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Kris
August 6th, 2003, 03:46 AM
August 6, 2003

Deal Is Sought on Plan for Train to Meadowlands

By ROBERT HANLEY

HACKENSACK, N.J., Aug. 5 — New Jersey officials say they are trying to reach an agreement on a proposal to bring train service to the Meadowlands Sports Complex.

"We think that rail service is an imperative part of the transportation plan, or we're going to have widespread traffic problems," said George R. Zoffinger, president of the New Jersey Sports and Exposition Authority, which operates the complex.

Mr. Zoffinger said the service was urgently needed now because of the plan to construct a 100-acre, $1.3 billion family entertainment and office complex, Meadowlands Xanadu, near Continental Airlines Arena, on the eastern side of the complex.

Officials hope to reach an agreement on a $470 million rail plan and then to seek money for it. The activity on the proposal was first reported today in The Record, of Hackensack.

For years, football, basketball and hockey games have caused traffic snarls on roadways around the complex, and construction on the Xanadu project is scheduled to start late this year or early in 2004, he said.

Talks involve the authority, New Jersey Transit, the State Department of Transportation, local and Bergen County officials, businesses in the Meadowlands, and the two companies planning to build Xanadu: the Mills Corporation, a mall developer based in Virginia, and the Mack-Cali Realty Corporation, an office developer in Cranford, N.J.

Officials said today that the parties were attempting to reach a consensus on the location of railroad tracks into the complex and on improvements to nearby roadways.

If the current rail proposal is approved, train passengers from throughout the northern half of New Jersey, Midtown Manhattan and Orange and Rockland Counties in southern New York would have direct access to the sports complex.

Service this broad will be made possible, in large part, by the opening next month of a new multimillion-dollar railroad hub, the Secaucus Transfer, a few miles east of the complex in Secaucus. Nearly all of New Jersey Transit's commuter trains will pass through the depot, and it will allow thousands of rail commuters to transfer to trains to and from Manhattan for the first time.

The rail plan under discussion calls for construction in two phases. The first provides for creation of a $150 million, 1.5-mile rail link from the existing Pascack Valley Line, situated west of the complex, to a new elevated station in an existing parking lot between Giants Stadium and the Meadowlands Racetrack.

The second phase calls for a $320 million, 1.1-mile set of elevated tracks between the new station in the Meadowlands and the Secaucus Transfer, said George D. Warrington, executive director of New Jersey Transit.

"This is a plan that's workable," Mr. Warrington said. "It's practical. It's affordable, and, most importantly, it solves a potentially significant transportation problem."

Copyright 2003 The New York Times Company

MidnightRambler
August 6th, 2003, 05:50 AM
"Meadowlands Xanadu"

normaldude
August 6th, 2003, 07:34 AM
Quote: from Christian Wieland on 3:46 am on Aug.

..train passengers from throughout the northern half of New Jersey, Midtown Manhattan and Orange and Rockland Counties in southern New York would have direct access to the sports complex


That would be awesome. New Yorkers could really use a train service to Giants stadium. Better than relying on the bus.

ZippyTheChimp
August 6th, 2003, 09:15 AM
A good idea overall, but buses aren't the problem at football games. It's the tailgate culture.

TLOZ Link5
August 6th, 2003, 06:29 PM
Wasn't Xanadu an '80s movie musical starring Olivia Newton-John?

ZippyTheChimp
August 6th, 2003, 06:49 PM
Yes - harmlessly awful.
The moderators may pounce on us for going off-topic.

Freedom Tower
August 6th, 2003, 07:57 PM
What about lower manhattan? They could add a link from the new transportation center... since they *haven't finished building it they can add things like this.

dbhstockton
August 6th, 2003, 08:23 PM
"What about lower manhattan? They could add a link from the new transportation center... since they *haven't finished building it they can add things like this."

If we didn't have the tangle of agencies that we do, something like that would probably be included. *I believe this is an NJ Transit project, though Amtrak may have some trains stop there. *PATH is a totally different kind of train (subway vs. commuter) and is owned by the Port Authority.

They've been building this thing since the mid-nineties, it's a little late *to change it. *The PATH does come tantalizingly close, though. *Hoboken and Harrison are not far away. *You'll just have to switch trains at Newark or Hoboken, like you do now, but it'll be quicker.

I do believe the develpers have future expansions in mind, so you kind rule it out entirely.

TLOZ Link5
August 6th, 2003, 09:04 PM
Since they're referring to the Secaucus Transfer Station as being involved in the extension, it is most definitely a Jersey Transit project.

Freedom Tower
August 7th, 2003, 09:04 AM
Perhaps we need a "Department of Homeland Trains" to sort out everything between the different agencies ;)
Hey, it just might work.

NYatKNIGHT
August 7th, 2003, 01:31 PM
I'm all aboard that train - make it happen! The bus is inadequate. One brings you right up to the stadium, but the traffic is a nightmare. Another drops you off far away, and though it doesn't deal with the stadium traffic jam, you have to walk for a half hour. And neither allows you to bring a cooler, grill, canopy, or whatever........

