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Edward
October 14th, 2003, 11:46 PM
A quizz for tourists: how many taxis can you count in the pictures below? A quizz for New Yorkers: how many are available?


Traffic jam on Columbus Circle.

http://www.wirednewyork.com/manhattan/columbus_circle/columbus_circle_taxis_26sept03.jpg



A herd of taxis on Eighth Avenue at 42nd Street.

http://www.wirednewyork.com/images/taxi/taxi_42nd_2oct03.jpg


Howard and Edward Milstein are building the 850,000-square-foot building, 11 Times Square (http://www.wirednewyork.com/skyscrapers/11xsq/), which will combine office space, street-level stores and possibly apartments on a parking lot at the southeast corner of 42nd Street and Eighth Avenue. New York Times Tower (http://www.wirednewyork.com/skyscrapers/new_york_times_tower/) will replace the white 3-story building on 41st Street. 17 February 2003.

http://www.wirednewyork.com/skyscrapers/11xsq/images/11xsq_42nd_17feb03.jpg



Taxi's available. Thomas Struth's Video Portraits on the NBC Astrovision by Panasonic in Times Square.

http://www.wirednewyork.com/times_square/images/times_square_struth_panasonic_11may03.jpg

Dennis
October 16th, 2003, 10:10 AM
:shock: :o great!

Edward
October 25th, 2003, 11:46 PM
From the Harlem thread: Cobblestone street under the Henry Hudson Parkway.

http://www.wirednewyork.com/manhattan/images/cobblestone_130th_14sept03.jpg

Dennis
October 26th, 2003, 04:01 PM
very cool pics,

dont feel sorry if you wanna post more!
we like it! :D :shock: :P

Rob
October 31st, 2003, 05:56 PM
YEAH MAN!! THATS ROCKS

monaro
December 22nd, 2003, 11:21 AM
great pics :shock:

TLOZ Link5
December 22nd, 2003, 04:53 PM
Columbus Circle: 5 taxis, one vacant

Port Authority: 15 taxis, 6 vacant

Milstein site: One taxi, not vacant

Times Square: Two taxis, one vacant

krulltime
July 2nd, 2004, 10:09 AM
DRIVE TO OUTFIT TECHNO TAXIS


By CLEMENTE LISI
July 2, 2004

The city has started the process of placing "technological enhancements" inside yellow cabs by asking companies to submit ideas on how best to use the instruments, The Post has learned.

The Taxi and Limousine Commission has put out a "request for information" as a way of soliciting feedback from companies and gauging the options available to the agency.

"This starts the process between us and the various industries," said TLC Commissioner Matthew Daus. "We hope this will spark interest and ideas that will help us."

The enhancements that would go in each cab include Global Positioning Systems, credit/debit-card machines, text-messaging abilities and electronic maps in the back seat so passengers can track their location.

The TLC approved a 26 percent fare hike in March that included providing riders with technological perks by November 2005.

The purpose of the request is to solicit "feedback about different service-improvement options," with the goal of establishing a "pool of vendors."

A committee has been established to review the various plans the TLC will eventually have to approve.

"We're hopeful some great ideas will come out from this process," Daus said.


Copyright 2004 NYP Holdings, Inc.

krulltime
July 2nd, 2004, 10:15 AM
An electronic map is a super idea! :P Those maps they have in the back are useful but sometimes at night when is dark and trying to talk to the driver to turn the back laght on sometimes is a comunication challange.

The new electronic maps should also include maps of all the other boroughs as well. That is important.

Edward
September 27th, 2004, 12:51 AM
Getting a cab on Broadway.

http://www.wirednewyork.com/images/taxi/nyc_taxi_25sept04.jpg

Edward
October 23rd, 2004, 01:57 AM
Some useful information could be found on

New York Taxi & Limousine Commission (http://www.nyc.gov/html/tlc/html/home/home.shtml) website:

http://www.nyc.gov/html/tlc/html/passenger/passenger_info.shtml
http://www.nyc.gov/html/tlc/html/passenger/faq_pass.shtml

For example, I learned that cab drivers are not allowed to use cell phones! My experience was that they are always talking to someone.

NewYorkYankee
October 23rd, 2004, 12:48 PM
the pic above posted by edward in Spet. what area is this around? Chinatown?

Bowbridge
October 23rd, 2004, 02:01 PM
Looks like it's just south of Canal Street looking uptown. You can see the street sign on the right side of the pic.

NewYorkYankee
October 23rd, 2004, 02:14 PM
It looks very busy, Id like to live in one of those apartments above the street :)

Edward
April 24th, 2005, 11:45 PM
Yellow cabs on Eighth Avenue, near the Passenger Bus Terminal, with the crane for New York Times Tower (http://www.wirednewyork.com/skyscrapers/new_york_times_tower/).

http://www.wirednewyork.com/images/taxi/taxi_eighth_avenue.jpg (http://www.wirednewyork.com/guide/taxi/)

NewYorkYankee
April 25th, 2005, 07:50 PM
Great Pic Edward!

MagnumPI
April 25th, 2005, 08:00 PM
A cab on Canal St.

http://fotos.miarroba.com/fotos/f/4/f4951ef5.jpg

asg
April 27th, 2005, 12:01 PM
One block of West 42nd Street became a scene of mayhem when a taxicab rear-ended a station wagon, struck a pedestrian and then set off a string of other crashes.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v651/asg9000/taxi.jpg

TonyO
May 5th, 2005, 05:48 PM
NYTimes
May 5, 2005

Taxis to Go High Tech With Credit Cards and Commercials

By SEWELL CHAN
Riders will have to wait longer until they can use credit cards in all New York City taxicabs, and the price they may have to pay for that convenience is to endure commercials in the back seat.

The New York City Taxi and Limousine Commission voted unanimously yesterday to push back a Nov. 1 deadline for installing credit- and debit-card readers, passenger-information screens and devices that will transmit the locations of all cabs, while announcing that the new technology could also include ads aimed at riders.

A pilot project containing those innovations will still be started by Nov. 1, but installation in all 12,787 cabs could take months longer than originally expected because of the project's complexity, said the commission's chairman, Matthew W. Daus.

The commission required the devices in March 2004, when it raised fares for the first time in eight years. The new devices would represent one of the most dramatic changes in taxi regulation since the creation of the commission in 1971 and the installation of electronic meters in 1984.

In another change, the commission agreed yesterday to permit paid advertising and messages from commercial sponsors to be displayed on the electronic information screens. Such messages could evoke the recorded announcements - featuring the voices of Jackie Mason, Chris Rock, the Sesame Street character Elmo and other celebrities - that entertained tourists, irritated New Yorkers and infuriated drivers from 1997 to 2003.

The new advertisements are intended to help defray the cost of the credit-card and vehicle-locator technology, which could exceed $1,500 per cab. Passengers will be able to lower or turn off the sound of any commercial advertising under the rule changes passed yesterday.

The panel also voted to expand the text-messaging systems that will be installed in cabs so that drivers can send and receive information to and from the commission about lost property, traffic conditions and emergencies.

Last year, the commission talked to passengers and drivers and met with about 70 companies interested in providing various parts of the technology. In March of this year, the commission formally requested proposals from contractors. Bids were due this month and a three-year agreement with a primary contractor was to begin in August.

But the deadline for bids has now been pushed back to June, and the start of the work is likely to be delayed, officials said.

Mr. Daus, the chairman, who at the time of the March 2004 vote called the schedule for installing the technology "aggressive," said yesterday that the project was still moving forward.

But he said he could not say how many vehicles would be included in the pilot project or when the full installation would begin.

The seven commissioners held a public hearing to discuss changes to the plan, including the advertising, but most of the people at the hearing, which was held at the agency's headquarters on Rector Street in Lower Manhattan, raised concerns instead about the cost of the equipment and the potential misuse of the technology. Mr. Daus tried to address both concerns, but the rancor - which included the rare spectacle of commission employees escorting one driver out of the building - suggested that the proposed technology had not won wide acceptance.

"Taxi drivers are not lab animals," said one driver, Robert C. Kirk, 55, who added that he was particularly concerned about "noise pollution" from incessant exposure to commercial messages. He said it would be an "act of utter disregard for taxi drivers and the taxicab riding public" to force drivers to install credit-card readers when cash machines have proliferated.

Another driver, William Lindauer, 61, asked, "Since when do guinea pigs have to pay to be part of an experiment?"

Although the technological changes were approved almost 14 months ago, some critics said the proposal had not been fully thought out.

Erhan Tuncel, 45, a taxi owner and driver, said the upgrades should include the installation of global positioning system devices for drivers to use in finding their way around the city. "I have seven years of experience and I still have to use my five-borough map," he said. "The map is fine, but it is ridiculous to use when we have the most advanced technology available."

One commissioner, Harry E. Giannoulis, suggested that detailed route and trip information could produce an avalanche of unwanted advice from back-seat drivers. "I don't think we should give it to the passengers at all, or the passenger is going to be sitting there, screaming at the driver," he said, drawing laughs in the packed meeting room.

The most contentious moment in the two-hour meeting occurred when one driver, Kevin M. Fitzpatrick, asked whether the high proportion of Muslim drivers in the industry had anything to do with the installation of the vehicle-locator technology.

Noach Dear, a commissioner and a former city councilman, interrupted him. "I move that we don't need to hear any more from a racist," Mr. Dear said before guards led Mr. Fitzpatrick, 55, from the building.

Mr. Daus said the devices would be used only to collect information on routes and trips to analyze traffic and usage patterns, to resolve customer complaints and to help passengers find lost property. The locations of cabs would not be made available to the police unless specific records were subpoenaed, he said.

Mr. Daus acknowledged that the commission was seeking electronic records in part because some drivers had fraudulently altered the paper trip sheets they are required to maintain. The commission will be able to use the electronic data to adjudicate complaints against drivers in its so-called taxi court, although Mr. Daus said the records could just as easily exonerate drivers as inculpate them.

NewYorkYankee
May 5th, 2005, 07:18 PM
WELL, about time! Sometimes I didnt have cash so I couldnt take a taxi. I always have my cards though. :)

NewYorkYankee
May 5th, 2005, 07:25 PM
SO, they ARE or ARE NOT going to put detailed street maps? The thing about passengers screaming at the drivers threw me off.

TonyO
June 11th, 2005, 03:54 PM
NY Times
June 11, 2005

Designing a New Taxicab (But Keeping It Yellow)

http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2005/06/11/nyregion/11taxi_lg.jpg
A redesigned taxicab whose roof light more clearly indicates a vacancy.

By SEWELL CHAN
With all due respect to the Ford Crown Victoria, a group of architects, designers and urban planners say the classic New York City taxicab is in dire need of a makeover.

With measured support from city officials, including the chairman of the Taxi and Limousine Commission, a nonprofit group called the Design Trust for Public Space plans to "define the ideal taxi and taxi system of the future."

The group seeks to move well beyond basic innovations of recent decades, like air-conditioning and more legroom. It wants to reimagine the taxicab as a unique element of the urban landscape, and more than a reconfigured passenger sedan.

At a workshop on May 24, designers, architects, city officials and representatives of taxi owners and drivers sketched out an array of ideas.

The taxis themselves could include sunroofs, child car seats, sliding doors, wider entrances for wheelchair users and front-passenger seats that face the rear of the car.

Certain curbs and lanes could be designated for the exclusive use of cabs. Taxi stands could be built outside Manhattan, along with "convenience stations" with amenities for drivers.

Even the traditional mode of hailing a cab - hand in air, legs akimbo - is being rethought. One idea under discussion is a system to allow hailing a taxicab with a cellphone.

The wide-ranging ideas will be presented for the first time on Thursday afternoon at a public workshop at the Parsons School of Design, which is helping to organize the effort.

Among the 58 participants in the "Designing the Taxi" work group, perhaps the only common point of agreement is a sense that the Ford Crown Victoria is boring, if functional. The workmanlike sedan makes up about 93 percent of the New York City taxicab fleet.

The fleet, which totals 12,760 cabs, also includes several models of minivans, of which the Toyota Siena (865 vehicles), the Honda Odyssey (127) and the Isuzu Oasis (85) are the three most common.

The Ford Explorer, a sport utility vehicle, accounts for 16 cabs. (The last Checker cab was retired in 1999.)

"In a perfect world, the taxi would be a purpose-built vehicle, designed to be a taxi, just as a post-office vehicle is designed to deliver mail," said Deborah Marton, the executive director of the Design Trust.

"If you were to design a taxi to its Platonic essence, it would not be the Crown Victoria. It serves its purpose, but it's been pushed to the limit of its efficacy as a taxi vehicle."

Ms. Marton, who is a lawyer and a landscape architect, acknowledged that for economic reasons, any redesign of the taxi might well involve a reconfiguration of existing passenger vehicles on the market.

In the past, taxi-medallion owners have fiercely resisted any proposal to bring the distinctive London-style cab - which is spacious, distinctive and far more expensive than the Crown Victoria - to New York.

"Our goal here is to keep the taxi as democratic as possible," Ms. Marton said. "We don't want it to become the London version of the New York taxi."

Matthew W. Daus, the chairman of the Taxi and Limousine Commission, has given cautious support to the effort, assigning his first deputy commissioner, Andrew Salkin, to be part of the six-member steering committee that is overseeing the project.

"This is a good exercise to get the perspectives of consumers and passengers, and also of architects and designers who are not involved in the day-to-day business of cabs," Mr. Daus said in an interview. While he was not ready to endorse any specific proposal, he said of the taxi, "It's an icon, a recognizable part of the public space."

The genesis of the new effort stretches back to a controversial Museum of Modern Art exhibition, "The Taxi Project: Realistic Solutions for Today," that was open from June 17 to Sept. 6, 1976.

That exhibition was financed by the United States Department of Transportation, after all the major American automakers declined to participate. It drew critical acclaim but had virtually no impact on the industry.

"The average New York taxi is a combination of dilapidation, filth, inefficiency and acute Rube Goldbergian discomforts designed to torture, humiliate and frustrate, for a price," Ada Louise Huxtable, the architecture critic of The New York Times, wrote in her review.

Paul Goldberger, the dean of Parsons, said in an interview that he attended and vividly remembered the 1976 show.

"It was a wonderful and ambitious thing with some really neat vehicles that were created, but it had almost no meaning, because it was designers talking to other designers about design," he said. "There was no buy-in from the taxi industry, from the American manufacturers or from the city regulators who control the taxi industry. Drivers even picketed that exhibition."

Mr. Goldberger, a former architecture critic for The Times, said his school was supporting the new effort in part because of the strong bid to include taxi owners and drivers.

He described the current state of cabs as "really awful," adding, "What we do is take cars, and not even particularly good cars at that, paint them yellow and put a meter in them."

The current effort was financed with a $25,000 grant from the Lily Auchincloss Foundation, which tries to improve the quality of life in New York City, with support from Parsons and from Deborah Berke & Partners, an architectural firm.

Mr. Daus, the top taxicab regulator, said he looked forward to the unveiling of the proposals and would be open to almost every idea.

"The color of the cabs is off limits, as far as I'm concerned," he said. "There's such a history with yellow.

"If you took the yellow off the cab, I don't think it would be a cab anymore."

NewYorkYankee
June 11th, 2005, 05:22 PM
I prefer the Crown Vics over the vans. JMO

TonyO
June 30th, 2005, 05:10 PM
NY Daily News
Jun 30, 3:33 PM EDT

NY tries to make yellow cabs greener; will New Yorkers accept less legroom?

By DAVID B. CARUSO
Associated Press Writer

NEW YORK (AP) -- The quality of the air in New York City could come down to 10 inches of legroom.

That is approximately the difference in backseat space between a standard New York taxi and the new hybrid SUVs that environmentalists would like to see added to the city's fleet of 12,760 yellow cabs.

Whether New Yorkers are willing to give up the extra room is about to be tested.

Running on a combination of gasoline and electricity, the hybrids get double the gas mileage of traditional taxis and pollute far less. But for months, the city Taxi and Limousine Commission has been reluctant to allow them to be used as cabs.

Advertisement






The problem, explained commission chairman Matthew W. Daus, is that people like their cabs big, and hybrids do not have the legroom and large trunks of the fleet's current workhorse, an extra-long version of the Ford Crown Victoria.

"It would be unbelievably wonderful to have hybrid vehicles in our taxi fleet. I think it would have a profound effect on the environment," Daus said. "The one challenge that we have is that they are too small."

The City Council passed a bill Thursday that would allow taxi owners for the first time to put hybrids into service, starting in late summer. It would then be up to the taxi commission to decide which brands will be allowed.

Daus said the commission is close to selecting one or two models on a trial basis. From there, the success of the experiment could depend, at least in part, on whether New Yorkers will put up with less legroom.

Exactly how many hybrid cabs will ultimately hit the streets will be up to the cab owners and companies.

Mark A. Izeman, a lawyer with the Natural Resources Defense Council, said he is certain hybrids will be embraced by cabbies and customers alike.

"They'll take less legroom if they can breathe easier in the back seat," Izeman said. "If you converted the entire fleet of New York City taxicabs to hybrids, it would be the equivalent of taking 24,000 cars off the road, from a global warming perspective."

A trial of hybrid cabs in New York is likely to be watched closely by cab companies in other big cities, which have been similarly slow to embrace alternative-fuel taxis. Despite their potential to lower fuel costs, only a token number of vehicles running on clean fuels have been put into service as cabs nationwide.

Space has been a big concern, and so have reliability and power, said Alfred Lagasse, executive vice president of the Taxi, Limousine and Paratransit Association, a national trade organization for cab companies.

"We aren't used to that type of vehicle. We want to see what happens," Lagasse said. "Does it hold up to the wear and tear of taxi service? Do the customers accept it as a taxi?"

The industry asked a similar question about cabs running on compressed natural gas in the late 1990s, and got a mixed answer.

In New York, the city's taxi commission persuaded a peak of around 180 cabbies to switch to natural-gas cars, but largely abandoned the campaign in 2000 after drivers complained there were not enough fueling stations.

Drivers in other parts of the country voiced similar concerns, and Ford recently announced it would stop making a compressed natural gas version of the Crown Victoria.

Hybrids may hold more promise.

In San Francisco, a pair of companies added 15 hybrid Ford Escapes to the city's fleet of 1,400 taxis in February. The small SUVs have an in-town fuel efficiency rating of 36 miles to the gallon, compared with 18 for the Crown Victoria - an important advantage at a time of rising gas prices.

Yellow Cab Cooperative of San Francisco owns 10 of the hybrids. The company's general manager, Hal Mellegard, said customers seem to like them, but he is waiting to see how the vehicles hold up on the city's famous hills.

"I expect a car to be running well after just 50,000 miles," he said. "When we get to 90,000 miles, we'll talk."

thomasjfletcher
June 30th, 2005, 06:38 PM
we need johnny cabs...!

http://www.alvarezwaxmodels.com/Images/Film%20Images/johnny-cab.jpg

New York Lover
July 6th, 2005, 01:27 AM
http://tastesgood.org/2005/06/12/192535.html

http://www.urbanphoto.net/forum/viewtopic.php?t=401&highlight=york

krulltime
September 9th, 2005, 11:24 AM
HYBRID CABS OK TO ROLL


By RICH CALDER Transit Reporter
September 9, 2005

The city's Taxi and Limousine Commission yesterday gave cabdrivers some much-needed relief from sky-high gas prices, by approving the use of hybrid vehicles as taxis.

