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View Full Version : Which is your Favorite Local Airport?



Agglomeration
September 30th, 2003, 05:09 PM
Everyone's flown from one or more of the three airports at some time or other. Why not mention which airport you all think has the best service, the best infrastructure, the shortest delays, the sleekest terminal buildings, whatever.

My personal favorite of course is Kennedy Airport. It's huge, it's world famous, it has room for more than 110 different airlines, and it's revamping itself thoroughly in many ways, including the addition of an Airtrain, which was patterned partly after Newark's.

Feel free to describe your favorite major airport, and to post pictures of these airports anytime you feel like it.

STT757
September 30th, 2003, 05:26 PM
Newark Liberty International, best mix of flights.

Continental's Terminal C just finished a $800 Million renovation just two years ago in which they added the new C-3 Concourse which is gorgeous.

http://www.ityt.com/albums/EWR/agent_desks.sized.jpg

http://www.ityt.com/albums/EWR/new_terminal.sized.jpg

http://www.ityt.com/albums/EWR/openspace.sized.jpg

http://www.ityt.com/albums/EWR/pclub_distance.sized.jpg

http://www.ityt.com/albums/EWR/peoplemovers.sized.jpg

Terminal C-1 food court
http://www.ityt.com/albums/EWR/pclub_view.sized.jpg

STT757
September 30th, 2003, 09:52 PM
New American Airlines terminal 8 at JFK, slated for completion by '07-'08.

http://www.airport-technology.com/projects/jfk/images/new1.jpg

http://www.airport-technology.com/projects/jfk/images/new3.jpg

http://www.airport-technology.com/projects/jfk/images/new4.jpg

http://www.airport-technology.com/projects/jfk/images/new5.jpg

http://www.airport-technology.com/projects/jfk/images/new6.jpg

http://www.airport-technology.com/projects/jfk/images/new2.jpg

STT757
September 30th, 2003, 10:23 PM
JFK Terminal 1 (opened 1997), former site of Eastern Airlines Terminal.

http://cruisinaltitude.com/images/airports/jfk/jfkt1side.jpg

http://cruisinaltitude.com/images/airports/jfk/jfkt1dept.jpg

http://cruisinaltitude.com/images/airports/jfk/jfkaftktctrl.jpg

http://cruisinaltitude.com/images/airports/jfk/jfklhtktctrl.jpg

http://cruisinaltitude.com/images/airports/jfk/jfkt1dept.jpg

BrooklynRider
October 1st, 2003, 09:48 AM
I use Newark almost exclusively, simply because of the ease to get there. LaGuardia is closer abnd, without traffic, it is a breeze of a ride from Park Slope, Brooklyn. However, it's built in delays to nearly every flight are major detractions. I would switch to JFK in a minute. It's facilities are nicer and more modern than the other airports. The problem with JFK is gettingthere. Build a one-stop monorail (not a special subway - not a connecting train) and I will switch in a second. JFK has the best runways in the metro area and the least delays.

TLOZ Link5
October 1st, 2003, 12:15 PM
The British Airways Terminal at JFK is very nice, also. But I picked LaGuardia because the food there is good, I use it the most, it's the easiest to get to, and any of the proposed transportation improvements they make to it would benefit me directly.

STT757
October 1st, 2003, 04:25 PM
Happy birthday Newark Airport, 75 years!


Newark Airport keeps rolling

Wednesday, October 01, 2003

BY RON MARSICO
Star-Ledger Staff

Aviation pioneers Lindbergh and Earhart flew from its runways.

The world's first air traffic control center was built there.

PeopleExpress ushered in an age of discount fares from the old North Terminal in the early 1980s, and Continental Airlines made the hub the region's busiest from the new Terminal C in the late 1990s.

On Oct. 1, 1928 -- 75 years ago today -- operations officially began at what was originally called Newark Municipal Airport, a hub built on 68 acres of marshland at the behest of municipal officials.

"They said, 'We've got to get an airport, get in on the air age,'" said Dave Morris, the airport's historian. "They got the jump."

Today, at what is now Newark Liberty International Airport, Gov. James E. McGreevey will mark the anniversary by leading a low-key ceremony in the refurbished original terminal, a 1935 art deco structure with a vintage control tower that is now the airport's administration building.

