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TREPYE
January 13th, 2014, 09:33 PM
The texts are pretty damining.
What did they say that was damning??

eddhead
January 13th, 2014, 11:56 PM
What did they say that was damning??

There are over 500 of them, many asking what PED's to take when and arranging for other logistics. They are not hard to find.

TREPYE
January 14th, 2014, 08:46 AM
I understand that there is a whole bunch of stuff out there. What I am asking you is to delineate which of the text messages youve seen are the most "damning"... (Please provide a link).

ZippyTheChimp
January 14th, 2014, 09:19 AM
Watch the 60 Minutes tape.

eddhead
January 14th, 2014, 09:26 AM
I was going to suggest the same thing, where excerpts are provided.


In the meantime, there is this:

.The most incriminating piece of evidence against Rodriguez was a transcription of more than 500 text messages between Bosch and A-Rod with apparent code words and information regarding dosing that would help him avoid detection.
http://newyork.cbslocal.com/2014/01/12/anthony-bosch-to-discuss-a-rod-in-60-minutes-interview/


Horowitz’s ruling also offered a narrative darkened by exchanges between Bosch and Rodriguez of more than a 1,000 text and Blackberry messages (BBMs), delivered in coded language, in 2012. Horowitz wrote that Bosch initially supplied the drugs to a cousin of Rodriguez who administered shots, and that later Bosch often delivered the shots.

Horowitz considered the text-message history damning. The ruling mentioned one message from Rodriguez to Bosch during an Atlanta road trip in 2012. Bosch was meeting his client at the Yankees’ team hotel. "Try to use service elevators," Rodriguez wrote. "Careful. Tons of eyes


The BBMs by and to Rodriguez address doses, timing and administration of (performance-enhancing drugs) to Rodriguez, as well as payment for drugs and services," Horowitz wrote. "The BBMs also reflect the deliberate efforts taken by Bosch and Rodriguez to conceal their activities and to avoid a positive MLB drug test."
http://www.nj.com/yankees/index.ssf/2014/01/alex_rodriguez_seeks_to_have_ruling_by_arbitrator_ vacated.html

There are many more which are far more explicit detailed on the 60 minute interview where Arod expiclitly asks which substances to take when, and Bosch just as expliclty responds. At one point, Arod instructs Bosch to erase the texts.

Very damining stuff.

IrishInNYC
January 14th, 2014, 10:03 AM
What is most shocking about this is that Rodriguez was still using a Blackberry. In 2012.

ZippyTheChimp
January 14th, 2014, 10:16 AM
I'm not sure if it still is (security breaches were discovered in 2013), but in 2012 Blackberry was by far the most secure SMS platform.

ARod may have known this; he has never been described as a dummy. Unfortunately for him and many others, there is always an electronic trail that can be retrieved.

TREPYE
January 14th, 2014, 11:32 AM
I was going to suggest the same thing, where excerpts are provided.


In the meantime, there is this:

http://newyork.cbslocal.com/2014/01/12/anthony-bosch-to-discuss-a-rod-in-60-minutes-interview/




http://www.nj.com/yankees/index.ssf/2014/01/alex_rodriguez_seeks_to_have_ruling_by_arbitrator_ vacated.html

There are many more which are far more explicit detailed on the 60 minute interview where Arod expiclitly asks which substances to take when, and Bosch just as expliclty responds. At one point, Arod instructs Bosch to erase the texts.

Very damining stuff.

None of the links provided lead to the exceprts of the texts or messages. Telling someone to take a certain elevator is hardly damning stuff without any ancilliary contexts. Im not saying that these messages do not exist all I am saying is that I would like to see the evidence as it would validate what type of case A-rod has. I like most am inclined to think that A-rod did cheat, but I would like to see evidence that is not based on Bosh's hearsay. I wanna see the messages that came from Arod when he is specifically asked to get injected; even better, I would like to see hotel footage of Bosh at the arranged time in that hotel and that A-rod was registered at the hotel at that time described at the text.