Of course there's the car, but it now costs $15 to park it (and I hear it's going up again), and you still have to deal with the traffic - not to mention curtailing the beer drinking.

STT757
August 8th, 2003, 11:07 PM
Secaucus transfer station photos, check they are on pages 6 and 7 of the link.

Note..

The pictures are of the Lower Level platforms, Bergen, Main, Pascack Valley lines.

The upper level is the North East Corridor, platforms are within the building.

[http://www.railfanwindow.com/gallery/album22?page=6]

JCMAN320
August 9th, 2003, 10:07 PM
I say they use the Hudson-Bergen Lightrail. There was talk about an extension out of Newport Mall thorugh the abandoned Bergen Arches and use that to get out to the sports complex, but I don't know whats happened to the talks.

dbhstockton
August 10th, 2003, 07:03 PM
With sporting events and the Olympics in mind, it would have to be NJ Transit. *The Light Rail is only Intra-state and doesn't have the capcity.

Zoe
August 11th, 2003, 09:54 AM
How about extending the Hoboken PATH train to the sports complex. *It seems silly that there is only one stop on that line anyways. *Create a second stop in Hoboken, a stop in JC Heights, and a stop at the sports complex. *Oh wait, that makes too much sense, they will never do that. *That would bring direct mass trasit to too many thousands of people...

NYatKNIGHT
August 11th, 2003, 12:54 PM
The Hudson-Bergen Light Rail is going to extend into Weehawken, North Bergen and then onto the Vince Lombardi Park & Ride on the Turnpike.

I like the idea of more PATH stops in Hoboken and JC Heights, but the proposed idea seems to be the best way to access the sports complex - three or four NJ Transit Lines and the Secaucus Transfer Station are already so close, the spurs into the Meadowlands would be the only new tracks to build. They estimate 25 minutes from New York, 20 from Hoboken, 20 from Newark. That's hard to beat.

Kris
December 4th, 2003, 08:31 AM
December 4, 2003

Deal Provides Final Approval for Complex in Meadowlands

By RONALD SMOTHERS

NEWARK, Dec. 3 — New Jersey will receive $160 million from developers for the rights to develop a mammoth entertainment complex that will transform the New Jersey Meadowlands, under the terms of an agreement approved on Wednesday.

The agreement gives final approval to the $1.3 billion Meadowlands Xanadu project. It will be one of the most ambitious construction developments the state has seen in recent years — a family entertainment complex with indoor ski slopes, a surfing pool and a mini-Formula One racing oval. Plans for the 104-acre complex call for the eventual addition of stores, restaurants, offices, hotels and a stadium for minor league baseball.

The agreement follows 10 months of negotiations that have taken place since the New Jersey Sports and Exposition Authority selected the Xanadu project from a list of six original bidders.

The project is slated to rise in the shadow of Giants Stadium and around the current home of the New Jersey Nets and Devils at the Continental Arena, which will remain standing after Xanadu is completed.

The development is being built by a partnership of the Mills Corporation, a real estate investment trust based in Arlington, Va.; the office developer Mack-Cali Realty Corporation of New Jersey; and the KanAm Group, an investment company based in Munich. Construction could begin as early as next spring if the developers can quickly obtain environmental permits and other clearances from state agencies.

Progress on the Meadowlands project was swift compared with that on the proposed Newark arena that was to be the new home for the Devils and the Nets. The prospect of the two teams moving from the East Rutherford location prompted the state last year to start seeking alternative uses and economic development projects for the Meadowlands, to silence critics who saw Newark benefiting from state help and Bergen County losing out. But in the last six months the proposed $355 million Newark arena plan has foundered over disputes within the ownership group of the Devils and Nets, in which there is some question whether the teams will remain in New Jersey at all.

George R. Zoffinger, the president and chief executive of the state's sports authority, said that taxpayers and the region would benefit from the outcome of the Xanadu project. The $160 million will be immediately available to pay off the authority's debt on the Continental Arena and save taxpayers $90 million in future interest payments. He said the project would probably create 20,000 construction jobs at the site and 19,000 permanent jobs after the development's completion in six to eight years.

"Most importantly, it positions the region for greater economic expansion in the future," Mr. Zoffinger said. "As more people come here for entertainment, they will come from longer distances, fill up hotels and use other amenities in the region."

Officials project that the development will eventually provide $133 million annually in state and local taxes and that the developers will invest $65 million in road improvements.

Laurence C. Siegel, chairman and chief executive of the Mills Corporation, said that it was "a defining event for any real estate company" to have the opportunity to develop the site. Noting that the Meadowlands site is easily accessible to more than 20 million people in the region, near three sports venues and only minutes from the Lincoln Tunnel, he said it it had "huge advantages."

