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View Full Version : Will Classical Music ever die?



YesIsaidYesIwillYes
April 26th, 2004, 11:09 AM
As a guy whose cd collection is comprised of about 95% of classical discs, I was curious what my fellow New York lovers thought would ultimately happen to the genre. I have numerous recordings of the same pieces (10 different recordings of the Chopin Ballades for instance). It's a bad addiction. And how many more interpretations of Rachmaninoff's 2nd Piano concerto do classical fans need? Is it really necessary to continue to have new recordings of pieces that have been burned to cd hundreds of different times?

For the most part, it's a dead art form. Nobody really composes symphonies anymore and younger gnerations simply don't listen to it. However, academia and the college setting rely heavily on classical music to teach theory and provide students with performance repertoire.

I guess when I say 'die' I'm implying the recording industry in classical music will come to an end.

Any thoughts?

ZippyTheChimp
April 26th, 2004, 01:56 PM
The topic of Classical Crossover was explored a few weeks ago on the CBS News Sunday Morning program.

Some text from the report:
http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2004/04/02/sunday/main610045.shtml

TLOZ Link5
April 26th, 2004, 03:02 PM
I love classical music. I was exposed to it from an early age because that's all my family would listen to when we ate dinner. My sister and I would alternate each night over whose turn it was to pick a tape to play. I always wanted to hear Tchaikovsky, but she liked Bach and Beethoven. Never really got into Mozart, though I recently downloaded a lot of Don Giovanni from iTunes.

I don't think classical music will go away anytime soon. It's still a major fixture of our culture, people of all backgrounds listen to it, and many great works have become ingrained in popular culture; witness Strauss' Blue Danube or the fermata for the first movement of Beethoven's Fifth. We're not so ignorant of culture that we'll forget some of the greatest musical masters.

Deimos
April 26th, 2004, 03:04 PM
Classical music is never appreciated until long after the death of the artist. The classics of Motzart and Beethoven et al will never die, but over time new pieces will be added.

Also with the changing of media, the art will adapt to modern times. I'm sure everyone reading this instantly will recognize the classical scores of John Williams or Hans Zimmer. Does the fact that their music is written to accentuate a movie change their value?

rocca
June 3rd, 2004, 01:30 PM
I agree with all of you. I think classical music is the most perfect type of music as it has so many details that were actually thought by its composers; they're not just a mere combination of some chords (with eletric guitars and drums making all that loud noise). Unfortunately, there aren't too many great compositors now (such as John Williams, and, in my opinion, Jim Brickman (listen to "All I ever wanted")).

I'm a great admirer of all Chopin's works (mainly Nocturnes and Ballades) and I think people should listen carefully to them, trying to feel the same way the author felt.

Anyway, I'm just expressing my opinion.
Thanks.

"There are two kinds of groups of people: people who DO things and people who SAY they DID things. Try to be in the first group: there's less competition".

krulltime
June 3rd, 2004, 01:44 PM
I think movie soundtracks has always been the tool that the music industry gives classical music to the younger population. Classical recordings from John Williams and many more I guess.

I am not a fan of classical music but that doesnt mean I hate it. I wish I will listen more of it though. :wink:

flat head
June 4th, 2004, 09:45 AM
Classical music will never die out, especially seeing how it has lasted this long. It is (probably) the only “timeless” genre of music

flat head
June 4th, 2004, 09:47 AM
I think movie soundtracks has always been the tool that the music industry gives classical music to the younger population. Classical recordings from John Williams and many more I guess.

I am not a fan of classical music but that doesnt mean I hate it. I wish I will listen more of it though. :wink:

yes!, it's really good if you want to listen to something, but not too closely!
Barber’s adagio is a particular favourite of mine. I’m listening to it right now

Avenue A
July 24th, 2004, 02:32 PM
Classical will never die but will develop and is developing into a more modern form. Some say it isn't the same as the euphoria they'll feel when they listen to Brahms BUT you have to accept music must develop even if minimilistically. Sylvie Courvoisier is a new fave of mine. 8)