.

Mocco has said he expects construction to begin in the spring and the first units to be completed within a year.

Jersey City's abatement policy requires developers to make a payment in lieu of taxes equal to 16 percent of the project's gross annual revenue, with all of the funds going directly to the city. The policy also calls for another 5 percent to go to Hudson County.

Abatement supporters tout the deals as revenue boosters for the city, which winds up with almost all of the PILOT money. If the developer were to pay conventional property taxes, more money would be paid overall, but the city would get less because the money would be split with the county government and the school district.

The three abatements for Liberty Harbor North correspond to the three sections of the project's first phase. In all, phase one will include 416 condominium units, 17 units of commercial retail space and 460 parking spaces.

Combined payments to the city will come to more than $1.5 million, according to information provided by James McCann, attorney for the developer. Another approximately $77,000 will go to the county and the developer will also make a total contribution of $655,500 to the city's affordable housing trust fund, the attorney said.

The abatement drew criticism from city resident and stalwart abatement opponent Yvonne Balcer, who argued that developers received unfair advantages.

"When it comes to the purse, the lower class public who can't afford this is being discriminated against," she said, admonishing the council. "Every time you vote for this, you're saying I can discriminate in favor of the wealthy."

In the end, the council adopted the abatements in a 7-1 vote, with Councilman E. Junior Maldonado, who represents the area that will be developed, casting the sole dissenting vote.

Maldonado said he did not think a tax abatement was necessary to encourage development in the area, which has become popular with developers in recent years.

Maria Zingaro Conte covers Jersey City. She can be reached at mzconte@jjournal.com.

JCMAN320
March 12th, 2005, 12:25 PM
3 old Med Center buildings bought
County gets $3M from developer under its part of condo deal

Saturday, March 12, 2005
By Bonnie Friedman
Journal staff writer

Metrovest Equities, the developer selected to take over the old Jersey City Medical Center, closed with Hudson County on its portion of the deal yesterday, agreeing to purchase three buildings for just over $3 million, said county spokesman Jim Kennelly.

The developer is still in negotiations with the Jersey City Redevelopment Agency for the remaining seven buildings, said agency Chairman Junior Maldonado, who is also a city councilman.

Maldonado said the sale of the county buildings should help speed up the process for the Jersey City portion, which he expects to finalize in the next month.

George Filopolous, the principal of Metrovest, plans to build 1,200 market-rate condominium units on the 14-acre site, at Baldwin Avenue and Montgomery Street.

The project - called the Beacon - is expected to cost roughly $350 million, with a large portion of the cost coming from extensive remediation of the site.

Filopolous said he expects to start marketing and construction on the first 314 condos by June.

The timing of the sale allows the county to devote part of the proceeds to the 2005 budget, Kennelly said.

"It would be heartening to have the deal complete so it could be added to the ledger for this year," said Kennelly, before learning that the deal had been finalized.

The agreement also allows the county to continue to maintain office space in Murdoch Hall for the next two years, at which time those offices can move to the future Block Drug site, Kennelly said.

Built in the 1930s, the Jersey City Medical Center is listed with the state Historic Preservation Office, and Filopolous said all structures will be restored with the exception of the powerhouse chimney.

"A lot of care is being taken to restore the building," Filopolous said. "There is a lot of expense in the facade restoration because it's obviously suffered a lot in the 70 years and it involves a lot of work on the terra-cotta."

Gulcrapek
March 12th, 2005, 01:13 PM
The JC Med Center buildings are beautiful. There was an article on them in the Times a little while ago with closeups and stuff... they're way overdue for real acknowledgement.

Ninjahedge
March 14th, 2005, 10:05 AM
You totally missed my point being that the town is not just yuppies. I'm sorry for the people who can no longer live here due to the old slum buildings that was their housing stock being demolished for updated, safe, building-code compliant condos.
As much as one would hope, economics you can not escape. Real world economics apply in NYC, Madrid, Moscow, grandma's house in Kansas and yes even in Hoboken and JC. You can't expect to live less than a half mile from the epicenter of the capitalist world with a perfect waterfront view of it and not have the property values affected. This is true of LIC, JC, Hoboken, Weehawken up to the GWB, Dumbo, ect.... Those areas all had days before where they were much more prosperous. The slump they all faced was a limited time opportunity. Hopefully the people from the old neighborhood took advantage of the many US programs that help people of that income demographic you’re speaking of into home ownership. If they did, then they are now very well off.

JCM, I really do enjoy your postings about JC. Do not take me as adversarial.


Zoe, I sorta agree with you there.

the thing is, i think most of the people that were in this area that were the entrepenurial ones, or the forward thinkers, worked to own their property here, OR move out.

They were not comfortable with what they had and worked to change it. Same thing with a lot of areas in the surrounding buroughs.

A lot of the ones that stayed, and did not try to improve their lives in those ways, were not the industrious ones. There are some exceptions, of course. It is a very sensitive topic, so forgive me if I am trompling over some family feelings here......


Now, with the cahnce to make money, the ones that bought are selling out. Selling their building for a cool million to a condo developer and moving out to the suburbs. They stil have attachments to their home town, but they see it as changing around them with everyone leaving, so they are going too.


I do not like it when the small shops leave and we are left with StarFarqs, Dunkin Donuts, Qudoba, Boston Market, Subway, Blockbuster, McDonalds, et all. But what can you do? STOP all future development? As good as Hoboken is, you stagnate development, the developers will just look for someplace else and Hoboken will start to suffer again.



Ah well, whatever. We will see what is done in the next 10. they have a chance to keep a new generation here for a lifetime, so long as they improve the standards of child care and education as this new batch grows up.

I hope they get a group of kids going through the schools that are there because the parents WANTED to stay, not because they could not afford to move.

JCMAN320
March 18th, 2005, 12:11 AM
NEW YORK TIMES

Wall Street West Recuperates From 9/11

By ANTOINETTE MARTIN
Published: March 16, 2005

JERSEY CITY - The once-decrepit warehouse district along this city's waterfront acquired the nickname Wall Street West about a decade ago. It houses the back offices for some of Manhattan's largest financial institutions and is a job destination for about 100,000 every weekday. But the area stood still for a long time after the attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, as various companies dropped plans to move or expand here and vacancy rates rose.

Now, with the recession eased and the PATH train connection between the two financial districts rebuilt, the Jersey City waterfront is moving forward again. Developers and brokers say there is a major movement under way to upgrade the area to front-office status.

Two years ago, in the face of high vacancy rates, the Mack-Cali Realty Corporation marketed the half-empty office tower it had built for Charles Schwab & Company, after Schwab decided not to move in, and sold it last year. This month, Mack-Cali laid out $329 million to buy a different office building, the 42-story tower at 101 Hudson Street, and did not stop there. The company is also beginning a $20 million renovation project at one of the buildings in its "city within a city" office complex, Harborside Financial Center.