The commission's decision gives the city's 12,760 taxicab drivers the option to convert from gas-guzzling Ford Crown Victorias to any of six car models that run on both gas and electricity. The new cabs are expected to be on the road in a little more than a month.

"I believe the TLC made history today," said its chairman, Matthew Daus. "The fact that any medallion owner can now choose to replace their retiring taxicabs with cleaner and more economical hybrid-electric vehicles will both yield environmental benefits and save them money at the gas pump."

Daus also said the hybrids are cheaper to buy than the Crown Victorias, and that their purchasers are eligible for potential state and federal tax incentives that total, in some instances, more than $6,000.

The TLC's vote comes as the leading driver groups say the recent spike in gas prices following Hurricane Katrina is sucking an extra $20 or so daily from cabbies' incomes.

The commission discussed proposals from three taxi-driver organizations that are pressing for a new surcharge of $1 to $2 per ride to combat the spike in gas prices.

The Taxi Workers' Alliance, which represents 6,500 "yellow" cabbies, is leading the drive by proposing an immediate surcharge of $1 — and an extra 50 cents for every dollar increase in the cost of a gallon of gas. Daus said the proposals are under consideration.

Before yesterday's decision to approve the hybrids, the TLC for more than two years was regularly accused by the City Council of dragging its feet on the issue.

Mayor Bloomberg in July signed a council bill into law mandating the TLC set the new rules.


Additional reporting by Bill Sanderson

Copyright 2005 NYP Holdings, Inc.

BigMac
November 4th, 2005, 04:47 PM
NY1
November 4, 2005

First Fleet Of Hybrid Taxi Cabs Hits The Streets

http://www.ny1.com/ny1/content/images/live/89/176427.jpg

Although they won't officially be unveiled until next week, the city's first fleet of six hybrid taxi cabs hit the streets Friday.

The new cabs are SUVs, hybrid versions of the Ford Escape.

Hybrids run on a combination of gasoline and electricity, getting much better gas mileage and releasing fewer pollutants.

In September, the Taxi and Limousine Commission approved the use of six models of hybrid vehicles to be used as taxis.

Copyright © 2005 NY1 News

Comelade
November 4th, 2005, 05:13 PM
the history taxi
http://www.pbs.org/wnet/taxidreams/

Gregory Tenenbaum
November 7th, 2005, 05:44 AM
Great images there Edward. Really great.

I am doing a series of paintings entitled "Dunces in the Big Smoke" or "Dunces in the City", and your photos of herds of taxis has inspired me to entitle one painting

"Leave Your Pickup at the GW Bridge, Dunce"

ECTO-1
January 2nd, 2006, 01:35 AM
Anybody else miss Checker Cabs? I loved those things.

DirtyHabit
May 14th, 2006, 06:37 PM
Anybody else miss Checker Cabs? I loved those things. I have one sitting on my driveway. I bought it off the orginal owner in 1994 and shipped back to England
1884

ablarc
May 14th, 2006, 10:44 PM
Anybody else miss Checker Cabs? I loved those things.
Me too. Plenty of legroom, easy to get in and out of, room for my family of five.

Wish they were back, though a fleet of London cabs would make an excellent substitute.

The Isuzus and older Hondas were also OK: regular doors in place of the sliders you find on the newer Hondas and Toyotas.

Dead last: the dreaded Crown Victoria.

milleniumcab
June 3rd, 2006, 01:37 PM
Everybody loved my old Honda Odysee...But some have problem getting into my new Toyota, which is a little higher, and have hard time closing the sliding doors.. you won't see me driving a Crown vic again though, piece of garbage that they are...

ondaponda
June 17th, 2006, 01:09 PM
i am a cab driver. i,ve been driving cab for 10 years. let me tell you something about talking on the cell. cab driver are not talking about like where the chicks are? or where the party is gonna be?. they are talking about where are the passengers and how to get to the destination or where are the cops with speeding tickets etc. dont even think that be a cabby is just sitting and driving around and looking at girls. ok. and one more thing , you should also learn that passengers are not allowed to smoke, drink, eat,have sex bla bla bla etc in the cab . and i,ve seen this a lot,almost every day that passengers are doing these things inside the cab.
have a good one :D


keep the city running.hit the fcuker and go.:mad:

Some useful information could be found on

New York TAxi & Limousine Commission (http://www.nyc.gov/html/tlc/html/home/home.shtml) website:

http://www.nyc.gov/html/tlc/html/passenger/passenger_info.shtml
http://www.nyc.gov/html/tlc/html/passenger/faq_pass.shtml

For example, I learned that cab drivers are not allowed to use cell phones! My experience was that they are always talking to someone.

lofter1
June 17th, 2006, 02:11 PM
... where are the cops with speeding tickets

Hmmmm...

Why would that be a worry to a cab driver?

milleniumcab
June 17th, 2006, 03:43 PM
Hmmmm...

Why would that be a worry to a cab driver?

Most of those radars are painted yellow, if you know what I mean.;)..

misterbarlow
June 21st, 2006, 10:03 PM
Made my first visit to both the US and NY last wknd and I have to say, on the taxi journey from JFK to my hotel I was sh!tting myself...
I have never seen such mental driving in all my life as NY taxi drivers...
I mean i'm a bit of a mad driver here in the UK and he even put the wind up me.. hehe..
It was crazy... and all wknd every time we got in one it was the same.. they are all nuts.. I cant believe there are not more crashes given how many of em are on the road out there.... It really was an eye opener!!!

Also can any NY locals answer me this.. On the cabs info thing in the back it says drivers MUST (and must was underlined) use EZPASS for bridges/tunnels and pass discount onto passenegers, but on both inbound and outbound trips to/from JFK both drivers asked me for the $4.50 toll for the Q-M tunnel... are they supposed to do that?? Do ALL cabs have an EZPASS??

BPC
June 22nd, 2006, 12:43 AM
I use yellow cabs all the time, and my experience has been 99% positive.

antinimby
June 22nd, 2006, 04:26 AM
misterbarlow, while I'm not certain whether taxicabs are legally required to have EZPass or not, I do know that the difference in toll charges is only 0.50 cents more without it.
Therefore, I don't think you should be too concerned about it.
Did you enjoy your trip? :)

misterbarlow
June 22nd, 2006, 08:10 AM
Yeah I did enjoy it, thought its a fantastic place...
Always wanted to go there for years and finally got around to it...
Found it all a bit overwhelming at first and a big culture shock, coming from a small Welsh city of just 300,000 people, it even makes London look quiet, but you get used to it after a day or so...

Not too bad then if the ezpass is only 50c cheaper...

Ninjahedge
June 22nd, 2006, 09:34 AM
misterbarlow, while I'm not certain whether taxicabs are legally required to have EZPass or not, I do know that the difference in toll charges is only 0.50 cents more without it.
Therefore, I don't think you should be too concerned about it.
Did you enjoy your trip? :)

Difference is $1 on all the Hudson crossings, and even more during non-peak ($2 I think).

Queens Midtown is a different story, however, and I cannot be sure what it is...

ZippyTheChimp
June 22nd, 2006, 10:18 AM
I have never seen such mental driving in all my life So you didn't mean that they were thinking about what they were doing?

lofter1
June 22nd, 2006, 10:39 AM
... a bit overwhelming at first and a big culture shock, coming from a small Welsh city of just 300,000 people ...

Anywhere near Llanelly?

Ninjahedge
June 22nd, 2006, 10:52 AM
So you didn't mean that they were thinking about what they were doing?

Was that sarcasm?

I would check my notes if I had any.......

AmeriKenArtist
June 23rd, 2006, 06:45 PM
EDWARD! s'been a while since I've been here.......

milleniumcab
June 24th, 2006, 12:18 AM
Also can any NY locals answer me this.. On the cabs info thing in the back it says drivers MUST (and must was underlined) use EZPASS for bridges/tunnels and pass discount onto passenegers, but on both inbound and outbound trips to/from JFK both drivers asked me for the $4.50 toll for the Q-M tunnel... are they supposed to do that?? Do ALL cabs have an EZPASS??

Yes, the taxi drivers must use E-Z Pass when crossing any toll bridge or tunnel and they are not allowed to charge more than the discounted amount.

One more thing, we are not all mental drivers. You just got unlucky with your picks, I guess...:p... Better luck next time, unless you enjoy the mental driving, hehehe..

lofter1
June 24th, 2006, 01:48 AM
Today I saw a NYC Yellow Cab with a siren and flashing interior red light (on the dash) zooming down 33rd St. by the ESB. The driver looked like he could be a NYC cop. It was about 1 PM and NYPD was pulling one of their "Operation Atlas" exercises on 5th Ave / 34th (needless to say the tourists were both freaked out and really excited).

Question: Is it standard practice for NYPD to use yellow cabs for undercover vehicles?

milleniumcab
June 24th, 2006, 12:52 PM
Question: Is it standard practice for NYPD to use yellow cabs for undercover vehicles?

Yes , NYPD use taxis for undercover work. They are assigned certain medallion numbers and those med #s are taking out of the nyc taxi fleet.

Gregory Tenenbaum
June 25th, 2006, 05:36 AM
Stunning photos, one of the great posts on this site.

lofter1
June 26th, 2006, 07:58 PM
Yes , NYPD use taxis for undercover work. They are assigned certain medallion numbers ...
Within 5 minutes of each other I saw 2 undercover NYC yellow cabs today -- one pulled somebody over on 8th Ave/43rd (cab # 2W85) and the other was zooming up 8th Ave with siren / lights ablaze, trailed by a patrol car (cab # 2W65).

milleniumcab
June 26th, 2006, 09:37 PM
Within 5 minutes of each other I saw 2 undercover NYC yellow cabs today -- one pulled somebody over on 8th Ave/43rd (cab # 2W85) and the other was zooming up 8th Ave with siren / lights ablaze, trailed by a patrol car (cab # 2W65).

2W65 and 2W85 are two of the medallion numbers assigned to NYPD... They won't be stopping to pick you up..:D

lofter1
June 27th, 2006, 12:01 AM
Any idea how many of those U/C cabs there are lurking in our midst?

milleniumcab
June 27th, 2006, 12:27 AM
Any idea how many of those U/C cabs there are lurking in our midst?

I don't exactly but my guess is, around a dozen.. But I can always tell from the med #s..
Maybe it is not a very good idea to mention the numbers.. Criminals might be reading the forum..:(

Ninjahedge
June 27th, 2006, 09:45 AM
If you can read those numbers as the guy is pulling up behind you, GL, but by that time, they have usually spotted you doing something wrong.

Not only that, I think the guy in the drivers seat wearing a policemans uniform is a dead giveaway... ;)

lofter1
June 27th, 2006, 11:31 AM
They wear the u/c nypd "uniform": invariably a yankees shirt over a T and jeans

milleniumcab
June 28th, 2006, 01:48 AM
Lofter1 is right..Any cop in an undercover taxi is not dressed in uniform.. One will be posing as the driver and the other one will be in the back seat as a passenger...

Ninjahedge
June 28th, 2006, 09:36 AM
They wear the u/c nypd "uniform": invariably a yankees shirt over a T and jeans

Then I just guess you will have to tell that to the guy I saw, in a cops uniform, writing a ticket while sitting in the drivers seat for another yellow cab he pulled over in front of St Lukes on Hudson Street....

;)

milleniumcab
June 28th, 2006, 08:52 PM
^Was this on the west side of Hudson? It must have been, those bike lanes are a trap for cab drivers. I try my best not to pick up on bike lanes but sometimes you have to.:(

milleniumcab
June 28th, 2006, 08:55 PM
I guess it is possible for the cop to be in a uniform.. I have never seen one though..

milleniumcab
September 26th, 2006, 10:18 PM
RATE HIKE WORTH WAIT: CABBIES http://pqasb.pqarchiver.com/art/null.gif http://pqasb.pqarchiver.com/art/null.gif http://pqasb.pqarchiver.com/art/null.gif http://pqasb.pqarchiver.com/art/null.gif New York Post - New York, N.Y. Author: JEREMY OLSHAN Transit Reporter Date: Sep 15, 2006 Start Page: http://pqasb.pqarchiver.com/art/null.gif


Waiting in New York is a bargain compared to Miami, Boston, or Seattle, TLC Chairman Matthew Daus said. "We're at the bottom of the barrel and it's really not fair. Drivers deserve this and passengers can handle it".







The waiting time is to be doubled to $24 per hour from current $12 per hour.. This rate have not seen a hike since 1990..


And the flat rate of $45 from JFK into Manhattan will also apply to trips back to JFK from any location in Manhattan thus ending the confusion that has been there since the implimentation of the flat rate...

milleniumcab
September 26th, 2006, 10:22 PM
Commission Is Set to Discuss a Possible Increase in Taxi Fares


September 14, 2006, Thursday
By WILLIAM NEUMAN (NYT); Metropolitan Desk.....The Taxi and Limousine Commission is to begin considering today a plan that would increase taxi fares by as much as 11 percent, as well as the creation of a flat fare of $45 from Manhattan to Kennedy Airport, to mirror the fare for trips in the opposite direction, ...

Schadenfrau
October 26th, 2006, 04:04 PM
Here's a taxi fare finder that seems to be pretty accurate. Hopefully this will cut down on the amount of questions we get about cost:

http://www.nyccabfare.com/

milleniumcab
October 26th, 2006, 10:22 PM
New York City cabs have gotten a fare adjustment on the standing meter!...

Idle taxis, running meters: Cost of NYC cab ride jumps - USATODAY.com (http://javascript<b></b>:ol('http://www.emailthis.clickability.com/et/emailThis?clickMap%3dviewThis%26etMailToID%3d21402 71888');)*

milleniumcab
October 28th, 2006, 12:42 AM
INCREASE IN CAB FARES

NY TIMES...

By WILLIAM NEUMAN (http://query.nytimes.com/search/query?ppds=bylL&v1=WILLIAM%20NEUMAN&fdq=19960101&td=sysdate&sort=newest&ac=WILLIAM%20NEUMAN&inline=nyt-per)
Published: October 26, 2006
The Taxi and Limousine Commission (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/reference/timestopics/organizations/t/taxi_and_limousine_commission/index.html?inline=nyt-org) yesterday unanimously approved a fare increase that will double the amount a passenger pays while a cab is stopped or stuck in slow traffic. The change amounts to an increase of approximately 11 percent to the overall fare. Taxi meters now charge 20 cents a minute while the vehicle is stopped or moving slowly. Under the new fare, which will go into effect in early December, the meter will charge 40 cents a minute. The commission also set a $45 flat rate fare from anywhere in Manhattan to Kennedy International Airport, to mirror the flat fare in effect for trips from the airport to Manhattan.

milleniumcab
October 28th, 2006, 12:46 AM
October 26, 2006
Manhattan: Increase in Cab Fares

By WILLIAM NEUMAN (javascript:ol('http://query.nytimes.com/search/query?ppds%3dbylL%26amp;v1%3dWILLIAM+NEUMAN%26amp; fdq%3d19960101%26amp;td%3dsysdate%26amp;sort%3dnew est%26amp;ac%3dWILLIAM+NEUMAN%26amp;inline%3dnyt-per');)
The Taxi and Limousine Commission (javascript:ol('http://topics.nytimes.com/top/reference/timestopics/organizations/t/taxi_and_limousine_commission/index.html?inline%3dnyt-org');) yesterday unanimously approved a fare increase that will double the amount a passenger pays while a cab is stopped or stuck in slow traffic. The change amounts to an increase of approximately 11 percent to the overall fare. Taxi meters now charge 20 cents a minute while the vehicle is stopped or moving slowly. Under the new fare, which will go into effect in early December, the meter will charge 40 cents a minute. The commission also set a $45 flat rate fare from anywhere in Manhattan to Kennedy International Airport, to mirror the flat fare in effect for trips from the airport to Manhattan.

Copyright 2006 (javascript:ol('http://www.nytimes.com/ref/membercenter/help/copyright.html');) The New York Times Company (javascript:ol('http://www.nytco.com/');)

New York Daily News
Cab fare hike? Yes, just wait & you'll see
BY IVAN PEREIRA and PETE DONOHUE
DAILY NEWS WRITERS
Thursday, October 26th, 2006

Good thing Santa uses a sleigh. Just in time for the holidays, the Taxi and Limousine Commission yesterday jacked up the cost of a cab ride - boosting the rate that passengers pay when cabs are stuck in traffic.
The new fare scheme, expected to go into effect in December, will increase the cost of an average trip - 2.8 miles with about 5 minutes of so-called wait time - by about $1. Such a trip now costs $8.65.
Cab riders were not in good cheer when told about the vote.
"It's outrageous," said Kate Cardamone, 80, of the upper East Side. "It's already expensive to live in New York."
Angie Hughes, 26, of Manhattan, said she's going underground.
"I'll probably be taking the subway a lot more now," Hughes said. "It's not a good fare increase because the traffic here gets worse and worse, and everything is going up."
But cabbies such as Leslie Destine, 60, from Brooklyn, said the higher fares are needed for them to make a decent living.
"It's a good idea," Destine said. "With slow traffic I don't make that much."
TLC Chairman Matthew Daus said the rate adjustment, as officials call it, is needed to ensure that a cabbie shortage doesn't develop.
"An experienced driver is safer, and quite frankly, an experienced driver is one that serves better," Daus said.

Here's the cost of a 2.8-mile trip under different traffic conditions and so-called wait times.
Current fare scheme
Wait time and fare
1 minute ......... $7.90
4.77 minutes .....8.65
9.54 minutes .... 9.61
New fare scheme with increased wait-time rate
Wait time and fare
1 minute ........... $8.10
4.77 minutes ...... 9.60
9.54 minutes .....11.52
Calculations do not include surcharges or tips.


