PDA

View Full Version : Atlantic City Seeks New Image: Las Vegas's



Pages : [1] 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12

Kris
May 9th, 2004, 06:49 AM
May 9, 2004

Atlantic City Seeks New Image: Las Vegas's

By IVER PETERSON

ATLANTIC CITY, May 6 - Atlantic City turns 150 this summer, and it's busy working up its next act.

It sold cool ocean breezes by day and bawdy entertainment at night back when cities on the East Coast had tight morals and no air-conditioning.

Then it sold gambling, when the only other legal gambling was some 2,000 miles away in Nevada.

And now, with gambling almost everywhere, and more on the way, the Atlantic City casinos and the New Jersey state government are spending close to $1 billion to remake the city into a glossy shopping, entertainment and - yes - gambling attraction, with Las Vegas as its model.

"We are going to make ourselves into the Queen City of the Atlantic again," said Curtis J. Bashaw, executive director of the Casino Reinvestment Development Authority, which collects a 1.25 percent tax on casino revenue and puts it back into economic development projects in the city and elsewhere in the state.

The urgency is clear in the city's books: except for the Borgata Hotel Casino and Spa, which opened in July, the city's casino revenue is barely growing, as more and more gambling outlets open in a tightening ring around the shore. Delaware and West Virginia now have casinos; the two giant Indian casinos in Connecticut are attracting New Yorkers, and more may be on the way; Pennsylvania wants to install slot machines at horse tracks, including in Philadelphia, which is practically in Atlantic City's backyard. And Gov. George E. Pataki wants to open three half-billion-dollar Indian resort casinos in the Catskills, 30 miles closer to the heart of Manhattan than Atlantic City, which is 130 miles away.

According to an analysis by Harrah's 2003 Profile of the American Casino Gambler, more of the metropolitan Washington's 700,000 casino gamblers go to Delaware or West Virginia - places that did not have legal gambling 10 years ago - than come here. Baltimore and Philadelphia are sending a growing share of its gamblers someplace else. And even though the New York metropolitan region's 5 million regular gamblers still favor Atlantic City, 13 percent go to Connecticut, and more will head to the Catskills when the opportunity comes.

There is also a sense here, although no one says it out loud, that this town is not attracting enough of the right kind of people, which is to say people with time and money - the kind who fly to Las Vegas for a week of gambling, dining and shopping.

In fact, Atlantic City's businesses have complained about "shoobies," a derogatory reference to day trippers that dates back to an era when they carried their lunches in shoe boxes. The sense here is that the city has to keep people here for longer stays.

"We will wean ourselves from being the image of a day-trip destination to being a hot spot again," Mr. Bashaw said.

Although Atlantic City's 12 casinos take in about the same $4.5 billion a year in gambling that the 22 big hotels along the Vegas Strip do, they make only $300 million on nongambling attractions like shopping, dining and personal care spas. "And I think even that $300 million is exaggerated," said Dennis C. Gomes, head of the Tropicana Casino and Resort in Atlantic City and president for resort operations at the Aztar Corporation, which owns the Tropicana here and the Tropicana in Las Vegas.

The Las Vegas hotels make much more on nongambling operations, $9.5 billion last year, according to Frank Streshley of the Nevada Gaming Control Board, although that figure includes revenue from a 23rd casino.

No wonder, then, that the buzzword around here is "nongaming revenue." The Sands announced on Thursday that it had started planning for a hotel expansion, with more shopping and entertainment space. Caesars and Gordon Group Holdings are spending $150 million to gut the old Ocean One pier, which was, until recently, a dingy warren of cheap shops and restaurants across the Boardwalk from Caesars. They plan to put in a high-end shopping and dining attraction, with Gucci already signed as a tenant, and Polo and Tiffany among the others in lease negotiations, Mr. Bashaw said.

Sheldon Gordon, chairman of Gordon Group Holdings, bet his fortune to build the Forum Shops at Caesars Palace in Las Vegas. The Roman-themed arcade has been wildly successful. The project in Atlantic City will be the Pier at Caesars, and its motto, "If you liked the desert, you'll love the ocean."

At the same time, Harrah's Atlantic City recently announced a new hotel and shopping tower project; Resorts Atlantic City is scheduled to open its new $125 million, 27-story hotel tower later this summer and is in discussions over more expansion; and Mr. Gomes's Tropicana will open its new shopping, dining and spa addition, designed to recall pre-Castro Havana and called The Quarter, this fall.

Copyright 2004 The New York Times Company

Kris
July 30th, 2004, 08:22 AM
July 30, 2004

Encouraged by Earnings, Owners Plan to Expand Borgata

By RONALD SMOTHERS

The Borgata Hotel Casino and Spa's gamble that there was an appetite in Atlantic City for something beyond games of chance has apparently paid off. The operators of the Borgata have announced a $200 million expansion of their Renaissance Pointe location that will add not only slots and table games, but also spa, restaurant, nightclub and high-end retail space.

The announcement was part of a second-quarter earnings report released Wednesday by the Boyd Gaming Group, a Las Vegas-based casino operator, which along with MGM-Mirage owns the $1.1 billion Borgata.

Company officials had seen the casino - with 2,002 hotel rooms as well as spas and upscale shops - as a destination resort of a type more common in Las Vegas. They had brashly predicted that it would prove so effective in attracting visitors to Atlantic City and drawing from other casinos that expansion was inevitable.

While the Borgata has been thriving, the dozen other casinos in the city have barely stayed even with 2002 figures for house winnings and player losses.

"Borgata has now operated for four quarters, and every quarter since its opening has been better than the quarter before," said William S. Boyd, chairman and chief executive officer of Boyd Gaming. "When we developed Borgata we knew were building the right product for Atlantic City and the Northeast gaming market, but it is exceeding our expectations both in how fast its revenues and earnings are ramping up and in how quickly we need to expand the property." Because the Borgata is a joint venture, there is no clear indication of how its success affected the company's quarterly reports.

Officials of the state's Casino Control Commission agreed that the Borgata's performance had shaken things up in Atlantic City, where no new casino had opened in 13 years. At least four other casinos have recently announced plans for new hotel rooms, retail areas and other nongambling operations, said Linda Kassekert, commission chairwoman.

"I think we are beginning to feel more like Las Vegas," Ms. Kassekert said.

Robert Boughner, the Borgata's chief executive, said the expansion would include a three-story addition with space for 600 new slot machines, bringing the casino's total to 4,100; 36 additional gambling tables; and 56 new poker tables. Off-track betting counter slots would be doubled to 90.

The plans call for two more restaurants, bringing the total to seven; one casual dining spot, bringing the total to eight; and a large food court. Two nightclubs would be housed in the addition, along with a half-dozen retail shops. Mr. Boughner said space would be added to a spa operation that has had eight-week waiting lists for weekend appointments for its $150 facials.

Construction is to begin in December, and completion is projected for 2006.

Mr. Boughner said that although hotel occupancy was in "the mid-90 percent range," the company had no plans to add more rooms. That would have to wait, he said, until "we are absolutely certain that the tax climate in Atlantic City and the state of New Jersey as a whole would warrant our expansion."

Casino Control Commission officials noted that Atlantic City is updating the calculation of casino property values for property tax purposes and that the Legislature has passed a bill repealing a state tax on free hotel and nongambling services casinos offered to high rollers, although Gov. James E. McGreevey has not yet signed it. Ms. Kassekert said she expected the governor to allow the bill repealing the tax to become law.