The signing of the deal capped a decadelong effort by Mills to locate in the region. That effort envisioned a mega-mall built on some 500 acres of environmentally sensitive wetlands near the current Xanadu site. In shifting its vision and allying with a partner last year to win the chance to develop the planned family entertainment complex, the company turned potential for controversy and defeat into a victory.

"It is somewhat fortuitous," Mr. Siegel said. "I guess good things happen to people who persevere and are patient."

One potential roadblock remaining is a pending lawsuit brought by Hartz Mountain Industries, a large office developer and one of the unsuccessful bidders for development rights at the site. Pretrial hearings on that lawsuit, which challenges the fairness of the selection process, are scheduled to begin next month.

Still undetermined is whether the Nets and the Devils will be playing at the Continental Arena in the next few years, said Mr. Zoffinger. Under the lease agreement, the Mills and Mack-Cali partners get first refusal on the arena site if it becomes available, and they would put a convention center there.

But Mr. Zoffinger said he was prepared to talk with the teams if they wanted to stay. He said he was also prepared to use some of the money realized from signing the lease with the Xanadu developers to make improvements in the arena if that would keep the teams in New Jersey.

Copyright 2003 The New York Times Company

Kris
February 11th, 2004, 11:04 PM
Should light rail run to Xanadu?

Freeholders debate, likely to hire lobbyist

Wednesday, February 11, 2004

By John Martins
Journal staff writer

Despite loud, impassioned pleas from two county officials, the Board of Freeholders will decide today whether or not to pay a firm to lobby New Jersey Transit to build a rail extension across the county to the proposed Xanadu entertainment center in Bergen County.

A resolution placed before the board at yesterday's pre-meeting caucus authorizes the county to pay the Newark-based Metro Communications $60,000 for the "strategic marketing of a Meadowlands extension to the Hudson-Bergen Light Rail Line."

The marketing, County Administrator Abraham Antun said, would hopefully result in NJ Transit going against its previously stated plan to not build any rail extensions to the Meadowlands Sports Complex in East Rutherford.

"New Jersey Transit is not willing to do it," Antun said. "We're hoping this group will be able to convince them to do it."

Metro Communications is run by former NJ Transit executive director Jeff Warsh, Antun said. His familiarity with the agency makes him a strong candidate to convince the current administration that a rail extension would be beneficial.

Warsh also served as a Republican state assemblyman in Middlesex County in the 1990s.

The county's reason for wanting a direct link to the site, Antun added, is because current transportation links don't adequately cover the distance between Hudson and the complex.

"The county executive feels there is an opportunity to access an area that is right now difficult to access," Antun added. "We feel this link to the Meadowlands would be crucial to our residents."

Freeholders Maurice Fitzgibbons of Hoboken and Bill O'Dea of Jersey City vociferously challenged Antun's presumption. The proposed Xanadu complex inherently threatens the economic vitality of Hudson's shopping corridors, they said, and supporting a link to the site would be a big mistake.

"These are dangerous waters we're going into," Fitzgibbons said. "Are we building our own Trojan horse here?"

For almost two hours, the board debated what impact the Xanadu complex will have on the county. Describing Xanadu as nothing more than a glorified shopping mall, Fitzgibbons said increasing the public's access to it would hurt commercial areas in Secaucus, Union City, Jersey City and Bayonne.

"How do you market what's already on the (light rail) stops?" Fitzgibbons said. "Never mind taking our people out of Hudson County and into Bergen County. Why do we even have urban enterprise zones? What are we doing here?"

O'Dea took it a step further, saying the county should first spend its money on an impact study before forming any policy that would support its success.

"If the impact of Xanadu is negative and it closes our shops, then we're out of our minds to go out and spend $60,000 to make it easier for them," O'Dea said. "We should be concerned with how we're going to protect our shopping areas and less concerned with how we're going to get our residents out there."

Board Chairman Sal Vega of West New York repeatedly tried to steer the freeholders' conversation away from the Xanadu debate, saying the work to be done by Metro Communications goes beyond lobbying and also includes studies of county-specific transportation issues.

When Vega asked Antun to elaborate on the Hudson-specific work being done, Antun said the firm will also study whether the underground station to be built in Union City at 49th Street and Bergenline Avenue will have the infrastructure to support a building that can serve as the North Hudson campus of the Hudson County Community College.

Fitzgibbons, however, said he doubted that Metro Communications would do such work, saying the resolution placed before the freeholders only mentions the marketing work to be done for the proposed extension.

"If it ain't in writing, you're not getting it," he said.

Fitzgibbons also said the county faces more pressing transportation issues than extending a rail link to Bergen County.

"We have a poor mayor in Kearny who can't even get a train out of that town," he added.

NJ Transit last year stopped service from its Lower Boonton rail line, which included its Kearny station. A battle is currently being fought by concerned citizens and advocacy groups to convince NJ Transit to revive the service or allow a private operator to take it over.

Freeholder Albert Cifelli of West Hudson said he would like the consultant to explore how a light rail extension could serve as an alternative to connect West Hudson's towns with the eastern parts of the county. Cifelli also said Kearny Mayor Alberto Santos was excited about the possibilities such a rail extension could bring to his town.