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HAIL $TORM OVER 'SLOW-TAXI' HIKE By JENNIFER FERMINO and JEREMY OLSHAN
October 26, 2006 -- A New York minute just got a lot more expensive. That's because the Taxi and Limousine Commission yesterday doubled the cost of being stuck in traffic in a cab.
Riders now pay 20 cents a minute for "wait time" - a price that hasn't changed in 16 years - but yesterday, officials voted unanimously to raise the rate to 40 cents a minute at a meeting in TLC headquarters.
Adding insult to injury, the wait-time rate will now click in when a cab starts going less than 12 miles per hour. Currently, the rate takes effect at under 6 mph.
Traffic experts say the average speed on avenues in Manhattan is 10.2 mph and on crosstown streets its 7.5 mph - meaning that most rides in the Big Apple will now be charged at 40 cents a minute.
When the cab is moving faster than 12 mph, the rate will stay $2 a mile in increments of 40 cents per fifth of a mile. The hike to $2 a mile came in 2004, and was a 26 percent increase on the previous pricing scheme.
The new rates mean that the average trip will go up by about a buck, according to TLC estimates.
But some trips could jump much more.
An average trip within Midtown - 1.13 miles with 6 minutes of idle time - currently costs $5.58, according to "The 2006 Taxicab Fact Book."
At the new rate, the same trip would clock in at $6.80 - a 21.9 percent hike.
A ride from Grand Central to Union Square - 2.19 miles - would jump just over 15 percent.
TLC Chairman Matthew Daus said the hike, which is expected to go into effect in December, was about giving cabbies a better standard of living.
"It's not easy to tell passengers that they are going to have to pay a little bit more," he said. But "we want to make sure that the drivers can make an adequate income."
Drivers are now earning an average of $158 per shift, according to industry experts. If they put in five shifts a week, that already means $41,000 a year.
And many cabbies might now opt to work extra shifts, Daus said.
He predicted more cabs will hit the streets during rush hour - when it's notoriously difficult to hail a ride - because cabbies can make more money.
The news of the hike was well received by drivers, who've long bemoaned the struggles of operating in one of the country's most costly and congested cities.
"It's about time," said driver Erhan Tuncel. "Traffic has gotten worse, not better."
Passengers, not surprisingly, disagreed strongly.
"We're stuck in traffic and we're paying more?" said Tanya Mazyck, 41, of Queens. "This isn't fair - but this is New York and it's never fair. I'll definitely take less cabs."
Shawn Obasi, 24, said he frequently takes cabs home to The Bronx after a weekend night in Manhattan. "I take cabs a lot, it's definitely going to affect me," he said. "That's a big difference."
Edmundo Gallardo, 46, of Queens, said, "I know a lot of cabdrivers that make money. They complain about the gas but look at gas prices - they've gone down."
Cabbies have been asking for a gas surcharge for a long time and were turned down. Yesterday's ruling may have been a way to compensate them.
But Katherine Ramirez, 34, of the Upper West Side, said that with the city's usual gridlock, raising the cost of waiting made no sense.
"It's insane. You know how much traffic there is in Manhattan," she said.
But Ioannis Mentzas, 34, of Queens, said: "It's still cheaper than hailing a gypsy cab."
In addition to the fare hike, the eight-member board also approved:
* A flat fare of $45 on trips from Manhattan to Kennedy Airport. The rate previously applied only to trips from JFK to Manhattan.
* A controversial move eliminating the requirement that cabbies demonstrate they are legal U.S. residents.
They now will only have to produce their original Social Security card and a valid driver's license.
"We don't have any business asking people if they are a citizen or not," Daus said.
jeremy.olshan@nypost.com (http://www.wirednewyork.com/cgi-bin/compose?mailto=1&msg=88CEF47D-D94E-48E6-8E0F-196CFAA1EFBE&start=0&len=53043&src=&type=x&to=jeremy.olshan@nypost.com&cc=&bcc=&subject=&body=&curmbox=00000000-0000-0000-0000-000000000001&a=e87f8268dfaee30fd93aeea63e2b56b876d0d1658e064730 f2ee64ac92d0a536)

NEW YORK POST is a registered trademark of NYP Holdings, Inc.
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Cab fares go up

By Sara Stefanini
Special to amNewYork

October 26, 2006
Sitting in a yellow cab stuck in traffic will soon be more taxing on your wallet.

With enthusiastic backing from taxi drivers and advocates, the Taxi and Limousine Commission unanimously voted Wednesday to double the amount charged on the meter when a cab idles, raising the cost of an average fare by about a dollar.

Once the changes kick in, possibly in December, the meter will climb to 40 cents a minute when the car goes 12 miles per hour or less, instead of 20 cents a minute at 6 mph or less.

Although taxi fares went up in 2004, this is the first increase on "wait time" since 1990. The increase will bring the average taxi fare without tips to $9.61 from $8.65, the commission said, with cabs earning $24 for an hour of wait time, instead of $12.

The board also approved a flat $45 fare for cab rides from anywhere in Manhattan to Kennedy Airport, the same fee that already exists for trips originating at the airport.

But even that new flat fee is in essence a hike, as the average cost of a trip to the airport from Manhattan now is $36 to $43, except for rides from Washington Heights, which average $46.

"On behalf of 4,000 taxi drivers, thank you," David Pollack, executive director of the Committee for Taxi Safety, told the commission at Wednesday's public hearing.

"Thank you for understanding the pressures taxi drivers go through sitting in traffic."

Pollack noted that the new flat airport fare will encourage passengers to hail yellow cabs instead of using private cars or "gypsy" taxis, which people perceive to be cheaper but can charge up to $75.

New York has the 15th highest average fare out of 23 American cities, according to Schaller Consulting, which researches urban transportation issues.

When the commission last boosted taxi prices in 2004, the base price went up 50 cents to $2.50. When not idling, the meter charges 40 cents every one-fifth of a mile.

The wait-time hike was necessary to compensate for higher gas prices, said Bruce Schaller, the Brooklyn-based firm's principal consultant, adding that several cities have also upped fares.

Ehran Tuncel, a taxi driver, said the increase will also make cab rides safer because many drivers speed in order to keep the meter ticking.

"It's about time, really," Tuncel said. "People always complain about reckless taxi drivers."

Passengers' reactions Wednesday were mixed.

Mike Puno, a Fordham University senior, didn't mind too much.

"They're expensive already, in general, but for me a dollar isn't that bad," Puno, 21, said.

Leslie Woody, 46, rolled her eyes when she heard the news.

"That's crazy," said Woody, a funeral director who often takes taxis. "Knowing that, I'll take them even less."
Copyright 2006 Newsday Inc.

milleniumcab
November 15th, 2006, 11:17 AM
The taxi fare adjustment with the waiting time being increased to .40c per minute will take effect starting 12:01 AM, November 30th.. JFK flat rate of $45 will also apply to trips from Manhattan to JFK...

lofter1
December 1st, 2006, 01:01 PM
It's the little things that get you ...




The taxi fare adjustment with the waiting time being increased to .40c per minute will take effect starting 12:01 AM, November 30th ...

TICKER SHOCK AT REAL TAXI HIKE

PROMISED 11% BOOST GOES AS HIGH AS 27%

nypost.com (http://www.nypost.com/seven/12012006/news/regionalnews/ticker_shock_at_real_taxi_hike_regionalnews_mark_b ulliet_and_jeremy_olshan.htm)
By MARK BULLIET and JEREMY OLSHAN

December 1, 2006 -- Taxi riders saw red at every stop light yesterday as fare hikes up to 27 percent kicked in - after New Yorkers were promised they'd average only 11 percent.

Most of the increase came from boosts in the amount cabbies charge for time they're at a dead stop or crawling.

When The Post put the new fare to the test, a ride from Penn Station to the Metropolitan Museum of Art came to $18.50. The 5-mile, 29-minute midday trip would have cost $3 less the day before - an increase of nearly 20 percent.

Passengers were hit even harder on trips closer to rush hour.

It took 66 minutes to make the 8.7-mile journey from Lincoln Center to Grand Army Plaza in Brooklyn during the afternoon, including 37 minutes of waiting time. Under new fare rules, the cost spiked $7.30, or 26.8 percent, to $34.50.

The Taxi and Limousine Commission had said the increase would amount to only a buck for an average ride - or 11 percent.

"I think it's horrible," said Lisa Navarro, who lives on the Upper West Side. "I think [drivers] are rude. I don't think they should get any more money."

Candyce Kannengieser, a Long Island high-school teacher, said she wouldn't mind the increase if it came with better service.

"Considering that the service hasn't improved, I don't really think it's fair," said Kannengieser, 34. "In fact, the service seems to have declined."
"It's appalling, I hate New York cabs!" said Aisling McEvoy, 45.

The Upper West Side mom said her ride from West 81st Street and Riverside Drive to Midtown used to cost $9 - but yesterday, it was $12.

"If the service was good, it wouldn't be a big thing," said her husband, Eric McEvoy.

Midtown resident Russell Keith, said, "What are you gonna do? It sucks. I've lived in Manhattan forever. I take cabs everywhere. It's an absolute outrage."

Cabbies, on the other hand, saw green at every light.

The said the change amounts to about a $50-a-day raise.

"Wednesday I made $160," Harpal Chalal said yesterday, his third day driving a cab.

"But today, I have already made that much, and I still have four hours left on my shift."

Drivers have long complained that they lose big dollars in slow traffic and that the fare structure had a built-in incentive to be reckless and run red lights.

"It's much safer," driver Eduard Tamarov, 41, said. "They should have done it a long time ago."

Taxi officials say drivers will now earn about $24 an hour, whether they are moving or sitting in slow traffic.

And though they weren't happy about paying more, some passengers said they couldn't really argue with the need for an increase.

"I think it's a deserved price raise with insurance and gas prices going up," Neil Bond, 50, of White Plains said after paying his fare. Yesterday, cabs also started charging the same $45 flat rate on rides from Manhattan to Kennedy Airport that previously applied only on trips from the airport.

Additional reporting by Tom Liddy

Copyright 2006NYP Holdings, Inc.

daver
December 1st, 2006, 01:46 PM
Party at milleniumcab's place, he's rolling in it! :D

I already didn't take cabs because of the cost when the subway is so ubiquitous and cheap. But hey, if you've got the cash, what's a 10-20-30% hike? Realistically, a 66 minute ride for $34 is not out of the question at all when you consider fuel, insurance, the cab, the driver, other supporting stuff. Hell, it is a bargain.

But not as much of one as my $2* subway ride!



*Good through May 2008.

eddhead
December 1st, 2006, 04:04 PM
Party at milleniumcab's place, he's rolling in it! :D

I already didn't take cabs because of the cost when the subway is so ubiquitous and cheap. But hey, if you've got the cash, what's a 10-20-30% hike? Realistically, a 66 minute ride for $34 is not out of the question at all when you consider fuel, insurance, the cab, the driver, other supporting stuff. Hell, it is a bargain.

But not as much of one as my $2* subway ride!



*Good through May 2008.

I agree. Besides, driving a cab has to be one of the toughest jobs in the city.

milleniumcab
December 2nd, 2006, 02:32 AM
The POST was in the wrong cab for these sample fares..I would have saved them at least 15 minutes ( $3.00 ) to Grand Army Plaza..)))

And the fare from Penn Station to the MET museum was never $15.50 so I find it hard to believe that it is $18.50 now... The distance from PS to MMoA is not 5 miles as they claim. It is more like 3 miles, maybe slightly more..

Some reporting from the best BS paper in NYC.. Maybe they got to hire me and go at it again.:))))

To the NY Post Editor.....Get a life...... Sincerely, MC

milleniumcab
December 2nd, 2006, 02:44 AM
One more thing; before this adjustment the meter made $12.00 waiting and $30.00 moving. Closing the gap to $24.00 to $30.00 evened the playing field for all cabbies. Most will slow down and make it a safer ride...Also they will be happier and serve better..;)

milleniumcab
December 2nd, 2006, 02:58 AM
Party at milleniumcab's place, he's rolling in it! :D

Even a person who doesn't take cabs is welcomed to my party, if I ever throw one....:D

ablarc
December 2nd, 2006, 10:16 AM
Most will slow down and make it a safer ride...
A good thing, as long as they don't overdo it. Where I live, most cabs are used by poor folk who don't have cars, so the cabbies poke along like hearses. Saves wear and tear on the cabs; consequently some are over twenty years old. The drivers act like geriatric cases.

lofter1
December 2nd, 2006, 10:30 AM
Closing the gap to $24.00 to $30.00 evened the playing field for all cabbies. Most will slow down and make it a safer ride...

Also they will be happier and serve better...

And now they'll stop blasting their damned horns, too :confused: :rolleyes:

milleniumcab
December 2nd, 2006, 01:02 PM
A good thing, as long as they don't overdo it. Where I live, most cabs are used by poor folk who don't have cars, so the cabbies poke along like hearses. Saves wear and tear on the cabs; consequently some are over twenty years old. The drivers act like geriatric cases.

There is no reason for a NY cabbie to milk the cow on purpose. Even with the waiting time increased, more money to be made from multiple pickups. There is enough business here in the city..

milleniumcab
December 2nd, 2006, 01:03 PM
And now they'll stop blasting their damned horns, too :confused: :rolleyes:

Probably not all but I hope so Lofter, I really do...

lofter1
December 2nd, 2006, 07:35 PM
Me, too ...

Here's one very unfortunate cabbie I saw today in SoHo who had some trouble with a left turn :eek:

He managed to hit not one but THREE parked cars (luckily it seems that no one was hurt) ...

http://i130.photobucket.com/albums/p242/Lofter1/20%20Thompson/20Thompson_03d1_Crash.jpg

Edward
December 11th, 2006, 09:46 PM
Yellow cabs on Fifth Avenue, in front of Salvatore Ferragamo store.

http://static.flickr.com/125/320063284_54f7becca3_o.jpg (http://www.flickr.com/photos/sudentas/)

BigMac
December 15th, 2006, 11:26 AM
AM New York
December 15, 2006

New taxis have TV, GPS and more

Associated Press

http://www.amny.com/media/alternatethumbnails/story/2006-12/26905048.jpg

Photos: New high-tech taxicabs (http://www.amny.com/news/local/newyork/am-taxi1215-pg,0,2191571.photogallery)

New York's next generation of cabs is coming -- complete with TV.

The new features -- designed to help riders pass the time, pay the fare and even find their lost umbrellas -- are expected to start hitting the streets within two weeks.

The city Taxi & Limousine Commission gave a preview Thursday, showing off a touch-screen device that lets passengers check news and weather reports, look up restaurant reviews and track their cab's progress on an electronic map.

The tracking feature also promises to make it easier for riders to retrieve things they leave behind. Rather than racking their minds for a medallion number, riders will be able to call a city information line and say where they were dropped off and what was lost. The taxi commission will work from that to try to find the cab.

The new features also include a credit-card reader, a significant addition for the largely cash-only taxi system. Riders can even calculate a tip.

And perhaps best of all, especially for riders driven to distraction by an experiment with "taxi TV" a few years ago, passengers can turn it all off.

"If you want a silent trip, you're going to get it," said Taxi & Limousine Commissioner Matthew Daus.

The new features have been in the works since a 2004 fare increase. Drivers can choose from four different models.

"We wanted to have a smorgasbord for drivers to pick from," said Transportation Commissioner Iris Weinshall.

The taxi commission flirted with television in taxis in 2003, but the 515 touch-screens were yanked within months.

Some passengers bemoaned the inescapable flickering of screens that could be muted but not turned off. The taxi commission ultimately said surveys showed passengers were either indifferent to or annoyed by them, though some taxi-TV companies said otherwise.

Copyright 2006 AM New York

milleniumcab
December 15th, 2006, 11:42 AM
There are 4 vendors approved for this technology improvement. They are each going to put 50 cabs on the road for test purposes. The City(Taxi & Limousine Commission) will also be involved in this final testing stage. If all goes well, all taxis are expected to have the GPS by the end of Summer/07..

All I want is the City to make sure this GPS works to a reasonable accuracy (95&#37;, no less)..Otherwise it will be a disaster...I remember, the MTA tried to track their busses with GPS few years ago. But they were not succesful.. They said the skyscrapers in Manhattan made it impossible for GPS to work..

I am skeptical..:confused: ..I hope they don't make us spend thousands of dollars for something that doesn't work properly..:eek:

TonyO
December 16th, 2006, 11:23 AM
Taxi and Limousine Commission Unveils New High-Tech Fleet

BY ANNIE KARNI - Special to the Sun
December 15, 2006
URL: http://www.nysun.com/article/45242

Cab-riding New Yorkers may be watching television during their commutes and paying with plastic come Monday.

The era of handwritten trip sheets and paying cabbies solely in cash is coming to an end, as the city's yellow cabs enter the 21st century with backseat screens broadcasting a mix of offerings including the Taxi Entertainment Network, ESPN headlines, movie trailers, clips from "The Today Show," news headlines, and, of course, plenty of advertisements.

Passengers will be able to pay their fares with credit or debit cards, and electronic maps will chart their trips through the city in real time. Cabs will also be fitted with GPS-systems, and text-messaging between drivers and the TLC will allow the option of matching available cabs with hailing customers.

"We can send them instant emergency information about traffic, black outs, or a water main break, and we can send them business opportunities, letting them know when certain major events are letting out," a spokesman for the TLC, Alan Fromberg, said.

Two hundred new cabs, constituting a "beta" test fleet, will start rolling next week, and the TLC plans to have its entire 13,000 fleet fitted with the taxi technology by next fall.

The exteriors of cabs in the beta fleet look the same as the old cabs, and so passengers will have to wait until they get in to discover if they've hailed a "high-tech" cab.

New Yorkers who endured the 2004 fare hike — the largest in the city's history, raising taxi fares by 26% — will now see an example of where their money has gone. The new technology, which costs between $3,900 and $5,300 a cab, will be bankrolled by taxi owners.

While some owners have expressed concern over assuming the costs, they're getting tough love from the industry.

"It was part of the agreement in 2004 that we were going to do this," the commissioner of the Department of Transportation, Iris Weinshall, said, referring to the fare hike, which resulted in an increase of about $350 million a year in revenues for the taxi industry. "They shouldn't be complaining that much that they'll have to pay for this," Ms. Weinshall said.

Taxi drivers and owners are also expected to reap some reward from the new technology. "It's an absolute fact that people tip and spend more on plastic," Mr. Fromberg said.

While Chicago, San Francisco, and Las Vegas have been ahead of New York in offering credit and debit payment options in their taxis, New York is the first city in the country to integrate so many technologies together, according to Mr. Fromberg.

The four companies providing the technology polled advocacy groups, industry specialists, and New Yorkers about what information they would find helpful when riding in a cab to help determine the content provided on the passenger screens.

Passengers who prefer riding without the company of perky newscasters and the white noise of advertisements always have the option of turning their screens off, which was not the case during the last experiment with TV screens for taxi passengers, which ran between September 2002 and August 2003.

BPC
December 17th, 2006, 01:27 AM
Yuk. More light and noise pollution. The back of a yellow cab is one of the few quiet, restful places in this City. They should install functioning credit card swipers like just about every other major city's taxis already have. These screens, however, will be an abomination -- the Joan Rivers tape-recorded send-off all over again.

milleniumcab
December 17th, 2006, 08:13 PM
Yuk. More light and noise pollution. The back of a yellow cab is one of the few quiet, restful places in this City. They should install functioning credit card swipers like just about every other major city's taxis already have. These screens, however, will be an abomination -- the Joan Rivers tape-recorded send-off all over again.

I haer you BPC... But this one you can turn off if you choose to...

ablarc
December 20th, 2006, 08:56 PM
I haer you BPC... But this one you can turn off if you choose to...
And after you leave, does the cabbie turn it back on? Or does opening and shutting the back door do that?

milleniumcab
December 20th, 2006, 11:29 PM
And after you leave, does the cabbie turn it back on? Or does opening and shutting the back door do that?

That I am not sure but this is my take on it. Even if someone turnes it off and gets out, I think it will turn itself on again either when the meter turned off or engaged for a new fare..It might even be so that it turnes itself off when the meter is turned off and restart when the meter is engaged back on...

That's a good question?.. I'll look into it and find out for sure...

Punzie
December 31st, 2006, 07:24 AM
Wonderful pictures, Edward et al!

NYC cabs to test cell signal strength

By DAVID B. CARUSO, Associated Press Writer
12/29/06

NEW YORK - Ever wanted to stuff that "Can you hear me now?" guy into the trunk of your car and take him on a tour of those maddening spots where your cell phone won't work? One telecommunications company has a plan to do the mechanical equivalent.

The Stockholm-based firm Ericsson recently got approval from New York's taxi commission to place mobile sensors in the trunks of at least 50 cabs in an attempt to better map dead zones in mobile phone networks.

The small devices, about the size of a computer modem, will automatically feed information about signal strength and clarity to engineers.

Because taxis in New York are on the road all day and all night, and ostensibly travel into every corner of the city, company executives said they are a cheap way of covering vast amounts of territory with limited effort.

Similar programs have been launched in several other cities since the 1990s using a variety of vehicles, but this is the first time it will be done in New York, the company said.