Copyright 2004 The New York Times Company

microserf
October 18th, 2004, 01:44 AM
Attracting people w. time & money is right. I visited Atlantic City once back in the early 90's and was NOT impressed. It was a cold, grey, uninviting experience...

From my personal observations (having worked in LV for weeks at a time in the late 90's early 2000's) these were the attractions to LV, from both a young technology company professionals point of view, and watching my parents weeklong soiree/meeting just a few months ago...

For the young professional who does not gamble (well, black jack 'n the slots.. maybe 1 or 2 games at the sportsbetting area, thats about it):

1. Large conventions, Comdex (yes, cancelled, but it will be back, and better than ever!), CES, E3, Networld+Interop, etc.
2. Top end gentlemens clubs such as Olympic Gardens, more affectionately referred to as "the OG".
3. Grandiose vista view skyline of top class hotels & legendary show attractions from top name entertainment (tough to beat shows from Cirque du Soleil such as the O @ the Bellagio & Zumanity @ the New York, New York for the young, and top performers such as Celine Dion for the older crowd)
4. Geek factor impressives, such as Star Trek: The Experience, and now Borg 4D @ the Las Vegas Hilton.. I see ST:TE every time I goto LV, and have turned peeps on to it.. It's got a buzz so to speak.
5. "See it no where else" themes such as the Gondola ride @ the Venetian, the animatronics display @ Caesars Palace (Posiedon and his children), the pirate ship battle scene @ Treasure Island, the booming water show @ the Bellagio.. these are all legendary attractions... You don't see any press about anything Atlantic City has to offer in visual/visceral competition.
6. Top end shopping experiences, Amani Xchange comes to mind.
7. Known, "hot times for the young 'n the young at heart" hotel venues such as the Palms, and the Rio. Clubs such as the Drink, or Rain.
8. Legendary buffets, such as the seafood buffet at the Rio, and the everything under the sun w. top end choices buffet of the Bellagio..
9. Heck, they even have an incredible roller coaster just 45 mins away in Primm!
10. Incredible hotels, such as the Luxor's black pyramid, the green glow of the MGM Grande, the exciting rides atop the Stratosphere...

I could go on and on... Atlantic City really needs to "step up" on the national/international scale, if it wants to fend off all the indian gaming going on nipping at its heels. They have to stand out as an attraction in of itself, a place worth spending time & money in, a place worth making an effort to going to... beyond gaming, or they will always be a second hand/second best to Las Vegas. Atlantic City needs that WOWZA factor. Personally, when I think of Atlantic City, I think of that movie by the same name, and then I think of the phrase "mob ties".. as in NOT SAFE. Las Vegas has been able to shake that negative connotation, by sheer force of will, vast investments by the casinos... and of course, an excellently executed marketing plan... primetime television show tie-ins, prime-time sports tie ins w. the world series of poker, etc... strong marketing messages tied in w. the old saying by lifelong road warriors.. "what goes on on the road, stays on the road"... ;-)

Peace.

Kris
January 3rd, 2005, 02:33 AM
January 3, 2005

Seeking a New Look, Atlantic City Turns to Its History

By IVER PETERSON

ATLANTIC CITY, Dec. 29 - Atlantic City has finally found something about Las Vegas that it doesn't want to copy: the way it looks.

When Las Vegas casino operators decided that their business should be more family-friendly, Atlantic City leaders started talking about roller rinks and other family attractions. When Las Vegas started making more money from dining, shopping and entertainment than from gambling, Atlantic City began pouring hundreds of millions of dollars into the same ventures.

But as Las Vegas begins yet another round of glitter-and-kitsch construction along the Vegas Strip, the Atlantic City casinos have signed on to a retro approach: starting with the famous Boardwalk, revive a little of the Atlantic City of old, before all the casinos arrived.

"Whenever I visit the head of one of the casinos, their walls are covered with black and white pictures of Atlantic City in its heyday," said Curtis Bashaw, head of the state's Casino Reinvestment Development Authority. "It's like this place is haunted by the images of this city in its glory days."

Now his agency, which invests money raised by a casino tax into economic development projects in the city, is using the lure of low-interest financing to encourage casinos to embrace new design standards along the Boardwalk that evoke the look and scale of the city's original tourist hotels.

Under the new rules, if the operators of the nine casinos fronting the Boardwalk want to use the agency's money to renovate their properties, they will have to meet those standards. Showboat has already agreed to change the design for its new $70 million House of Blues nightclub, scheduled to open on the Boardwalk in July.

With Delaware drawing customers away with its racetrack and gambling parlors, Pennsylvania rushing to create dozens of slot parlors and New York State moving to build casinos closer to Manhattan, Atlantic City is looking for a way to give gamblers something different.

"With all the encroachment of gaming in the region, the operators are much more aware that Atlantic City has to be more than a bunch of slots parlors on the beach," said Mr. Bashaw, who is also a Cape May hotel operator. "They are much more aware of Atlantic City as a brand."

The old photographs that the casino operators cherish offer a study in contrasts. Immense buildings white as snow jut up from the Boardwalk today, most of them presenting sheer, blank walls to passers-by. But the old Boardwalk was lined with brick and stone hotels that had tiled arcades, windows that gave a view in and out, bits of green grass and, as the new standards put it, "active facades" - stores, entrances, windows and semipublic areas.

"By comparison," the development authority's analysis concluded, "most existing casino hotels have few entry points and many linear feet of inaccessible interior."

Several casinos, indeed, have one of the city's most puzzling architectural features - nooks designed to look like doors, with glass walls and awnings, that are not doors. Judging by the scene on Pacific Avenue, the first street back from the Boardwalk, many newcomers spend their first moments in town looking for entrances to the casinos.

The Boardwalk casinos look the way they do because they were built by Las Vegas casino operators, said Michael Calafati, a partner with Historic Building Architects, of Trenton, who created a design inventory of the Boardwalk and drew up the new guidelines.

"They took a model that worked very well in the desert of the Southwest and plopped down these big boxes on the Boardwalk," Mr. Calafati said. "Financially they were a success, but the image is really anemic compared to Atlantic City's heyday."

The loss of many of the old hotels and their friendly scale also occurred, Mr. Bashaw said, because of the shock New Jersey leaders felt when the national news media came to Atlantic City for the 1964 Democratic nominating convention, and reported to the nation that "America's Playground," as the city had styled itself, had become a slum.

"The feeling was, just tear it down," Mr. Bashaw said.

The new design rules are not intended to create a museum, only a more historically accurate cityscape along the Boardwalk, and one that is more inviting to strollers. "Back to a sense of the city that celebrated people-watching, and general pedestrian activities," Mr. Calafati said.

The first tangible step back to the Boardwalk design of old Atlantic City was taken when the Showboat agreed to meet the new standards by changing the design for the marquee and the entrance to the House of Blues.

"Our first design was very Las Vegas-like," said Dave Jonas, senior vice president for Atlantic City operations for Harrah's, which also runs the Showboat. "It was very modern, with very sharp angles and lots of stucco; it was kind of cold. Curtis asked us to make some changes, and we came up with a design that was more modern, with softer corners and natural stone. And instead of a wall, we're putting in windows, so we get light coming into the casino, and we make the entrance more inviting."

Farther "down beach" from the Showboat, Bernard E. DeLury Jr., executive vice president of Caesars Entertainment, is thinking about ways to apply the design guidelines for repair work on the Claridge hotel, a survivor from the city's golden age and part of Caesars' three Boardwalk properties.