With the purchase of 101 Hudson Street, Mack-Cali's waterfront office holdings bounced back to more than four million square feet, approaching the Lefrak Organization's five million square feet at its nearby Newport Office Center. The newest major property holder is Goldman Sachs, whose 45-story waterfront tower is the tallest building in New Jersey and has 1.1 million square feet of space.

Mack-Cali now owns roughly a quarter and Lefrak close to a third of total office space on the waterfront. Mack-Cali also manages an additional 1.2 million square feet of Class A office space in the district.

Leasing activity in the waterfront area has picked up rapidly in the last year, according to brokers for both companies. Mark Ravesloot of CB Richard Ellis, the broker for Mack-Cali, said his company's statistics showed drastic declines in the number of signed leases each year from 2001 to 2003.

By the end of last year, however, the trend had begun to reverse. Last year, about 920,000 square feet were leased, higher than the 380,000 square feet leased in 2003, but still far below the 4 million square feet leased in 2001.

At the sleek new 980,000-square-foot Plaza 5 building that Mack-Cali added to Harborside Financial Center last year, 87 percent of space is now leased. Earlier this month, IXIS North America, an investment bank, and HQ Global Workplaces, a provider of temporary office suites, took a combined total of 93,910 square feet.

Now, Mack-Cali is starting a $20 million renovation of the Plaza 1 building at Harborside. It is a former shipping warehouse and the first building to attract a major company to Jersey City back in 1983.

Mack-Cali's chief executive, Mitchell E. Hersh, said his company's investment in Plaza 1 is both "a recognition" of the significant change that has taken place on the waterfront in the last 20 years and evidence that the process is continuing. "When Bankers Trust moved into Plaza 1 over 20 years ago," Mr. Hersh said, as he stood in the less-than-modern lobby of the building, "it was the first major company to come here and really started the transformation."

At the time that Bankers Trust (which is now part of Deutsche Bank) set up its office, the waterfront was almost completely lacking in amenities for those who worked there, Mr. Hersh said. "At least it was a short commute back to New York," he noted.

More than two decades later - and nine years after Mack-Cali bought the five buildings and all developable land at Harborside Financial Center, adding many amenities, including the Hyatt Regency hotel next door - Deutsche Bank is still at Plaza 1. But Deutsche Bank contracted its business sharply last year, selling part of its global securities services operation to State Street Bank. Consequently, it is shrinking its Jersey City office to 90,000 square feet, from 400,000 square feet.

Mack-Cali, Mr. Hersh said, is seizing the opportunity to upgrade Plaza 1 to "cutting-edge Class A status" - meaning competitive with the most-modern, best-located properties - with renovations designed by the high-profile Manhattan architecture firm of Beyer Blinder Belle. The architects are known for their adaptive reuse of buildings like Grand Central Terminal and the historic structures on Ellis Island. The firm also completed the renovations in the late 1980's at Harborside Plazas 2 and 3, now occupied by tenants that include Morgan Stanley, Bank of Tokyo, J. P. Morgan Chase and Dow Jones.

The renovations to Harborside Plaza 1 will include reconfiguration of the main lobby and all common areas. A new two-story glass entrance with wood-paneled walls and bluestone flooring will be created. Also, all elevator cabs and bathrooms will be renovated, and new heating and cooling systems are to be installed on every floor.

"We will assist every new tenant in customizing their space," Mr. Ravesloot said.

Mr. Hersh added that if a large company decided it would like to "brand" the building as its headquarters, building designs were flexible enough to accommodate that.

"This has become the kind of commercial neighborhood that another large company might very well want to call home," he said.

The current vacancy rate in the waterfront office district is 13.7 percent, Mr. Ravesloot said, down from 15.1 percent at the end of last year and 17.2 percent at the end of 2003.

Mr. Hersh said that Wall Street companies were still likely prospects to locate at Harborside and noted that several large firms currently operated trading floors here.

Mr. Ravesloot pointed to four first-class restaurants now in the financial center in addition to restaurants at the Hyatt, and Harborside's bustling retail promenade offering many dozens of shops and fast-food possibilities, plus several attractive courtyards where people might gather and the riverside walkway and piers along the Hudson, which are popular with people on lunch breaks in the warmer months.

"It's a dynamic market," Mr. Hersh summed up, "that's obviously still on its way to better things."

TLOZ Link5
March 18th, 2005, 04:10 PM
Think it's hit 300,000 by now?

Don't mean to resurrect this when it doesn't pertain to the subject at hand, but Newark's "actual" population could be that high if we consider that there might be some illegals among its large immigrant population. Some people speculate, for instance, that New York City's population is as high as nine million, because immigrants from Latin America and Haiti are severely undercounted and also due to the large number of illegally subdivided apartments in the outer boroughs.

Fun fact about old Newark: According to legend, the Texas-born artist Robert Rauschenberg accidentally got off his bus in Newark in the 1940s, and spent a week there before he realized that it wasn't New York City.

Gulcrapek
March 31st, 2005, 06:13 PM
Millenium Towers
~40 floors (x2)
523 units
Architect: Ismael Leyva

http://www.ilarch.com/images/photos/Millennium_BIG.jpg


"To support the need for growth and the rapid expansion of New Jersey shores neighboring Manhattan, a new mixed-use complex known as Millennium Towers received community approval for development which required re-zoning of the site. A 23,000 s.f. New Jersey Transit Light Rail station will occupy the commercial level. Two towers will offer 523 residential units atop 158,000 sq. ft. of retail space and an 844-unit parking structure. The program also includes a restaurant, a roof garden, and a health spa."

http://www.ilarch.com/images/photos/Millennium_BIG02.jpg

http://www.ilarch.com/images/photos/Millennium_BIG03.jpg

MidnightRambler
April 2nd, 2005, 12:16 PM
that tower reminds me of fox plaza in century city, california:

http://www.irvineoffice.com/resources/image/img66_4_0400.jpg

kind of a dull design, but i love that they're incorporating the HBLR into it.

JCMAN320
April 4th, 2005, 12:03 PM
Get OK to convert old Med Center
Condos, stores for three buildings

Monday, April 04, 2005
By Bonnie Friedman
Journal staff writer

The Jersey City Planning Board gave an enthusiastic thumbs up to a developer's plan to re-invent the former Jersey City Medical Center - even as negotiations with the city to buy the 10-building hospital complex are pending.

The initial stage of the three-phase project, called the Beacon, would target three buildings, turning them into 314 condominium units, a rooftop restaurant, a public pre-K /daycare center, and 64,821 square feet of office/retail space. The initial round of construction also would include all roadway, landscaping and utility work, as well as the construction of a new 1,049-space parking garage.