"Our favorite vehicle is the taxicab because of the randomness in its circulation," said Niklas Kylvag, Ericsson's manager of fleet services.

But, he added, "We have used trains, trucks, buses, delivery vehicles, limousines, pretty much anything that is moving and has electricity in it. I have myself done testing in the Swiss Alps with this on my back at a ski resort."

The research program is being conducted on behalf of an undisclosed wireless provider. Cab companies will be paid for participating. At least one fleet has signed up to participate and others have expressed interest, Kylvag said. The system, which will not be visible to passengers, is scheduled to be in place sometime this winter.

New York City Taxi and Limousine Commission Chairman Matthew Daus said the city has also opened cabs to other companies that wish to deploy a similar system.

http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20061230/ap_on_hi_te/hailing_cell_signals

http://i71.photobucket.com/albums/i130/Rapunzel61/Snow/Happy-New-Year/Banners/nyb.gif

ZippyTheChimp
February 16th, 2007, 04:06 PM
For centennial, New York City taxis to become canvas for 30,000 painters

The Associated Press
Friday, February 16, 2007
NEW YORK

If the image of a New York City taxi is any one thing, it is yellow — as splashy as a warning sign.

But an estimated 30,000 New Yorkers are about to put personal stamps on the city's archetypal cabs by painting bold floral decals, destined to be plastered on taxis from September through December. The stickers are marks of a metropolitan milestone — the centennial of the city's metered vehicles for hire — and measures of an expanding definition of public art.

Supporters envision the project, called Garden in Transit, as kaleidoscopic artwork on a massive civic canvas, with the general public as artist. Organizers recently set up a studio in a historic hotel ballroom and are inviting anyone interested in paiting to go to the project's Web site, http://www.gardenintransit.org.

"The city will look more vibrant, and this just sets New York apart from all the other cities that have transportation that's so bland," Evelisse Viamontee, 13, said after painting a panel — in sky blue, teal and lavender — at the studio on a recent morning.

City Taxi & Limousine Commissioner Matthew Daus called it "just a great way to marry art and history."

While cabs are common in at least parts of many cities, New York is an undisputed taxi capital. Its nearly 13,000 taxis make up the nation's biggest fleet by far — the next largest, in Washington, D.C., totals about 6,800, said Bruce Schaller, a former New York taxi commission official who produces an annual taxi fact book.

Besides the decal display in the fall, New York plans to mark its taxis' 100th anniversary with an exhibit of novel cab designs and other events in April.

The city had horse-drawn and even electric cabs before 1907, but taxi culture hit a turning point that year when cabs with meters and gasoline motors — and the term "taxicab" itself — arrived in New York, according to Michael Angelich and Ben Merkel, historian and director respectively of the Checker Car Club of America.

Taxicabs quickly became and remain a key form of transportation in a city where 55 percent of households still do not have access to a vehicle of their own, compared to 9 percent nationwide, according to a 2005 U.S. Census survey.

Cabs became even more ubiquitous after the city started requiring the distinctive yellow hue in 1968, aiming to make it easier to tell licensed taxis from unlicensed ones, Merkel and Angelich said.

So it is no small thing to tinker with the look of a New York taxi. It took a few years for brothers Ed and Bernie Massey — the founders of a Santa Monica, California, based art-therapy organization called Portraits of Hope — to get approval for the taxi decals.

Plans call for painting 800,000 square feet (74,322 square meters) of vinyl — about 17 professional football fields' worth — preprinted with outlines of oversized, six-petaled flowers.

Organizers expect 30,000 children and adults will paint the decals at schools, hospitals and the project's new studio in the one-time ballroom of the Hotel Pennsylvania, the midtown Manhattan standby that inspired the big-band-era hit "Pennsylvania 6-5000."

Enough painted stickers for every yellow cab will be supplied by organizers, but taxi owners have the option of declining. Representatives say they expect many owners will embrace the decorative decals, which are engineered to stay put in 110-mph (177-kph) road tests but still peel off without chipping a taxi's paint.

"There's a good feeling toward it," said Michael Woloz, a spokesman for the Metropolitan Taxicab Board of Trade. The group represents 18 fleets that own a total of about 3,500 taxis.

If Ed Massey sees the taxi decals as opportunities for citizens "to impact the cityscape of New York," they are also reflections of an increasingly flexible view of public art. At least some observers now apply the term to everything from painted bus benches to virtual reality realms.

"Public art used to be the equestrian statue in the town square," said David Darts, an assistant professor of art at New York University. "When we think about public art today, it really is something that's more conceptual in nature."

___

On the Net:

New York City Taxi & Limousine Commission: http://www.nyc.gov/taxi

ablarc
February 16th, 2007, 06:32 PM
Bad idea.

lofter1
February 16th, 2007, 11:58 PM
It's temporary ...

Can't be as bad as the Cow Parade / MOO York (http://newyork.cowparade.com/)...


http://newyork.cowparade.com/image/cow/large/1052.jpg (http://newyork.cowparade.com/cow/detail/125)

milleniumcab
February 18th, 2007, 01:31 AM
I'll be one of the first ones.. It will be an excellent conversation piece with my passengers..

BPC
February 18th, 2007, 07:38 PM
We should start a thread called "Ask the Cabbie".

I have two for you, MilleniumCab, if you will indulge me:

#1: Why do cabbies have to log every trip on that clipboard? Who is reading those logs? Why does it matter? As I understand it, cabbies rent their cars by the day, or they own their own medallion. In either event, who cares where they took the car all day?

#2: Who bribed whom at the TLC to get those Honda minivans approved as yellow cabs? Talk about a vehicle that was not designed for NYC streets. Any time I am in one of them and we hit a pot hole, it sounds like the whole vehicle is going to break apart into a thousand bits.

ablarc
February 18th, 2007, 08:45 PM
^ Beef up the shock absorbers?

BPC
February 18th, 2007, 11:51 PM
No, it's every last one of them. Minivan suspension is engineered for suburban driveways, not NYC potholes.

milleniumcab
February 19th, 2007, 12:15 AM
#1: Why do cabbies have to log every trip on that clipboard? Who is reading those logs? Why does it matter? As I understand it, cabbies rent their cars by the day, or they own their own medallion. In either event, who cares where they took the car all day?

#2: Who bribed whom at the TLC to get those Honda minivans approved as yellow cabs? Talk about a vehicle that was not designed for NYC streets. Any time I am in one of them and we hit a pot hole, it sounds like the whole vehicle is going to break apart into a thousand bits.

#1: TLC and IRS.. It is written in the TLC rules that each trip must be logged into trip sheets showing pick up & drop of time , number of passengers and the amount of fare. Also the driver, whether they own the cab or not, must keep the trip sheets for 3 years. The logs are also required for IRS, incase they want to see them to calculate the yearly income...

#2: Honda Odysees were the first ones to get approved but the minivans are mostly Toyota Sienas these days. I own one and have never heard that complaint from any of my passengers. All like the ride and the space she provides. A few complain that they are a little higher, making it more of a challenge to get in and out for the older people, and the sliding doors are a little harder to close..My previous taxi was a Honda Odysee. Between the two minivans I had as a taxi, I never had anyone complain about the ride, shocks or otherwise...

Are you sure it wasn't one of those Ford vans that are converted into wheelchair accessible taxis?... They don't hold up to NYC streets and soon after going on the road, the ride becomes the one like you described. These wheelchair accessible taxis also have terrible track record at the TLC inspections.. I would try to avoid them out there...

pianoman11686
February 19th, 2007, 12:36 AM
How well does the car hold up with all the punishment it gets? I imagine it can't weather the potholes as well as a traditional, heavy sedan. My dad got 370,000 miles out of his Town Car before it died, but that car took a beating.

BPC
February 20th, 2007, 01:14 AM
Thanks Millennium Cab! Actually, now that you mention it, I hate the Ford Broncos as well, but you don't see as many of them. I guess I am just a fan of the Crown Vic. I find the ride in one of those is far and away the best.

ablarc
February 20th, 2007, 08:37 AM
Perfect cab was the Checker: easier to get in and out of than either the Crown Vic or the minivans, and a lot more legroom than either once you were in.

Plus five could ride in back when you folded down the jump seats.

London cabs have the same characteristics fixed by law. Don't know why New York doesn't follow suit.

(Those hybrid cabs suck.)

milleniumcab
March 27th, 2007, 09:23 PM
I was at a meeting with the people who are organizing the "GARDENINTRANSIT" project. These people work for a non-profit organization called "portraits of hope" which is based out of California. Their main goal is to make kids with special needs happy by involving them in this and similar projects. With the canvases these kids have painted, they already have canvased airplanes, a blimp, Nascar race cars, a tower called the Tower of Hope and many more objects. Most of the kids are suffering or recovering from many different illnesses.. I think it is wonderful for the City of New York to permit them to canvas as many NYC Taxis as they can. I am looking forward to be one of those Taxi Drivers..

NewYorkDragon
April 1st, 2007, 08:44 PM
I have to ask,...what's the visual difference between a legal cab and a gypsy one? I looked it up the other day and found out -- but I don't recall the information. Tried looking it up and again and I can't find anything.

milleniumcab
April 8th, 2007, 10:39 PM
I have to ask,...what's the visual difference between a legal cab and a gypsy one? I looked it up the other day and found out -- but I don't recall the information. Tried looking it up and again and I can't find anything.

A true gypsy cab is a car with personal license plates looking to make money by acting like a cab... But the term is often used to describe dispatched cabs that pick up street hails, illegally....Street hails are exclusively belong to Yellow Cabs....

milleniumcab
April 9th, 2007, 12:06 AM
BY PETE DONOHUE
DAILY NEWS STAFF WRITER
Sunday, April 8th 2007, 4:00 AM


http://www.nydailynews.com/img/2007/04/08/amd_matas.jpg Bob and Betty Matas with Cab Driver Douglas Guldeniz, who will be driving the couple from their Forrest Hills home to their new home in Arizona.


Think it's tough finding a cab that will go to Queens? Try Arizona.
Senior citizens Betty and Bob Matas and their two cats are leaving Forest Hills for Sedona on Tuesday - and they're making the move by yellow taxi.
The distance: 2,500 miles.
The metered fare: $5,000.
The chauffeur: A hack from Brooklyn.
"It's a little unusual, but it will be fun," Betty Matas, 71, told the Daily News yesterday.
The adventure was hatched three months ago when the retirees found a house in the exclusive desert retirement community of Sedona, sold their home in Queens, and arranged for their belongings to be trucked west.
The only hitch was they didn't know what to do with their beloved cats, Cleo and Pretty Face.
They worried the pets could die in the cargo hold of a jet, caged in the dark between two giant engines.
And both of them are native New Yorkers who don't drive, so renting a car wasn't an option.
Then one day they found a solution in the most unexpected place: 73rd St. and Madison Ave.
Betty and Bob had just finished a round of shopping in Manhattan and were having trouble finding a cab to take them home.
Along came Douglas Guldeniz in his canary-colored Ford Escape, and he didn't even blink when they told him they were headed for Forest Hills.
"He seemed like a real likeable chap," said Bob, 72, who used to work as an audio and video engineer for advertising agencies.
On the trip home, talk turned to the couple's plan to move to the village of Oak Creek in Sedona. Guldeniz, 45, who is originally from Turkey and lives in Gravesend, Brooklyn, peppered them with questions.
"We said, 'Do you want to come?'" Bob recalled. "And he said, 'Sure.'
"We were just going along with him as a gag," Bob said.
But by the time Guldeniz pulled up in front of the Matases' home, the idea didn't seem so nuts.
They exchanged telephone numbers, and over the next few weeks a plan began to take shape.
Cleo and Pretty Face could ride in the back luggage area of the SUV in twin travel cases.
Guldeniz would drive about 10 hours a day, following the mover's rented U-Haul so Betty, a retired executive administrative assistant, could keep an eye on their possessions.
They would enjoy the scenery, read the local papers, listen to music and have pleasant conversation.
"My wife likes to talk," Bob said matter-of-factly.
Guldeniz, a married father of three teens who has been driving a cab for just two years, is up to the task.
He's not one of those laconic cabbies who barely acknowledges passengers, or spends the ride chattering on his cell phone.
"I want to try and help these people," Guldeniz said, explaining why he offered to make the journey.
But he's also looking forward to a change of pace.
"Manhattan is not easy," he said. "Too much stop and go. My leg, after driving so much, it hurts. This job is not easy, and I want to do something different. I want to have some good memories."
His wife, Rose, was initially surprised but then told him to "have fun," recalled the cabbie's son Deniz.
"I'm proud," Deniz said. "Not everyone can have something like this in their history."
It will certainly be Guldeniz's biggest fare.
Normally, the meter clicks off at a rate of $2 a mile in the city, but cabbies and passengers are supposed to negotiate a fair price for trips outside the five boroughs.

At the standard rate, the trip to Sedona would cost about $5,000 - plus another $5,000 for the return, said David Pollack, who puts out the Taxi Insider newspaper and is executive director of the Committee for Taxi Safety.
Guldeniz is charging the Matases a flat fee of $3,000 - though they will also pay for his gas, meals and lodging.
That's not bad for seven days' work - including the return trip - that includes a chance to see some of the country, Pollack said.
"The moral of this story is that being kind, driving carefully and safely, being helpful to people and communicating with them is worth it," Pollack said. "It pays off."

antinimby
May 11th, 2007, 12:54 AM
TLC unanimously OKs new taxi technology


Published: May 10, 2007 (http://www.newyorkbusiness.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20070510/FREE/70510006/1064)

(AP) — The city's Taxi and Limousine Commission unanimously approved a plan Thursday to install touch-screen monitors in all 13,000 city cabs over the objections of some drivers who consider the technology too expensive and intrusive.

The monitors, already in 200 cabs as an experiment, allow riders to pay by credit card, map out where the cab is going and find information about restaurants and bars.

Taxi officials say the monitors will help passengers make the most of the 13 minutes they spend on an average ride in the city. But many drivers have decried the cost -- up to $7,400 for equipment and fees over three years -- and say the technology will let taxi owners and officials check up on them.

TLC Commissioner Matthew Daus said the monitors could help drivers, giving them information about traffic while boosting ridership by eliminating the need for cash.

''This project is nothing short of revolutionary and evolutionary for the taxi industry,'' Mr. Daus wrote in a recent agency newsletter. He noted the commission had called for the technology while approving a 26 percent fare increase in 2004.

The commission set an Aug. 1 deadline to choose a system and said that starting Oct. 1, as taxis come up for inspection, they will be required to have the technology.

The issue has a delicate history: A 2003 experiment with touch-screen television in taxis ended within months amid passenger antipathy, and the drivers' group leading the opposition to the monitors notes that it carried out a crippling taxi strike over other issues in 1998.

The credit-card option is expected to prove popular with customers, though, in what is now a mostly cash, $1.8 billion-a-year business.

The global positioning system in the technology, from Englewood, N.J.-based TaxiTech, automates required record-keeping. It could help with lost items, as well: If a customer reports losing a wallet, the taxi commission could send alerts to drivers in the neighborhood where the customer was dropped off to be on the lookout.

Objecting drivers have raised concerns about the costs of the technology, credit-card fees and potential working time lost if it needs repair. Some worry that the global-positioning system will be used to track their movements, although the taxi commission says it will record only the pickup and drop-off points and fare, which drivers already are required to log.

''It's trampling on our constitutional rights, and it will cut deeply into our income,'' said Bill Lindauer of the New York Taxi Workers Alliance, a drivers' advocacy group with more than 7,000 members.

The alliance held a rally in March to protest the systems, and Mr. Lindauer said it was exploring legal and political avenues to block the plan.

©Copyright 2006 Associated Press

milleniumcab
May 13th, 2007, 02:08 PM
I am all for it but the T&LC should have also mandated a Driver Navigation Monitor to go along with the Passenger Information Monitor. We are required to have a GPS System that is going to cost thousands of dollars but still, by law, have to carry a 5 borough map that cost $10..Does that make sense?..

Ninjahedge
May 14th, 2007, 09:35 AM
What happens if the GPS system breaks down or is interrupted?

Yes it makes sense to have a map, and $10 ain't gonna kill you, is it?

milleniumcab
May 14th, 2007, 11:37 PM
Do you really think I am against spending $10 after saying I am ok with GPS which is going to cost thousands of dollars. I wanted T&LC to mandate the DNM because I believe it is good for the industry.. Driver Navigation Monitor along with the Credit Card capability would have been an excellent combination for the Industry. That's all I am saying...

NYatKNIGHT
May 22nd, 2007, 11:54 AM
New York’s Mayor Plans Hybrid Taxi Fleet

By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
May 22, 2007

NEW YORK (AP) -- The city's yellow taxi fleet will go entirely hybrid within five years, Mayor Michael Bloomberg announced Tuesday.

''There's an awful lot of taxicabs on the streets of New York City,'' Bloomberg said. ''These cars just sit there in traffic sometimes, belching fumes.

''This does a lot less. It's a lot better for all of us,'' he said of the hybrid plan.
Nearly 400 fuel-efficient hybrids have been tested in the city's taxi fleet over the past 18 months, with models including the Toyota Prius, the Toyota Highlander Hybrid, the Lexus RX 400h and the Ford Escape.

Under Bloomberg's plan, that number will increase to 1,000 by October 2008, then will grow by about 20 percent each year until 2012, when every yellow cab -- currently numbering 13,000 -- will be a hybrid.

Hybrid vehicles run on a combination of gasoline and electricity, emitting less exhaust and achieving higher gas mileage per gallon.

The standard yellow cab vehicle, the Ford Crown Victoria, gets 14 miles per gallon. In contrast, the Ford Escape taxis get 36 miles per gallon.

In addition to making the yellow cab brigade entirely green within five years, the city will require all new vehicles entering the fleet after October 2008 to achieve a minimum of 25 miles per gallon. A year later, all new vehicles must get 30 miles per gallon and be hybrid. Bloomberg made the announcement on NBC's ''Today'' show.

Hybrid vehicles are typically more expensive, but the city said the increase in fuel efficiency will save taxi operators more than $10,000 per year. Yahoo Inc. said it would donate 10 hybrid Ford Escapes for the city's effort.

Shifting the taxi fleet to hybrids is part of Bloomberg's wider sustainability plan for the city, which includes a goal of a 30 percent reduction in carbon emissions by 2030.

BPC
May 22nd, 2007, 12:24 PM
New York’s Mayor Plans Hybrid Taxi Fleet

By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
May 22, 2007
...
In addition to making the yellow cab brigade entirely green within five years, the city will require all new vehicles entering the fleet after October 2008 to achieve a minimum of 25 miles per gallon. A year later, all new vehicles must get 30 miles per gallon and be hybrid.

Can someone explain to me the environmental benefit of a hybrid car that gets 30 mpg over a gas-powered car that gets 30 mpg (of which there are many in production)?

Ninjahedge
May 22nd, 2007, 03:05 PM
It forces the design to go that way. There are hybrids that do much more than that, but they are setting a minimum.

The current fleet of full-sized vehicles do not get that milage now (25) so one step at a time. Besides, of ALL the places to be used, hybrid (or even 100% electric) is best in the city. When you stop, you are not burning any gas!!!!

Eugenious
May 22nd, 2007, 03:17 PM
It forces the design to go that way. There are hybrids that do much more than that, but they are setting a minimum.

The current fleet of full-sized vehicles do not get that milage now (25) so one step at a time. Besides, of ALL the places to be used, hybrid (or even 100% electric) is best in the city. When you stop, you are not burning any gas!!!!