"Instead of doing a slab dab paint job on the Claridge, we're thinking, lets move with a view toward preservation, of looking up there and seeing what's there - taking off encrustations that were added, but getting the same functionality - something that's closer to original design," he said.

Mr. DeLury says he also wishes he could open up the adjacent Dennis Hotel, another survivor, to the Boardwalk. But its inviting courtyard is blocked by an undistinguished two-story food and retail space whose owner is content to remain there.

It exemplifies one of the problems Mr. Bashaw faces in remaking the Boardwalk. However willing the casinos may be to put a new, old stamp on the Boardwalk, much of the frontage along it is taken up by a one- and two-story mishmash of three-for-$10 T-shirt joints, palmists, pizza-by-the-slice houses, fudge shops and other businesses that happen to be huge money makers.

With so much money already coming in, their owners appear content to stand pat, but Mr. Bashaw said he was patient.

"We're not saying this is compulsory," he said. "But if you want to use our money, you're going to have to do it the right way."

Copyright 2005 The New York Times Company

TonyO
January 12th, 2005, 10:17 PM
Ch65 Time Warner (Nat'l Geographic) had a Megastructures episode on about the Borgata casino in AC. I found it interesting that Wynn was sold the property for $1.

JCMAN320
February 21st, 2006, 11:06 PM
Atlantic City casino to add 800-room 'Water Club' tower in 2007

2/21/2006, 7:46 p.m. ET
By JOHN CURRAN
The Associated Press

ATLANTIC CITY, N.J. (AP) — Borgata Hotel Casino & Spa is spreading the wealth.

The $1 billion casino, a huge hit with gamblers since its 2003 debut, will add an 800-room hotel tower next year in the second phase of an expansion project, the company announced Tuesday.

The $325 million addition, named The Water Club at Borgata, will also feature four pools, a two-story "spa in the sky," six retail shops and 18,000 square feet of meeting space in the glass hotel tower. Of the 800 guest rooms, 750 will be "classic," and there will be 20 suites and 15 two-bedroom suites, four of which will be corner suites with "media-rich mini theaters," the company said.

The 43-story building, which will look similar to Borgata's existing tower, will help the casino keep pace with runaway demand for its rooms, which have occupancy of 97 percent even in the market's traditionally slow winter months, said Larry Mullin, president and chief operating officer.

"It will be a more upscale experience than what we have now," said Mullin.

Like the Borgata, the expansion is a joint venture of Boyd Gaming Corp. and MGM Mirage. The new tower is expected to open in late 2007.

"We conceived The Water Club as an exclusive extension to the sophisticated, international style that already defines Borgata," said Bob Boughner, the former Borgata CEO who oversaw design of the expansion. "Quietly cosmopolitan yet energized, The Water Club will be defined by clean, contemporary architecture."

Borgata, which opened in July 2003 as the first new casino in Atlantic City in 13 years, has been anything but quiet.

The 2,010-room casino has dramatically affected the Atlantic City market, drawing younger gamblers to town and luring older ones away from its competitors.

It has been the city's highest-grossing casino in all but one month since its opening, and its emphasis on table games, coinless slot machines and expensive name-brand restaurants has helped it dominate the market since the day it opened its doors.

The casino is already at work on the first phase of its expansion, which includes $200 million worth of new casino space, new restaurants and a poker room. Opening for that is scheduled for spring.

JCMAN320
February 21st, 2006, 11:11 PM
My apologies on this being way late but thought worth noting:

Jay-Z Opens 40/40 Club in Atlantic City
Wednesday, October 26, 2005
By: Michael Ivey

Tuesday night marked the grand opening of Jay-Z’s second 40/40 spot, this one in Atlantic City. The club is located in front of Caesars Resorts, on the corner of Missouri and Atlantic Avenues. During a tour of the $3.5 million, 15,000 sq. ft. sports bar Jay admitted it was even more imposing than he expected.

The 40/40 Club is equipped with many television screens showing sports events, a theme important to it’s naming according to Jay. “It [40/40] is actually the most exclusive sports club in baseball cause it combines power and speed. There is only three members, A-Rod, Barry Bonds, and Jose Canseco.” An ESPN Hall of Fame room for about 100 guests, and an A-Rod room, which holds 50 people, can be rented for $3,000 and $1,500 a night respectively. A-Rod and P. Diddy were among those at the grand opening Tuesday night. Jay actually declined on establishing a 40/40 club in LA because he feels AC will “be pretty comparable to Vegas” due to new developments.

Jay-Z is also very is fond of New Jersey: “it’s like an extended home for me…I stayed in Trenton for a while. And Philly’s like my second home.” Jay says he wants an atmosphere that’s “relaxed and you know cool, people saying what’s up to each other, having fun with each other.” By the way, no jerseys or sneakers allowed in the 40/40 club.

lofter1
February 21st, 2006, 11:57 PM
Atlantic City thread gets less than 10 posts in almost 2 years!

Shows that AC doesn't hold much mystery or intrigue ...

ablarc
February 22nd, 2006, 08:01 AM
^ Place is a mess.

stache
February 22nd, 2006, 09:04 AM
Surrounded by a giant ghetto.

ablarc
February 22nd, 2006, 09:11 AM
You'd think all the sleaze squeezed out of Times Square would have relocated here, maybe just off the Boardwalk. Is it zoned out?

JCMAN320
February 22nd, 2006, 10:59 AM
I think personally this is the beginning of it's finest hour.

Dagrecco82
February 22nd, 2006, 11:12 AM
Atlantic City casino to add 800-room 'Water Club' tower in 2007


By JOHN CURRAN
The Associated Press
ATLANTIC CITY, N.J. - Borgata Hotel Casino & Spa is spreading the wealth.
The $1 billion casino, a huge hit with gamblers since its 2003 debut, will add an 800-room hotel tower next year in the second phase of an expansion project, the company announced Tuesday.
The $325 million addition, named The Water Club at Borgata, will also feature four pools, a two-story "spa in the sky," six retail shops and 18,000 square feet of meeting space in the glass hotel tower. Of the 800 guest rooms, 750 will be "classic," and there will be 20 suites and 15 two-bedroom suites, four of which will be corner suites with "media-rich mini theaters," the company said.
The 43-story building, which will look similar to Borgata's existing tower, will help the casino keep pace with runaway demand for its rooms, which have occupancy of 97 percent even in the market's traditionally slow winter months, said Larry Mullin, president and chief operating officer.
"It will be a more upscale experience than what we have now," said Mullin.
Like the Borgata, the expansion is a joint venture of Boyd Gaming Corp. and MGM Mirage. The new tower is expected to open in late 2007.
We conceived The Water Club as an exclusive extension to the sophisticated, international style that already defines Borgata," said Bob Boughner, the former Borgata CEO who oversaw design of the expansion. "Quietly cosmopolitan yet energized, The Water Club will be defined by clean, contemporary architecture."
Borgata, which opened in July 2003 as the first new casino in Atlantic City in 13 years, has been anything but quiet. The 2,010-room casino has dramatically affected the Atlantic City market, drawing younger gamblers to town and luring older ones away from its competitors.
It has been the city's highest-grossing casino in all but one month since its opening, and its emphasis on table games, coinless slot machines and expensive name-brand restaurants has helped it dominate the market since the day it opened its doors.
The casino is already at work on the first phase of its expansion, which includes $200 million worth of new casino space, new restaurants and a poker room. Opening for that is scheduled for spring.