O'Dea moved to carry the item to the next meeting, citing a desire for more time to flesh out the county's needs. Fitzgibbons supported the motion, saying he wants the resolution to be heard by more committees and its language specifically written to include the other components of work.

The motion to carry the item, however, was defeated. Freeholders Cifelli, Vega, Barry Dugan of Bayonne, Thomas Liggio of North Bergen and Tilo Rivas of Union City voted to keep the item on today's agenda.

O'Dea maintained his skepticism, saying he thinks the county will be spending money on an initiative that does not support the county's goals.

"There's no way anyone's going to convince me that the prime beneficiary of this is Hudson County," O'Dea said. "All this is going to do is create a rail link between New York and Xanadu.

"The beneficiary of this is Xanadu. Let them pay for it. Let them dig into their pockets and spend another $60,000 and let them hire the group. They're the beneficiary in every regard."

Board Chairman Vega, however, said the motivation for approving the resolution is both practical and political.

"Bergen County hasn't taken the lead on this at all," Vega said. "We have a light rail system that goes nowhere (outside Hudson County). We have to look at the importance of connecting to the Meadowlands and we have to look at the importance of going through Secaucus and West Hudson.

"Mayor and Assembly Speaker Albio Sires (of West New York) is a driving force behind this issue. This plan at least gives us a vision to go forward," Vega said.

The freeholders will hold their monthly meeting this evening at 7 in freeholders' chambers at the Hudson County Administration Building Annex, 567 Pavonia Ave., Jersey City.

John Martins can be reached at jmartins@jjournal.com

Copyright 2004 The Jersey Journal

NYatKNIGHT
February 12th, 2004, 10:37 AM
It's called the Hudson-Bergen Light Rail, not the Hudson Light Rail, and it would benefit the streets of that county by not forcing residents into their cars just to access the Meadowlands right next door.

tmg
February 12th, 2004, 11:02 AM
How did we get from here...


August 6, 2003
Deal Is Sought on Plan for Train to Meadowlands
By ROBERT HANLEY

...

The rail plan under discussion calls for construction in two phases. The first provides for creation of a $150 million, 1.5-mile rail link from the existing Pascack Valley Line, situated west of the complex, to a new elevated station in an existing parking lot between Giants Stadium and the Meadowlands Racetrack.

The second phase calls for a $320 million, 1.1-mile set of elevated tracks between the new station in the Meadowlands and the Secaucus Transfer, said George D. Warrington, executive director of New Jersey Transit.

"This is a plan that's workable," Mr. Warrington said. "It's practical. It's affordable, and, most importantly, it solves a potentially significant transportation problem."


...to here...?



Freeholders debate, likely to hire lobbyist
Wednesday, February 11, 2004
By John Martins

...would hopefully result in NJ Transit going against its previously stated plan to not build any rail extensions to the Meadowlands Sports Complex in East Rutherford.


Also, why have the NYC2012 folks been so quiet on this issue? The rail link to the Meadowlands is an integral part of their "Olympic X" proposal.

NYatKNIGHT
February 12th, 2004, 11:54 AM
Though the article doesn't say it, I took it to mean a light rail IN ADDITION TO the commuter rail link.

STT757
February 12th, 2004, 05:27 PM
There are two separate projects that would bring rail service to the Meadowlands:

The first is to build a spur off of NJ Transit's Main line which is a heavy commuter rail line that has three routes from Hoboken Terminal, all three of the routes (Pascack Valley, Bergen Line, Main Line) Originate from Hoboken terminal.

The three lines run from Hoboken through Secaucus transfer station where direct connections to NY Penn Station and NJ Transi'ts other (M&E, NJCL, NEC, Montclair) trains operate, then run adjacent to the Meadowlands Sports Complex where they branch off into three directions.

All three lines terminate in New York State: Spring Valley, Suffern, and Port Jervis.

What the first plan is which they have secured funding for is to re-route the Main Line trains through the Meadowlands (after leaving Secaucus Transfer station) with a station between Giant's Stadium and the new "Xanadu"., they trains then would rejoin the original Main line routes and continue towards Rockland and Orange Counties.

http://www.njtransit.com/images/proposed_west_shore_map.jpg

The second plan is to extend Hudson-Bergen Light Rail service from North Bergen to the Meadowlands.

z22
February 21st, 2004, 10:16 PM
Planned Bergen County, N.J. Development Spurs Regional Rail Transit Solution

By Daniel Sforza, The Record, Hackensack, N.J. Knight Ridder/Tribune Business News

Feb. 20 - New Jersey transportation planners think they have finally found a way to link Bergen, Passaic, and Hudson counties and the Meadowlands through a phalanx of rail lines.

And, more importantly, they think they know how to pay for the more than $1 billion plan.