TREPYE
January 14th, 2014, 11:47 AM
Baseball (http://www.nytimes.com/pages/sports/baseball/index.html)
In Alex Rodriguez Decision, the Devil Is in a Lack of Detail


(http://www.nytimes.com/2014/01/13/sports/baseball/rodriguez-decision-offers-result-but-not-answers.html)Since early August, “The Wolf of East 161st Street” has been playing in the Bronx and theaters everywhere, with Alex Rodriguez (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/reference/timestopics/people/r/alex_rodriguez/index.html?inline=nyt-per) as the star.
We watched Major League Baseball bring its doping case against Rodriguez and levy a 211-game suspension (http://www.nytimes.com/2013/08/06/sports/baseball/mlb-suspends-12-in-doping-investigation.html) against him. Although it was the most severe ban over performance-enhancing drugs in the history of the sport, the league could not point to a failed drug test to prove Rodriguez’s guilt. Still, Commissioner Bud Selig contended, the league’s investigators had turned up plenty of other evidence linking Rodriguez to drugs. Trust him, he basically said, the evidence was damning.
More than five months later, the credits are rolling. But does anyone fully understand the ending?
An arbitrator chosen by the league and the players union ruled Saturday that Rodriguez’s suspension would be reduced to 162 games (http://www.nytimes.com/2014/01/12/sports/baseball/arbitrators-ruling-banishes-the-yankees-alex-rodriguez-for-a-season.html), the entire 2014 season, and that he was barred from the postseason, too.
The 162-game suspension of Alex Rodriguez is the longest in baseball history for doping. Patrick Smith/Getty Images Baseball, its players union and the arbitrator who rendered the decision, Fredric R. Horowitz, did not reveal the body of evidence that may have ended Rodriguez’s career. Instead, what the public has learned of Rodriguez’s doping follies has been bits and pieces of details leaked to news organizations, like CBS’s “60 Minutes,” which aired a segment about Rodriguez on Sunday. Still, those drips of proof have fallen woefully short of painting a complete picture of Rodriguez, baseball’s most infamous cheater.
We have heard that Anthony Bosch, who ran Biogenesis, a now-closed anti-aging clinic that supplied steroids and other drugs to many major leaguers, injected Rodriguez with banned substances. We have heard that Rodriguez’s name was in Bosch’s notebooks and that the drugs listed under his name included IGF-1, which is thought to build muscle, reduce fat and increase endurance, and DHEA, which turns into a steroid in the bloodstream. Bosch himself told “60 Minutes” that Rodriguez popped fast-acting testosterone lozenges 10-15 minutes before a game, and that Rodriguez had paid him $12,000 a month to devise a sophisticated doping plan for him.
But after suffering through this tiresome Rodriguez drama for far too long — listening to his incessant complaints that the investigation is a witch hunt and hearing stories of how the league was so desperate to nab him that it hired its own investigative team to dig up dirt — the public deserves all the gory details.
Those details might help us understand, once and for all, whether Rodriguez was a doper (this second time around), how long he doped, what he took and what lengths he might have taken to gain an edge on his competitors.
Details would also help the league justify its behavior in obtaining some of the evidence, like buying documents and offering payments to witnesses. In Rodriguez’s case, if his claims of innocence are true, details could help clear his name.
Look how details served the public in the case of Lance Armstrong, the seven-time Tour de France (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/reference/timestopics/subjects/t/tour_de_france_bicycle_race/index.html?inline=nyt-classifier) winner who was stripped of his titles for doping (http://www.nytimes.com/2012/10/23/sports/cycling/armstrong-stripped-of-his-7-tour-de-france-titles.html). Armstrong was suspended for life from Olympic sports in 2012 , but the United States Anti-Doping Agency did not announce that harsh ban and then flee without answering questions.
Instead, in several months’ time, it handed the public 1,000 pages of evidence against Armstrong. Overkill, maybe, but that evidence satisfied the public’s desire to know the how — not only the what — that made Armstrong’s actions so bad. The problem is that baseball and its union did not release details like that, if those details even exist. Per the league’s collective bargaining agreement with the union, the evidence in a doping arbitration remains confidential. The union pushed for that privacy to protect its players, in case an athlete was exonerated after being accused.
Yesterday Arbitration hearings are, by definition, private matters.
You can't ask for arbitration then complain the hearing isn't public.... But when the player is found guilty, as in Rodriguez’s case, why not lay everything out for the public? Instead, there is no transparency.
In the Olympic sports, which follow the World Anti-Doping Agency’s code, arbitrators at least make their written decisions public. If the case is appealed and is heard by the Court of Arbitration for Sport, the same holds true. Fans are given a chance to understand the reasoning behind a suspension.
Although baseball has made impressive strides in its drug testing in recent years — including implementing testing that looks at players’ biological markers to study variances that may indicate doping — the ruling entities of the sport continue to promote secrecy over transparency. They have not been able to agree to put their doping program in the hands of an independent entity, like the United States Anti-Doping Agency.
Usada’s program may not be perfect, but it is the current gold standard and would be miles ahead of what baseball has now.Until then, we are left to guess what Rodriguez did to deserve his infamy and how the arbitrator arrived at that number, 162. If the case goes to court, which Rodriguez has vowed, the body of evidence, and the arbitrator’s rationale, might be illuminated.
Short of that, we may never really understand the ending of this misguided saga. The raw footage remains out of reach. That leaves us stuck watching the edited version, and that is simply not enough.
Email: juliet@nytimes.com