MidtownGuy
February 23rd, 2006, 10:41 AM
Hmmm, all this sounds great. I've never been to AC, but if they keep it up I might have to pay a visit.

lofter1
February 23rd, 2006, 11:37 AM
Seems by your reaction that the new offical New Jersey State Slogan is working:

January 12, 2006

http://www.state.nj.us/slogan/

The new slogan for New Jersey has been chosen by the people of the state. Over 11,000 people voted by phone and on the internet. The final tally was close, but we have a clear winner.

The winning slogan is:

"New Jersey, Come See For Yourself"

and was first submitted to us by Jeffrey Antman of Passaic, New Jersey.

Thank you to all who contributed ideas and took the time to vote - I am proud to be the Governor of a State whose residents came forward with thousands of ways to tell the world that New Jersey is a wonderful place to live, work and play.

With regards,
http://www.state.nj.us/slogan/images/slogan_signature.gif
Acting Governor

Fabrizio
February 23rd, 2006, 05:26 PM
Midtown:

"Hmmm, all this sounds great. I've never been to AC, but if they keep it up I might have to pay a visit."

It´s a hell hole. The Borgata ( and etc.) is nice because it´s a self contained "environment"...you could be anywhere.

Out on the streets it´s a completely different scene...largely a slum... Camden-by-the-sea. The boardwalk is about as charming as 14th street circa 1978.

Kris
June 20th, 2006, 04:01 AM
June 20, 2006
Atlantic City and Rail Line Agree to Offer Direct Service
By RONALD SMOTHERS

NEWARK, June 19 — Three Atlantic City casinos have agreed to finance direct weekend train service to and from New York City's Pennsylvania Station in a bid to win new customers.

The deal was approved on Monday when New Jersey Transit, the state-run commuter rail line, agreed to operate the service, which was scheduled to start in 2007. The three casinos, Borgata, Caesars and Harrah's, will put up $15 million to buy eight new double-decker rail cars and provide $4 million a year to pay the annual operating costs for a three-year demonstration period.

An additional $4.5 million will come from the Casino Reinvestment Development Authority, a state agency financed by 12 casinos in the city, to lease diesel engines from Amtrak for the initial three years.

Auggie Cipollini, senior vice president and chief administrative officer of the Borgata, said "this is all of a piece" with an array of other marketing moves by the industry to increase or at least hold the line on revenues. Those moves have included increasing the number of hotel rooms, broadening entertainment and restaurant offerings, and welcoming new retail outlets. In 2005, the casinos generated $5.018 billion in revenue.

For New Jersey Transit, the nation's third-largest publicly operated commuter rail operation, participating in the experiment was an easy decision, officials there said.

"Anytime we can increase service without having to invest the money ourselves is a plus," said Kris Kolluri, the state transportation commissioner and chairman of the transit agency's board. "The casinos have done marketing studies to show that this will be profitable, and the good news for us is that it is entirely financed by them."

The ticket price for the 2 ½-hour train ride has not been determined, Mr. Cipollini said. One-way bus tickets from New York to Atlantic City are about $30 for the 2 ½-hour journey. Travelers can also get there by taking a one-way Amtrak train from Penn Station to Philadelphia at a cost of $42 to $64, and then switching to New Jersey Transit's $7.25 one-way service to Atlantic City.

Dan Dressel, a spokesman for New Jersey Transit, said casino operators were hoping to come up with a competitive price for the service.

The plan calls for running 18 weekend trains to and from Atlantic City equipped for dining and drinking. The service is expected to provide round-trip transportation for approximately 1,100 people each weekend, the officials said.

While each casino will have a block of tickets for its customers, at least 25 percent of the tickets must be available to the public because of the financing from the casino reinvestment agency, which has helped pay for housing, roads, health centers and hotel expansions that are deemed to benefit Atlantic City and the gambling industry.

Mr. Cipollini said the casinos providing the bulk of the financial support would most likely use the rail service in "a lot of good marketing packages" aimed at higher-end gambling and nongambling customers.

"I think it is great for us to be in the railroad business," he said.

Copyright 2006 The New York Times Company

stache
June 20th, 2006, 10:04 AM
You can get halfway there (Bay Head) for $20 R/T on NJT. Or you can take NJT via the Riverline and PATCO for around $30 R/T, but it would probably take longer than three hours. I'm curious to see which route the trains will take.

Bob
June 20th, 2006, 11:47 AM
One way to encourage tourism to Atlantic City is to upgrade the Expressway and the Garden State to autobahn-spec, and to post higher speed limits (75+). This will cut down the travel time from both NYC and Philadelphia. 65 is ok, but it still leaves too many opportunities for the NJSP to nab people doing 70. Who needs the hassle of Atlantic City, when they can hop a cheap flight to Las Vegas and take a shuttle to their favorite casinos?

ablarc
June 20th, 2006, 12:55 PM
The ticket price for the 2 ½-hour train ride has not been determined, Mr. Cipollini said. One-way bus tickets from New York to Atlantic City are about $30 for the 2 ½-hour journey.
Why is the train as slow as the bus?

Are freight trains going to bollox this service too?


Dan Dressel, a spokesman for New Jersey Transit, said casino operators were hoping to come up with a competitive price for the service.
Good for them. How about free with documentary evidence of casino gaming?


The plan calls for running 18 weekend trains to and from Atlantic City equipped for dining and drinking.
That's the idea.

Will there be strippers?

pianoman11686
June 20th, 2006, 01:45 PM
The train from my town to Penn (50 miles) is slower than the bus ride to Port Authority. NJ Transit sucks.

NYatKNIGHT
June 20th, 2006, 03:26 PM
One way to encourage tourism to Atlantic City is to upgrade the Expressway and the Garden State to autobahn-spec, and to post higher speed limits (75+). This will cut down the travel time from both NYC and Philadelphia. 65 is ok, but it still leaves too many opportunities for the NJSP to nab people doing 70. Who needs the hassle of Atlantic City, when they can hop a cheap flight to Las Vegas and take a shuttle to their favorite casinos?I can't believe posting speeds 10 m.p.h. more would make a difference whether people go or don't go to A.C. Besides, everyone is going 75-85 anyway. I also don't see how a 2.5 hour train ride is a "hassle" as opposed to the 4.5 hour flight out to Vegas and dealing with getting to and from two airports.

On the other hand, even if it takes the same amount of time, a train could make a big difference: no driving, no speeding tickets, no parking, NO TRAFFIC JAMS, and partying on the train! I completely agree that it is ridiculous that it doesn't go faster than the bus with only one stop in Newark, but this is very good news for Atlantic City and mass transit users. It's about time, I bet it will be popular.

Fabrizio
June 20th, 2006, 04:09 PM
My hunch is that they´ll use the tracks that are already in place between AC and NY. They probably can´t handle high speeds. And considering the Amtrack accidents of the last few years...safety is probably a consideration.

pianoman11686
June 20th, 2006, 04:44 PM
Here is a map of the existing tracks in place. I'm not sure if there is already some sort of old rail infrastructure in place that simply needs to be revamped, or if entirely new tracks have to be laid. In any case, some level of work will be done to connect Bay Head to Atlantic City. And you can be sure they won't be using high-speed trains.

http://www.njtransit.com/images/sf_tr_rail_map13.jpg

lofter1
June 20th, 2006, 05:24 PM
3 hour train trip already available NYC > AC via Philly weekdays & weekends ...