The Crown Vics are used because they have body on frame construction which suits the operators maintenance wise and also the size of the back seat which is like a limo in most countries.

The switch to hybrids is long overdue but they should really push plug-in hybrids instead of parallel hybrid systems. The plug-in hybrid can be 100% electric and electricity costs approx. 3 or 4x cheaper then fossil fuels. The plans to put tidal energy wave farms in the east river and huge wind power farm off Long Island should prevent us from building more fossil powered plants and support a good size plug-in hybrid taxi fleet.

There's quite a few hybrid taxi's in the city already I've seen everything from Ford Escapes to Toyota Hylander Hybrid around the city.

antinimby
May 22nd, 2007, 05:53 PM
Yahoo Inc. said it would donate 10 hybrid Ford Escapes for the city's effort.I like Yahoo. Time for Google to step up too and do some donating to the city as well.

How does this program work?

Doesn't it force the current medallion owners to cough up the dough to buy a new vehicle or are they subsidized? :confused:

ZippyTheChimp
May 23rd, 2007, 08:14 AM
May 23, 2007

Mayor Plans an All-Hybrid Taxi Fleet

http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2007/05/22/nyregion/22cnd_hybrid.jpg
Daniel Acker/Bloomberg News
A Ford Escape Hybrid.

By RAY RIVERA

The spacious but gas-guzzling Ford Crown Victoria, long the emblematic vehicle of the city’s yellow cab fleet, would be replaced by cleaner, more fuel-efficient hybrid vehicles under a five-year plan proposed by Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg yesterday.

The move, which requires approval by the city’s Taxi and Limousine Commission, is part of the mayor’s ambitious environmental agenda for the city, PlaNYC, which calls for reducing greenhouse gas emissions by 30 percent by 2030.

“There’s an awful lot of taxicabs on the streets of New York City obviously, so it makes a real big difference,” Mayor Bloomberg said on NBC’s “Today” show yesterday. “These cars just sit there in traffic sometimes, belching fumes. This does a lot less; it’s a lot better for all of us.”

Replacing the city’s 13,000 yellow cabs, more than 90 percent of which are Crown Victorias, with hybrid vehicles would have the same impact on air quality as removing 32,000 privately owned vehicles from the road, the mayor said. Hybrids, which run on a combination of gasoline and electricity, emit less exhaust and are far more fuel-efficient; a hybrid Ford Escape, for instance, is rated at 34 miles per gallon in city driving.

Environmentalists have long complained about the poor gas mileage of the Crown Victoria, which gets 10 to 15 miles to the gallon in city traffic. But taxi owners and drivers say they like the vehicle’s spaciousness, dependability and safety.

In the last two years the city has added about 375 hybrid vehicles to the yellow cab fleet, including models like the Toyota Prius sedan; Toyota Highlander Hybrid, a sport utility vehicle; and Ford Escape, another S.U.V.

Under the mayor’s plan, that number would triple by October 2008 and would grow by about 20 percent each year after that.

While the plan does not specifically require that the new taxis be hybrids, it calls for all new vehicles entering the fleet beginning in October 2008 to get at least 25 miles to the gallon, rising to 30 miles to the gallon for cars entering the fleet the following year. City officials said the only vehicles that currently meet those fuel standards, as well as tougher emission standards that the mayor is proposing, are hybrids.

Mr. Bloomberg said the new regulations would have little impact on the city’s cab owners, who by law are required to replace their vehicles every three to five years, depending on their use. The city’s yellow cabs are privately owned but regulated by the Taxi and Limousine Commission, the head of which is appointed by the mayor.

He said the slightly higher cost of buying hybrid vehicles would be offset by the average $10,000 a year owners would save in fuel costs.

The mayor’s proposal for higher fuel standards was first reported in The Daily News yesterday.

PlaNYC initially called for converting the fleet within 10 years. But Mr. Bloomberg said City Councilman David Yassky, a longtime advocate of a greener taxi fleet, had persuaded him to cut that time in half.

The faster schedule, however, also reflects the mayor’s desire to get as much of his PlaNYC carried out before he leaves office at the end of 2009, especially those elements that do not require state approval or financing.

“I’ve never liked to plan something and then have somebody else have the responsibility of doing it or paying for it,” the mayor said yesterday.

The mayor and Mr. Yassky appeared together on the “Today” show and at a separate announcement at City Hall, flanked by 3 of 10 new hybrid Ford Escapes donated yesterday by Yahoo Inc. to a fleet operator, Team Systems.

“They gave us 10 cars, which they’re paying for, which is a heck of an impetus for us to go ahead and say, ‘Let’s do it now,’ ” the mayor said.

Cabdrivers and owners had mixed feelings about the mandate yesterday.

“The trick is to balance passenger comfort and safety, for the both the passenger and the driver, with environmental concerns,” Michael Woloz, a spokesman for the Metropolitan Taxicab Board of Trade, an industry group, said yesterday. “The stretch Crown Victoria has met all those needs.”

Liaquat Janjma, 50, drives the night shift in a cab owned by a friend. Six months ago they switched from a Crown Victoria to a Toyota Highlander Hybrid, and the impact was immediate, saving him $20 to $50 a shift.

“The only bad thing is that repairs can be very, very expensive,” he said.

Matthew W. Daus, chairman of the Taxi and Limousine Commission, said that even with higher maintenance costs, “when you add it all up, with the gas savings, it’s going to mean more money in the drivers’ pockets.”

San Francisco, Boston and other cities have introduced hybrids into their taxi fleets, but New York City officials said the mayor’s plan was believed to be the most extensive of any major city.

The officials said the new fleets would cut carbon dioxide emissions by 215,000 metric tons a year, just a small fraction of the 58.3 million metric tons the city produces each year.

Still, Kate Sindig, a senior attorney at the Natural Resources Defense Council, said the mayor’s plan would “have real impacts, both in terms of air pollution and global warming gas emissions.”

“It also sends a really powerful signal around the world,” she added, “because New York is a city that is looked to around the world.”

Kate Hammer contributed reporting.

Copyright 2007 The New York Times Company

lofter1
May 29th, 2007, 06:08 PM
A friend who hasn't been to NYC in a while recently returned for a visit ...

After a couple of days he noted that every single taxi he rode in was being driven by a man apparently from India -- and all the drivers seemed to be from a similar sect. He wondered how this had come about. He also noted that when he lived here 15 years ago that cabbies were very diverse -- but now there seems to be almost no diversity whatsoever in the drivers of cabs in Manhattan.

I know that when I first moved to NYC 25+ years ago that cabbies were often real characters. They were from all over and from all walks of lfe. Now you'd never know what a cabbie is like as a person -- since most drivers are gabbing away on their cell-phone headsets, and too busy to interact with their passengers.

How did this sea change happen?

Why is the economic game being played with drivers / medallion owners?

Any info will be greatly appreciated.

BPC
May 29th, 2007, 09:17 PM
SOME GENERAL THOUGHTS

1. What your friend is referring to as "India" is actually three countries, India, Pakistan and Bangladesh with over 1.5 BILLION people between them, and a whole lot of diversity between them, even if they all appear the same to Western eyes.

2. As a regular cab passenger, I can attest that there are lots and lots of Caribbeans and West Africans and Middle Easterners and Eastern Europeans. I have not noticed any demographic shift in the last 5 years or so. That being said, the general rule of thumb is that driving a yellow cab is a tough job -- MOST WORK 12 HOUR SHIFTS, 6-7 DAYS PER WEEK -- which in better economic times (such as now) is done more frequently by poorer persons, of which the old Indian Subcontinent has many.

3. Historically, immigrants tend to cluster in the same occupations -- think Greek diners, Irish bars, Italian pizzerias, Korean delis, etc. That is because the first wave of immigrants succeeds and then spreads the knowledge back to the old country. Networking, essentially. It is hard for anyone to break into a new profession, let alone an immigrant to a new country. Doubtlessly the same thing is happening in the taxi cab profession.

lofter1
May 30th, 2007, 09:49 AM
thanks for the info -- although the other nationalities must somehow magically skip the neighborhoods where I travel :cool:

Can anyone address the question regarding ownership of taxi medallions and changes in ownershiop of same over the past 10 years?

And the process by which "renting" of cabs from medallion owners is offered / transacted?

lofter1
May 30th, 2007, 06:02 PM
Two Taxi Medallions Fetch Record Price

http://www.ny1.com/ny1/content/index.jsp?stid=1&aid=70199
May 30, 2007

Two taxi medallions recently sold for $600,000 each, breaking the previous record set last June when a medallion sold for more than $550,000.

The city strictly limits the number of medallions, driving up demand and prices. There are about 13,000 medallions currently in circulation, but only 1,300 have been auctioned in the past 70 years.

In 2001, medallions were selling for just under $200,000. The Taxi and Limousine Commission chairman says the record sale price shows just how healthy and vital the city's taxi industry is.

Copyright © 2007 NY1 News.

milleniumcab
May 31st, 2007, 03:01 AM
May 23, 2007

Mayor Plans an All-Hybrid Taxi Fleet

http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2007/05/22/nyregion/22cnd_hybrid.jpg
Daniel Acker/Bloomberg News
A Ford Escape Hybrid.

Mr. Bloomberg said the new regulations would have little impact on the city’s cab owners, who by law are required to replace their vehicles every three to five years, depending on their use. The city’s yellow cabs are privately owned but regulated by the Taxi and Limousine Commission, the head of which is appointed by the mayor.

He said the slightly higher cost of buying hybrid vehicles would be offset by the average $10,000 a year owners would save in fuel costs.


An average of $10,000 savings is not really going to happen because my gas expense for a year is around $6,500. So the Mayor is saying that I am not going to spend $6,500 for gas and he is going to give me $3,500...That's cool but it just won't happen..

milleniumcab
May 31st, 2007, 03:14 AM
I like Yahoo. Time for Google to step up too and do some donating to the city as well.

How does this program work?

Doesn't it force the current medallion owners to cough up the dough to buy a new vehicle or are they subsidized? :confused:

There are no subsidies here for owners.. They rule, we pay...But you shouldn't care about that, after all, it ain't your pocket they are ruling..

milleniumcab
May 31st, 2007, 03:22 AM
It forces the design to go that way. There are hybrids that do much more than that, but they are setting a minimum.

The current fleet of full-sized vehicles do not get that milage now (25) so one step at a time. Besides, of ALL the places to be used, hybrid (or even 100% electric) is best in the city. When you stop, you are not burning any gas!!!!
There is an electric cab being tested right now. All electric engine has been fitted into a Chrysler PT Cruiser which is probably the smallest cab in America if not the world..It also needs to be charged every 8 hours for about 2 hours...

milleniumcab
May 31st, 2007, 04:13 AM
A friend who hasn't been to NYC in a while recently returned for a visit ...

After a couple of days he noted that every single taxi he rode in was being driven by a man apparently from India -- and all the drivers seemed to be from a similar sect. He wondered how this had come about. He also noted that when he lived here 15 years ago that cabbies were very diverse -- but now there seems to be almost no diversity whatsoever in the drivers of cabs in Manhattan.

I know that when I first moved to NYC 25+ years ago that cabbies were often real characters. They were from all over and from all walks of lfe. Now you'd never know what a cabbie is like as a person -- since most drivers are gabbing away on their cell-phone headsets, and too busy to interact with their passengers.

How did this sea change happen?

Why is the economic game being played with drivers / medallion owners?

Any info will be greatly appreciated.

25+ years ago, back when an aspiring actor drove a cab rather than wait tables, money made driving a cab was much better. Because of that reason alone the industry attracted much more diverse drivers from all walks of life. Most were steady drivers, unlike today. And guess what, cell phones were not as popular as they are today and language skills aren't the top priority for the T&LC...:(

ManhattanKnight
May 31st, 2007, 09:22 AM
Last night, I went out to JFK to meet a friend arriving on an international flight at the brand-new Terminal 9. Between the terminal exit and the taxi stand, we were accosted by several waves of aggressive cell-phone-wielding jackals pretending to be real taxi dispatchers or drivers. The terminal was nearly empty at that hour (after Midnight), but there were easily 15 or more of these guys. Of course, I've encountered this phenomenon before, but never to this degree, or so close to the official taxi dispatchers or the several uniformed Homeland Security cop types who were gathered in front of the terminal and doing nothing to protect potential victims of these predators. A truly unfortunate way to welcome international visitors to our city. So's the new terminal, by the way, but that's another story.

NYatKNIGHT
May 31st, 2007, 11:05 AM
I recently had a similar experience and because I couldn't find anyone to complain to I vowed I would write a strongly worded letter.....but didn't. As if that would accomplish anything. It sucks.

The_Other_White_Meat
May 31st, 2007, 03:06 PM
I counted 22 in your original post, Edward... But they're all taken. Damn tourists... ;)

I'm not a big fan of taxi rides myself, but NYC wouldnt look quite right without the yellow cabs speeding down the streets. And it keeps tourists off the Subway. Well, some of them.

BPC
May 31st, 2007, 03:09 PM
An average of $10,000 savings is not really going to happen because my gas expense for a year is around $6,500. So the Mayor is saying that I am not going to spend $6,500 for gas and he is going to give me $3,500...That's cool but it just won't happen..

MC, do you not rent your car out to another driver for the second shift? Assuming two shifts, and a near tripling of gas mileage in the new hybrid vehicles, $13K in total gas ($6.5K x 2) could be reduced to $3K, leading to a $10K savings. What am I missing?

milleniumcab
June 1st, 2007, 12:52 AM
MC, do you not rent your car out to another driver for the second shift? Assuming two shifts, and a near tripling of gas mileage in the new hybrid vehicles, $13K in total gas ($6.5K x 2) could be reduced to $3K, leading to a $10K savings. What am I missing?
Aren't they claiming $10,000 savings for drivers who are only allowed to work a single shift. Their statement makes it sound like every driver will save $10,000 not every double shifted car.. That is my point....

milleniumcab
June 1st, 2007, 12:56 AM
About the predators at the Airports, if enough people wrote a complaint to T&LC and The Port Authority, I believe enforcement would be increased.. Taxi drivers' complaints fall to deaf ears, unfortunately....They would take the consumers' complaints a lot more seriously...

ablarc
June 4th, 2007, 09:32 PM
http://www.pbase.com/nyguy/image/79143057/large.jpg
Gonna miss those Crown Vics when the hybrids take over?

milleniumcab
June 4th, 2007, 10:57 PM
Gonna miss those Crown Vics when the hybrids take over?

If you like the space it provides, for sure...

ablarc
June 5th, 2007, 07:37 PM
^ Time to revive the Checker with a hybrid motor.

milleniumcab
June 5th, 2007, 10:36 PM
We might get lucky if Ford decides to put out HYBRID Crown Vics. They are already manufacturing a few Hybrid models using Toyota's Hybrid Technology.. It is a big possibility..Or maybe Toyota will bring the Hybrid Sienas to US. I have been told there is a Hybrid Minivan just like the Siena being used in Japan...Whatever the case is, I hope there is a Hybrid Vehicle in the future that has plenty of leg room for the passengers...Hey, we can have our cake and eat it too, right?.....:)

milleniumcab
June 5th, 2007, 10:41 PM
Gonna miss those Crown Vics when the hybrids take over?

In the picture, did you notice the cab ( top-left).. It looks like a Hybrid Ford Escape..It is a shame she don't have enough leg room for comfort...

ablarc
June 5th, 2007, 10:56 PM
Those Escapes should never have been approved by the taxi commission. They don't serve the public well.

milleniumcab
June 5th, 2007, 10:58 PM
Those Escapes should never have been approved by the taxi commission. They don't serve the public well.
It was approved to please The City Council and the advocates of the environment.. ;)

ablarc
June 5th, 2007, 11:01 PM
Toyota Highlander Hybrid.

milleniumcab
June 6th, 2007, 12:11 AM
Toyota Highlander Hybrid.

Little better leg room but much more expensive.. Remember I am an owner. I'll have to buy the vehicle..;)

BPC
June 6th, 2007, 01:28 AM
When I was in Beijing, the taxis had different (pre-set) rates depending on the size of the car. A big Mercedes ran about twice the rate of a small Honda. The system seemed to make sense for me. Why one size fits all? Let some medallion owners spend a little more and charge a little more, and others spend a little less and charge a little less, and let the consumer pick what he wants. The Chinese have come to understand the free market better than we have.

ZippyTheChimp
June 6th, 2007, 06:20 AM
^
How do taxis pick up passengers in Beijing?

Do they cruise the streets?

BPC
June 6th, 2007, 05:19 PM
If I recall correctly (this was about 7 years ago), you could hail them from the street like in NYC. Incidentally, at the time, not a one of them spoke English, but our hotel would give us a card with our destination on one side and the name of the hotel on the other, written in Chinese.

milleniumcab
June 7th, 2007, 12:59 AM
NYC cabs are regulated to a point where consumer is protected to the T....It is just not possible to have YELLOW cabs with different fares. It might make sense elsewhere but it is not going to happen in NYC.. If it is YELLOW, it must be same fare...And that makes a lot of sense, in my opinion... A yellow cab is a familiar ICON in NYC... One is same as other.. Competition among yellow cabs is not what is needed to improve service to the riding public...In order to improve service , we need to improve the quality of cab drivers... How we do that is another story which the City is not willing to listen...Unfortunately, you will suffer the consequences, as a passenger, until they bring quality to driver's life...LET US NOT FORGET THAT, A HAPPY DRIVER IS A GOOD DRIVER.....Until next time.....

milleniumcab
June 7th, 2007, 01:47 AM
Please, ask this question to yourself!...... Why are only immigrants are driving cabs, not only immigrants but the ones who can not even speak English?.....I am an immigrant but people who get in my cab are happy that they have an American Cab Driver.. That explains how desperate people are to have their own to drive their CABS....But it is USA, and we need immigrants to do the work we are not willing to do ourselves...So please , let's not invite them here to put them down, alright?....

antinimby
June 7th, 2007, 05:13 AM
I am an immigrant but people who get in my cab are happy that they have an American Cab DriverAnd I bet you get more tips because of that.

milleniumcab
June 7th, 2007, 05:27 AM
That maybe so but in my little world; tip is not automatic, it is deserved....Some days I am, for whatever reason, happier and make more than other days ...Tips play a big role in that...;)

milleniumcab
June 24th, 2007, 11:31 PM
FOR THOSE WHO ARE INTERESTED, SOME INFO ABOUT THE NEW TAXI TECHNOLOGY....

http://www.nyc.gov/html/tlc/html/passenger/taxicab_serv_enh.shtml

antinimby
August 23rd, 2007, 06:42 PM
Taxi drivers' union calls for strike



Kira Bindrim
August 23. 2007 3:40PM (http://www.newyorkbusiness.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20070823/FREE/70823011/1066)

The New York Taxi Workers’ Alliance called on the city’s more than 40,000 yellow-cab drivers to take part in a 48-hour strike on Sept. 5 and 6 to protest the installation of global positioning systems in their cars.

TWA Executive Director Bhairavi Desai said the Alliance has collected over 10,000 strike pledge cards from drivers throughout the city, which represents around 23% of the city’s 44,000 licensed drivers.

In May, the city’s Taxi and Limousine Commission ordered cab owners to have the GPS devices installed. The systems, which cost as much as $6,000, include a text-messaging box for drivers and a credit- and debit-card reader.