eddhead
January 14th, 2014, 12:23 PM
None of the links provided lead to the exceprts of the texts or messages. Telling someone to take a certain elevator is hardly damning stuff without any ancilliary contexts. Im not saying that these messages do not exist all I am saying is that I would like to see the evidence as it would validate what type of case A-rod has. I like most am inclined to think that A-rod did cheat, but I would like to see evidence that is not based on Bosh's hearsay. I wanna see the messages that came from Arod when he is specifically asked to get injected; even better, I would like to see hotel footage of Bosh at the arranged time in that hotel and that A-rod was registered at the hotel at that time described at the text.

Watch the 60 minutes interview. Transcripts of the excerpts are provided. I am not sure how the author of that article could have watched that interview, complete with the transcripts and come to the conclusion she did.

But I mean, asking for hotel footage of Bosch or messages asking to be injected? Who does that?

hbcat
January 14th, 2014, 06:58 PM
@Treype. Bosch's testimony is not hearsay. He describes things he saw, heard or did. Nor are the 500+ messages between Bosch and *Arod* himself "hearsay". You may not like the quality of the evidence but it is not 2nd or 3rd hand.

As has been pointed out, this was not a criminal trial, so all the arbitrator needed to focus on is how, in his judgement, the evidence weighed against the terms of Arod's contract and whether the discipline meted out was justified. He found that the testimony and communications, etc. justified a severe penalty. The MLB is satisfied, the Players union does not contest the result, and the great majority of experts near and less near from the dispute agree. In the meantime, Arod has sued everyone, including his own union, which only reinforces his image as a sleazy cheat.

TREPYE
January 14th, 2014, 11:45 PM
So does the CBA for the players deem "communications" as a sufficient form of evidence to suspend, or does it mandate that the player must have failed a drug test in order to asses culpability?

ZippyTheChimp
January 15th, 2014, 12:44 AM
The answer is obvious.

ZippyTheChimp
January 15th, 2014, 09:44 AM
Scorched earth, burn all the bridges.

Sue the union, criticize its recently passed-away chief, Michael Weiner. Now maybe David Ortiz on a blunder by a member of his Bag-O-Lawyers.


Alex Rodriguez attorney says David Ortiz not his target

By Peter Abraham | Globe Staff January 15, 2014

Red Sox slugger David Ortiz is one of the few major league players to voice support for Alex Rodriguez in recent months.

Ortiz took Rodriguez out for dinner in Boston late last season after the controversial Yankees third baseman was mercilessly booed at Fenway Park. Ortiz even criticized teammate Ryan Dempster for throwing at Rodriguez.

In December, Ortiz invited Rodriguez to his charity event in the Dominican Republic.

So much for that goodwill. On Tuesday, Rodriguez’s lead attorney seemed to cast aspersions on Ortiz during an interview with ESPN Radio.

Joseph Tacopina said he would not name other players accused of using performance-enhancing drugs, “but some of them are God-like in Boston right now.”

In 2009, the New York Times reported Ortiz tested positive for an unnamed substance in a 2003 survey test.

Tacopina, via an e-mail to the Globe, denied he was alluding to Ortiz, but he would not say whom he was referring to. It is unclear what other Boston athlete would fit the description given by Tacopina.

Rodriguez was suspended for the entire 2014 season for using PEDs and obstructing an investigation. On Monday, he sued Major League Baseball and the MLB Players Association in federal court to overturn the ban. The suit went so far as to criticize MLBPA executive director Michael Weiner, who died last May.