AMTRAK (http://tickets.amtrak.com/itd/amtrak/FareFinder?_tripType=OneWay&_origin=New+York+-+Penn+Station%2C+NY+%28NYP%29&_depmonthyear=2006-06&_depday=20&_dephourmin=&_destination=Philadelphia+-+30th+Street+Station%2C+PA+%28PHL%29&_retmonthyear=&_retday=&_rethourmin=&_adults=1&_children=0&_infants=0&_searchBy=schedule&x=22&y=9) : NYC > Philly ~ 1 hr. 20 min.

NY TRANSIT (http://www.njtransit.com/sf_tr_schedules.jsp?action=entry&resptype=U&MinB=0&MinA=0&Fare=Y&Line=ATLC&LineDesc=Atlantic+City+Line&LineLookup=&STime=12%3A00+PM&RTime=1%3A00+PM&Oloc=Philadelphia+30th+Street&OSID=1+++++++&Dloc=Atlantic+City&DSID=10++++++&back=sf_tr_schedules.shtml&LineExt=ATLC%3AAtlantic+City+Line&ori=1+++++++%3APhiladelphia+30th+Street&LineExt2=ATLC%3AAtlantic+City+Line&des=10++++++%3AAtlantic+City&DOW=W&mm=6&dd=20&yyyy=2006&date=6%2F20%2F2006) : Philly > Atlantic City ~ 1 hr. 30 min.



Travelers can also get there by taking a one-way Amtrak train from Penn Station to Philadelphia at a cost of $42 to $64, and then switching to New Jersey Transit's $7.25 one-way service to Atlantic City.

stache
June 20th, 2006, 07:31 PM
The following article by Thomas Barlas was posted on the Press of Atlantic City website on June 16.)

ATLANTIC CITY, N.J. -- NJ Transit could decide Monday whether to begin new rail service between Atlantic City and New York.

The proposal will be discussed by NJ Transit's board of directors Monday. A vote on the plan is expected, NJ Transit spokeswoman Penny Bassett Hackett said.

Karlis Povisils, director of policy research for the Casino Reinvestment Development Authority, said the train would stop only at Newark during its run between New York and Atlantic City. The trip would take about 2½ hours, or the same time it takes a bus to run between Manhattan and Atlantic City, he said.

An attempt to connect New York City and Atlantic City with a direct train failed in the late 1980s. This time, Atlantic City's casinos, faced with looming competition from Pennsylvania and New York, are apparently putting their weight behind the project. The train would run as a contract operation, with the casino industry guaranteeing operating costs and handling other services such as marketing, Povisils said.

NJ Transit Executive Director George Warrington said during a transportation conference in Atlantic City in April that NJ Transit was working out details with Amtrak for the use of a portion of Amtrak's Northeast Corridor line between 30th Street Station in Philadelphia and Trenton.

NJ Transit already runs trains along the Northeast Corridor line between Trenton and Newark. It needs to use the portion of the Northeast Corridor line between 30th Street Station and Trenton so customers can ride one of its trains between Atlantic City and Newark without having to change trains in Philadelphia.

While Warrington wouldn't discuss details of the plan, transportation officials said they involve whether NJ Transit's proposed train service would cut in profits for cash-strapped Amtrak.

Should those details work out and NJ Transit get the passenger cars and engines it needs, the service could begin in about 18 months to two years, Warrington said during the April conference.

NJ Transit's rail plan would essentially link the Atlantic City line — which runs between Atlantic City and Philadelphia — and the Northeast Corridor line.

************************************************** *******

I'm guessing that the train would stop at Newark Airport and possibly Rahway as well -

pianoman11686
June 20th, 2006, 09:45 PM
Why the hell wouldn't they just extend the North Jersey Coast line? It's a shorter distance, and it's a much quicker route than going right by Philly. Am I missing something here?

OmegaNYC
June 20th, 2006, 10:00 PM
Why the hell wouldn't they just extend the North Jersey Coast line? It's a shorter distance, and it's a much quicker route than going right by Philly. Am I missing something here?

I guess people in South Jersey wouldn't like that idea. :p

pianoman11686
June 20th, 2006, 10:12 PM
Yeah but people in South Jersey already have the Atlantic City Line. The whole point of this is to give people closer to New York City easy access. It just makes no sense to make people take a train that goes west to Philly just to go back east later. It's thinking like this that has led to American rail travel becoming a laughingstock.

stache
June 21st, 2006, 04:21 AM
When I found the above article I was actually looking for information if there ever was a train that went all the way to AC following the shore line. Does anybody know? Bay Head is about 40 miles from AC, and for some reason you have to change trains at Long Branch to go any further South.

lofter1
June 21st, 2006, 10:10 AM
Are there any boats that ferry passengers from the harbor @ NJ / NYC > AC?

ablarc
June 21st, 2006, 11:12 AM
^ They ought to run a high-speed ferry, like Hong Kong-Macau or Boston-Provincetown. Hydrofoil would be nice.

Convenient for day trips.

Dynamicdezzy
June 21st, 2006, 01:33 PM
Why the hell wouldn't they just extend the North Jersey Coast line? It's a shorter distance, and it's a much quicker route than going right by Philly. Am I missing something here?


This is a project between the casinos and NJ Transit. The casinos would pay the agency to run direct service on the weekends only. This is not NJ Transit's doing, which is why they are only utilizing existing infrastructure. I doubt the casinos are willing to invest all that money in expanding someone else's business.

NYatKNIGHT
June 21st, 2006, 04:10 PM
When I found the above article I was actually looking for information if there ever was a train that went all the way to AC following the shore line. Does anybody know? Bay Head is about 40 miles from AC, and for some reason you have to change trains at Long Branch to go any further South.


North Jersey Coast Line - Electric trains operate daily between New York Penn Station and Long Branch, 63.9 miles. On weekdays, diesel-powered trains operate from Hoboken Terminal and Newark Penn Station to Bay Head. Off-peak and weekend service to Bay Head is provided by diesel-powered shuttles from Long Branch, 15.7 miles. Serves 24 stations. On weekends in the summer, extra diesel trains run direct from Hoboken and Newark to the Jersey Shore, and NJ Transit operates the Pony Express to Monmouth Park racetrack.

There was no line that followed the shore all the way down to A.C. continuing from Bay Head, however the Central RR of NJ - Southern Division branched off the NJCL at Red Bank.

Central RR of NJ “Famous for the route of the Blue Comet which ran from Jersey City to Atlantic City from 1929 to 1941…”

http://www.thebluecomet.com/cnjsoudiv.html

stache
June 21st, 2006, 05:32 PM
My hero... : )

stache
June 21st, 2006, 06:37 PM
I found this map of the Blue Comet line. You follow the red line to Winslow Junction, then the line to AC. So it looks like the NY/AC train line was always somewhat circuitous. It must be the pull of Philly, which makes sense. Long Island is more convenient for NY as a resort area.

NYatKNIGHT
June 23rd, 2006, 05:34 PM
Good Map!