Since its opening, Newark Airport has been a place of firsts.

Along with the first control tower, the airport claims the world's first paved runway, first lighted runway and first passenger terminal.

It has also had its dark moments.

On Sept. 11, 2001, terrorists hijacked United Airlines Flight 93, which had departed from Terminal A en route to San Francisco. The plane, which authorities said was likely being diverted to crash into a Washington, D.C., landmark, plummeted into a Pennsylvania field after passengers stormed the cockpit.

Not long after it opened, Newark Airport quickly became the world's busiest, serving 90,000 passengers in 1931 and 350,000 seven years later. In the early 1940s, the Army Air Corps took over the airport for the duration of World War II. In 1948, the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey assumed control and continues to run the airport today.

Last year, 29.2 million passengers flew into and out of Newark, making it the nation's 12th busiest hub.

"It's grown as America has grown. And it's grown as the Port Authority has grown," Port Authority Chairman Anthony Coscia said, citing the agency's $3.8 billion investment in the complex over the past five years. "That airport has found a way to keep pace with those changes."

Seventy-five years ago, Newark Airport's primary mission was transporting mail, not flying people.

"Air mail started this whole thing," said William DeCota, the Port Authority's aviation director.

During the 1930s, mail was trucked from Manhattan across the Pulaski Skyway to Newark Airport. By 1938, planes there were hauling 5 million pounds of mail a year. Soon after, however, New York Mayor Fiorello LaGuardia won a power struggle between the city and New Jersey and the air mail depot was moved to a fledgling Queens airport that would one day bear his name.

Among the earliest planes to use Newark Airport were Ford Tri-Motors and Curtiss Condors, Morris said, noting that pilots landed on a cinder runway affectionately known as "the cinder patch." Then came the two-engine Boeing 247, which carried 10 passengers, and the all-metal DC-3, which held 21 passengers, "unheard of for that time," he said.

Morris recalled making trips to the airport as a boy and seeing the DC-3, which was used by American Airlines in 1936 for the Newark-to-Chicago run.

"I couldn't believe it had curtains on the windows," said Morris, who later spent 36 years at the airport for the Port Authority. "It was like flying from your living room."

An airport legend, William "Whitey" Conrad, who died in 2000 at the age of 95, pioneered air traffic control at Newark Airport, beginning with two flags -- red and green -- as he stood atop a wooden tower directing pilots next to the airport's hangar.

"It was a half-assed operation, but it worked," Conrad said in a 1996 interview.

He even found romance at the airport.

"I was on the second floor of the building, and he used to come in front of the doors, eating an ice cream cone," said his widow, 91-year-old Catherine Conrad, who did payroll for a company based at the historic art deco terminal. "He used to come in front of the doors, eating an ice cream cone."

"Whitey" Conrad retired in the 1960s as chief of the airport's fourth control tower -- a 147-foot structure that was in use until May of this year. He lived to see the blueprints for the new $22.4 million concrete tower that rises 325 feet.

As the control towers grew taller, the number of passengers using Newark Airport also grew. Close to 7 million people a year used the airport by the 1970s, but the number of passengers really took off in the 1980s and 1990s with the advent of PeopleExpress and Continental. Aided by relatively easy accessibility, the number of fliers peaked at 34.2 million in 2000 before the recession and 9/11. In 2001, Newark scored a regional first -- an AirTrain monorail service.

Princeton University professor Jameson Doig, who wrote "Empire on the Hudson," a history of the Port Authority, said the airport has helped both the state's image and its economy.

"Newark Airport became even more important for the whole region than had been anticipated," Doig said, crediting the Port Authority for wise investments that spurred its growth. "Newark Airport ... brings credit to an agency that is often criticized."

Looking to the future, DeCota, the aviation director, said the goal is to increase the number of fliers by 50 percent, to 45 million, over the next 15 years, while also increasing air cargo by 50 percent.

Such growth, however, faces constraints by the airport's limited size.

"The challenge for us is how to get 45 million passengers through an airport that's only 2,000 acres," said DeCota, who envisions higher capacity planes and moving more nonessential services such as parking off-site eventually. "The challenge for us is to maximize the horizontal geography of Newark Airport."

