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NewYorkYankee
April 20th, 2004, 10:10 PM
We are returning to NYC this summer (our 2nd time) !!! :) :) :) ANYWAYS.... We want to see the outer boroughs so we decided the best way to do this is by the subway...ride it awhile..then get off look around a couple blocks...get back on...and so on.....good idea??? The ONLY reason I wouldnt want to do this is if we got into a bad area, such as Jamaica, Queens or Gates Av, Brooklyn...becuase we dont know all the bad neighborhoods we could end up getting into a bad one without even realizing it. This is why I wanted to take the car around the streets, so in case we entered a bad area we could get out. Heres how we would go on the subway...first we would ride down through BK and Queens....then another day go uptown and into the Bronx. Suggestions???

Gulcrapek
April 20th, 2004, 10:17 PM
If you ask us here which neighborhoods not to go to, you won't have to bother worrying. The subway is a good choice, however it does not extend to all areas of Brooklyn and Queens. The northern sections of both boroughs are the best served. If you want to see an area that isn't on a subway route, you can also use the extensive public bus system.

NewYorkYankee
April 20th, 2004, 10:20 PM
SO the subway trip is a good choice for seeing other parts of the city besides Manhattan??? Okay...so what neighborhoods should I avoid?

Gulcrapek
April 20th, 2004, 10:28 PM
Generally, it's a good way.

Neighborhoods to avoid:

East New York
East Flatbush
Brownsville
Canarsie
Bushwick
Bedford-Stuyvesant (actually only half of it)

Those are in Brooklyn, and five of those are in the same general area so are easy to bypass. I'm not familiar enough with Queens neighborhoods to help you with those.

ASchwarz
April 20th, 2004, 10:33 PM
Gulcrapek, I would disagree with the avoidance of Canarsie. It's a semi- suburban area of middle class West Indians. There are also some long-time Italians and Jews left in the neighborhood. The neighborhood is boring, but not at all threatening.

Bushwick looks intimidating, but is pretty safe. Bushwick's got $2,500/month lofts, so it can't be that bad.

I would agree a newcomer should avoid E. New York, Brownsville and E. Flatbush. I'll throw in most of the South Bronx, especially Morrisania and Mott Haven. If you want to see the South Bronx, walk along the Grand Concourse, which is completely safe.

Jamaica isn't dangerous. The areas near subway stations in Jamaica are all fine.

TLOZ Link5
April 20th, 2004, 10:40 PM
Queens is generally all right, with the exception of parts of Jamaica (South Jamaica, though, is best avoided) and parts of Rockaway, around the housing projects.

fioco
April 21st, 2004, 12:29 AM
I would agree with ASchwarz and the short-list of areas that a newcomer should avoid. Once comfortable with the city, even these neighborhoods can be visited using discretion. I've been in all of these neighborhoods and they are not lawless as the media and crazy tales would lead people to believe.

Should tourists wander these areas at night? Of course not. But I've been in these neighborhoods at night for good reasons and I've had no difficulties. Remember, I'm originally a hillbilly from West Virginia. My experience with violent crime was in a Southernly city's suburbs, so go figure.

Gangs are something to watch out for, their behavior is unpredictable; but that's a reality in my Long Island village. I sense no greater danger in South Jamaica. I think a lot of it has to do with personal comfort. If you're scared you shouldn't be there even if the area is quite safe. Perception is important, but don't confuse it with reality.

Schadenfrau
April 21st, 2004, 11:04 AM
ASchwarz, how long has it been since you've been in the South Bronx? There are sections of Mott Haven that are far nicer than most of the Grand Concourse, namely the Port Morris section of MH. The Grand Concourse gets a bit dodgy above 170th.

Don't be afraid of Jamaica either.

I do have to wonder though, ILUVNYC: why do so many of your threads focus on presumed danger in New York?

NewYorkYankee
April 21st, 2004, 08:20 PM
Becuase so many people have put it in my head that certain areas are bad and Im just afriad of wandering into them...sorry Im so pressimistic

TLOZ Link5
April 21st, 2004, 08:29 PM
Becuase so many people have put it in my head that certain areas are bad and Im just afriad of wandering into them...sorry Im so pressimistic

It's understandable, but the great thing is that you're willing to cast presumptions aside where others are comfortable in their obsolete perceptions of New York. The fact you want to learn more is wonderful.

Marty
April 22nd, 2004, 08:24 AM
Just to give you an idea Detroit Washington, Philadelphia, Chicago and L.A. are all more dangerous than NYC. Detroit has a tenth of itís population with almost as many murders. Come and see for yourself and enjoy.