Oddly enough, the preliminary approval was awarded even though Metrovest Equities is still negotiating with the city to buy the buildings. George Filopolous, the principal of Metrovest, has so far bought only the three county-owned buildings on the complex. Those buildings, purchased in March for a total of $3 million, aren't included in phase one.

Filopolous said he expects to seal the deal with the city on the remaining buildings in the next 30 to 60 days, and to begin construction in June. The entire project is expected to be completed in three to five years, he said.

The planning board's enthusiastic approval of Metrovest's site plan is the culmination of a process that began nearly two years ago, and which includes suggestions made by various community groups and officials at the state, county, and city-level and with the State Historic Preservation Office.

"This project means a lot to Jersey City," said Councilwoman Mary Donnelly, who is a member of the planning board. "The community is going to be happy with the end result. This is going to be great for the inner city."

Members of the public also spoke favorably of the plan, urging the developer to show his commitment to Jersey City by hiring local contractors and subcontractors for the project.

"I am concerned about how locals will be implemented from a contractor/subcontractor point of view," said Dania Caballero, a member of the Morris Canal Coalition and the Communipaw Block Association. "Let's keep money in Jersey City by having local contractors work on the property."

Several homeowners who live on Clifton Place - which sits in the shadows of the medical center complex - also expressed concern about how they might be impacted by construction and any future expansion plans.

Filopolous said he is not eyeing any possible expansion and that construction traffic patterns would not disrupt residents who live on Clifton Place.

The two-hour hearing on Tuesday night featured testimony from an architect, a landscape architect, and historic preservation and restoration experts.

Ulana Zakalak, a historic preservation specialist, said the Jersey City Medical Center, which was listed on the national register of historic places in 1985, is the best example of art-deco architecture anywhere in New Jersey, and the most prominent legacy of Mayor Frank Hague.

"The question we asked is, if Frank Hague came back from the dead, would he be able to recognize the Jersey City Medical Center?" said Zakalak. "We will do everything to preserve the Jersey City Medical Center. The level of expertise on this project is unprecedented."

Frank Ricciardelli, a historic preservation expert, said every crack in the brick has been marked for repair, noting that he is working with specialists to clean the severely discolored terra-cotta.

When completed, the complex will feature 1,200 condominium units, a public theater, a gourmet market, parks, shops, a dog run, a library and business center, screening rooms, a spa and a museum devoted to the Jersey City Medical Center.

Filopolous said a unit of the Jersey City Police Department will also be stationed at the complex.

Bonnie Friedman can be reached at bfriedma@jjournal.com.

JWG
April 9th, 2005, 08:02 PM
Lots of good info on this thread. . .

Can anybody direct me to a link for a good map of the Hudson Exchange Redevelopment Plan Area ?

Anybody know status of Powerhouse Arts District Redevelopment Area?

Many thanks

:D

z22
April 11th, 2005, 01:41 AM
The Millenium Towers project was killed a few year ago, right? Is it back to live?

JCMAN320
April 11th, 2005, 05:06 PM
Yea the Powerhouse Art District is in full swing currentll two buildings are being fixed up for artists only and 111 First isnt going to be knocked down it was saved and it will be fully restored, so things are looking up. I forget what Mellenium Towers was if anyone has pics to refresh my memory that would be great. By the way here is another post.

Second building in $135M project approved
Planning Board also discusses condos, new district, schools

Ricardo Kaulessar
Reporter staff writer 04/09/2005

The View 2

The View 2 will be the second of three buildings to be built overlooking Liberty State Park. The View is a $135 million project by Bayonne developer Lance Lucarelli that will consist of three condominium towers, commercial space, and possibly an upscale restaurant on the ground floor.

The entire project was approved by the Planning Board at a meeting in early December, but individual site plans must go before the Planning Board.

The View 2 is a 14-story mixed use tower with 189 dwelling units and 16,265 square feet of retail space, and a garage with 381 parking spaces. The residential units will be an average of 1,200 square feet.

A presentation of a preliminary site plan for the View 2 was made by Lucarelli's attorney Francis Schiller and the project's architect, Dean Marchetto. The address will be 1 Harbor Place.

During the presentation, Schiller spoke of the expansion of Jersey Avenue that would be necessary to accommodate the increased traffic. The south end of Jersey Avenue in downtown Jersey City is located behind the Jersey City Medical Center, where it ceases being a vehicular thoroughfare and becomes a walkway that leads into Liberty State Park.

Also, Schiller mentioned he is working with the city's Municipal Utilities Authority to deal with the situation of the water flow in the area.

Say the 'M Word'

The Planning Board also is reviewing a new residential district for the Marion section near Journal Square. The nine-block district would fall between St. Paul's and Newark avenues.

It would be called MWORD, or the Marion Works Office/Residential District.

The purpose, as detailed in a document issued by the city's Planning Department last month, "is to encourage the redevelopment, rehabilitation and conversion of older industrial structures in the area to higher intensity residential and mixed use buildings, and the construction of new residential and mixed-use buildings on vacant and under-utilized land."

Speaking on the district was Edward Kolling, an attorney representing an owner in the area who wants to build residential spaces.

Kolling, who worked on developing the MWORD, pointed out that developers who wanted to build housing in this section of the city are bound by the fact that it was zoned for industrial use.

Among the major structures currently located in the district is the old American Can Company, a million square-foot facility that spans much of St. Paul's Avenue.

Public schools

There was also discussion of the proposed construction of two public schools, both located between West Side Avenue and Route 440.

Public School 35 would be located in the vicinity of Sip, Hawthorne, Whitman and West Side avenues, and Public School 39 is slated for Plainfield Avenue. Work on Public School 35 would require the existing facility, which serves as an adult high school, to be torn down and a new school for elementary school students to be built. Public School 39 would require an addition to the school.

Charlotte Kitler, an attorney for the Jersey City Board of Education, addressed the Planning Board regarding the two schools.

The board asked whether the state Department of Education will acquire 27 properties surrounding Public School 35, since the new school would require more space than available.

But Kitler said that there would be a meeting scheduled in the near future with residents to discuss relocation. If the Public School 35 project is approved, then work would start in 2006.

Applebee's, two residences

Other items on the Planning Board agenda included approval of a site plan to construct an Applebee's Restaurant at Hudson Mall on Route 440. The proposed restaurant would be 5,991 square feet and would be built starting later this summer.

Also, approval was given for a two residential buildings to be constructed on Culver Avenue and Fisk Street. respectively.

The building on Fisk Street would be 36 residential units with 34 parking spaces, and the Culver Avenue project would see 37 residential units with 41 parking spaces.

The buildings will fall within the West Side Redevelopment plan. The redevelopment plan was approved by the City Council on March 23.

The plan is meant to "facilitate the redevelopment of vacant and underutilized properties within an area encompassing a portion of West Side Avenue stretching from Claremont Avenue at the North end to Carbon Place at the South end."