"It seems like we are starting to reach a consensus on a comprehensive mass transportation system here in the Bergen-Passaic-Hudson region," said Democratic state Sen. Paul Sarlo of Wood-Ridge, who worked closely on the plan. "It's a significant step."

Money to fund the comprehensive system of rail links is expected to primarily come from the federal government.

It involves taking the $1 billion that would have been needed just to bring the Hudson-Bergen Light Rail to Tenafly and redistributing it to other projects that would create a cohesive mass transit system for the first time.

Trains from the counties would essentially meet at Xanadu, a $1.4 billion entertainment, retail and office complex set to be built at the Meadowlands Sports Complex.

"Clearly, the Xanadu project has changed the whole dynamic of the region's conversation about rail," said Rep. Steve Rothman, D-Fair Lawn. "We [need] to try to maximize the chances of Xanadu's success as well as provide access to Xanadu for people who would like to work there, whether it be from Bergen, Passaic, or Hudson counties."

The need to bring rail to the new development, coupled with $150 million from the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey to start the rail project, spurred lawmakers into action.

Officials have been meeting over the past several weeks to iron out the complex plan and agree on a strategy for federal funding.

The key funding move to get the plan rolling would be to scrap the Bergen County portion of the light rail system -- essentially an electric trolley -- and replace it with a self-powered diesel train that would provide similar service. The diesel would run from Ridgefield to Tenafly on Bergen County's Northern Branch, a freight line.

NJ Transit Executive Director George Warrington said the agency is aggressively pursuing the new technology because it would save "hundreds of millions of dollars."

The new type of train, a "Diesel Multiple Unit" or DMU, does not need to be pulled by a locomotive. Instead, small diesel engines mounted near the wheels power the passenger car, which can pull an additional two cars.

The DMU is rated to run on freight lines, meaning that it can withstand a collision with a bigger train. The advantage it offers over an electric trolley is mainly economic.

DMUs do not require electrical substations, new track being laid, overhead electric wires, or raised station platforms.

The cars are also more environmentally sensitive than a typical diesel, burning about 1 gallon of fuel for every two to three miles they travel. A typical diesel locomotive drinks 5 gallons of fuel for each mile, Warrington said.

"From a user point of view, it's virtually indistinguishable [from a typical electric trolley]," he said. "What's most important is that there is fast and frequent rail service that connects people to markets they need to go to. What technology is employed here is much less significant."

Warrington said electric trolleys are still on the table for the Northern Branch if the DMU proposal falters.

"We are committed to moving the project forward," he said. "We need to work together to get money."

Funding for the plan has already been requested by Rothman, who sits on the House Appropriations Committee. It has not yet been secured.

The proposal's various components also include:

--A 1.5-mile spur from the Pascack Valley Line in East Rutherford to a new station in the Meadowlands. The Pascack line runs from Montvale through Hackensack to Hoboken. This $150 million spur is expected to be completed in 2007 and has been funded by the Port Authority.

--A one-mile link from the new Meadowlands station to the Bergen County Line. The Bergen line runs from Mahwah through Fair Lawn to Hoboken. No completion date has been set. The project has been estimated at $244 million.

--A continuation of the Meadowlands link from the Bergen to the Main Line. The Main Line runs from Mahwah through Paterson to Hoboken. No completion date has been set, and the cost is estimated at more than $100 million.

--An extension of the Bergen-Hudson Light Rail from Tonnelle Avenue in North Bergen to a park-and-ride facility in Secaucus. No completion date or cost estimate has been set.

--Using DMUs on the so-called cross-county line to connect Hackensack with Hawthorne. The line is operated by the New York, Susquehanna & Western Railway. The total DMU program in Bergen and Passaic counties is estimated to cost between $100 million and $200 million, Warrington said.

Officials were reluctant to give a timetable for the various projects, but Warrington promised to get them done quickly -- as soon as the funding was in place.

"It's all about money," he said Thursday. "When money is in place, we can move very, very rapidly."

Enter the federal lawmakers.

Rothman and Rep. Bill Pascrell Jr., D-Paterson, say they are both committed to the plan because it offers solid transportation options for their constituents.

"I have placed all of these rail projects including the DMU for the Northern Line and the DMU for the cross-county line on my list of projects submitted in [the federal transportation funding bill]," Rothman said. "The timing of the construction ... will be directly dependent on the level of funding that the Bush administration sets for mass transit."

Pascrell sees the plan as a way to invigorate the economy.

"These [rail links] are going to bring our industrial areas back, link our suburbs and our urban areas," he said. "I've always had in mind that we could tie in the area from Hawthorne and Paterson to Hackensack and the Meadowlands."

Pascrell, who sits on the House Transportation Committee, said the plan had to link Passaic County to the rest of North Jersey to get his support.

"Our county has been treated as an addendum," he said. "And Passaic County no longer accepts that. We want mass rail, we want light rail. ... We want to go to the jobs, where they exist. The Patersons of the world, the Hackensacks of the world need to be destinations."

http://www.miami.com/mld/miamiherald/business/national/8002397.htm

Kris
March 13th, 2004, 11:39 AM
Originally posted by STT757.