M

ASchwarz
April 23rd, 2004, 02:47 AM
ASchwarz, how long has it been since you've been in the South Bronx? There are sections of Mott Haven that are far nicer than most of the Grand Concourse, namely the Port Morris section of MH. The Grand Concourse gets a bit dodgy above 170th.

Don't be afraid of Jamaica either.

I do have to wonder though, ILUVNYC: why do so many of your threads focus on presumed danger in New York?

Schadenfrau, I'm in the South Bronx almost weekly. I'm a Columbia graduate student and often bike to Arthur Avenue on weekends. If I take the subway, I usually walk back along the Grand Concourse. I have walked the length of the Concourse, and never noticed any problems. Should I be cautious just north of 170th Street? I do know one area to the east of the Concourse is a bit intimidating (heading east on Tremont, Third Avenue, etc.).

Regarding Mott Haven, I've explored most of the area, and generally find it safe. Third Avenue is decent, and there are many nice sidestreets. I've been to a couple loft parties on Bruckner Boulevard. At night, Willis Avenue is intimidating. There are dozens of young men loitering in front of the bodegas and projects, and I was a bit unnerved. Am I overreacting? I've never been in Port Morris, as I assumed it was all industrial.

Schadenfrau
April 23rd, 2004, 11:36 AM
Don't be afraid of the guys hanging out on Willis Avenue. I've found that most of them are outside because Grandma doesn't want all their friends in the house.

The area around Bruckner Boulevard that you're talking about is Port Morris.

I don't think you need to take any special precautions above 170th Street. Someone could jack you just as easily on the Upper East Side.

Weirdly enough, I think I might know you. I'm going to send you a PM.

lovelife
May 5th, 2004, 06:39 PM
Also dont be afraid of Harlem, its not as bad as the media would have you believe. I would never know new york like i do if i had not go to spanish, and the african american part of harlem.

I could describe to you, but your best bet is to take a train to 125th and see for yourself.

Lauren Loves NY
May 5th, 2004, 07:16 PM
You know, I can understand why ILUVNYC sees NY as a dangerous city. Fo so long, NY really wasn't the safest city, and even though it has definitely cleaned up, the media still likes to portray it as a crime-filled metropolis.

I was really surprised when I recently found these stats. I didn't realize just HOW safe NY has become. From www.askanewyorker.com :
Is it dangerous in New York City?
The most recent nationwide FBI Crime Statistics ranks New York City 160th in crime out of 205 American cities, making it the safest city with a population of over 1 million people in America. Specifically, New York City continues to be safer than cities such as St. Louis (which has the highest crime rate in the nation), Atlanta (which ranks 2nd), Orlando (3rd), Dallas (13th), Phoenix (38th), Houston (60th), San Antonio (63rd), Philadelphia (82nd), Boston (96th), San Francisco (113th), Los Angeles (135th), and San Diego (157th). In any case, the crime rate goes down each year in NYC, and you will find that fact in many different sources. Anyone who says NYC is a very dangerous place is watching too much TV. If you use common sense and don't wander into unknown areas deep in the Bronx in the middle of the night, for instance, you will be fine. Just use common sense, be aware of your surroundings, and know where you are going. No problem.

thomasjfletcher
May 6th, 2004, 08:58 AM
I'm just reading "The Bonfire of the Vanities" (written about 87) and it paints the craziest picture of the Bronx ever.
I live in brooklyn which is great. For a tourist who likes architecture i think Bed-Stuy (the A train) is really something. Having gone from a highly affluent picturesque neighbourhood to a poor dangerous one (fantastic houses). The second largest ethnically African city outside Africa (after one area in Brazil).
So check it out, by day.

http://www.nyc-architecture.com/BES/Pict0005.jpg
http://www.nyc-architecture.com/BES/Pict0193.jpg
http://www.nyc-architecture.com/BES/Pict0199.jpg
http://www.nyc-architecture.com/BES/Pict0268.jpg

more info and pix--

http://www.nyc-architecture.com/BES/BedStuy.htm

JCMAN320
June 25th, 2005, 04:58 PM
Those pics were nice if I you didn't say they were from Brooklyn I would have bet money you were in JC for the day because we have buildings and architecture exactly like that. Nice pics by the way.

pianoman11686
June 26th, 2005, 01:06 AM
It'd actually be more like 7 stops from Columbus Circle to 148th because the 2/3 make all the stops above 96th street.