You'd think you could get to A.C. from New York on the Pennsylvania Railroad, no? They have that, the B&O Railroad, the Short Line, and the Reading, right?

stache
June 23rd, 2006, 10:14 PM
Here's a map of part of the Penn RR system from 1893. They had to work their way around that Amboy bay, plus the large inlet of water above AC. The second map is part of the B&O RR from 1876. As far as I can tell, the Short Line served South Jersey and had a line that went from AC to Ocean City. There's a good background article at http://www.7miletimes.com/seaisletimes/railroad.htm The third map shows part of the Reading RR from the 20's.

pianoman11686
June 26th, 2006, 02:11 PM
GlobeSt.com (http://www.globest.com/news/607_607/newjersey/146879-1.html?type=pf)
Last updated: June 26, 2006 10:56am

Investors Plan to Buy 11-Acre Site

By Eric Peterson

ATLANTIC CITY-A long, vacant three-block tract at the southern end of this city’s boardwalk is about to change hands and may finally be developed. According to a published report, an investment group is set to pay $88 million for the 11-acre site, which is owned by the Atlantic City Hilton Casino Resort and its parent, Colony Capital LLC.

According to the report, the investment group is led by Wallace R. Barr, the former president and CEO of Caesars Entertainment, who stepped down from that position when the company was bought by Harrah’s Entertainment, and by Curtis Bashaw, the former executive director of the Casino Reinvestment Development Authority, a state agency. Bashaw, who left the CRDA post last October, currently heads Cape Advisors Inc., a Cape May, NJ-based firm that operates historic hotel properties there and office and residential properties in two other states. All of the parties involved in the pending transaction declined to comment or were unavailable.

According to reports, what Barr and Bashaw have in mind for the site is a small casino/hotel property. The 11 acres is considered too small for a mega hotel of the type that has been rising here lately, such as the Borgata. The site once held the Dunes Casino Hotel, which was never completed and was finally demolished in the early 1990s after sitting vacant for five years.

Copyright © 2006 ALM Properties, Inc.

pianoman11686
June 30th, 2006, 03:06 PM
From Saltwater Taffy to Louis Vuitton

http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2006/04/19/business/19mall.600.jpg
Luxury boutiques are among the 85 tenants signed so far to move into the Pier at Caesars, which is scheduled to open in June.

http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2006/04/19/business/19mall_graph.190.gif
The new shopping center juts into the ocean near Caesars.

By TERRY PRISTIN

Published: April 19, 2006

ATLANTIC CITY — The shops along this city's storied Boardwalk tend to be modest establishments with names like Sully's Pizza and 99¢ Everything.

But soon, Gucci, Louis Vuitton, Burberry and Salvatore Ferragamo — brands that evoke Fifth Avenue and Rodeo Drive rather than rolling chairs and saltwater taffy — will be added to the mix. These luxury boutiques are among about 85 shops and restaurants that have signed leases at the Pier at Caesars, the gambling resort's first upscale mall, a glossy structure of three and a half stories that looks like a pale green ship jutting into the ocean. Linked to the casino by a skybridge, the pier will also house the city's first wedding chapel.

The lead developer of the pier, which is scheduled to open in June, is Gordon Group Holdings, a privately owned company in Greenwich, Conn., founded by Sheldon Gordon. Mr. Gordon created the Forum Shops at Caesars in Las Vegas, a project that seemed daring when it was built in the early 1990's. But the Forum Shops, with its gigantic talking "Roman" statues, went on to be among the top-performing malls in the nation and is credited as the catalyst for the transformation of Las Vegas into a destination for shoppers as well as gamblers.

Gordon Group and its partner, the Taubman Company, a real estate investment trust based in Bloomfield Hills, Mich., say that Atlantic City is poised for a similar metamorphosis. "This town is shifting already," said Scott Gordon, the company's president and Sheldon's son, in a recent interview in the construction trailer next to the pier. "There's enough meat on the bone for someone not interested in gambling to come here."

The pier — which received $43 million from the state Casino Reinvestment Development Authority and a $100 million construction loan from Eurohypo, a German bank that invests heavily in American real estate — will be the third heavily subsidized shopping center to open here since 2003.

That year, the Cordish Company of Baltimore opened the Walk, an outlet center in a previously drug-infested neighborhood. Another shopping center, the Quarter at Tropicana, has branches of the Palm and P. F. Chang chain restaurants, and a Las Vegas-style blue ceiling with clouds.

Today, the city is awash with hotel, casino and retail expansion projects and condo developments, but Wall Street analysts say that the pier is a gamble. "I would call it fascinating, very interesting and very creative as retail goes," said Matthew L. Ostrower, a REIT analyst at Morgan Stanley, "but I would also call it high risk. They are in uncharted waters here."

Mr. Gordon concedes as much. Some of the most sought-after tenants — no more than a handful, he maintains — will not pay a set rent but will be charged initially according to the sales they generate. The developers will also absorb much of the expense of creating the stores, a cost known as tenant improvement, or T.I.

"We don't build cookie-cutter projects that make sense to a lot of people when they first see them," he said. "We like going into underdeveloped, underappreciated markets, and we know we need large T.I. before we go out and talk to tenants. We know that going to Gucci and asking them to go to a market like Atlantic City is a reach."

Though Atlantic City had almost as many visitors last year as Las Vegas did (35 million, as opposed to 38.6 million, according to each cities convention and visitors authorities), there are striking contrasts between them. About two-thirds of Atlantic City's visitors are day-trippers, while visitors to Las Vegas stay an average of 3.5 days. Tourism generates $36.7 billion for Las Vegas, but only $6.5 billion for Atlantic City.

Real estate prices in nearby suburbs have escalated, but Atlantic City (population 40,500) remains poor, with a median household income of $27,000, compared with $42,000 for the nation as a whole, according to the 2000 census. Only 10.4 percent of Atlantic City's residents are college graduates.

Mr. Ostrower said that Taubman, whose relationship with Gordon began more than two decades ago with their co-development of the Beverly Center in Los Angeles, has also hedged its risk. The partnership, announced last year, required Taubman to invest only $4 million at first. A second payment of about $20 million is not due until six months after the project opens. The final installment will equal 7 percent of the project's net operating income in 2007.

"This is the way you structure a deal if you are worried about how well the property is going to do," Mr. Ostrower said.

But Robert S. Taubman, the chief executive of Taubman, said that the Gordon Group sought this arrangement to "capture most of the value creation."

There have been bumps in the road, however. As the cost of the project escalated — Mr. Gordon said the price tag is now about $200 million — the Gordon Group ran short of capital and Taubman declined to move up its payment schedule, said two participants in the negotiations. The problem was resolved recently when Gordon got a loan of about $20 million from the Starwood Capital Group. Originally built a century ago as an amusement park known as the Million-Dollar Pier, the pier was converted in 1950 into an inward-looking shopping mall with T-shirt shops and other low-end retail. When Caesars bought the mall in 1996, the Gordon Group managed it for a few years. In 2003, Gordon signed a 75-year ground lease with Caesars, now owned by Harrah's Entertainment.

But it was not until the Borgata Hotel Casino and Spa opened in the city's marina district that summer and became an instant success that the company determined that it made sense to go after high-end retail tenants, Mr. Gordon said.

The city's first luxury hotel, Borgata has attracted a younger, more affluent crowd. "It's difficult to get in there on the weekend unless you're a rated player," said Warren J. Marr, the director of the hospitality and leisure consulting practice at PricewaterhouseCoopers, referring to serious gamblers.