But the system isn’t navigational, can’t be used to dispatch taxis to waiting passengers and allows the city to unfairly track taxi movement, says the TWA. In addition, drivers will have to pay 5% of their total fare -- including tolls, tax and tip -- for every debit and credit card transaction. That percentage is above the 1.5% to 2% fee usually paid for use of credit card machines in stores.

For many drivers, who start their day with a fare from John F. Kennedy International Airport into the city, losses from transaction fees could represent over $1,000 a year, said Ms. Desai.

“Drivers recognize that it’s better to sacrifice one or two days rather than to lose your income nonstop for years to come,” she added.

The TLC argues that the installation of GPS systems will maximize efficiency for drivers, passengers and officials, and fees resulting from credit- and debit-card machines will be offset gain by recent fare increases and adjustments.

“Under the Bloomberg administration, taxicab drivers continue to be a top priority,” TLC Chairman Matthew Daus said in a statement. “Riders have paid an additional $1 billion directly to drivers’ pockets, were promised technology enhancements in return – and they deserve to have that promise kept.”

A strike would be the first for taxi drivers since 1998, when TLC rules regarding fines for minor driver violations caused more than 40,000 licensed drivers to strike for a 24-hour period.

© 2007 Crain Communications, Inc.

lofter1
August 23rd, 2007, 07:48 PM
If the taxi drivers go on strike (like they did a while back) we'll all have a couple of days of peace & quiet to look forward to ...

The previous strike day was remarkably free of horns & honking --

Which goes to show who is causing so much of the needless ruckus in NYC.

milleniumcab
August 23rd, 2007, 08:03 PM
I will not be striking... I think most drivers will be on the road...And also the City will be prepared to allow the liveries to pick up street hails incase the strike is widespread..
I do not know how quiet it is going to be with an announced strike date..The liveries will fill in the gap and then some....The strike in 1998 was not announced to anybody thus the city was not able to put in their contingency plan into effect. This time they will....

milleniumcab
September 4th, 2007, 01:22 AM
From http://www.nytimes.com/2007/09/03/nyregion/03taxi.html:
MC, do you anticipate having any of these problems?

No, I don't...

I am an owner driver and I'll be paying %3 to %3.5 for every credit card transaction. That will not bother me as I see it for what it is, simply cost of doing business in the new millennium...The credit card companies do not charge that much but the monthly fees, for the vendor that handles the transaction between the meter and the bank, bring the percentage to it's estimated level of %3 to %3.5..I will have my own merchant account and manage it myself.. The drivers who lease will be paying the %5. The fleets are charging the extra percentage because they will be managing the drivers merchant account. I don't know for sure but I think the drivers will ahve the option to open their own merchant account and pay as little as owner-drivers since they will be managing it themselves..


As far as the background noise... I believe New Yorkers are mostly to busy with their daily lives, between the appointments, computers and all the other technology gadgets, to play with that damned monitor and listen to news clips or anythingelse.. If a few do, I can deal with it..Most customers will turn it off once they get in but the monitor will come back on at the end of each trip to give the passenger the option to pay buy credit card..

Logging on will be done once a day, at the start of each shift, which will take about 2 minutes.. The driver will also have to log back in coming back to duty after a brake which will take much less time than the inital log-in....Logging in after each trip is a misleading information!...

The monitor will not be directly behind the driver. It will be mounted to the middle of the partition, therefore how much it will effect the driver as far as it heating up remains to be seen..This is true for most cabs with full partition. The others will have different mounting for the monitors. The Hybrids will have them mounted to the head-rest of the front passenger seat.. All others without the partition will have mounting brackets installed in the middle of the cab, between the front seats.....

These lease drivers have nothing better to do than try to organize a strike against the GPS which have, in my opinion, many long term benefits to the industry..The credit card option for the passenger alone has a lasting benefit to the industry.. Some elements of the GPS is not currently being mandated but in the future they could be very useful.. The driver navigation monitor and hot button to contact police incase of emergenency could add to reliability and safety of cabs..

Bottom line is this... The GPS is a heads-up customer service improvement that will also benefit the industry..

brianac
September 4th, 2007, 05:18 AM
No, I don't...

I am an owner driver and I'll be paying %3 to %3.5 for every credit card transaction. That will not bother me as I see it for what it is, simply cost of doing business in the new millennium...The credit card companies do not charge that much but the monthly fees, for the vendor that handles the transaction between the meter and the bank, bring the percentage to it's estimated level of %3 to %3.5..I will have my own merchant account and manage it myself.. The drivers who lease will be paying the %5. The fleets are charging the extra percentage because they will be managing the drivers merchant account. I don't know for sure but I think the drivers will ahve the option to open their own merchant account and pay as little as owner-drivers since they will be managing it themselves..


As far as the background noise... I believe New Yorkers are mostly to busy with their daily lives, between the appointments, computers and all the other technology gadgets, to play with that damned monitor and listen to news clips or anythingelse.. If a few do, I can deal with it..Most customers will turn it off once they get in but the monitor will come back on at the end of each trip to give the passenger the option to pay buy credit card..

Logging on will be done once a day, at the start of each shift, which will take about 2 minutes.. The driver will also have to log back in coming back to duty after a brake which will take much less time than the inital log-in....Logging in after each trip is a misleading information!...

The monitor will not be directly behind the driver. It will be mounted to the middle of the partition, therefore how much it will effect the driver as far as it heating up remains to be seen..This is true for most cabs with full partition. The others will have different mounting for the monitors. The Hybrids will have them mounted to the head-rest of the front passenger seat.. All others without the partition will have mounting brackets installed in the middle of the cab, between the front seats.....

These lease drivers have nothing better to do than try to organize a strike against the GPS which have, in my opinion, many long term benefits to the industry..The credit card option for the passenger alone has a lasting benefit to the industry.. Some elements of the GPS is not currently being mandated but in the future they could be very useful.. The driver navigation monitor and hot button to contact police incase of emergenency could add to reliability and safety of cabs..

Bottom line is this... The GPS is a heads-up customer service improvement that will also benefit the industry..

What an excellent analysis and explanation of this subject.

And also, a refreshingly optomistic attitude. Thanks MC.

milleniumcab
September 4th, 2007, 11:24 PM
What an excellent analysis and explanation of this subject.

And also, a refreshingly optomistic attitude. Thanks MC.

YW brianac...I just hope that my optimism will not turn around and bite me in the ass...:eek:...

brianac
September 5th, 2007, 06:14 AM
YW brianac...I just hope that my optimism will not turn around and bite me in the ass...:eek:...

I'm Sure it won't MC. Reading between the lines I think there will be plenty who think like you. I certainly hope so.

BPC
September 5th, 2007, 05:29 PM
As a frequent (actually too-frequent for my budget) taxi user, let me chime in from the passenger's perspective. First, I wholeheartedly support the credit card concept, but I have been in three of these new cabs already, and so far none of the card machines have been operational. That was also my experience the last time that TLC experimented with credit card swipers a few years back. Also, the new screen is just more noise pollution that you have to turn off at the start of each rider, remniscent of those celebrity "don't forget your bag" annoucements from years ago. It would be far better if you had to turn it ON to listen to the station, but of course, no one ever would.

milleniumcab
September 6th, 2007, 02:38 AM
As a frequent (actually too-frequent for my budget) taxi user, let me chime in from the passenger's perspective. First, I wholeheartedly support the credit card concept, but I have been in three of these new cabs already, and so far none of the card machines have been operational. That was also my experience the last time that TLC experimented with credit card swipers a few years back. Also, the new screen is just more noise pollution that you have to turn off at the start of each rider, remniscent of those celebrity "don't forget your bag" annoucements from years ago. It would be far better if you had to turn it ON to listen to the station, but of course, no one ever would.

First, let me thank you for your patronage..:D..

If you get in one of these cabs, CC machines should be operational..To have all three not operating is probably too much of a coincidence to call it a possible braekdown of the system..:confused:

If you had to turn it ON when you got in rather than turn it OFF, the vendors would not be making the top advertisement money from the adds on monitors..;)... But the idea for the option of turning it off came from the people in the industry.. We care about you..:).. Now we are going to have to work on the volume of monitors..I hera some of them can be very loud. I wouldn't like that either..

The system will not be perfect at the beginning but with input from you (riding public) and the drivers, it can be perfected.. Passengers' input usually has a faster and better influence on the T&LC...

lofter1
September 6th, 2007, 10:36 AM
I got in a cab cmoning home from Labor Day Weekend trip and was greeted by one of those obnoxious vid screens yelling at me.

Cabbie was helpful in telling me how to shut off the POS but it seemed to have a mind of its own and kept coming back on :mad:

After about 3 tries the screen stayed black.

Cabie told me that the CC swipe slot at the bottom of the vid screen didn't work -- hence the 2nd & independent CC swiper up top.

No doubt that CC swipers will really waste time -- just as they do when people use them in line at the grocery store :mad: :mad: :mad:

(note to those people: get your damned card out of your purse while the checker is racking up your goods).

Ninjahedge
September 6th, 2007, 02:52 PM
I usually help pack while he is going, then get the card out once the tally is done, then go.

But the thing that is most annoying are the people that wait in line for the bus, and only get their change out when they are standing in front of the driver holding everyone up....


OT, but whatever.. ;)

milleniumcab
September 7th, 2007, 05:36 AM
I think it is already coming back to bite me in the ass..... The only thing that will defeat the GPS in cabs is "itself"...If it does not operate properly, it is a gonner....................

brianac
September 29th, 2007, 08:13 AM
New logo.

New taxi logos coming! TLC’s Board of Commissioners has approved a new package of taxi stickers, seen in this picture. Smart Design, a design firm, produced and donated these new logo designs to TLC.

Taxis must display these new stickers for their first TLC inspection on or after October 1st, 2007. Taxi drivers and owners will be able to purchase the stickers from authorized printers. Check with your favorite meter shop to see when they will have the new stickers ready to print. If you want to print them yourself, please see information on how to become an authorized printer.

There are 4 stickers (per vehicle side) in this logo package: a fare panel, the NYCTAXI sticker, the medallion number and a checker stripe decal. Printing details, sticker location and size are all specified by TLC Rule

lofter1
September 29th, 2007, 10:59 AM
The logo looks sharp ...

Here 's more from the Smart Design website (http://www.smartdesignworldwide.com/announcements_detail.php?id=54)

How much do cab owners have to cough up in order to meet the rules?

brianac
September 29th, 2007, 11:52 AM
Perhaps Milleniumcab can tell us the cost.

More info.

http://www.nyc.gov/html/tlc/html/safety_emissions/taxicab_logo_main.shtml

http://www.nyc.gov/html/tlc/html/safety_emissions/taxicab_logo_vehicles.shtml

milleniumcab
September 29th, 2007, 02:25 PM
$45-$50.. I like the new logos..

milleniumcab
September 30th, 2007, 01:34 AM
Have any of you seen the flower painted taxis. I think they are really cool.. It's a shame only a hand full have volunteered to have their taxis painted..:o..

www.gardenintransit.com (http://www.gardenintransit.com)

They will stay on until December....I got my flower as I promised..

brianac
September 30th, 2007, 07:13 AM
Have any of you seen the flower painted taxis. I think they are really cool.. It's a shame only a hand full have volunteered to have their taxis painted..:o..


They will stay on until December....I got my flower as I promised..


Photographs anyone?

milleniumcab
September 30th, 2007, 11:19 AM
I don't have a camera...:(

lofter1
September 30th, 2007, 11:33 AM
Garden in Transit (http://www.portraitsofhope.org/git/about_git.php) website

( Warning : TURN OFF your speakers!!! )

Garden in Transit uses NY taxi canvas (http://www.the1secondfilm.com/forums/the_1_second_foundation/collaborative_art_social_change/garden_in_transit_uses_ny_taxi_canvas)

http://www.portraitsofhope.org/git/images/intro_daus.jpg

brianac
October 1st, 2007, 03:08 PM
Managed to capture a couple on Earthcam Times Square. I saw about 15 in 30 seconds.

milleniumcab
October 7th, 2007, 07:28 PM
http://www.nypost.com/seven/10042007/news/regionalnews/splinter_group_hacks_to_strike.htm

I still don't agree with the strike...

brianac
October 22nd, 2007, 05:18 AM
Cabbies Plan 2nd Strike to Protest New Devices

By FERNANDA SANTOS (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/reference/timestopics/people/s/fernanda_santos/index.html?inline=nyt-per)

Published: October 22, 2007
A group that says it represents about 10,000 cabdrivers is calling for a strike today, its second in less than two months, to protest a city plan requiring the more than 13,000 medallion taxicabs to install global positioning systems and credit card machines.
The group, New York Taxi Workers Alliance, staged a two-day work stoppage last month, but it had limited participation and failed to achieve its goals. The group plans a 24-hour strike this time, beginning at 5 a.m. today.
“We are not going to back down,” Bhairavi Desai, the alliance’s executive director, said in an interview.
Ms. Desai said the strike was also intended to compel city officials to use revenue from a planned medallion auction to create a health care and retirement fund for cabdrivers.
Officials will roll out a contingency plan much like the one used during last month’s stoppage, but are ready to cancel it if the strike fails to significantly disrupt taxicab service, Allan J. Fromberg, a spokesman for the city’s Taxi and Limousine Commission (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/reference/timestopics/organizations/t/taxi_and_limousine_commission/index.html?inline=nyt-org), said in a news release on Thursday.
The contingency plan calls for a zone-based fare structure, with four zones in Manhattan and one in each of the other boroughs. Trips inside one zone will be a flat fee of $10 per rider; another $5 will be charged for additional zones entered. Tolls are included in the price of the trips.
On trips to and from the airports, passengers can choose to ride alone and pay metered rates. Group riders will each pay flat fees from Manhattan to La Guardia Airport ($20) or to Kennedy International Airport ($30). About a dozen cabdrivers interviewed yesterday at Punjab Food Junction, a 24-hour deli on 10th Avenue near 28th Street, said they participated in the strike on Sept. 5 and 6, and were planning to do the same today, even as few among them seemed hopeful that officials would reverse course.
“Cabbies don’t have enough power to defeat politicians,” Shahid Iqbal, 44, who has driven a cab for four years, said over a plate of lentils and chicken curry. “But we can make our voices heard and hope for change some day.”
Mr. Iqbal does not have the new system in his cab, but Hamado Bissiri does. He said he also had a host of complaints about it — like the time it takes to start up to the credit card machine, which frequently malfunctions.
“If a person goes to the supermarket and the credit card machine isn’t working, he has to pay cash or leave his groceries behind,” said Mr. Bissiri, 38, who has driven a cab since February. “But if my credit card machine freezes at the end of a fare, I could lose money because people can just leave without paying.”
Charles Fergusson, a cabdriver for 26 years, said, “This is a war that can’t be won, but I’ll go on strike in solidarity.”
During the previous strike, there was no noticeable change in subway and bus ridership, said Jeremy Soffin, a spokesman for the Metropolitan Transportation Authority (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/reference/timestopics/organizations/m/metropolitan_transportation_authority/index.html?inline=nyt-org). In fact, Mr. Soffin said, “our bus operators were actually thrilled about it because traffic moved at a faster clip without so many taxis on the road.”
If demand warrants, however, the city could add more buses on the line from Manhattan to La Guardia and along other busy routes, he said.
Last month, a group of cabdrivers organized by the Taxi Workers Alliance sued the city in federal court, arguing that it acted unconstitutionally when it ordered taxicabs to install tracking systems. During a hearing on Sept. 28, a federal judge refused to block the city rule, saying the use of technology to improve service seemed to outweigh drivers’ privacy rights.
Ms. Desai said the group planned to take the lawsuit to trial.
William Neuman contributed reporting.

milleniumcab
October 23rd, 2007, 12:24 AM
It is so unfortuanate that some, not all, cab drivers took full advantage of the ZONE FARE SYSTEM and charged their customers what they were allowed to charge... By doing so, they pissed off many regular taxi patrons which we need to co-exist with..I believe this strike and zone fare system did more damage to taxi industry than GPS will ever do.. The zone fare system was implemented by the city to convince the cab drivers that working the day instead of striking will be more profitable than an average day.. It was their way of trying to brake the young union( taxi workers alliance) and in my opinion they accomplished the mission... The garages who favor the gps gave discounts on daily lease fees, in some cases they did not charge at all...About %15 did not work compare to first strike with %50 taking the day off...

It is a shame that the customers had to be punished.. I did not strike because I still see the GPS as a boost to taxi industry, even without it's full benefits...I worked the meter today to show my solidarity to taxi passengers, instead of showing solidarity to a bunch of hard-heads who thought GPS could be stopped.. I think I said this before; the only thing that's going stop it is itself..They should go back to work and pray that it keeps messing up...

Ninjahedge
October 23rd, 2007, 10:36 AM
MC, what is the main reason for nil on the GPS?

Is it beacuse teh GPS system is expensive? Does it still have bugs? Or is it fear of more direct accountability for all fares and money exchanged? (Or, better yet, an accurate count of how fast and possibly how reckless some drivers are!!!!!).

:confused:

milleniumcab
October 23rd, 2007, 10:02 PM
MC, what is the main reason for nil on the GPS?

Is it beacuse teh GPS system is expensive?
Owners are paying for it not the drivers and the drivers are the ones who are organizing these strikes..
Does it still have bugs?
Some say yes and some say no... I guess we'll know more once all cabs have it.. I have a credit card meter even though I don't have the GPS.. I have had it for about 3 years and it has difficulty with reception via wireless service at certain spots in the city, even in the suburbs.. I signed up with a vendor which is supposed to have Verizon for the wireless service..I know it is good because I have Verizon cell phone. Credit Card transactions have to be reliable, smooth and fast for this system to be successful..

Or is it fear of more direct accountability for all fares and money exchanged? I think that has a lot do to with it..Some cab drivers are supporting themselves plus a dozen people in Pakistan or Bengaldesh and are reporting $15,000 or under for income...

Or, better yet, an accurate count of how fast and possibly how reckless some drivers are!!!!!
I don't think so, at least I hope not!..... Because once the city start tracking cab drivers for reasons other than collecting the daily trip sheets which only transmits data from the meter when it is turned on and off, as they claim, and try to see what laws they are breaking, the shit will hit the fan...Then the strike will be a huge success..Even the fleets will be for that strike...We'll all be off the road....I seriously doubt they will do that..

Because their main argument when it comes to cab drivers is that we are indepentent contractors thus do not have the right to organize or ask for benefits...Well, we can argue and argue successfully that they don't have the right to track us for the same reason...And I believe they realize that fact...

brianac
October 27th, 2007, 08:34 AM
From New York Times.