BOARD APPROVES TRACK REDESIGN

Direct Rail Service On Track

NEWARK, NJ, March 10, 2004 – The NJ TRANSIT Board of Directors today approved a contract amendment for Parsons Brinckerhoff Quade & Douglas Inc. of Newark to redesign a portion of the right-of-way in East Rutherford along the Pascack Valley Line, which will allow direct rail services to the Meadowlands Sports Complex.

“Thanks to the leadership of Governor McGreevey, we have laid out an alignment that addresses connectivity, frequency, cost-effectiveness and flexibility,” said NJ DOT Commissioner and NJ TRANSIT Board Chairman Jack Lettiere. “We are going to begin immediately to build rail service to the Meadowlands in a smart way.”

“We are uniquely positioned to make the vision of rail service to the Meadowlands a reality,” said NJ TRANSIT Executive Director George D. Warrington. “For the first time in about 30 years, we have a practical, affordable, workable, do-able program that we’re absolutely committed to bringing on line in less than four short years.”

The Meadowlands rail link construction project, which includes a new station at the sports complex, is scheduled to begin in the summer 2005 and conclude by the end of 2007.

NJ TRANSIT is the nation's largest statewide public transportation system providing bus, rail and light rail services for 752,600 daily trips on 238 bus routes, two light rail lines and 11 commuter rail lines. It is the third largest transit system in the country with 162 rail stations, 29 light rail stations and more than 17,000 bus stops linking major points in New Jersey, New York and Philadelphia.

http://www.njtransit.com/images/proposed_west_shore_map.jpg

http://www.njtransit.com/images/NJTrrmap_Nov03.jpg

lofter1
July 3rd, 2006, 07:41 AM
Construction Begins On Rail Line To Meadowlands

NY 1 (http://www.ny1.com/ny1/content/index.jsp?stid=1&aid=60703)
July 02, 2006

Jets and Giants fans who can live without the tailgate party will soon have a new way to get to the game.

Construction has begun on a new rail line that will connect Penn Station and New Jersey Transit to the Meadowlands.

The $150-million expansion is being funded by the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey.

Eight to ten thousand fans are expected to use the train on game-day.

If all goes according to schedule, the line will be up and running by 2008.

Copyright © 2006 NY1 News

stache
July 3rd, 2006, 07:47 AM
Is this a spur that will run off the exsisting line, like at Princeton junction?

urbanaturalist
September 16th, 2006, 05:35 PM
great

JCMAN320
September 8th, 2009, 11:28 PM
GOVERNOR CORZINE LAUNCHES RAIL SERVICE TO THE MEADOWLANDS
New rail line and fan-friendly service provide a great option for attending events at the Meadowlands Sports Complex

July 20, 2009
NJT-09-073

EAST RUTHERFORD, NJ — Governor Jon S. Corzine inaugurated new rail service to the Meadowlands Sports Complex today, launching an era of travel convenience for the millions of New Jersey residents and visitors who attend year-round events at the Meadowlands.

Dozens of officials and guests, including players from the New York Jets and New York Giants, joined the Governor for the train ride, which originated in Hoboken and finished with a ribbon-cutting ceremony at the new Meadowlands Station.


What fans need to know

-Purchase round-trip tickets in advance
-The new line operates between Hoboken Terminal and Meadowlands Station for major Meadowlands events, making one stop at Frank R. Lautenberg Station at Secaucus Junction
-Service operates every 10-20 minutes between Secaucus Junction and Meadowlands Station before and after events
-Go to www.njtransit.com for information on connecting trains at Secaucus Junction


“NJ TRANSIT rail service, with its ability to move thousands of people in a safe and efficient manner, is a natural fit for one of New Jersey’s premiere spectator sport and concert locations,” Governor Corzine said. “This line will play an increasingly important role in the development of green transportation practices by helping fans avoid traffic congestion, resulting in fewer cars on our roadways and reduced emissions.”

The new line gives customers statewide rail access to the Meadowlands from 11 of 12 NJ TRANSIT rail lines. Frank R. Lautenberg Station at Secaucus Junction, the new line’s only stop between Hoboken and the Meadowlands, provides the connection.

“Excellent public transportation service is a hallmark of world-class sporting and entertainment facilities, so this new rail service helps cement the Meadowlands’ status as a world-class destination for spectator sports and other major events,” said Dennis Robinson, President and Chief Executive Officer of the New Jersey Sports & Exposition Authority.

“This new public transportation mode for the Meadowlands complements existing bus service from New Jersey and New York locations, and will help thousands of additional fans to choose NJ TRANSIT as their preferred way to get to games and other events,” said NJ TRANSIT Chairman and Transportation Commissioner Stephen Dilts.