The area is also bounded by a former railroad right-of-way to the west and the eastern lot line of properties fronting West Side Avenue.

z22
April 13th, 2005, 12:48 AM
Gulcrapek posted about the Millenium Towers above.

JCMAN320
April 13th, 2005, 05:11 PM
Oh ok yea it is going to be built. They were gonna build a Hoem Depot but the city killed it and opted for this. Here is another post:

14 businesses doomed

Wednesday, April 13, 2005

By Ken Thorbourne
Journal staff writer

The long-awaited transformation of Journal Square is about to begin.

A massive demolition job is planned for Journal Square, city officials revealed yesterday. When it's over, just three properties on the block just south of the Journal Square Transportation Center - the ones housing Kentucky Fried Chicken, Wendy's and McDonald's restaurants - will be left standing.

A start date for the demolition work has yet to be scheduled, city officials said yesterday, but Ray Meyer, the city's acting construction official, said the work was "imminent" due to the deteriorated conditions of the hotel and the corner building.

By the end of this week, affected commercial tenants will receive a letter from the city ordering them to evacuate the properties, he said.

Demolition plans include ripping down the mostly vacant Hotel on the Square - a crumbling symbol of the city's many failed attempts to redevelop the Square - and all the properties between the hotel and the PATH station, Meyer said.

That would wipe out 14 businesses, including Twin Donuts and 3 Guys from Italy pizzeria.

Also slated to be knocked down is 17-23 Journal Square, at the corner of Sip Avenue, and an adjacent building, 88 Sip Ave.

All the properties slated for demolition are owned by limited liability companies run by the New York-based Tawil family, who began to amass properties on the Square in the late 1980s.

During a tour of the properties yesterday with the owner's demolition contractor, Meyer pointed out cracks in the exterior walls of both properties.

The cracks could give, causing the parapets and the billboards perched on top of both properties to plummet to the ground, he said. "That's five stories," Meyer noted.

The demolition would represent the most tangible step the city has taken to redevelop the Square, and that has at least one city official hopeful about the future.

"I am extremely proud of the efforts of the officials in the city," said City Councilman Steve Lipski, whose ward includes Journal Square. "I believe the owners of these properties also look forward to taking these properties down.

"We look forward to the demolition and the redevelopment of the property in the not too distant future," Lipski said, noting city officials now await a development plan from the Tawils.

But if current conditions of the Tawils' Journal Square properties are any indication, redevelopment could take a while.

Pointing to the Hotel on the Square (8-11 Journal Square), Meyer said the walls are cracked, roof damaged, and the chimney is moving in different directions. The courtyard behind the hotel has "several structural deficiencies," he said.

Most of the buildings slated for demolition share an adjoining wall. Knocking down one building will affect the other.

"It's dominoes," said Michael Ambrosio, the demolition subcontractor for the Tawils.

Yet, the demolition contractors plan to leave untouched three buildings not owned by the Tawils. Marie Grasso, owner of MMG Demolition in Staten Island, the prime demolition contractor, said those buildings will only have to close one day during the demolition work.

For the other properties slated to be ripped down, Grasso said a fence extending roughly 10 feet onto the sidewalk would have to be erected.

Gulcrapek
April 13th, 2005, 06:53 PM
Zephyr Lofts
689 Luiz Munoz Marin Boulevard
11 floors

http://www.corcoran.com/property/nd/photo/zephyr.jpg


http://www.corcoran.com/property/nd/index.asp?CGM=Y

JCMAN320
April 14th, 2005, 05:36 PM
BIG ENGINE
Ridership, development along corridor are growing

Thursday, April 14, 2005
By Bonnie Friedman
Journal staff writer

On the fifth anniversary of the launch of the Hudson-Bergen Light Rail, NJ Transit officials are touting the $1.2 billion project as the impetus for widespread economic growth along the Jersey City waterfront.

"In 1988, when the HBLR was first proposed, there was less than 1 million square feet of Jersey City office space," said Dan Stessel, a spokesman for NJ Transit, the agency that operates the light rail. "That is in contrast with 17 million square feet of office space today.

"We have a relationship with development. We can't take all the credit, but we definitely have had a positive impact."

For U.S. Rep. Robert Menendez, D-Hoboken, who helped secure many millions in federal funding for the project, the five-year anniversary is also an important milestone.

"I almost feel this is the longest birthing period," Menendez said. "Every time I think about those 18,000 trips (NJ Transit's average weekday total for the month of March), I think about the cars that are off the streets and what that means, and what it is going to mean in terms of good paying jobs for families."

When it first opened in April 2000, light rail trains operated between 12 stations - eight in Bayonne and Jersey City - and four on a western spur between West Side Avenue and Liberty State Park in Jersey City.

Now, five years later, light rail trains operate through 20 stations between Bayonne and Weehawken. Three additional stations in Weehawken, North Bergen and Union City are expected to open in December.

According to statistics provided by NJ Transit, over the five-year period, light rail ridership increased from 1,719,200 rides in the first year, to 5,008,600 for the current year. All told, about 17,815,000 trips have been taken on the light rail over the past five years.

Although NJ Transit's initial projections fell short - with the agency serving a little more than half of the 10,000 expected weekday riders in the first year - they had hit that mark by the end of the second full year in operation.

Now, officials say, ridership for the first phase of the project (34th Street in Bayonne to Pavonia/Newport) has met the revised goal of serving 18,500 riders on a typical weekday.

"We're in good shape for projections," said Stessel, noting that 22nd Street in Bayonne, the two Hoboken stations and Lincoln Harbor in Weehawken, which were slated for Phase Two, opened ahead of schedule.

"And the busiest station (Tonnelle Avenue) has yet to open. As it fills in along the Hudson River, the demand is going to increase."

NJ Transit expects to serve 38,500 riders per day by 2010.

Ridership questions aside, NJ Transit says the success of the state's most expensive public works project should be measured by the economic impact along the 12.8-mile alignment.

"We couldn't be happier with the way the community is served by the HBLR and the impact its had on the Gold Coast," Stessel said.

Martin Robbins, director of the Transportation Policy Institute at Rutgers University, agreed.

"What is exciting is that there appears to be economic development following the light rail and when you look 10 years from now, it might be a remarkable accomplishment," said Robbins, who is working with NJ Transit to develop a strategic review of the Hudson Bergen Light Rail. "It would be a terrible mistake to shortchange this investment and to say it isn't worth it."

Joe North, general manager of the light rail, said the service is also faring well in terms of its bottom line.

Ticket sales and other revenue bring in roughly 25 percent of the $26 million yearly operating figure, said North, noting that NJ Transit's Riverline rail route only brings in 11 percent of yearly operating expenses.

Stessel said NJ Transit, private security guards and local cops have worked to address riders' complaints about crime on the system, and Bayonne Police Director Mark Smith said light-rail related crime has decreased by 20 percent since Bayonne cops started riding the trains two years ago.