Most designs were from Times readers, some from kids.


http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2007/10/16/nyregion/16potts.2.jpg


http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2007/10/16/nyregion/16potts.1.jpg


http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2007/10/16/nyregion/16potts.3.jpg



http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2007/10/17/nyregion/17corum.2.span.jpgMr.


http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2007/10/18/nyregion/nyc-taxi-normal.gif


http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2007/10/18/nyregion/nyc-taxi-reversed.gif


http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2007/10/19/nyregion/nyc-taxi-normal2.gif

http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2007/10/22/nyregion/22schwebel.span.jpg

http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2007/10/22/nyregion/22commenter.span.jpg

http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2007/10/22/nyregion/22jardee.span.jpg

brianac
October 27th, 2007, 08:35 AM
http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2007/10/22/nyregion/22lloyd.span.jpg
http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2007/10/22/nyregion/22schnaas.span.jpg


http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2007/10/22/nyregion/22hu.span.jpg


http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2007/10/22/nyregion/22richardr.span.jpg

http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2007/10/22/nyregion/22Lahodny.span.jpg


http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2007/10/23/nyregion/23amandap.span.jpg


http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2007/10/23/nyregion/23Srta.-Puri.span.jpg


http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2007/10/23/nyregion/23hall.span.jpg

brianac
October 27th, 2007, 08:35 AM
http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2007/10/23/nyregion/23Bobby-S.jpg


http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2007/10/23/nyregion/23Bobby-S.1.jpg


http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2007/10/23/nyregion/23condouris.jpg


http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2007/10/23/nyregion/23ward.span.jpg

ablarc
October 27th, 2007, 09:40 AM
http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2007/10/22/nyregion/22richardr.span.jpg
Low-key and classic.

milleniumcab
October 27th, 2007, 11:31 AM
^^^ I agree..This one is the best of all, including the one we have to get...

http://www.nyc.gov/html/tlc/html/safety_emissions/taxicab_logo_main.shtml

lofter1
October 27th, 2007, 12:03 PM
The one with the bullet holes is pretty damned funny:

http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2007/10/16/nyregion/16potts.1.jpg

brianac
October 27th, 2007, 01:23 PM
^^^ I agree..This one is the best of all, including the one we have to get...

MC. Some of these would cost a lot more than your $50/$60.

milleniumcab
October 28th, 2007, 02:30 AM
MC. Some of these would cost a lot more than your $50/$60.

I don't think the one Ablarc pointed out would cost anymore than the ones we'll have to put on.. And if it did, so what.. It looks much better..

brianac
October 28th, 2007, 04:41 AM
Regarding costs, I was talking about some of the more bizarre designs.

I agree if you get what you want, so what.

milleniumcab
October 28th, 2007, 06:10 PM
Regarding costs, I was talking about some of the more bizarre designs.

I agree if you get what you want, so what.

You are right about some of the designs being bizarre.. Obviuosly the city hasn't asked the right people to enter the design or should I say, the decision process...

macreator
October 28th, 2007, 08:33 PM
I was going through some pics of the new design on different cab models, and came across a pic of a cab that has to offer the worse ride I've ever experienced:

http://www.nyc.gov/html/tlc/images/photos/thumb_chevy_uplander.jpg
The Chevy Uplander

I've been in a few of these lately and each time I had an awful ride. It's not even just the ride, it's the whole experience. You're lower than the driver which makes you feel very uncomfortable, and this car has no suspension at all -- you feel every bump and street defect. What an awful automobile.

milleniumcab
October 28th, 2007, 09:41 PM
I was going through some pics of the new design on different cab models, and came across a pic of a cab that has to offer the worse ride I've ever experienced:

http://www.nyc.gov/html/tlc/images/photos/thumb_chevy_uplander.jpg
The Chevy Uplander

I've been in a few of these lately and each time I had an awful ride. It's not even just the ride, it's the whole experience. You're lower than the driver which makes you feel very uncomfortable, and this car has no suspension at all -- you feel every bump and street defect. What an awful automobile.

Chevy Uplanders are used for Wheel Chair Accesible medallions. They are converted into wheel chair accessible vehicles, making the ride just as you described..:eek:..If you have a choice do not get in one..;)..

macreator
October 28th, 2007, 10:08 PM
Chevy Uplanders are used for Wheel Chair Accesible medallions. They are converted into wheel chair accessible vehicles, making the ride just as you described..:eek:..If you have a choice do not get in one..;)..

I try to avoid riding in them, but sometimes I am not paying attention and I immediately regret getting inside.

I also feel awful for the drivers of these things, I would simply get physically sick if I had to spend 9 hours inside one of these things.

milleniumcab
October 28th, 2007, 10:23 PM
I try to avoid riding in them, but sometimes I am not paying attention and I immediately regret getting inside.

I also feel awful for the drivers of these things, I would simply get physically sick if I had to spend 9 hours inside one of these things.

I am glad I am not driving one...:rolleyes:

ablarc
October 28th, 2007, 11:55 PM
GM still committing suicide.

Uplander?

What an uplandish name.

milleniumcab
October 29th, 2007, 10:53 PM
^^^ :)))))))))))

HansonNY
October 30th, 2007, 11:18 PM
So of those designs are alright but I'm not really a fan of the new logo. What was wrong with the old logo?

Why the need to change it?:confused:

milleniumcab
October 31st, 2007, 12:21 AM
Every now and then, people in government get bored and need to bring about changes that will affect the public in general...THIS IS ONE OF THOSE PROJECTS....... It is a way to fix something that's not broken.. What is even most disgusting is they did not even consider the people who makes the world go around, in taxi business anyway!...

macreator
October 31st, 2007, 12:37 AM
The logo change seems to coincide with the overall rebranding of NYC Visit and NYC & Company. I kind of like the new logo and new taxi stickers in a Total Recall kind of way, but it still does seem a bit unnecessary. I'd rather spend the cash on some paint for a whole swath of subway stations that are in desperate need of a new coat.

milleniumcab
October 31st, 2007, 04:07 PM
I'd rather spend the cash on some paint for a whole swath of subway stations that are in desperate need of a new coat.
The City decided to change the taxi logos but they are not paying for it. The owners od medallions are...

Front_Porch
November 1st, 2007, 11:05 AM
Typical!

brianac
November 2nd, 2007, 05:45 AM
Cabdrivers Sweat It Out Bidding on Medallions

By WINTER MILLER
Published: November 2, 2007
“Dropped, dropped, still good, dropped, dropped.” Gary Kanterman was talking to himself as he ran his pen down his list of taxi drivers.
Mr. Kanterman, 41, a broker with Jericho Taxi Brokers, was assessing the bids of his 35 clients — most of whom were out driving fares — at an auction yesterday of 63 medallions by the Taxi and Limousine Commission (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/reference/timestopics/organizations/t/taxi_and_limousine_commission/index.html?inline=nyt-org).
About 13,000 cabs honk and swerve through the streets of New York City, yet even with recent strikes over the cost and purview of new technology mandated in the cars, owning a medallion remains a shot at independence and equity for many drivers.
“This is one of the best investments — better than Merrill Lynch, which is going down the drain,” said a driver, Mahmoud Sadakah, 42. “This is a guaranteed investment, because it will never go down.”
The auction by the commission was the first of two offering a total of 150 medallions. Most are for the opportunity to drive wheelchair-accessible taxis. By all accounts, it was a rare opportunity for individual drivers, because the second auction, set for next spring, will be for corporate medallions, which are sold in pairs. Corporate medallions are more expensive, and the owner is not required to drive.
“That’s me!” Mohammad Bhuiyan, 40, said as he saw his bid of $241,000 appear on a big white screen in a drab room at 40 Rector Street. About three dozen people were there — most wore suits and were either brokers, like Mr. Kanterman, or commission employees. One of the exceptions was Vladimir Nisanov, 34, a driver who snapped photos of the on-screen bids hoping that no more than 62 would top his offer of $300,000.
In the last row, Mr. Bhuiyan was sitting slightly slumped in a navy pea coat and baseball cap. A driver for 10 years, he wanted to obtain a medallion so that he could build some equity. He was excited, he said, even though his broker told him he had “no chance” of winning.
The trick of this sealed bid auction was how much over the commission’s minimum bid of $189,000 to go. To compare, the market value of an independent medallion sold in October was $426,000. Medallions are perceived as low-risk investments because resale prices have continued to rise and there is a fairly stable cap on the number of new cars allowed on the streets.
“Historically, the appreciation in value of all medallions protects people in that they can always borrow additional funds,” Mr. Kanterman said. But, he said, the medallions offered yesterday carry a greater risk. “There’s not a car proven yet that it can take the rigors of being an N.Y.C. taxicab that is wheelchair accessible,” he said. “The risk here is the car.”
Next to Mr. Bhuiyan, Mr. Sadakah looked at the bids and shook his head. He was driving his cab yesterday, but had parked his car at a taxi stand, hoping he would not get a ticket while attending the auction. But his bid of $220,000 looked unlikely to win. “In the beginning I was hopeful,” he said. “Now I’m hopeless.”
In the second row, Mohammad Islam was leaning forward in his chair, eagerly watching the bids land. “I put $341,000,” he said. “If I become winner I’ll be proud of myself because I determined the price.”
Mr. Islam, 32, who has been driving a cab for a decade, participated in the recent strikes over the cost and effectiveness of a global positioning system and credit card machines. Driving a cab is a job, he said, that gets no respect and does not offer health insurance. Still, Mr. Islam borrowed $20,000 from relatives and 90 percent from the broker, who also agreed to finance the cost of a new car.
As the 155th bid hit the screen, brokers jumped to their feet to compare notes about who got what. The highest bid was $384,999, and two of Mr. Kanterman’s clients made the cut with matching bids of $277,777. The winners have 30 days to finish paperwork and close the deal.
“I got a deal. I’m happy,” Mr. Nisanov said. But he did not look happy.
He was already tabulating his worries: What if the car he buys breaks down? What if medallion prices fall because drivers are dissatisfied with the new technology?
But Mr. Sadakah didn’t mind his loss. “Now I can go on vacation with my family to Disney,” he said. “I’m not dreaming of being a taxi driver for the rest of my life.”

milleniumcab
November 2nd, 2007, 08:21 AM
Just one little detail for the people who bid and won on the latest wheel chair accessible medallions...The T&LC have not yet decided what the governing rules will be for these medallions. They have once again showed their backward state of mind when it comes fairness to cab drivers and owners..Sell them before deciding on the rules so the bidders will not be discouraged by the rules...
The winners have to worry not only for the cars they have to buy but also for the TLC rules that are going to be approved for these medallions. They better attend every public hearing and show their displeasure.. There is a slight chance it might make a difference..:rolleyes:

brianac
November 2nd, 2007, 08:30 AM
So they may have to buy the Chevy Uplander as a price for getting the medallion.

milleniumcab
November 2nd, 2007, 08:42 AM
So they may have to buy the Chevy Uplander as a price for getting the medallion.
And if the rules pass as they stand, the drivers could travel (with their Uplanders) up to an hour to a destination (and have to wait minimum 15 minutes) to pick up a wheel chair passenger, all free of charge..The passenger will only pay for the metered ride while seated in the cab.. Calls will be dispatched through 311 with the help of the GPS to the nearest WCA yellow cab to the passenger's pick up location..

brianac
November 2nd, 2007, 08:57 AM
"^"

Thanks MC it's good to have someone with inside knowledge to explain the finer detail.

milleniumcab
November 4th, 2007, 10:20 AM
"^"

Thanks MC it's good to have someone with inside knowledge to explain the finer detail.

It is public info at TLC's web site under the proposed rules..

www.nyc.gov/taxi (http://www.nyc.gov/taxi)

milleniumcab
November 14th, 2007, 12:26 AM
One of the 4 vendors approved to put the GPS in cabs is in financial trouble. Apparently, they could not get the financing they need for the operation and, most likely, TLC will pull the plug on them.. I, along with thousands of medallions owners, had signed with this vendor.. Now it appears, I will not have to put the GPS in mine until the first inspection after February 1st, 2008..:).. I don't really mind finishing the year off without the GPS... So there is a little delay for all cabs to get it by the New Year...

lofter1
November 14th, 2007, 11:00 AM
Hmmmm ... How did such a questionable vendor ^ get an initial OK from the City?

milleniumcab
November 15th, 2007, 12:14 AM
I can only guess, the inital OK from TLC did not require financial stability from the vendors.. All the vendors had to come up with was a system that's capable of the requirements; credit card payment capability, text messaging and electronic trip sheet collection.. And in the testing phase, they each had to hook up 50 cabs with their system to road test it for 6 months and provide the data to TLC.. Up to this point everything was Ok but I believe they messed up when it came to their contract offers to medallion owners.. They offered the best (cheapest) contract of all vendors ( free system, no monthly fees, free meters if needed, etc.)thus making it difficult to finance the project.. It still isn't over yet though. I found out today they have a few more days to come with proper financial deals.. This time TLC might want them to prove where the money is gonna come from..;)..

milleniumcab
December 3rd, 2007, 10:53 AM
http://www.nyc.gov/html/tlc/downloads/pdf/industry_notice_07_26.pdf


Taxi Tech, the vendor with problems, have filed for bankruptcy.. By doing so they have frozen their status as one of the vendors for the technology until the Bankruptcy court reaches a decision.. I think they are trying to buy time to come up with the money somehow..The time T&LC has given them has already expired..

I do not know how this will play out but it is ok with me since I won't be penalized for not having the system by my next T&LC Inspection...

antinimby
December 12th, 2007, 05:19 PM
25 M.P.G. for City Cabs


By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Published: December 12, 2007 (http://www.nytimes.com/2007/12/12/nyregion/12taxi.html)

The city’s Taxi and Limousine Commission adopted a rule on Tuesday that will require all cabs purchased after Oct. 1, 2008, to get at least 25 miles per gallon.

Cabs bought after fall 2009 will have to get 30 miles per gallon.

The new rule will mean that taxi fleet owners, who must replace their cabs every three to five years, will probably be forced to buy fuel-efficient hybrids, which run partly on electricity.

In a statement, Matthew Daus, the commission chairman, said the rule “lays the groundwork for the cleanest, greenest large city taxicab fleet in the world.”

NewYorkDoc
December 12th, 2007, 07:02 PM
^ Best idea in a while for NY. Hybrids are perfect for Manhattan.

ablarc
December 12th, 2007, 10:40 PM
^ Maybe, but is there enough legroom in the back seat?






(A hybrid Checker ... now that would be a cab.)

NewYorkDoc
December 13th, 2007, 04:44 PM
In my opinion, yes. Cabs aren't for long distance traveling, so the few passengers who may find the rear a bit uncomfortable only have to suck it up for a bit.

The benefits far out weigh the negatives.

ablarc
December 13th, 2007, 06:51 PM
You must have short legs.

milleniumcab
December 13th, 2007, 09:17 PM
In my opinion, yes. Cabs aren't for long distance traveling, so the few passengers who may find the rear a bit uncomfortable only have to suck it up for a bit.

The benefits far out weigh the negatives.

I agree with Ablarc, you must have short legs and probably don't depend on cabs much...

I am against the mentality that cabs are strictly for short fares. I would like all cabs to be comfortable so that people wouldn't mind taking longer trips every now and then..

In my opinion, there are forces out there trying to localize the yellow cab even more so than it already has been.. Your mentality fits right in with those forces..

TonyO
December 15th, 2007, 10:38 AM
NY Times
The TV Watch

Taxi TV, Brisk as the Traffic You’re Stuck In

Nicole Bengiveno/The New York Times

http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2007/12/15/arts/15watc600.jpg
The New York Taxi and Limousine Commission predicts that by March, all 13,000 of its cabs will have touch-screen television monitors similar to the one above, with news, ads and entertainment.

By ALESSANDRA STANLEY
Published: December 15, 2007

Where once there was only peeling vinyl, printed fare rates and the cabdriver’s ceaseless cellphone chatter, there is now a television screen.

Suddenly, brash ads for banks and credit card companies (“Your morning mocha could be on us”), an almost endless supply of health tips and features about family-run bagel factories and cookie drives to cure cancer, and even, in some cases, movie times and restaurant reviews, are all part of the Manhattan cab ride experience.

But is there anything on Taxi TV worth watching? Stay tuned.

It’s a question that seems all the more pressing during a holiday season when the city is overrun with tourists, traffic is clotted, and during a single car ride from Columbus Circle to Wall Street, a passenger can see many times over a promo for WABC-TV that shows the anchor Bill Ritter striding purposefully through a herd of whirling helicopters.

New York City is at the forefront of cab technology, but cab vision is still in its infancy. At the moment, it’s a dizzying display case for ads and vignettes culled from local newscasts. But passengers are by definition a captive, if captious, audience. It’s not too soon to examine whether cab vision will become home-away-from-home-entertainment, a traveling multimedia emporium that gives riders a broad choice of short programs, or an advertising autocracy where blaring promotional messages are flashed at viewers strapped down by seat belts like Alex undergoing aversion therapy in “A Clockwork Orange.”

Slightly more than half the taxis in New York City are now equipped with touch-screen video monitors. Despite resistance and much grumbling from some drivers, the Taxi and Limousine Commission expects that by March, all 13,000 of the city’s medallion cabs will be equipped with monitors that allow credit card payments, a global-positioning feature tracking the trip on an electronic map, and television.

And as it turns out, there is a ferocious network battle for backseat viewers. Of the four companies that have contracts with the city, there are only two major providers who together control most of the taxi programming, and they offer starkly opposite philosophies. VeriFone Transportation Systems, which has an alliance with WABC-TV, calls its system Taxi-TV, and favors aggressively interactive content: Alongside ads and news briefs, its touch-screen monitors offer gallery listings, restaurant reviews and ads disguised as quizzes. (“What is Donald Trump’s rank in the Forbes 400?” asks Forbes magazine.) The company also plans to add a Reuters business digest. Its monitor even comes with a dimmer to soften the screen’s brightness after dark.

Creative Mobile Technology Inc., which is in league with Clear Channel and NBC Universal, and which offers NY 10, the Taxi Entertainment Network, believes that less is more: Its screens are designed to encourage passenger passivity; the main choice is whether to turn the crawl under the screen from sports to entertainment news.

Taxi-TV, via WABC and VeriFone, offers more consumer information, but is also more demanding, and sometimes more enervating. The screen does not always instantly respond to touch (“Please be patient while data is loading”), and trying to scroll through the Zagat Guide’s restaurant listings while the cab maneuvers potholes and stop-and-go traffic is a little like trying to thread a needle on horseback.

Tipping procedures are also different. When customers pay the fare by credit card, the monitor offers a choice of automatically calculated tips. VeriFone begins at 20 percent all the way up to 30 percent, whereas Creative Mobile Technology starts at a more modest 15 percent. (Both systems allow customers to bypass those buttons and enter their own tips.)

News briefs, also known as taxicasts, are updated three times a day, but less time-sensitive features are changed once a week, so viewers may watch a promo for an ABC movie like “For One More Day,” based on the Mitch Albom best seller, several days after it has been broadcast and many times before the meter shuts off.

On the other hand, TaxiTV has a more diverse and intriguing cast of advertisers than its rival. One of the more arresting 30-second spots is an enigmatic ad for a pro-Kremlin Web site, russiatoday.ru, and magazine, Russia Today; it offers a surprising spin on the proverbial Butterfly Effect: a soccer ball kicked through a scientist’s window eventually results in a handsome New Russian couple waiting impatiently on a snow-covered tarmac for a private jet that fails to arrive. The tag line, “Dare to Be Different,” doesn’t explain much, but it does convey a Putinesque disdain for Western efficiency.

The programming provided by Clear Channel and NBC is more prosaic, and tightly bound to corporate sponsorship, including its own. NBC provides promotional clips from “The Tonight Show With Jay Leno” and “Saturday Night Live” and many, many ads for “The NBC Nightly News With Brian Williams” and the next season of “The Apprentice.”

NBC also has broadcast rights to the 2008 Olympic Games in Beijing, which it promotes with snippets from the 2004 games. When traffic is clogged and honking loud, and the driver is irate and yelling obscenities, there is something soothing about the sight of Olympic swimmers slicing through water at three times the speed of a Midtown cab.