Train service will operate frequently, approximately every 10-20 minutes between Frank R. Lautenberg Station at Secaucus Junction and Meadowlands Station, both before and after major events expected to draw 50,000 or more spectators. These events include all Jets and Giants pre-season and regular season home games, major concerts at Giants Stadium, and Gold Cup soccer. NJ TRANSIT will be able to accommodate about 10,000 customers traveling to and from an event on the new rail line.

“This new line is a perfect example of NJ TRANSIT supporting economic development by providing residents and visitors alike access to great New Jersey entertainment and recreational destinations,” said NJ TRANSIT Executive Director Richard Sarles.

“This rail service is great news for all of our faithful fans throughout the entire tri-state region, whether they’ve been making the trip to the Meadowlands from other parts of New Jersey, or from New York, Long Island or Connecticut,” said New York Jets owner Woody Johnson. “Now they’ve all got another option.”

"This train service complements our vigorous efforts to improve the fan experience here at the stadium,” said New York Giants co-owner John Mara. “This new line gives our fans in New York, New Jersey and Connecticut more ways to get to our games and back home in a comfortable, hassle-free manner.”

“Hoboken Terminal is a landmark in the city that functions magnificently as a multi-modal transportation hub, so we are delighted that this new NJ TRANSIT rail line starts here, providing our residents and people from throughout the region with direct rail access to the Meadowlands,” said Hoboken Mayor Peter Cammarano.

“The Borough Council and I created a “Green Team” in January that encourages residents to help us create environmentally friendly initiatives,” said East Rutherford Mayor James L. Cassella. “This new rail line, which will take cars off the roads and improve the air we breathe, is a great way to promote our efforts.”

The line and station are the centerpieces of a $213 million Meadowlands Railroad and Roadway Improvement Project funded by the Port Authority of New York & New Jersey, the New Jersey Department of Transportation, NJ TRANSIT and the New Jersey Sports and Exposition Authority.

The new line consists of two new tracks, each about 2.5 miles long. Each set of tracks connects to NJ TRANSIT’s Pascack Valley Line near the Meadowlands. Service will begin about 3.5 hours before a game or event and continue for about two hours after the conclusion of the event.

Starting in September, Connecticut residents will access the new line under a pilot program with Metro-North Railroad. As previously announced, Metro-North crews will operate NJ TRANSIT equipment into New York Penn Station for service to and from 1 p.m. home football games. From New York, NJ TRANSIT crews will operate the trains via Frank R. Lautenberg Station at Secaucus Junction, where football fans will transfer to the Meadowlands trains.

Existing bus service on the 351 line from Port Authority Bus Terminal in New York will continue to operate to all Jets and Giants home games, providing additional transit capacity. For smaller events, trains will not operate to the Meadowlands, but bus shuttles will operate between Secaucus Junction and the Meadowlands.

The new rail line will serve customers for the first time on Sunday, July 26, when
Giants Stadium hosts the Confederation of North, Central American and Caribbean Association Football (CONCACAF) Gold Cup Final championship soccer match.

Customers are urged to purchase round-trip tickets to Meadowlands Station in advance from their station of origin at ticket vending machines or from a ticket agent. Visit www.njtransit.com or call customer service, 973-275-5555 for more information.

NYatKNIGHT
September 9th, 2009, 11:49 AM
It can't be overstated how great this and all new rail options are, and for me this particular new route makes life much more convenient for my frequent trips to the stadium. Despite all that, this is another instance where you don't necessarily save time, particularly when on the way to a game.

I took the train to the Jets-Giants pre-season game. It was easy, though slower than I had hoped. The switch in Secaucus went smoothely enough, though it's easily 15 minutes when all is said and done. Then the train itself is rather slow, especially around the Meadowlands. When you finally crawl into the platform, for now, during construction of the new stadium and probably through the dismantling of the old, all passengers have only one route to take when leaving the train in a narrow lane between construction fences. Try to sit at the front of the train or you'll be walking slowly too. So unless you're going directly into the stadium or meeting up with a party parked near the platform, you might be doing quite a bit of walking around both stadiums also.

But after the game, there is no better way back to the city, IMO. My friend from Queens who drove said he waited nearly 2 hours to get through the Lincoln Tunnel. I don't want to discourage anyone taking the train; you just might want to leave a little more time than expected on your way there.

JCMAN320
September 9th, 2009, 02:03 PM
NYatKnight I was at that game with the girlfriend; I took it from Hoboken Terminal. We loved it it was way better than driving. I don't think 15-20mins by train is bad at all. The tickets are cheap; 2 round trip tickets cost only $11.25. I loved it and well be taking it again.

When we left the Stadium, the train left the station at 11:45pm, we were in Hoboken by 12:05am. I took the PATH back to JSQ and was there by 12:20am. Was home by 12:40am. Not bad at all IMO.

Marv95
September 9th, 2009, 02:12 PM
The tickets are cheap; 2 round trip tickets cost only $11.25
Each or altogether?

JCMAN320
September 9th, 2009, 02:16 PM
Altogether.