Efforts to reach for Ortiz comment were unsuccessful.


© 2014 Boston Globe Media Partners, LLC

eddhead
January 15th, 2014, 10:39 AM
Maybe it was Rico Petrocelli.

ZippyTheChimp
January 15th, 2014, 11:13 AM
Assuming the injunction is denied, what do the Yankees do if ARod shows up at spring training?

From what I've read, the suspension starts on March 31st, and legally, he can attend spring training. But since he wouldn't be on the 40-man roster, they could assign him to the minors.

BTW, it sort of flew under the radar: In December it was reported that ARod was negotiating a deal ($5 million advance) for a book detailing his fight with MLB et al, and two publishers were fighting over the rights. Trouble is that the two publishers, HarperCollins and Random House, knew nothing about it.

GordonGecko
January 15th, 2014, 03:06 PM
I don't know that the Yankees are able to assign A-Rod to the minors without putting him on waivers. Not that he wouldn't clear. They will do that if need be, because they're not going to let him anywhere near steinbrenner field

hbcat
January 16th, 2014, 07:54 AM
A lot of minor league players go to ML camps but never make the big league rosters. I guess this would be the reverse of this. There's just never been a reason for it before.

ZippyTheChimp
January 16th, 2014, 09:02 AM
I read that there's no definite explanation about spring training games (as it applies here).

Certain articles of contracts are purposely left vague so that there is leeway to adjust to particular situations. There has never been a season-long suspension in MLB. Let's say a player is suspended for 50 games beginning the season (or a number of games continued from the previous year). Allowing the player to participate in spring training would help get him in playing shape, anticipating a return during the season.

antinimby
January 16th, 2014, 10:04 AM
I don't see why they wouldn't let him go to Spring Training with the rest of the team. It's not like he has some kind of contagion.

Anyway, from what I understand, he is technically allowed to participate and play in all the games in ST since his suspension only calls for the 162 regular season games.

I think the Yankees even have to pay part of his salary for ST as well.

ZippyTheChimp
January 17th, 2014, 09:58 AM
Maybe the Five-Stages are kicking in...

At a gym opening in Mexico City:
I think that in the year 2014, the league could have done me a favor because I've played 20 years without a timeout. I think 2014 will be a year to rest mentally and physically prepare myself for the future and begin a new chapter of my life.

The following day from spokesman Ron Berkowitz:
This process has been taxing both mentally and physically throughout the past eight months. Alex will abide by the rulings of the federal judge -- whatever he decides -- and get ready for 2015 should the judge rule against him. He will continue to move forward with his complaint which will help all players against this unfair system.

It would only help other players if the suspension is overturned; otherwise, it will hurt them. It will mean that the CBA clause permitting a penalty beyond a 50 game suspension has been upheld in an arbitration case, and a precedent established for future cases.

hbcat
January 19th, 2014, 06:36 AM
I saw the same report and had a similar reaction. He's already wrecked his reputation; attacking everyone involved on his mess will only further alienate him from the team and whatever friends he has in baseball. A year off and an attempt at a comeback of some sort now seem to be his goals. He might surprise everyone with some good baseball at 40.

If he can only keep his head down for the coming year. Too much to ask? Probably, but even Arod might surprise us.

lofter1
January 19th, 2014, 10:05 AM
Last night on SNL, Drake did a pretty hilarious sketch of AR (http://www.boston.com/sports/blogs/obnoxiousbostonfan/2014/01/drake_strikes_out_a-rod_on_snl_video.html), the master-accuser / whiner.

GordonGecko
January 20th, 2014, 12:29 PM
http://i40.tinypic.com/2cylfh5.jpg

IrishInNYC
January 20th, 2014, 01:14 PM
Last night on SNL, Drake did a pretty hilarious sketch of AR (http://www.boston.com/sports/blogs/obnoxiousbostonfan/2014/01/drake_strikes_out_a-rod_on_snl_video.html), the master-accuser / whiner.

Off topic for a second but SNL has been pretty great of late. Kate McKinnon is a stand out for me. (Do It In My) Twin Bed (http://www.nbc.com/saturday-night-live/video/do-it-on-my-twin-bed/n44605/) is one of the funniest things I've seen in a long time.