Ron Marsico covers Newark Liberty International Airport. He can be reached at rmarsico@starledger.com or (973) 392-7860.

http://nj.com/news/ledger/jersey/index.ssf?/base/news-4/1064986873179650.xml

normaldude
October 1st, 2003, 04:28 PM
#1: Newark (EWR). Because it's the only one you can currently get to by train/subway.

#2: JFK. Because the JFK Airtrain should be running soon.

#3: LaGuardia (LGA). Last place, because 2 blocks of Astoria NIMBYs are perpetually blocking the N train extension to LaGuardia Airport.

Paul451
November 12th, 2003, 03:20 AM
it has to be Newark cos has decent flights and is easy to get to

fioco
November 12th, 2003, 05:48 PM
JFK for purely selfish reasons:

1) Long Island Bus (JFK Express) direct service to terminals: $2.00
2) JetBlue

'nough said.

BrooklynRider
November 13th, 2003, 01:43 PM
I use Newark for convenience of getting there (from Park Slope Brooklyn) and because I'm a Continental frequent flyer.

LaGuardia is closer, but traffic is always snarled on the BQE and the on-time record is abysmal.

JFK is a sentimental favorite and one I would switch to in a minute if we had a one stop link. I do not consider Airtrain an One Stop Link.

TLOZ Link5
November 13th, 2003, 03:36 PM
For me it would be a four-seat ride: 6 from my dorm or my home to the E train to the LIRR to the AirTrain, or I could just take the A or the E to Jamaica or Howard Beach and forego Penn Station, which would make it a three-seat ride.

JCexpert558
August 9th, 2007, 04:40 PM
Are the Port authorty going to expand Newark airport because I know that it is going to be bussier in the future.

66nexus
August 9th, 2007, 05:10 PM
I actually like JFK and LaGuardia but I like Newark all in the name of convenience

JCMAN320
August 9th, 2007, 07:18 PM
Also think about it Newark Aiport right next to Newark/Elizabeth Seaport, the busiest and largest in on the East Coast, beign built next to eachother was genius. A seaport and airport side by side helping move goods 24/7 365 was brilliant. Newark will be the top of the class in my opinion once the PATH directly connects to it.

Newark Liberty Airport, the airport of firsts and pioneer in USA in terms of commercial avaiation is the best hands down out of the 3.

JCMAN320
September 25th, 2007, 03:59 PM
PORT AUTHORITY APPLAUDS U.S. DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION PROPOSAL TO AWARD NEWARK-SHANGHAI ROUTE IN 2009 TO CONTINENTAL AIRLINES AT NEWARK LIBERTY INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT

Date: September 25, 2007
Press Release Number: 80-2007


Air passengers and the New York metropolitan region’s business community scored a victory today when the U.S. Department of Transportation announced a proposal to award a daily nonstop route between Newark Liberty International Airport and Shanghai to Continental Airlines beginning in 2009. Port Authority staff spearheaded a two-year-long grassroots effort that brought together public and private interests in a campaign to support Continental’s bid before the U.S. Department of Transportation for the route.

Port Authority Chairman Anthony R. Coscia said, “By linking the business capitals of the United States and China, this route will help drive economic growth in our region while providing an essential service for our customers.”

Port Authority Executive Director Anthony E. Shorris said, “We all know how important China is to the global economy. This new link to their rapidly expanding market is great news for the entire region, especially the finance and tourism sectors. My congratulations and thanks to all the parties who worked so hard to bring this route to the region.”

investordude
September 25th, 2007, 07:17 PM
I just came back from Shanghai on China Eastern out of JFK. Service was good - and I think it will improve because Singapore Airlines - which has FABULOUS service, just bought a stake in China Eastern.

But the US needs another airline to service Shanghai. 20 years from now, New York and Shanghai will be the most important destination for New York bankers besides London.

JCMAN320
October 23rd, 2007, 08:47 PM
FAA: Cutting JFK flights could worsen Newark delays

by The Associated Press Tuesday October 23, 2007, 7:12 PM

Aviation regulators striving to fix "epidemic" delays at New York's John F. Kennedy International Airport are worried about potential solutions there leading to similar problems at other airports in the region, including Newark Liberty International Airport.