"More aggressive patrolling of the light rail has definitely impacted in a positive way in the City of Bayonne and for our residents," Smith said. "Since (the program's inception), we've had 200 arrests and in the area of 600 to 700 summonses for fare evasions and other violations."

Jersey City Police Capt. Jon Tooke said police officers who were previously assigned to the Richard Street station were taken off the detail five months ago, after NJ Transit stopped paying for the service.

NJ Transit officials have their sights set on extending light rail service to Secaucus and the proposed Xanadu Entertainment Complex at the Meadowlands, although no funding currently exists for the "phase three" component.

Bonnie Friedman covers transportation. She can be reached at bfriedma@jjournal.com.

NYatKNIGHT
April 15th, 2005, 11:57 AM
They were smart to do it when they did.

Art DeCoCK
April 16th, 2005, 06:20 PM
millenium tower seems ok, but what the f*#k those palms inside the buiding represents? those are awfull

212
April 17th, 2005, 05:22 AM
A massive demolition job is planned for Journal Square, city officials revealed yesterday. When it's over, just three properties on the block just south of the Journal Square Transportation Center - the ones housing Kentucky Fried Chicken, Wendy's and McDonald's restaurants - will be left standing.

They'd best be careful! That block is no nirvana, but it has the liveliest retail on Journal Square ...

JCMAN320
April 17th, 2005, 02:25 PM
Yea but it needs to be done those building are dangerin the lives of everyone there. Plus once there down new buildings for Hudson County Community College will be built along with a new residential tower with retail on bottom. This is whats best for the city and JSQ. Everyone agree this is the key for JSQ to make a huge come back. PLus the demoliton should happen over the course of one week.

Ninjahedge
April 22nd, 2005, 12:02 PM
The county should start stepping in here and try to make it so that we do not get an extreme difference when you travel from Hoboken to JC.

And I don't mean building a bunch of river-view blocking towers like they seem to be doing in Hoboken either.

That one rendering showing the two residential towers popping up look a little out of place, but even if other buildings were constructed in a similar manner in that area (making the towers 'fit in' more), they would be radically different than the current village-looking developments in Hoboken.

Should there be some ruling preventing rampant overdevelopment?

(PS, has anyone heard about improvements in the infrastructure? That is another prob Hoboken is having now, water electricity, sewerage, you name it.)

Gulcrapek
April 26th, 2005, 08:48 PM
?

http://www.3d-win.com/html/gallery/residential/img/4_lrg_06.jpg

3d-win.com

JCMAN320
April 26th, 2005, 10:24 PM
That was an old plan for that sight the new features much taller nicer towers. Thats is on Christopher Columbus right down the block from the Grove St. PATH Station. The building is actually going to have a PATH entrance to the station. One tower be residential and the other office.

kliq6
April 29th, 2005, 03:00 PM
I love residential development in JC, as long as they dont build offices to steal NYC firms

JCMAN320
April 30th, 2005, 07:32 PM
Well the Powerhosue district is underway with 2 warehouse being renovated for artists and a new building on second street beign built for artists. The Columbus Plaza development is on Christopher Columbus Dr. btwn Marin and Warren. At the site the new PATH entry is almost done and they have signs up with renderings of the building. It is going to consist of one residetnial tower 35 stories high with a low lying office building on its base with retail and a new entry to the Grove St. PATH station.

http://www.waldolofts.com/
http://www.150baystreet.com/

Two sites to two of the new art residences. We are going to surpass DUMBO once this district is complete just becasue we have more room and warehouses in that area.

JCMAN320
April 30th, 2005, 07:36 PM
'YES, HELP THE ARTISTS'
Subsidized housing plans get a thumbs-up in Hudson

Thursday, April 28, 2005
By MOLLY BLOOM
JOURNAL STAFF WRITER

About two-thirds of Hudson County residents think towns should offer subsidized housing for artists, and a little more than half say such housing subsidies would enhance the arts in the area.

The poll, conducted by New Jersey City University for The Jersey Journal, indicates "high levels of support for preferential treatment of artist communities," wrote the poll's supervisors, Fran Moran of NJCU's Political Science Department and Bruce Chadwick of the English Department.

Such a plan is already in effect in Jersey City. Ten percent of new units in the Powerhouse Arts District are to be set aside as affordable work/live space for artists, with the intention of drawing more artists to the community and fostering the local arts scene.

James Greer, a 47-year old Greenville resident who works Downtown, said it's a good idea.

"Any situation where there's culture and diversity and where people can participate and be exposed to new ideas, that's great," he said.

It is likely that this spring the 58-unit renovated and expanded warehouse at 140 Bay St. will be the first project to offer artists units in accordance with these guidelines, giving the city six lofts with hardwood floors, granite counters and roof-deck access to rent out to qualified artists.

The city's artist certification board, which was first created under former Mayor Bret Schundler, has certified about 250 people as artists potentially eligible for the studios, said Leon Yost, who sits on the five-member board.

When the first project under the zoning rules comes online, the city will hold a lottery, drawing names from the list provided by the certification board. The city will then determine who on that list is qualified for the affordable units based on the same federal affordable housing criteria, said Yost.

But even without artists in buildings like 111 First St., other renters and buyers are clamoring to move in, said real estate agent Medhat Zak Dewaik.

"I'm sure someone else will replace them," he said.

In Dewaik's opinion, adding more upscale restaurants and stores to Newark Avenue is more important than maintaining an arts scene.

With more than 50 other Powerhouse projects, including 150 Bay St. and 159 Second St., in the works, 140 Bay St. will likely serve as a "guinea pig" for the administration of the artists affordable housing aspect of the plan, Yost said.

JCMAN320
April 30th, 2005, 07:42 PM
Life is good in Jersey City
Friday, April 29, 2005

Jersey City residents are the biggest critics of their city, as well as its staunchest defenders. It seems things are not as bad as locals sometimes portray them. Men's Health magazine has come up with a list of those cities considered the happiest in the country and Jersey City ranks third, behind two Texas municipalities and ahead of another Lone Star State town.

The method used to determine this list included checking antidepressant sales, suicide rates and the number of days the inhabitants reported being depressed. Federal agencies provided the data collected by Sperling's Best Places, an Internet firm that can be found at www.bestplaces.net, where a number of different surveys are available.

Laredo and El Paso are listed ahead of Jersey City and Corpus Christi, on the Gulf of Mexico, is ranked just below the Hudson County seat. A reason given for the top rankings is that states and local health services in these cities provide strong programs dealing with mental illness, including crisis psychiatric help.

New York City was ranked 91st out of 101. We can only guess that this all stems from the Boston Red Sox winning the World Series. Boston is 71st, probably because its residents still cannot believe they won.