GordonGecko
January 21st, 2014, 01:26 PM
Rotoworld -

According to Jeff Passan and Tim Brown of Yahoo! Sports, MLB player representatives "overwhelmingly agreed" that Alex Rodriguez should be kicked out of the union during a 90-minute conference call last week.

The call occurred on the day Rodriguez sued both MLB and the players' union. While union leadership quickly advised the player reps that kicking A-Rod out of the union is not legally possible, this is the latest indication that he could have trouble returning to a major league clubhouse. "That's what everyone was thinking," said one player. "We wanted to get on this call and not let him back. [To say,] ‘This is our game and we don't want you in it.'"

ZippyTheChimp
February 7th, 2014, 08:52 PM
First shoe dropped a few weeks ago in Mexico City. Now the other one.


Rodriguez accepts season-long suspension

By Associated Press, Updated: Friday, February 7

NEW YORK — Alex Rodriguez accepted his season-long suspension from Major League Baseball on Friday, the longest penalty in the sport’s history related to performance-enhancing drugs.

The decision came nearly four weeks after arbitrator Fredric Horowitz issued his decision largely upholding the penalty issued to the New York Yankees third baseman last summer by baseball Commissioner Bud Selig.

Rodriguez had repeatedly proclaimed his innocence and sued MLB and the Major League Baseball Players Association in federal court to overturn the penalty.

But 27 days after Horowitz’s decision, the three-time AL MVP withdrew the lawsuit and a previous action filed in October claiming MLB and Selig were engaged in a “witch hunt” against him. Rodriguez became the 14th and final player to accept a suspension following baseball’s investigation of the Biogenesis of America anti-aging clinic.

“I think it’s a good move for him,” former Commissioner Fay Vincent said. “A-Rod had no chance legally, and the commissioner got his authority validated.”

MLB issued low-key statement calling the decision to end the litigation “prudent.”

“We believe that Mr. Rodriguez’s actions show his desire to return the focus to the play of our great game on the field and to all of the positive attributes and actions of his fellow major league players,” the sport said. “We share that desire.”

Rodriguez had angered many of his fellow players by suing his own union in an attempt to avoid a suspension.

“Alex Rodriguez has done the right thing by withdrawing his lawsuit,” the union said in a statement. “His decision to move forward is in everyone’s best interest.”

After Horowitz issued his decision on Jan. 11, Rodriguez put out a defiant statement proclaiming “no player should have to go through what I have been dealing with” and promising “I am exhausting all options to ensure not only that I get justice, but that players’ contracts and rights are protected.”

But a few hours after the Arizona Diamondbacks became the first team this year to start spring training workouts, and with the Yankees a week from opening camp, Rodriguez folded quietly.

“We stand by the statements issued and have no further comment,” Rodriguez spokesman Ron Berkowitz said.

Rodriguez will lose most of his $25 million salary — Horowitz ruled he is entitled to 21-183rds, $2,868,852.46. He will be 39 when he is eligible to return in a year, and he has incentive to play during the final three seasons of his contract. The Yankees owe him $21 million in 2015 and $20 million in each of the final two seasons of the record $275 million, 10-year deal.

But the 14-time All-Star has been hobbled by injuries in recent years and has not played a full season since 2007.

The timing of Rodriguez’s decision was set in motion by U.S. District Judge Edgardo Ramos, who on Jan. 30 told the player’s lawyers to respond by Friday to arguments from MLB and the union that the case should be dismissed.

Copyright 2014 The Associated Press.

ZippyTheChimp
February 7th, 2014, 08:57 PM
More info:
Sources told ESPNNewYork.com in recent days that Rodriguez had been considering dropping the lawsuits for several reasons, not the least of which was the anticipated $10 million it would cost him in legal fees to continue his fight to play baseball in 2014. Rodriguez is already losing $25 million in salary during his suspension.

Also, sources told ESPNNewYork.com that Rodriguez was seeking to reconcile with baseball in hopes of continuing to work in the industry once his playing days are over. His contract with the Yankees runs through 2017 and he has told confidantes he has every intention of returning to the field in 2015.

According to sources familiar with the proceedings, Rodriguez had in recent days made contact with Major League Baseball COO Rob Manfred, who spearheaded baseball's Biogenesis investigation that resulted in the suspensions of 13 players, in the hopes of repairing relations with the sport.