The latest government proposal for reducing congestion at JFK, which had the worst on-time departure record of any major U.S. airport through August, is to reduce the hourly flight limit by 20 percent. However, Acting Federal Aviation Administrator Robert Sturgell said he was "concerned about spillover" from JFK to nearby airports, such as Newark or New York's LaGuardia, and the airline industry has pledged to fight the proposal.

Sturgell, whom President Bush today nominated to become FAA administrator, and Transportation Secretary Mary Peters addressed airline executives at the start of a two-day meeting focused on scheduling issues at JFK. Peters repeated the government's desire for airlines to voluntarily change their summer 2008 flight schedules in order to alleviate record delays at JFK and other airports, but also reiterated that schedule reduction mandates remain an option.

The Transportation Department last week suggested an hourly limit of 80 flights at JFK, which now has some hours when airlines plan for as many as 100 flights.

The Air Transport Association, the commercial airlines trade group, and the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, which runs JFK, both criticized the government's hourly flight target.

66nexus
October 24th, 2007, 12:30 PM
FAA: Cutting JFK flights could worsen Newark delays

by The Associated Press Tuesday October 23, 2007, 7:12 PM

Aviation regulators striving to fix "epidemic" delays at New York's John F. Kennedy International Airport are worried about potential solutions there leading to similar problems at other airports in the region, including Newark Liberty International Airport.

The latest government proposal for reducing congestion at JFK, which had the worst on-time departure record of any major U.S. airport through August, is to reduce the hourly flight limit by 20 percent. However, Acting Federal Aviation Administrator Robert Sturgell said he was "concerned about spillover" from JFK to nearby airports, such as Newark or New York's LaGuardia, and the airline industry has pledged to fight the proposal.

Sturgell, whom President Bush today nominated to become FAA administrator, and Transportation Secretary Mary Peters addressed airline executives at the start of a two-day meeting focused on scheduling issues at JFK. Peters repeated the government's desire for airlines to voluntarily change their summer 2008 flight schedules in order to alleviate record delays at JFK and other airports, but also reiterated that schedule reduction mandates remain an option.

The Transportation Department last week suggested an hourly limit of 80 flights at JFK, which now has some hours when airlines plan for as many as 100 flights.

The Air Transport Association, the commercial airlines trade group, and the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, which runs JFK, both criticized the government's hourly flight target.


Oh man if we ever thought Newark delays were bad before...
They're going to alleviate traffic from JFK so it won't have record delays....which is only going to give Newark record delays (and it's not like there ain't delays already). That's not solving a problem, it's only moving the problem around.

Ninjahedge
October 24th, 2007, 03:32 PM
It sounds bad, but ALL airports have to be rated on peek efficiency and restricted to maximum attainable and maintainable schedules.

If the "spillover" hits Newark, Newark has to limit scheduled flights. I know that that will make it harder to get a flight, but we are not all playing Survivor here. Most of us plan out the trips ahead of time.

I would rather have a terminal with less flights but a bit more redundancy than one where a snowstorm can keep you sitting for a week.

NoyokA
October 24th, 2007, 05:39 PM
I voted for JFK, its easily accessible to New York City and Long Island via masstranist. I've never waited long at the check-in process.

21&Invincible
October 25th, 2007, 06:18 PM
I'm going to say Newark because it's like 2 miles from my school. Newark Light Rail to NJ Transit to Air Train and I'm there. I flew out of Newark last November and it was a pretty smooth process... compared to say Philly :mad:, which I fly out of 8-9 times in the summer.

pricedout
October 29th, 2007, 12:13 PM
I think it depends when you're going to fly and on what airline. The American terminal at JFK has been greatly improved over the last couple of years, but sometimes they only have two people handling baggage check.

A tip for international flyers leaving from JFK. If you find a flight on one of the US major carriers, check to see if they have a code-share with an international carrier. For example, many of Delta's flights to Rome are code shared with Alitalia, but they are the same flight. You'll usually get the same price (sometimes lower), you can still get the domestic carrier's frequent flyer points, and check in is usually much easier.:)