Not that long ago, Sperling also did Jersey City justice when it used special software allowing people to enter their personal preferences in determining "America's Best and Worst Cities for Dating." Jersey City came in 11th as a best place for dating. It was edged out for the top ten by Honolulu.

Is it all too good to be true? Perhaps it is. In another survey, the same outfit found that Jersey City ranked 19th out of 100 most stressful places to live. Among those cities more stressful are Miami, New York, Detroit and Denver. Phoenix is right behind Jersey City. What some people call stress, Jersey City people probably see as an invigorating way of life.

Life is good in the middle of Hudson County. What does it all mean? Perhaps, it is not always easy to find greener grass than here - when Jersey City does have grass.

MichaelMike5556
May 1st, 2005, 06:58 PM
"A competetive NJ would be really good for the economy overall. *New York will be forced to, as Stockton said, ante-up to stay on the ball. *It's not like having some jobs in the suburbs is a bad thing; the *Chicago metropolitan has 60% of its commercial jobs in the suburbs, and it's still going strong."

i'm from Joliet IL a suburb of chicago and the reason for all the jobs going into the suburbs is because they were chased there by soicalist anti bussness tactics such as high taxes tort taxes and bussness regulations . and because of that chicago suffered not improved . but people in chicago cant blame people in the suburbs for jsut playing the game better than they did in the city . thats something u have to think about chicago never had some god given moral right to those jobs and bussnesses . that goes to NYC as well NYC is the greatist city in the US and the world . but that isnt a god given right u have to rember before NYC it was London befor London paris ... at one time it was Rome at one time athens . rember that . and think about this maybe Jersy citys big gift to New york will be to keep u guys rembering that so that u keep yourself on your toes and keep NYC as the world greatist city .

JCHeightsFan
May 2nd, 2005, 05:48 PM
Have there been any background studies done to include JC Heights neighborhoods as Historic Preservation districts?

To some of the negative posts regarding the Heights, east of Kennedy: I didn't like it either--until I moved there. Some of the many pluses:

Shorter commute. I used to live near Journal Square, and the PATH is wonderful (most of the time), but find the bus to NY suprisingly convenient. And, it isn't an un-doable walk to the PATH station, even on cold days in winter.
Pershing Field and Reservoir No. 3.
Central Avenue. Tons of good, cheap food and independent shops (and more 99-cent--and lower-- stores than should be allowed by law) keep the street bustling and alive.
Architecture and gorgeous trees. Summit, Ogden and Reservoir Avenues to name a few.
NY view.
Some of the crime concerns me, but I think that goes for just about anywhere. The Jersey City police seem to be responsive to citizen complaints--it's a little way I can take responsibility for my own neighborhood.

JCMAN320
May 7th, 2005, 11:03 PM
New apartment tower, Newark Ave. upgrade
Saturday, May 07, 2005

Developers broke ground Thursday on a new high-rise apartment building in Downtown Jersey City, just opposite the Grove Street PATH station.

The 29-story Grove Pointe luxury housing complex will be built by Schenkman/Kushner Affiliates of Bridgewater.

The project's 525 units will be a mix of rentals and condominiums, with commercial retail space on the ground floor. The building will also contain 525 parking spaces.

In addition, a one-block section of Newark Avenue will be refurbished, along with the triangular park at the entrance to the PATH station.

Jersey City Mayor Jerramiah Healy attended the ground-breaking, just blocks from City Hall.

MARIA ZINGARO CONTE

JCMAN320
May 14th, 2005, 03:40 PM
Mayor Breaks Ground on Jersey City Luxury Complex

JERSEY CITY – Mayor Jerramiah Healy and city officials celebrated the start of construction on Grove Pointe today, the newest luxury apartment and condominium complex from Schenkman/Kushner Affiliates. Grove Pointe is located in the heart of historic downtown Jersey City, close to galleries, restaurants, and businesses. It also affords convenient access to New York City.

Grove Pointe, located on Newark Avenue between Grove Street and Luis Muñoz Marin Boulevard, is designed to appeal to the professional increasingly attracted by the employment opportunities and amenities of Jersey City. The 29-story building will consist of 525 luxury residential units, 67 condominiums and 458 rental apartments.

Grove Pointe will offer discerning residents the features they desire, including an on-site swimming pool and world-class health club, along with the convenience of 535 spaces of on-site parking and a renovated PATH station allowing quick travel to midtown and downtown Manhattan. On the ground floor, the building will offer 20,000 square feet of retail space, complementing the existing retail of the historic downtown area.

“We are very excited about Jersey City and happy the community is excited about Grove Pointe,” said Jeffrey Persky, vice president of Schenkman/Kushner. “Jersey City has for some time attracted people with its jobs, convenience and dynamic city atmosphere. Grove Pointe will offer residents a new standard in luxury while embracing the vitality of Jersey City.”

Grove Pointe is just steps away from the PATH station to New York. The project, which is scheduled to be completed in 2007, will include the revamping of a one-block section of Newark Avenue and the triangular park area at the entrance to the Grove Street PATH station.

About Schenkman/Kushner
Headquartered in Bridgewater, N.J., Schenkman/Kushner Affiliates is one of the largest privately held diversified real estate companies in New Jersey. It owns and manages more than 5 million square feet of office, warehouse and retail space, and owns 8,000 apartments, of which it also manages about 3,000. The company is a full-service real estate firm, handling everything from acquisition and development to leasing and management. The Schenkman/Kushner portfolio includes premier office space in New Jersey and other prime locations throughout the Northeast, as well as upscale residential properties in prime communities.

JCMAN320
May 15th, 2005, 07:53 PM
Journal Square on the move
Concourse demolished, State Square building opened, Apple Tree house to be restored

Ricardo Kaulessar
Reporter staff writer 05/14/2005

Journal Square is making a lot of noise again.

And it's not only because demolition work started last week on a building near the Journal Square PATH station.

The Square was once the main shopping and entertainment center of the city, with venues such as the Canton Chinese Restaurant, the State Theatre, the Five Corners Bakery, Liss Drugstore, and the still-existing Loew's Theater.

Most are now gone from this area that, according to the old-timers, starts from Academy Street and runs to Newark Avenue.

But new buildings are going up and being restored, as others are knocked down. Projects include:

* The recent completion of the State Square building on Kennedy Blvd., which will welcome 130 tenants in June.
* Thanks to new funding, the restoration on the historic Apple Tree House.
* Demolition of old buildings, to be replaced with new ones near the Journal Square Transportation Center.
Pat O' Melia, host of the radio show Hudson County's Talking who grew up in the Journal Square area, sees these actions as a sign of changes for the better.

"They could only be good. They'll bring new people to the Square, a first step in the ongoing renaissance," said O'Melia last week.