"It was a question of either becoming Pete Rose or Ryan Braun,'' said the source, referring to Rodriguez's fear that he would be ostracized from the game the way Rose, baseball's all-time hits leader, has been since it was revealed he gambled on baseball while a manager.

http://espn.go.com/new-york/mlb/story/_/id/10420424/alex-rodriguez-new-york-yankees-withdraws-lawsuit-overturn-suspension

eddhead
February 7th, 2014, 09:22 PM
"It was a question of either becoming Pete Rose or Ryan Braun,'' said the source, referring to Rodriguez's fear that he would be ostracized from the game the way Rose, baseball's all-time hits leader, has been since it was revealed he gambled on baseball while a manager.

My, our standards are low.

hbcat
February 7th, 2014, 10:34 PM
That was my thought as well. It's good he's accepted his situation though. Who knows, he might still contribute next year.

ZippyTheChimp
February 10th, 2014, 10:43 AM
I guess it takes the big ARod ship SS Sue Everybody a long time to come to a stop.

On of his attorneys, Joe Tacopina, is suing two reporters of The Daily News.



Alex Rodriguez's lawyer sues Daily News reporters for defamation

By Kevin Manahan/NJ.com

February 07, 2014

Two reporters, "obsessed with ridding the sports world of performance-enhancing drugs," tried to discredit Alex Rodriguez's attorney by getting a past client -- former New York City Police Commissioner Bernard Kerik -- to file a false ethics complaint against him, according to a $15 million defamation lawsuit.

Joseph Tacopina's federal lawsuit, filed in Manhattan, says New York Daily News reporters Nathaniel Vinton and Michael O'Keeffe have slanted coverage in their crusade to persecute Rodriguez, and also wrote a "hit piece" on Tacopina. Kerik and others are also named in the legal action.

“The claims are completely without merit and the allegation that the Daily News’ reporters were involved in some sort of conspiracy is simply absurd," Daily News Assistant General Counsel Matthew Leish said in a statement to NJ.com. "We will file our response in due course.”

Tacopina says he became a target while defending the Yankees third baseman in his dispute with Major League Baseball, which suspended Rodriguez for 211 games for allegedly using banned substances and then trying to cover up evidence. That suspension was later reduced to 162 games.

According to a report by Courthouse News Service:

The lawsuit says the reporters had former New York City Police Commissioner Bernard Kerik, a disgruntled former client of Tacopina's, "to provide false information to injure Tacopina's reputation."

The lawsuit describes Kerik as a "convicted felon and liar" who "wanted to rehabilitate himself by blaming all of his criminal convictions for corruption and fraud" on his former attorney.
joe-tacopina-yankees-alex-rodriguez.jpgJoe Tacopina is suing two Daily News reporters and the newspaper for defamation of character.Patty Sapone/The Star-Ledger

Kerik, considered a national hero after the Sept. 11, 2001 terrorist attacks, was sentenced to four years in prison in 2010 after pleading guilty to eight felony charges, including tax fraud and lying to the White House while being vetted for the job of Homeland Security secretary.

Kerik allegedly told Vinton and O'Keeffe that Tacopina had disclosed privileged information in his case and had failed to notify him that he'd been subpoenaed by federal prosecutors.

These allegations are false, Tacopina says, and there are records to prove it.

The article "contains numerous factually inaccurate statements and falsely implies that Tacopina engaged in unethical conduct and is an unethical attorney," Tacopina claims.

Neither Vinton nor O'Keeffe immediately returned requests for comment.

© 2013 New Jersey On-Line LLC


Joe Tacopina failed ARod. Instead of protecting his client by offering good advice, something any competent arbitration attorney could have done, he chose to put his face on TV and make ridiculous statements, as he did last August on the Today Show:

If he listens to me, if I were advising him based on the evidence and based on what I know about the evidence. I would tell him, ‘Don’t take one inning, Alex. Forget 50 games. Don’t take e inning.'


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y0UuKKVdZbM

The only thing that prevented those outside ARod's legal circle from being 100% certain is that they didn't have access to all the evidence. But Tacopina did know everything. Seems to me he just wanted to keep the job.

Maybe ARod should sue Joe Tacopina. (Not easy BTW)

TREPYE
February 16th, 2014, 11:59 AM
Boy, ARod is some sort of an imbecile; all that defiant kicking and screaming he did when the suspension was held up by the arbitrator, suing everybody short of his own mother to just bow out with his tail between his legs. If I was really innocent, the extra $10 million would have been the least of my worries.... I thought he thought he might have had a case because the CBA would have stipulated that only a positive drug test would be enough to suspend (and the reason the other players succumbed to communication based evidence was because the wouldn't have enough $ to fight it out on the courts). Well this seals it for me.