NYatKNIGHT
September 9th, 2009, 02:25 PM
The price is great and worth every cent. 15-20 minutes is hard to believe - the train really went slow for me. I could probably save some time by using PATH to Hoboken and avoid the switch in Secaucus. Does that help or do you still have to switch? Still, going to and coming from the train station then waiting for the train ought to be factored in to time. With a car you hop in and go. Either way, again, I recommend the train. Though if you want to tailgate with a grill or chair or cooler you'll need somebody else to drive.

JCMAN320
September 9th, 2009, 02:30 PM
There is no switch coming out of Hoboken. You leave Hoboken, stop at Secaucus, then next stop Meadowlands.

They also allow open alcohol on the train; just dispose of it before you get off the train at the Meadowlands. They have recepticles on board. The conductor makes an annoouncement reminding peoples its a privilege and not to ruin it.

NYatKNIGHT
September 9th, 2009, 02:33 PM
Thanks, I will definitely go through Hoboken next time (Sunday!).

JCMAN320
September 9th, 2009, 02:34 PM
Your welcome glad I could help. Enjoy it! :)

stache
September 9th, 2009, 03:48 PM
Not a great idea imo.

JCMAN320
September 9th, 2009, 04:01 PM
Well I guess their thought is that its only a 15-20 min ride. If the arguement is that people will get trashed, they can hit the bars and get trashed before the train too. People get trashed at tailgates and then enter the Stadium.

I mean I don't see the harm as long as people are responsible, but I do think that there is going be "that guy" or "that girl" that will ruin it for everbody; I hope it doesn't happen but I'm afraid it might.

My whole thing is enjoy it while it lasts. We saw people in our car that were drinking a beers but weren't acting rowdy at all. I myself had a bottle of Sam Adams on the train and ejoyed it. At most people started chanting "Let's Go Giants" "Let's Go Jets" back in forth, which I enjoyed and took part in and it only lasted like 30 secs.

STT757
September 13th, 2009, 11:51 AM
Not a great idea imo.

Alcohol has always been allowed on NJ Transit trains, doesn't matter if it's a football game, New Year's eve or the 5PM to Montclair during the Work week. They want you to keep in covered up, but still drink as you want. There used to be bar cars on the NJCL trains.

Sid
May 13th, 2011, 05:35 AM
So, is the train still going to run every day once American Dream @ Meadowlands opens, or do they just expect everyone to drive?

JCMAN320
May 13th, 2011, 08:36 AM
I have no idea Sid; very good question though. In my opinion I think it will regularly once it opens.

ramvid01
May 13th, 2011, 04:58 PM
I remember reading way back that when Xanadu (or American Dream as it will be called) opened, that this rail spur would have regular service.

Newarkguy
May 13th, 2011, 07:57 PM
Alcohol has always been allowed on NJ Transit trains, doesn't matter if it's a football game, New Year's eve or the 5PM to Montclair during the Work week. They want you to keep in covered up, but still drink as you want. There used to be bar cars on the NJCL trains.
Lol. When I first hired into nj rail, we were told to go to the bar car and get some drinks. I knew better from the smirk in the older workers faces, bar cars were already gone. Yet, a new cocky employee volunteered. We burst laughing when he came back red faced and empty handed. Njt bars employees from drinking on the job. To make sure, bar cars had to go, so I was told.

Nexis4Jersey
May 14th, 2011, 03:01 AM
Lol. When I first hired into nj rail, we were told to go to the bar car and get some drinks. I knew better from the smirk in the older workers faces, bar cars were already gone. Yet, a new cocky employee volunteered. We burst laughing when he came back red faced and empty handed. Njt bars employees from drinking on the job. To make sure, bar cars had to go, so I was told.

Do you think they'll every bring them back as a $$$ maker , more of a cafe car like the New M8 cars?

Newarkguy
May 14th, 2011, 01:04 PM
Maybe. Assuming they figure out a plan to have vendors rent a space on a car and set up a stand. Its possible.

arcman210
May 14th, 2011, 08:51 PM
I don't think it would be feasable. First, they'd lose seating and many trains are jam packed as it is. And many people don't spend too much time on the train, on and off in a short time span... and I don't think NJ Transit would want to be responsible for dropping off drunk patrons at their parked cars in commuter lots. I think the policy of allowing patrons to bring their own alcohol onboard the train is a pretty good one.

Nexis4Jersey
May 14th, 2011, 10:20 PM
I don't think it would be feasable. First, they'd lose seating and many trains are jam packed as it is. And many people don't spend too much time on the train, on and off in a short time span... and I don't think NJ Transit would want to be responsible for dropping off drunk patrons at their parked cars in commuter lots. I think the policy of allowing patrons to bring their own alcohol onboard the train is a pretty good one.

I would say most people stay on NJT for at least 50 mins depending on which line you use and which service you use. Why not give some fast food companies some of the older cars to convert to cafe cars like a Starbucks car or Dunkin Donuts car? Something that doesn't require that much time to eat or is needed on the go.