Knock down to build up

Last week, demolition crews hired by the New York-based Tawil family, which has owned several properties in Journal Square near the transportation center since the mid-1980s, started tearing down the building with the address of 10 Tube Concourse, formerly the site of the Jersey Bargain Center discount store.

The address refers to the alleyway that commuters walk down when they are coming from the buses in the terminals or the trains in the subway below that comprise most of the center.

The Tawils own not only the 10 Tube Concourse building, but also the Hotel on the Square at 8-11 Journal Square and 17-23 Journal Square located near Sip Avenue, both of which will also be demolished in the next five to six weeks. The only buildings there not owned by the Tawils are 13-16 Journal Square.

Marie Grasso, the owner of MMG Demolition in Staten Island, one of three companies retained by the Tawils for the pending demolition, said on Monday that first there will be a cleanup of the empty store, followed by interior demolition. Grasso said that they have to proceed cautiously since businesses located next to the 10 Tube Concourse, such as a Mexican restaurant and a donut shop with the addresses of 1-7 Journal Square, will continue to operate.

There is also a parking lot behind the building that will continue to do business.

"We have to be sensitive to the people who are still working in the area. They need to still earn a paycheck." said Grasso. "Working from the inside out prevents more damage from occurring."

There is a fear expressed by the city's acting construction official, Ray Meyer, that if demolition is not done properly, there is the strong possibility of other buildings collapsing in a domino effect. Grasso said that after the exterior demolition work on 10 Tube Concourse is completed, the parapet walls of 8-11 Journal Square and 17-23 Journal Square that have shown damage will be taken down, eventually followed by demolition of 17-23 Journal Square.

For now, there is an orange steel barrier put up about 100 feet from the 10 Tube Concourse building to limit the amount of traffic that traverses the concourse area as a shortcut to the bus terminals and the PATH station.

This work being done will be the culmination of six months of negotiating with the Tawil family to get them to start remedying the poor structural conditions of the buildings. It was in November that the Journal Square properties in question were found to have building violations including falling concrete, cracks in the facade of one of the buildings, electrical problems, and even homeless people residing on floors of another building.

Since then, the city has fined the Tawil family $11 million as an attempt to prompt them to start demolishing their buildings.

As for the future of the demolished sites, there is speculation that the Tawils will be allowed to build new structures. But a source who has been in on private talks with the mayor and Tawils believes that another developer will be brought in to start developing on the sites

A State of things to come

On May 4, local officials and developers gathered for the opening of the new State Square building.

The 12-story building located on Kennedy Boulevard at the site of the old State Theater in Journal Square contains 130 rental residences, including 100 market-rate apartments and 30 affordable housing apartments; 15,000 square feet of retail space, and an eight-story parking garage for 395 cars.

At a cost of $31 million, the building is the product of a collaboration of Jersey City-based Panepinto Properties, the Alpert Group of Fort Lee, Hoboken-based Applied Housing, Harwood Properties of Jersey City, and former U.S. Congressman Frank Guarini that started 19 months of construction in August 2003. The principals of the project were at the ceremony.

One of those principals, David Barry of Applied Housing, gushed about State Square and its impact on Journal Square.

"Journal Square has a ton of potential and it just really needed a shot in the arm, and I think this building will give it that shot," said Barry. "There's been very little new development on Journal Square in the past 20 to 30 years. But it's got a great retail presence, great transportation links. We feel great about the building; we think it's a beautiful building, we think this is what Journal Square needs, and it will spur further revitalization of the Square."

Joseph Panepinto, president of Panepinto Properties, told of how he was approached by Lowell Harwood of Harwood Properties in 1998 with a contract to purchase the old State Theatre property. Panepinto also talked about the difficulties of getting this project started.

"This is a true public-private partnership. This project is a very, very busy project, very difficult to finance and very difficult to get investors," said Panepinto.

Ward C Councilman Steve Lipski, who represents the Journal Square area, also spoke about State Square presence at a time when the 10 Tube Concourse building in Journal Square near the PATH Station will soon be undergoing a transformation.

"You see a property that's been abandoned for over 20 years. This morning, I was just out with the contractors who represent the owners to draw up permits to demolish one of the buildings," said Lipski, "and part of the reason they are doing that is because of the risk that this group is willing to take and get this project started."

George Cahn, spokesman for the project, said that the apartments will start being occupied by June 1 and leases will be signed for the retail space in next two months.

This old Apple Tree House

There are a number of old homes in Jersey City. Many dating back to the late 1800s have been restored, especially in Downtown Jersey City. But restoration takes time, public involvement and lots of money.

That's the case of the Apple Tree House located on Academy Street in Journal Square. Also known as the Van Wagenen House because of the family that owned the house from the late 1600s to the late 1940s, the house is believed to be one of the oldest in the city, and according to legend, was the site of a meeting between George Washington and the Marquis de Lafayette under an apple tree in front of the house.

The house was also the location of the Quinn Funeral Home for a number of years, but recently has been abandoned and fallen into disrepair.

But since 2001, there has been much activity toward restoring the house, currently owned by the city.

Recently, the city commissioned a report from Holt Morgan Russell Architects, based in Princeton, which detailed the history and architecture of the house.

On May 4, there was a ceremony on the grounds of the Apple Tree House to announce that the Jersey City Economic Development Corporation is granting $1.3 million in Urban Enterprise Zones (UEZ) Funds toward the restoration of the Apple Tree House.

UEZ refers to business zones designed in municipalities such as Jersey City, where designated businesses charge 3 percent sales tax, half of the 6 percent state sales tax.

The UEZ revenues collected can then be used by the municipality to be applied toward public improvements.

City officials and activists involved in restoring the Apple Tree House were on hand for the ceremony. Restoration work is to start this summer.

©The Hudson Reporter 2005

JCMAN320
May 20th, 2005, 03:09 AM
New residential developments that all will be completed in the next 3 years:

http://www.insidea.com/

http://www.libertyterracecondos.com/

http://montgomery-greene.com/

http://www.jcedc.org/new/grovepointepr050505.html

http://www.700grove.com/main.html

http://www.shoreclubatnewport.com/

Artist District Residences

http://www.waldolofts.com/
http://www.150baystreet.com/

I see another population jump and our skyline getting even more impressive!!!!

sirhcman
May 20th, 2005, 11:45 PM
Taken 5/15/05..

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v216/sirhcman/nyc2005/DSCN0861.jpg

NewYorkYankee
May 21st, 2005, 01:05 PM
I like that JC is somewhat like Manhattan. Its skyline is a great compliment to the best across the river. WHat is the artist housing? Is it at special prices JUST for artists?

czsz
May 21st, 2005, 04:28 PM
I like that JC is somewhat like Manhattan.

!!!

Walk around Jersey City. Walk around Manhattan. Reevaluate your claim.