Schadenfrau
June 27th, 2005, 11:24 AM
Law&Order, once you pay your $2.00 for the subway, you can go anywhere in any borough you want to go. Unlike other cities, the NYC subway costs the same amount whether you're taking it one stop or 30 stops.

drlikuid1444
July 4th, 2005, 05:15 PM
"I'm just reading "The Bonfire of the Vanities" (written about 87) and it paints the craziest picture of the Bronx ever.
I live in brooklyn which is great. For a tourist who likes architecture i think Bed-Stuy (the A train) is really something. Having gone from a highly affluent picturesque neighbourhood to a poor dangerous one (fantastic houses). The second largest ethnically African city outside Africa (after one area in Brazil).
So check it out, by day."


Great Book, However where it took place, The South Bronx has become one-thousnad times better, "SOBRO" as it is now called has been influenced like the village was 10 yrs ago, its becoming this less expensive place to live, and its very cool and artsy. I would def. recomend people to go check it out.

ibright05
July 10th, 2005, 11:15 AM
i just wanted to clear the air about the bronx. many people who aren't from the bronx or other parts of the city usually are afraid of the borough due to bad press. i grew up on 3rd ave until i was 11 years old when i moved upstate. everytime i go back to visit family (which was made for recent due to me goin to long island university) i feel fine walking along 3rd ave at 170st for most of the day. the only time i get a bit nervous is at like 11pm on a friday night walking into a building due to people outside drinking or something like that. most of the borough is pretty decent and is great for a subway traveller because most of the routes are above ground and offer great views of not only the borough, but other parts parts of the city.

abbygirl
July 11th, 2005, 05:13 PM
I see you posting about which areas to avoid but what is the reason to avoid these neighborhoods? Voilence, bad reputation, racism? other?

Just was curious as some post listed some areas had certain nationalities, is that a bothersome to somepeople? i'm more worried about violence then there race. but that's just my view.

HarlemRep
July 11th, 2005, 10:58 PM
Nowhere in N.Y. that you go are you likely to be a victim of random violence.

peterd
July 12th, 2005, 04:52 PM
Most places in Queens served by the subway aren't that dangerous, though Queens Plaza seems pretty iffy at night (if you're just passing through on the subway, don't worry)

There's not much to see in Jamaica, so don't bother unless you're on your way to JFK. If you're going to Rockaway, go to the *western* end of the subway line on the peninsula and head through the nice residential areas or along the beach as far as you feel like walking. And on the way to Rockaway, check out Broad Channel - not much there, but it's probably the most different neighborhood in the city. And the Howard Beach station is worth a peek because of the AirTrain - it's now this massive ultra-modern hulk perched amid swamps and a very low rise, very very modest little downtown. Very odd.

But I'd say that the best places to visit via subway in Queens are:

1) Forest Hills Gardens. A beautiful English garden neighborhood mostly built between the 1910's and 1930's just a couple blocks from the Forest Hills/71 Avenue subway station (take the E or F). The neighborhood and surrounding area is safe at all hours. More at http://queens.about.com/b/a/018663.htm

2) Jackson Heights. On 74th Street just north of the Roosevelt Avenue/74th Street subway station (take the E, F, or 7), this is the place to go for all things Indian, from saris, to Bollywood movies, to 24k gold jewelry, to the city's best Indian food. Can be desolate late at night, when much everything is closed anyway.

3) Downtown Flushing. At the end of the 7 line, it's fast becoming New York's *real* Chinatown (and Koreatown). It's ugly, but if you like good Asian markets and good Asian food, here's where to go.

4) Flushing-Meadows Park. A lot more threadbare than the lush Central Park, but always filled with immigrants playing soccer, cricket, and eating from some of the many Columbian food carts (think hot dog carts, but with empanadas and grilled pork and such). Get off at Shea Stadium (on the 7) and walk south past the tennis stadium (where the US Open is played) to the Unisphere and maybe to the Panorama, or the little Queens Zoo or the the Hall of Science - lots of good places to see with kids.

Hope that helps!
Peter

Schadenfrau
July 25th, 2005, 12:03 PM
You should exit the train before anyone enters.

ryan
July 25th, 2005, 01:18 PM
Most importantly, when you're waiting to get on a train, stand to the side of the door to let people off quickly.

SubwayRider
July 26th, 2005, 10:15 PM
Try www.SubwayInfo.com (http://www.subwayinfo.com/) for subway directions. You just type in where you are and where you want to go. It will not only tell you which trains to take, but also give you directions on how to get to the train station.