At the moment, the cab tube has novelty, but that can wear off pretty quickly after one too many loops of Chase credit card ads or movie reviews from NBC’s “Reel Talk.” But the technology allows for more and better programming, and viewers do have a voice in what they watch while traveling. All taxi television sets are equipped with an off button, and that is the captive cab rider’s last resort.

ablarc
December 15th, 2007, 02:29 PM
All taxi television sets are equipped with an off button, and that is the captive cab rider’s last resort.
Last or only?

macreator
December 15th, 2007, 04:46 PM
I ride a cab a few times a week and immediately press the off button after I've told the driver where I'm headed. Of course, "off" isn't truly off. The screen never turns off and instead just cuts the audio and shows one line of text "Touch here to start" or something like that.

These screens are truly awful and some of the interfaces even look like they were cobbled together in Microsoft Paint by a first-year New Media student. The only interface that is even mildly bearable is the one that is sponsored by ABC-TV. At least that one does in fact give you some news and weather video clips albeit with lots of advertising. The rest of the units offer pretty mediocre mapping, awful design, and blaring ads that keep on coming...over...and over....and over again. That Chase ad mentioned in the Times article is the worst. I get it, I can get something free if I use my Chase debit card.

I still can't seem to figure out how to get any useful information out of the NBC sponsored units. The only news seems to come from the ticker at the bottom. In terms of video all I get is a stream of relentless promos for Brian Williams and an annoying Al Roker welcoming me to NBC-10 Taxi TV.

The TLC's foray into technology in taxis is a disaster. They should have stopped at credit card payment.

antinimby
December 15th, 2007, 10:37 PM
Turn off that screen. Just a waste of electrical energy. Besides, this is New York, the city outside the windows is the entertainment.

milleniumcab
December 16th, 2007, 12:53 AM
This TV thing came about because all of the industry representatives asked TLC to allow owners to be able to advertise inside the cab. The past law did not allow us to.. So the TLC did change the law and now you have to deal with the TV thing.:))

Out of all the things the system provide, the only real advantage to passengers is Credit Card capability, everythingelse is just bologna.. And what is funny is Credit Card capability is possible without the system.:rolleyes:

Alonzo-ny
December 16th, 2007, 01:56 PM
Turn off that screen. Just a waste of electrical energy. Besides, this is New York, the city outside the windows is the entertainment.

Exactly! Why the hell would anyone want to stare at some crap on those tvs when you can watch the city pass by?

NewYorkDoc
December 17th, 2007, 05:59 PM
You must have short legs.

6'1"

NewYorkDoc
December 17th, 2007, 06:01 PM
I agree with Ablarc, you must have short legs and probably don't depend on cabs much...

I am against the mentality that cabs are strictly for short fares. I would like all cabs to be comfortable so that people wouldn't mind taking longer trips every now and then..

In my opinion, there are forces out there trying to localize the yellow cab even more so than it already has been.. Your mentality fits right in with those forces..

In reality, the longest trips a driver will normally drive is to the airport. I'm thinking most dont even like that with the hateful glares I've received from more than one when I said JFK.

NoyokA
December 17th, 2007, 06:10 PM
Exactly! Why the hell would anyone want to stare at some crap on those tvs when you can watch the city pass by?

I agree with what you're saying and that's precisely why I do not have cable, why spend time watching tv in my apt. when I can be out? Because of this, personally, I have to disagree with what you're saying though, I like tvs in cabs, because its the only time I get to actually watch the local news and weather.

NewYorkDoc
December 17th, 2007, 06:47 PM
Different strokes for different folks.

NewYorkDoc
December 17th, 2007, 07:36 PM
In reality, the longest trips a driver will normally drive is to the airport. I'm thinking most dont even like that with the hateful glares I've received from more than one when I said JFK.

A ride to the aiports isn't really that long of a trip. Those who want to complain "OH, there isn't enough room in the back for me to spread my legs until we reach the aiport!" seem to me to just need something to complain about.

Seems similar to the folks in the NY Times article that was about owning town homes in NY. They complained of not having a doorman and having to take their own luggage in after trips! OH THE HORROR!

ablarc
December 20th, 2007, 09:23 AM
Thing I object to is not so much the legroom as the dirty lucite security division claustrophobically in my face.



(New York in the Eighties.)

milleniumcab
December 20th, 2007, 06:21 PM
Thing I object to is not so much the legroom as the dirty lucite security division claustrophobically in my face.



(New York in the Eighties.)

That partition takes away 6-7 inches...

BPC
December 22nd, 2007, 01:13 AM
This may sound strange, but the back of the cab to me is one of the few peaceful places I experience in my City, where I can collect my thoughts. I hate those damn tv sets.

ManhattanKnight
December 22nd, 2007, 12:51 PM
I hate those damn tv sets.
Who, outside the TLC and bribe-payers behind them doesn't, but they're easy enough to shut off. Unlike the cabby I had Thursday during a nearly hour-long ride from the UES to the W. Village who treated himself to an animated cell phone encounter with someone in a language not English throughout the trip, including the part near the end where I tried (unsuccessfully) to convince him that the wide, divided highway at the edge of the Hudson River was not, as he put it, Green-WITCH Street.

Alonzo-ny
December 22nd, 2007, 04:12 PM
Is there a special cell phone plan for cab drivers? They are all constantly on their cells.

milleniumcab
December 23rd, 2007, 02:27 AM
Is there a special cell phone plan for cab drivers? They are all constantly on their cells.

They make sure they are all in the same plan with the same company..:rolleyes:.. It annoys me just as much..

lofter1
December 23rd, 2007, 08:36 AM
Drivers are supposed to stop gabbing and shut off the damn cellphone if a passenger so requests:

http://www.nyc.gov/html/tlc/includes/site_images/pagetitles/tlc_pass_rights_pagetitle.gif

http://www.nyc.gov/html/tlc/html/passenger/taxicab_rights.shtml

As a taxi rider, you have the right to:

Direct the destination and route used;
Travel to any destination in the five boroughs of the City of New York;
A courteous, English-speaking driver who knows the streets in Manhattan and the way to major destinations in other boroughs;
A driver who knows and obeys all traffic laws;
Air-conditioning on demand;
A radio-free (silent) trip;
Smoke and incense-free air;
A clean passenger seat area;
A clean trunk
A driver who uses the horn only when necessary to warn of danger; and
Refuse to tip, if the above are not complied with.If you feel your rights were violated by a taxicab driver please File a Complaint. (http://www.nyc.gov/html/tlc/html/passenger/file_complaint.shtml)

Take your receipt.
24-hour Consumer Hotline: 311

lofter1
December 23rd, 2007, 08:39 AM
No TIPS will get this message ^ across.

If the driver argues with you say that you are doing research on behalf of the Taxi & Limousine Commission (which as a citizen you have every right to do) and then ask the driver to verify the cab / license number which you tell him you have written down :cool:

Alonzo-ny
December 23rd, 2007, 02:43 PM
Me and my roommate were talking about this, it seems as soon as you take their number and threaten to report them their attitude changes pretty rapid.

lofter1
December 23rd, 2007, 03:32 PM
Darn tootin" ^

I've only filed a complaint against a driver at TLC once. That was after he gave me so much guff that I just thought, "Hmmm, REVENGE!"

But after filing the complaint I didn't follow-up (you have to show up for a hearing and all). So while my complaint might have given the driver pause it didn't really cut him too deeply.

Doubt it changed his attitude or behavior in the long run.

antinimby
December 23rd, 2007, 04:45 PM
Did NewYorkDoc just argued with himself @ post #219? If it is, then that's the first time I've seen anything like that.

lofter1
December 23rd, 2007, 05:56 PM
I think he did :D

That is funny.

milleniumcab
December 23rd, 2007, 06:20 PM
Drivers are supposed to stop gabbing and shut off the damn cellphone if a passenger so requests:

And I say, why should the passenger have to request it..:mad:.. They shouldn't be on the cell phone to begin with. If it isn't the law, it should be professionalism helping them to do the right thing and hang up......at least while the passenger is in the cab..;)

Alonzo-ny
December 23rd, 2007, 06:25 PM
Its not the ones who talk that annoy me its the ones who blatently argue and curse loudly, so much that its obvious they couldnt care less about your comfort.

Encideyamind
December 24th, 2007, 12:04 AM
Drivers are supposed to stop gabbing and shut off the damn cellphone if a passenger so requests:

http://www.nyc.gov/html/tlc/includes/site_images/pagetitles/tlc_pass_rights_pagetitle.gif

http://www.nyc.gov/html/tlc/html/passenger/taxicab_rights.shtml

As a taxi rider, you have the right to:

Direct the destination and route used;
Travel to any destination in the five boroughs of the City of New York;
A courteous, English-speaking driver who knows the streets in Manhattan and the way to major destinations in other boroughs;
A driver who knows and obeys all traffic laws;
Air-conditioning on demand;
A radio-free (silent) trip;
Smoke and incense-free air;
A clean passenger seat area;
A clean trunk
A driver who uses the horn only when necessary to warn of danger; and
Refuse to tip, if the above are not complied with.If you feel your rights were violated by a taxicab driver please File a Complaint. (http://www.nyc.gov/html/tlc/html/passenger/file_complaint.shtml)

Take your receipt.
24-hour Consumer Hotline: 311

I work for a cab company and find this laughable. It's one thing to expect all of the above but to get it is a different story. Most of these are reasonable requests but my time here shows that most our drivers would get no tip at all. Our dispatchers are always screaming into the radio, the reservation room is full of loud voices and bad attitudes. The real funny thing though is that the customers are the worst part of it all. Most have a ridiculous sense of entitlement, constantly complain, and overall just come across as down right rude but they always come back. Always.

Alonzo-ny
December 24th, 2007, 12:07 AM
but they always come back. Always.

Do we have a choice?

Encideyamind
December 24th, 2007, 12:24 AM
There's always a choice.

I've noticed in my time here the customers respond well to a calm voice and even-toned demeanor. I've had many people tell me I was their best reservation/call center experience.

I don't know, it's easy to say you get what you give treatment wise but I know that most times that's not the case.

lofter1
December 24th, 2007, 01:25 AM
I've been known to withhold a tip from drivers who have a love affair with their horns ...

The sound of a car horn is one of the uglier noises around.

milleniumcab
December 24th, 2007, 01:03 PM
I work for a cab company and find this laughable. It's one thing to expect all of the above but to get it is a different story. Most of these are reasonable requests but my time here shows that most our drivers would get no tip at all. Our dispatchers are always screaming into the radio, the reservation room is full of loud voices and bad attitudes. The real funny thing though is that the customers are the worst part of it all. Most have a ridiculous sense of entitlement, constantly complain, and overall just come across as down right rude but they always come back. Always.

I take it you work for a cab company where taxis are dispatched. NYC yellow taxis are hailing cabs.. There is no contact with a base of any sort(there used to be years ago).
It is reasonable for a NYC passenger to demand the listed "customer's Bill of Rights"..

But then again, perhaps if "Driver's Bill of Rights" were listed next to the Passenger's, perhaps some of those drivers will feel differently about the whole thing..

lofter1
December 24th, 2007, 01:07 PM
Could you post what should be on that "Driver's Bill of Rights" ?

mykingdomlisa
January 7th, 2008, 03:51 AM
so many cars and people i do not like big cities coz too crowded maybe i can become a pizza everyday:D

brianac
January 25th, 2008, 06:44 AM
News finds most cab drivers break rules

BY CAITLIN MILLAT and JONATHAN LEMIRE
DAILY NEWS STAFF WRITERS

Friday, January 25th 2008, 4:00 AM

http://www.nydailynews.com/img/2008/01/25/amd_taxi-fare.jpg Handschuh/News
Taxi and Limousine Commission is cracking down on cabbies who talk on cell phones - or refuse to take credit cards.

http://www.nydailynews.com/img/2008/01/25/amd_bocanegra.jpg Joyce for News
Jose Bocanegra admits some drivers lie to avoid taking passengers' charge cards - and 5% charge.

A reporter took a dozen yellow cab rides in a 3˝-hour period Wednesday night, and only three of the hacks did not commit at least one violation of the taxi passenger's bill of rights.

Five of the cabbies talked on their phones during the rides, and when one was asked to hang up his phone - as permitted in the bill of rights - the hack angrily exploded at the reporter:

"It is my family member! My daughter is sick! This always happens! It is an emergency!" yelled the cabbie, identified by his ID card as Mbengue Bado.

"It is always the texting that causes accidents, not the talking!" he continued shortly after the ride began at the corner of Broome and Lafayette Sts. "They don't respect us! You don't respect us!"

"We're human," added Bado, who answered another call less than a minute later and continued to talk in a calm voice.

In addition to the five talkers, two other cabbies had hands-free phone headsets in their ears but did not make or receive any calls while the reporter was in the backseat.

The Taxi and Limousine Commission is cracking down on bill of rights violations with a sting operation titled Operation Secret Rider. Cabbies found breaking the rules could face fines; repeat violators could lose their licenses.

Two taxi drivers refused to allow the reporter to pay with a credit card, citing a 5% processing fee for such transactions.

"We don't have a [card] meter," claimed driver Richard Johnson, who picked up the reporter at the corner of E. 65th St. and Park Ave. "But we can stop by an ATM."

Some drivers who permitted credit cards to be used were rude while expressing their displeasure with the reporter's choice of payment.

"You don't have cash?" driver Chebil Faouzi snapped. "They charge me 5% if you use the card!"

Another cabbie said he understood that credit card readers were needed - and that many of his fellow hacks deceived their passengers.

"The drivers say they're broken, but if people find out [they're lying], they'll get fined or get their license taken away," said Jose Bocanegra, who picked up the reporter at the World Trade Center site.

Four of the cabbies were rude to the passenger, two honked their horns excessively and one refused to turn up the heat inside the cab, snapping, "The heat is already on!"

Consumer complaints have risen over the past three years to 19,774 in 2007. Officials noted that 240 million rides were taken last year.

Bhairavi Desai, head of the Taxi Workers Alliance, said she believes that the sting operation is payback for last year's taxi strike.

Copyright 2008 The Daily News

lofter1
January 25th, 2008, 11:58 AM
Ms. Desai needs a reality check.

And to instruct her taxi-driving members to be cordial and hang up their damned phones.

milleniumcab
January 26th, 2008, 02:56 AM
Ms. Desai needs a reality check.

And to instruct her taxi-driving members to be cordial and hang up their damned phones.

Duly noted!...:o...

brianac
February 5th, 2008, 05:43 AM
Company Changes Its Taxi Credit Card Security Policy

By JARED IRMAS
Special to the Sun
February 4, 2008

A leading provider of credit card technology for taxis is changing its security policies after it was disclosed that cabbies could easily gain access to customers' credit card numbers online.

Verifone, a California (http://www.nysun.com/related_results.php?term=California)-based payment technology company that operates in 28 countries, is one of three vendors the Taxi and Limousine Commission (http://www.nysun.com/related_results.php?term=New+York+City+Taxi+%26+Li mousine+Commission) approved last May to install GPS-equipped touch-screen payment units in the city's taxi fleet. The Verifone machines are in 45% of taxis equipped with the technology.

Drivers equipped with the Verifone technology who own and operate their own cabs have access to an itemized online log of their credit card transactions. Up until recently, those merchants had only to type in a user name and password on Verifone's Taxitronic Web site and click through a list of truncated credit card numbers to receive the full, unencrypted numbers and expiration dates of customers' cards.

Upon learning about the Verifone online system from The New York Sun (http://www.nysun.com/related_results.php?term=The+New+York+Sun+One+SL+L LC), consumer advocates and security analysts expressed concern.

"If you have credit card data online that can be accessed at home through the Internet, you need more than just a password," a fraud analyst at Gartner, Avivah Litan (http://www.nysun.com/related_results.php?term=Avivah+Litan), said. "Anybody can steal a user name and password."

After an inquiry from the Sun, Verifone changed its policy and removed the drivers' access to those credit card numbers.

"A lot of these merchants were unfamiliar and uncomfortable with having this data," a spokesman for Verifone, Joseph Ledford (http://www.nysun.com/related_results.php?term=Joseph+Ledford), said in a telephone interview. "We thought it to be wise to have the New York office assist them with this data, rather than have the numbers out and around."

The company did not make its decision as a response to the Sun's inquiry, the vice president of Verifone, Dave Faoro (http://www.nysun.com/related_results.php?term=Dave+Faoro), said. "It was on the business side, not a security thing," he said.

Owners of taxi fleets that lease out vehicles to subcontracted drivers will continue to have online access to unencrypted credit card data, but individual drivers will not, Mr. Faoro said. The numbers are made available in the event that a transaction dispute must be resolved with a credit card company.

The new distinction in access between merchant-drivers and fleet owners still has some in the taxi industry concerned about customer protection, and the liability of drivers and owners in the event of a security breach.

"I don't know why fleet operators would be more trustworthy than an owner-driver," the executive director of New York Taxi Workers Alliance (http://www.nysun.com/related_results.php?term=Taxi+Workers+Alliance), Bhairavi Desai (http://www.nysun.com/related_results.php?term=Bhairavi+Desai), said. "So many fleets have so many employees that would still have access to information that should be secure."

Copyright 2008 The New York Sun

itsallgoode9
February 9th, 2008, 03:03 AM
taxis talking on their phones does not bother me personally. But I've been frustrated time and time again about the credit card ordeal. Maybe it's my misunderstanding or the way the city portrays it, but i've been in plenty of cabs with card swippers that have one reason or another why they can't take cards (when i'm ready to pay).

I generally hold up my credit card in plain sight when hailing a cab and make sure to ask about taking "card" before i get in. But sometimes I forget to ask and i'm thrown for a loop when the cab driver says "oh I can't take card, you had to tell me before the meter shut off"

is this true, or is this just drivers not wanting passengers to use their cards?

Alonzo-ny
March 9th, 2008, 07:15 PM
A-hole driver refused to take me and my friends from Houston to greenpoint last night, rudely refused and told us to get out of the cab. Unbelievable, this is the first time ive seen a cab driver flat out be a d***head for no reason.

The Benniest
March 9th, 2008, 07:43 PM
A-hole driver refused to take me and my friends from Houston to greenpoint last night, rudely refused and told us to get out of the cab. Unbelievable, this is the first time ive seen a cab driver flat out be a d***head for no reason.
Can people turn these kinds of drivers in? I don't know where you'd turn them in at, but just a thought...

Alonzo-ny
March 9th, 2008, 08:17 PM
You can take their number and report them with their offense to the taxi commision, in this case the illegal refusal to take me somewhere in the city. Unfortunately when your drunk and just want to get to the next bar it just doesnt seem worth it. My friend kicked a dent in his door though, not my prefered way to take care of the situation but it made her feel better.

The Benniest
March 9th, 2008, 08:41 PM
Aah.. the reason I asked is because of this:


As a taxi rider, you have the right to:

Direct the destination and route used;
Travel to any destination in the five boroughs of the City of New York

Alonzo-ny
March 9th, 2008, 09:33 PM
Exactly.

milleniumcab
March 10th, 2008, 01:21 AM
Sorry to hear that Alonzo, I really am.. But is there anyone out there with a pleasant thought about cab drivers?.......Sick of this negativity.....

milleniumcab
March 10th, 2008, 01:27 AM
What about the moron who got out of my friend's cab without paying..That idiot wanted to pay with a CC but the cab did not have the GPS system installed yet?... The city is quick to give ammunition to morons via press conferences without thinking about the consequences... NOT ALL CABS HAVE THE SYSTEM YET.....