What at a scoundrel....

eddhead
February 17th, 2014, 02:26 PM
Joe Tacopina is a punk. He and A-Rod are a match made in heaven.

hbcat
February 17th, 2015, 02:35 PM
Boy, ARod is some sort of an imbecile; all that defiant kicking and screaming he did when the suspension was held up by the arbitrator, suing everybody short of his own mother to just bow out with his tail between his legs. If I was really innocent, the extra $10 million would have been the least of my worries.... I thought he thought he might have had a case because the CBA would have stipulated that only a positive drug test would be enough to suspend (and the reason the other players succumbed to communication based evidence was because the wouldn't have enough $ to fight it out on the courts). Well this seals it for me.

What at a scoundrel....

Dear Fans, I've been a scoundrel...

http://wirednewyork.com/forum/attachment.php?attachmentid=18096&stc=1

IrishInNYC
February 17th, 2015, 03:58 PM
A full year and 9 minutes this thread lay dormant. Speaks volumes. This bozo has spring-training hamstring-strain written all over him.

hbcat
February 18th, 2015, 12:18 AM
It would be a pleasant story-line for him to redeem himself with a strong year and a seriously contrite attitude but I wouldn't take that bet.

eddhead
February 18th, 2015, 09:25 AM
Still, I find myself rooting for him. I guess I am a little sick that way.

hbcat
February 18th, 2015, 08:28 PM
The Education of Alex Rodriguez (http://espn.go.com/espn/feature/story/_/id/12321274/alex-rodriguez-return-new-york-yankees)

"More often than not, the mention of Alex Rodriguez in polite company triggers one of a spectrum of deeply conditioned responses. Pained ugh. Guttural groan. Exaggerated eye roll. Hundreds of baseball players have been caught using steroids, including some of the game's best-known and most beloved names, but somehow Alex Rodriguez has become the steroid era's Lord Voldemort. Ryan Braun? Won an MVP, got busted for steroids, twice, called the tester an anti-Semite, lied his testes off, made chumps of his best friends, including Aaron Rodgers, and still doesn't inspire a scintilla of the ill will that follows Rodriguez around like a nuclear cloud."

http://espn.go.com/espn/feature/story/_/id/12321274/alex-rodriguez-return-new-york-yankees

hbcat
April 18th, 2015, 07:27 AM
Arod looks like Arod again. The long rest did him good.

hbcat
May 1st, 2015, 09:58 PM
660 is still amazing, not bad for a washed up "disgrace". I am enjoying this comeback.

IrishInNYC
May 7th, 2015, 12:18 PM
Being 4th in something doesn't normally merit much if any talk at all. I think the Babe is safe enough in 3rd.

ZippyTheChimp
May 7th, 2015, 03:04 PM
It's not a record, not even a plateau, like 500, 600, 700. Some TV commentary acknowledged this ahead of the event, yet they contradicted themselves and made a huge deal about it when it happened.

A have no use for ARod. It's not because he took drugs. It wasn't a crime, and he paid for it. He wasn't the first, and won't be the last.

It's not because of the "integrity of baseball," that he cheated. We shouldn't expect athletes to be role models because of their skills. Some athletes are role models, but they earn that respect they same way everyone else does.

It's because he accused others of wrongdoing, especially Michael Weiner (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Michael_Weiner_%28executive%29). He owed Weiner's family a public apology, but there was none of it in his cutsie handwritten 6th grade composition. The slanted script was a nice touch; I wonder who thought it up.

That he's come back at 40 after over a year layoff and can play at a reasonably high level is testament to the stupidity of his steroid use. A classic narcissist, to me he's just one of 25. If he helps them win, fine. If he's here next year or not, who cares. I'm not paying him.

From a baseball standpoint, I'll say one thing about the 660th HR that seems to have been overlooked by the media. As a Yankee fan, I couldn't have picked a better place than Fenway. The booing was sustained throughout the at-bat. ARod acknowledged it was the only time in his career that he could not tune it out.