Richard B. Hodos, a principal at Madison HGCD, a retail real estate consulting and brokerage company in New York, was originally skeptical about the project but wound up advising a designer to open a store at the pier. (The name of the designer has not been made public because the lease has not been signed.) "I know of no one who goes to Atlantic City," he said. "But when we looked at the average expenditure in the casinos, and the profile of the high rollers, in some cases it exceeded what we find in Las Vegas."

While the concept for the pier was inspired by the Forum at Caesars, the design was not. Rather, the goal was to take full advantage of the site, echoing the wood flooring of the Boardwalk and opening up the building to panoramic shoreline views.

"This is a different kind of mystical and romantic experience, a walk off the edge of the earth," said David P. Manfredi, a partner in Elkus-Manfredi, the architects who developed the original concept for the building and designed the exterior. (The Rockwell Group designed the common spaces.)

As a nod to the electric signs that created a sensation when they were installed on the Atlantic City piers in the 1920's, the new mall will be festooned with L.E.D. screens. A water show set to music is meant to draw visitors to the end of the long and narrow pier, Mr. Manfredi said.

Talking statues, however, will be nowhere in sight. "We didn't want to create a kitschy project," Mr. Gordon said.

Copyright 2006 The New York Times Company

stache
June 30th, 2006, 09:25 PM
How odd that the Borgata is away from the beach.

Dynamicdezzy
July 5th, 2006, 01:29 PM
Atlantic City casinos shut down
12 facilities forced to close due to budget battle in New Jersey

Associated Press
Updated: 8:45 a.m. PT July 5, 2006

TRENTON, N.J. - If there’s one sure thing in this city of uncertainties, it’s always been this: Casinos find a way to keep the dice rolling.

Until now.

Atlantic City’s 12 casinos — from the three Trumps to the Tropicana — shut down their gambling floors Wednesday morning for the first time ever, their hand forced by a stalemate over the state budget.

The casinos’ hotels, which attract millions of gamblers and vacationers every year, will remain open because they don’t require state involvement in their day-to-day operations, but no gambling will be allowed because the state casino inspectors who keep tabs on the money are off the job until lawmakers approve the budget. State parks and beaches will also close because of the lack of staff.

Minutes before the 8 a.m. deadline Wednesday, gamblers were still at the slot machines with their cups of coins.

“What else can you do down here besides gamble?” said Janice Sidwa, 60, who was in the midst of a four-day trip to the city.

Missed deadline
The problem started when the Legislature missed its July 1 constitutional deadline to pass the budget. Gov. Jon S. Corzine ordered state offices shutdown Saturday, all non-essential state government operations closed, and furloughed more than half the state’s employees.

Only about 36,000 people in vital roles such as child welfare, state police and mental hospitals remained on the job.

Without an approved spending plan, New Jersey can’t pay its state employees.

That means state parks, beaches, campgrounds and historic sites are also closing down — another smack to residents, with school out and the summer heat sizzling.

The casino shutdowns are a particularly hard blow to the state’s coffers as lawmakers fight over how to close a $4.5 billion hole in the governor’s state budget.

The Atlantic City casinos have a $1.1 billion payroll and spend billions more on goods and services. The state gets an 8 percent cut of their revenue — about $1.3 million a day.

“They’re going to lose a lot of money,” said Jerome Harper, 42, of Philadelphia, who was playing the slots at Resorts Atlantic City. “It’s bad. Why close it down when you could just do your job and put the budget together? That’s what they’re paid for.”

The Legislature, meanwhile, is under orders to get to work.

New address by Corzine
Corzine planned to address all 120 state lawmakers again Wednesday morning about the impasse.

The dispute — between the governor and his fellow Democrats who control the Legislature — centers on Corzine’s plan to raise the state sales tax from 6 percent to 7 percent to help overcome a $4.5 billion budget deficit in his $31 billion spending plan. The proposal would cost the average New Jersey family an estimated $275 per year.

Casino executives were busy trying to make sure the shutdown was orderly.

Up to 15,000 casino employees would be thrown out of work by the closings, and that number could double if the casinos remain closed through the weekend, according to Robert McDevitt, president of Local 54 of UNITE HERE, a labor union that represents rank-and-file casino hotel workers.

Police Chief John Mooney worried that the sudden evacuation of the casinos could lead to problems with drunken driving, street crime and labor unrest. If the shutdown continues, casino workers who aren’t being paid could make trouble, he said.

“This is a state-created disaster,” Mooney said.

The gamblers were well aware of the loss for the city.

“This is what brings the money in,” said Bertha Arrington, 57, of Baldwin, N.Y., sitting at slot machine Tuesday.

pianoman11686
July 18th, 2006, 10:53 AM
GlobeSt.com (http://www.globest.com/news/634_634/newjersey/147406-1.html)

Last updated: July 18, 2006 09:28am

$1B Redevelopment Set To Roll

By Eric Peterson

http://www.globest.com/newspics/nej_victoriatower.jpg

ATLANTIC CITY-A sweeping redevelopment plan has been unveiled for this city’s blighted Southeast Inlet section, and when it’s all built out, the total price tag could be in the $1-billion area. The plan covers a 10-block vacant area on the northern end of this city’s oceanfront boardwalk.
“There was a time when the Southeast Inlet was a desirable place to live, and I think you’re going to see history repeat itself,” says Tom Scannapieco, president of the Scannapieco Development Co. of New Hope, PA, who’s behind the plan. “Atlantic City is just emerging.”

The plan calls for as many as 19 residential condo buildings, along with a major retail component. Morgan Stanley Gaming Holdings Inc. is also planning to develop a new casino resort property on a 20-acre.

And while Scannapieco is behind the plan, and his company’s Bella Condominiums, already completed, is the catalyst, a number of other developers have signed on to develop properties within the site. Altogether, more than 1,300 residential units have been confirmed for the site, according to Scannapieco. The latter has also gotten the mayor and city council to change, by proclamation, the name of the region from Southeast Inlet to North Beach.

Scannapieco’s Bella Condos consists of 200 units in 27 stories. Additional commitments have come from Simdag Investment, a Tampa, FL-based company with an office in Sea Isle City, which is set to build Victoria Tower, a 38-story luxury building with 400 units. Jim Maggs, a Brielle-based developer will also build Marbella, featuring 331 units and 36 stories.

The Miami-based Lennar Corp., meanwhile, will add Reflections, a mid-rise condo building, to the redubbed North Beach mix. And Prestigious Homes, based in Ventnor, an Atlantic City suburb, will add 250 units adjacent to Scannapieco’s Bella property. Additional developers are expected to be announced for sites within North Beach.

Scannapieco first got involved in Atlantic City’s long-term redevelopment two decades ago, since building some $60 million worth of mid-level housing. Most of that has come in the city’s Northeast Inlet.

Copyright © 2006 ALM Properties, Inc.

American Gaming Guru
July 24th, 2006, 11:56 AM
Are there any boats that ferry passengers from the harbor @ NJ / NYC > AC?

Great idea, but Harrah's already tried it in the early 80's I believe. Supposedly the tides between NYC and AC were so rough that passengers we all arriving sick and had to be sent back in limos.

Not sure how newer boats would do, but it is worth a look.

The new train service sounds exciting, but at 2.5 hours, not more time saving than driving. For car-less NYC people, like me, it will offer a nice alternative to the bus. Hopefully the train crowd will be made of a more affluent crowd and a lively one too!

lofter1
July 24th, 2006, 02:45 PM
Supposedly the tides between NYC and AC were so rough that passengers we all arriving sick and had to be sent back in limos.