NewYorkYankee
May 21st, 2005, 04:34 PM
Im speaking of the type of buildings. High rises. Read the next sentance. "It's skyline is a compliment to the best across the river." Ive never been to JC, Ive only seen pics and seen it across from BPC. I cant speak on the street life, etc.

JCMAN320
May 22nd, 2005, 12:21 AM
Jersey City has a lot of street life. Downtown is not all of Jersey City. Jersey City has a lot of other awesome neighborhoods. I love downtown too but there are other great parts of Jersey City other than downtown. Downtown's street life will greatly improve once our Powerhouse Arts District gets better established and the other residences are built. Other parts of JC have great archtiecture and street life with fruit markets and smaller stores and shops and resturaunts such as the Westside (my neighrborhood), the Heights, Journal Square, Five Corners, Marion, etc...

JCMAN320
May 22nd, 2005, 12:27 AM
McNAIR ACADEMIC: HEAD OF THE CLASS
Jersey City school ranked 15th-best in the country

Friday, May 20, 2005
By KEN THORBOURNE
JOURNAL STAFF WRITER

Out of 27,668 public high schools in the nation, Jersey City's McNair Academic High School is the 15th best, according to Newsweek magazine's recently released "America's Best High Schools" list.

The list, which is the cover story of the magazine's May 18 issue, features splashy color photos of McNair Academic students working up a sweat in gym class, posing next to a school bus, and paying rapt attention to teacher Stephen Selby as he leads an advanced placement government and politics class.

The 29-year-old school, with its all-honors curriculum, is no stranger to accolades.

For a six-year stretch, New Jersey Monthly magazine ranked the Coles Street institution as the state's best high school. And the school, which adheres to a rigid quota system to maintain its diverse student body, has received countless salutations from state education officials.

But this week's honor has special meaning since it's national in scope, school officials said.

"It's wonderful to receive national recognition," said Ellen Gibney, the English department coordinator who's been at the school since it opened in 1976. "It's a wonderful learning environment."

Keeping close tabs on his last hard copy of the Newsweek high school article, Robert Roggenstein - McNair Academic's principal for 14 years - said the honor came out of the blue.

"We are not organized to get prizes," said Roggenstein, a Jersey City native who's been with the Jersey City district for 42 years. "Four months ago we got a call from a (Newsweek) researcher."

The next thing Roggenstein knew, Newsweek was sending a photographer.

"This (national recognition) is a tribute to every student and teacher in this school," Roggenstein said. "It is their award, really."

And the Newsweek standards were high.

Newsweek editors came up with a formula that took into account the number of Advanced Placement (AP) and/or International Baccalaureate (IB) tests taken by the students at a school and then divided that total by the number of graduating seniors.

AP and IB courses are both extremely rigorous and count more on student grade point averages than regular high school classes. Students earning a high enough grade on their AP or IB test earn college credit.

Nearly half of McNair Academic's students take advanced placement classes, Roggenstein said. And many of these students enter Yale, Harvard, Stanford and other Ivy League universities as sophomores, even juniors, he said.

The other classes at the school are considered honors courses, which are also more challenging than regular high school classes.

Roughly 40 percent of student body is eligible for the federal government's free or reduced price lunch program, Roggenstein said - one of the highest percentages on the Newsweek top high school list.

Seventeen-year-old junior Nura Salameh was pleased McNair Academic made the Newsweek list, but she thinks the school could rank higher.

"We deserve to be on the list for all the hard work we do," Nura said. "But I wish it wasn't based on the AP ratio . I would prefer it was based on how well we actually did on the test."

JCMAN320
May 25th, 2005, 01:02 AM
Here is the website about NJCU's new campus and how it will start up Jersey City's Bayside Waterfront!!! Best part is it's in my neighborhood!!!

http://www.njcu.edu/programs/westcampus/aboutus.html

kliq6
May 25th, 2005, 02:11 PM
JC is the waterfront nothing else, it serves its purpose for the state in bringing 100,000 plus jobs and added income

JCMAN320
May 25th, 2005, 06:21 PM
It may be the city's engine, but that is not all the city has to offer what so ever. The city has so much more than just the waterfront.

JCMAN320
June 3rd, 2005, 12:42 PM
Place to grow biz startups debuts

Friday, June 03, 2005
By MOLLY BLOOM
JOURNAL STAFF WRITER

Justin Strawhand's office has exposed brick walls, faux Herman Miller chairs, and broad-paned windows that stretch all the way up to the ceiling, just like a real SoHo office.

But the video producer's workspace is west of the Hudson River, in the New Jersey City University Business Development Incubator on West Side Avenue along what Mayor Jerramiah Healy yesterday called "the last frontier" in Jersey City's development.

The incubator, which currently provides office space, business advising and technical assistance to two companies, opened for business three months ago and had its official ribbon-cutting yesterday. It includes 30 offices, 15 cubicle-sized work stations, conference rooms, a library, a kitchen and a common area. Office rent starts at $375 a month; cubicle space starts at $125 a month.

It is supported by a $1 million grant from the Jersey City Economic Development Corp. and corporate, state and federal funds.

Strawhand's company, Mutation Engine, employs 15 freelancers producing spots for clients including Sony, Warner Brothers and the Jersey City Medical Center.

For the 2001 NJCU media arts grad, the incubator means he can hold client meetings in his own office or even a conference room, rather than the Dunkin' Donuts down the street. And when the clients visit, they don't want to leave.

"They all say they want to live here," he said.

But the incubator offers more than just cool decor. It has connected Strawhand with Jersey City entrepreneur Gregory Arnold, who runs a business selling prepaid phones through college bookstores from an office just down the hall.

After meeting in the incubator's hallways, the two struck up an entrepreneurial friendship.

The two now plan to create a partnership to sell video content to mobile phone users, Arnold said.

"I'd heard they shoulder the rent and that's it," Arnold said of the incubator. "But the value is much more in the mentoring and the access . not just to economic capital, but human capital."

JCMAN320
June 5th, 2005, 06:09 PM
Here are some developments on the way this year:

Harbor Spire wil be the tallest residential buildings in the state it will be located on Washington Blvd.
http://www.appliedco.com/aboutUs/pipeline/harborSpire.shtml

The Residences at Liberty National will be by far one of the most beautiful buildings in the NY area.http://www.appliedco.com/aboutUs/pipeline/libertyResidences.shtml

Liberty National Golf Course will be the best golf course in the area and will be for PGA as well. It well be situated right next to Liberty State Park.
http://www.appliedco.com/aboutUs/pipeline/libertyGolf.shtml

JERSEY CITY ALL THE WAY!!!

tone99loc
June 5th, 2005, 07:53 PM
Very exciting projects JCMAN - You know when they start construction? I feel like we've been hearing about that golf course forever now? BTW, I've been down in Virginia for 5 years, so I don't know if they've actually broken ground or not; but from what I understand, they haven't yet...