He was 0-6 on Wednesday, with 4 strikeouts. Career 1-19 as a pinch hitter. A screaming line drive that was measured 117 mph off the bat. And a game winner.

What happened from that point to the end was something I don't recall ever seeing in a Yankee-Red Sox game with the issue still in doubt - many people headed for the exits. ARod emptied Fenway. I had to laugh. I guess all that fan bile generated during the at-bat had nowhere to go except outside.

hbcat
May 11th, 2015, 03:13 AM
ARod has had, especially last year, a crappy attitude and lousy judgement. His lawsuit against the Players Union and his treatment of Michael Weiner was a low point, stupid even for a player who has so little common sense, and undoubtedly turned many fans, including you, off (probably) forever.

I tune a lot of BS out in my life. Baseball is my chief distraction, and I am a Yankee's addict. ARod got horrible advice from his equally tactless friends who encouraged him to pursue his scorched earth policy, but he didn't question it, all the more evidence the disconnect between his talent and his personality. I haven't forgotten that. Just watching the games.

I disagree that passing Willie Mays wasn't a big deal though. It was Willie Mays. If it had been Mattingly or Jeter passing Willie Mays on an important all-time list, the hoopla would have been over-the-top.

ZippyTheChimp
May 11th, 2015, 06:01 PM
I didn't think Jeter passing Lou Gehrig (it's Lou Gehrig) was such a big deal. Not like 3000 hits.

When Hank Aaron passed Mays, it was a big deal, because at the time, there were a handful of icons in the 500s, and one guy way out there at 714. Only Mays at over 600 was even somewhat close. It may have been the biggest #2 in all baseball.

Now you've got the likes of Sosa, McGwire, Palmiero in the mix.

hbcat
May 11th, 2015, 06:43 PM
Gehrig isn't famous for his 2721 hits, which was a team record not an all-time mlb mark.

ARod is indeed keeping company with Sosa, McGwire, and Palmiero for all the wrong reasons, but on the all-time HR list he sits between Mays and the Babe. Not bad, even if the achievement is tainted.

So here's a question: What if guys like ARod and Bonds never touched PEDs? Would Bonds have hit over 600 anyway? I guess we will never know. If half of his HRs after 1999 are attributable to juice, that would still give him 600+. But of course the steroids were also extending his career.

ARod is maybe trickier to estimate. If he began using after signed with Texas -- and we'd have to take his word for it (Danger, Will Robinson!) -- then all of those monster years are fakey, but he probably could have had several 40+ years anyway. There is also the strong possibility that the extended use of steroids from his mid-20s on led to tissue degeneration in his hips.

See, with ARod baseball is always more fun. :rolleyes:

eddhead
May 12th, 2015, 05:30 PM
Being 4th in something doesn't normally merit much if any talk at all. I think the Babe is safe enough in 3rd.

Really? Considering the totality of the history of baseball, and the tens of thousands of people who have played at this level, 4th isn't too bad.

eddhead
May 13th, 2015, 09:39 AM
It's because he accused others of wrongdoing, especially Michael Weiner (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Michael_Weiner_%28executive%29). He owed Weiner's family a public apology, but there was none of it in his cutsie handwritten 6th grade composition. The slanted script was a nice touch; I wonder who thought it up.

It is a good point and one that we consistently overlook in cases such as these. It is the same issue I have with Ryan Braun, who accused his specimen collector of mishandling his specimen, and Tom Brady who, by not accepting accountability for directing the locker room staff to deflate the balls, is at least somewhat responsible for the indefinite suspension of the two equipment managers who appear to have done so.

Athletes and the media treat these people as collateral damage, but they do not have tens of millions of dollars to fall back on when punishments such as these are doled out. They need to make a living. They are the real victims here.

http://www.boston.com/sports/football/patriots/2015/05/11/deflategate-ballhandlers-suspended-longer-than-brady/n7bJeMqyZLwn11RdIymORN/story.html




Assistant equipment manager John Jastremski and officials’ locker room attendant James “the deflator (http://www.boston.com/sports/football/patriots/2015/05/06/mean-texts-what-patriots-employees-said-about-tom-brady/5TAehtMZo1zKRLuK51UtjI/story.html)” McNally were suspended indefinitely without pay by the Patriots on May 6, the league announced along with the Brady suspension Monday. They cannot be reinstated without the approval of NFL Executive Vice President of Football Operations Troy Vincent.