Don't know if they should blame the tides / boat ...

Last time I was there AC itself made me queasy ;)

OmegaNYC
July 24th, 2006, 04:28 PM
I was in AC yesterday, had a great time! Though it was packed!

STT757
August 20th, 2006, 10:44 PM
I just got back from Atlantic City, the place is booming. I read recently that the month during which the State of NJ shut down and the Casinos had to temporarily close for a few days was actually the second highest grossing month for the Atlantic City casinos.

Business is obviously booming, it has alot of potential but has a LOOONG way to go. It's on the right track.

Good points:

Borgata (keep expanding, more shops and restaraunts)
Tropicana (it's my favorite AC casino, I love Carmines and PF Changs)
The Pier (it's not fully opened yet, but I liked what I saw. Apple Store, Tiffanys, Burberry etc.. Good job.

Other good points,
Convention center and Sheraton Hotel (very nice)
The Walk Outlets

What needs to be expanded upon:

Rail service, more frequent trains to Philadelphia and besides the Casino Express being developed for next Summer a direct rail link between NY Penn/North Jersey and Atlantic City.

Light Rail, connect the NJ Transit Rail station, Convention Center, Marina Casinos, Boardwalk Casinos, Atlantic City International Airport. NJ has done well with Light Rail in Newark and along the Delaware River in South Jersey and the Hudson River in North Jersey, it's time to apply the lessons learned in those projects to Atlantic City.

Atlantic City International Airport: Currently has only two airlines, Spirit and Delta Connection. Every major US Airline should have regional Jet service to their major hubs from Atlantic City, UAL, AA, NWA, CO, US, DL etc..
Also every effort should be made to attracting an airline like Jetblue who can draw alot of attention to Atlantic City.

Cesars Hotel and Casino, not bad but not as good as Tropicana and Borgata. Keep the investments coming.

The Bad:
The shadey boardwalk, clean it up and make it more family freindly like the Pt.Pleasant Boardwalk.
Trump Casinos, old run down casinos, old apartment buildings and the run down homes within the boardwalk area.

I would love if one of the Trump Casinos (either the Marina or Trump Plaza) was totaly gutted and rebuilt as a Hard Rock Hotel Casino.

As for the rest of Atlantic City, there are alot of neighborhoods with good spots that are totaly run down and abandoned. Why not build upon the resources available, South Jersey is experiencing a huge building boom with Retirement Communities. Many are high end Toll Brothers retirement communities, why not have developers like Toll Brothers, Hovanian etc take over some of these rundown abandonded neighborhoods and build gated retirement communities right inside Atlantic City.

Atlantic City has alot to offer Senior Citizens (the place is full of them), since Senior Citizens do not have kids they don't worry about things like the quality of the local schools. As long as it's safe, very safe, gated and conveinent I think it would be something that can work to bring new life to these dead communities surrounding the Casinos.

STT757
August 20th, 2006, 11:00 PM
Atlantic City Outlets http://www.acoutlets.com/

The Pier at Caesars http://www.thepieratcaesars.com/

http://images.appleinsider.com/images/thepier-rendering1.jpg

http://images.appleinsider.com/images/thepier-rendering2.jpg

http://images.appleinsider.com/images/thepier-rendering4.jpg

http://images.appleinsider.com/images/thepier-rendering5.jpg

About the Times Square style bilboards:
http://www.prnewswire.com/cgi-bin/stories.pl?ACCT=109&STORY=/www/story/11-02-2005/0004206342&EDATE=

Borgata http://www.theborgata.com/

Tropicana http://www.tropicana.net/

Atlantic City Airport http://www2.sjta.com/acairport/

OmegaNYC
August 22nd, 2006, 09:44 PM
That's what I like to see! Atlantic City is booming. What would really make Atlantic City a wonderful place, is a pro sports team. Yeah like basketball. Take that LV. :p

STT757
August 23rd, 2006, 12:09 AM
Im not sure about a sports team, but perhaps moving a NBA or NFL training camp to Atlantic City during the Summer Off-season would offer another non gambling attraction.

However one thing I think that would help put Atlantic City a little more closer to Las Vegas would be to legalize Sports betting, if Atlantic City legalized sports betting it would bring in a tremendous amount of revenue that is either going to Las Vegas or into organzied crime.

Imagine the crowds in Atlantic City during the Super Bowl Weekend if Sports betting were legal, that weekend every room with miles of Atlantic City would be booked solid.

pianoman11686
September 6th, 2006, 07:10 PM
From GlobeSt.com (http://www.globest.com/news/704_704/newjersey/148785-1.html)

Last updated: September 5, 2006 01:58pm

New Resort To Follow Pinnacle’s $250M Casino Buy

By Eric Peterson

ATLANTIC CITY-This gaming mecca is about to get yet another sprawling casino/hotel/resort property, but will lose a small, older hotel property in the process. The Las Vegas-based Pinnacle Entertainment Inc. has signed a definitive agreement to buy 18 contiguous acres along this city’s boardwalk for $250 million. The primary properties are the existing Sands Casino Hotel and the former Traymore Hotel site.

The sellers of the properties are affiliates of financier Carl Icahn, the primary affiliate being Atlantic Coast Entertainment Holdings Inc. (ACE Hi). The major stockholder of ACE Hi, AREP Sands Holding LLC, owns approximately 58% of the outstanding stock of ACE Hi. AREP Sands itself is a wholly owned subsidiary of Icahn’s American Real Estate Holdings LP.

And Pinnacle, which develops upscale mixed-use properties with or without casinos, plans to redevelop the site with an entirely new casino/hotel property. That plan calls for the 26-year-old Sands, one of the city’s smaller hotel/casino properties with 600 guest rooms, to be shuttered and torn down. While the deal isn’t expected to close until year’s end, the agreement calls for the Sands to be closed for good within 70 days, or approximately mid-November.

“While we regret the necessity of closing the Sands, we look forward to working with gaming regulators, state and local authorities to create more jobs, tax revenues and other benefits,” says Daniel R. Lee, Pinnacle’s chairman/CEO. “In connection with our longstanding interest in Atlantic City, we submitted our initial license application in New Jersey several months ago. The regulatory investigation is ongoing.”

“After spending many months reviewing various projects for this property, it became patently clear that a shutdown of the Sands was necessary and inevitable to make room for a great new casino,” Icahn says, in a prepared statement. “We also concluded that this was the most propitious time to undertake this shutdown given the robust employment environment in Atlantic City.”

According to details released by the buyer and seller, the deal is not subject to financing. The agreement also contains non-solicitation, fiduciary and termination fee provisions. ACE Hi can’t solicit other acquisition proposals, but for 45 days has the right to negotiate with anyone submitting an unsolicited proposal. If ACE Hi reneges on the sale agreement in favor of another bidder, the termination fee is $10 million.

And while Pinnacle develops properties with or without casinos, casinos are apparently part of the long-term game plan for the company. “This major new resort will be a key component in our plan to build a national network of gaming properties,” Lee says. Interestingly, one of those properties is a gaming/entertainment project proposed for 33 acres on the Delaware River waterfront just an hour’s drive to the west in Philadelphia.

Copyright © 2006 ALM Properties, Inc.

STT757
September 6th, 2006, 08:36 PM
Atlantic City needs a Hard Rock Hotel/Casino, either a new build or taking an older property like Trump Plaza and totaly gutting the structure and rebuilding it as a huge up scale casino hotel catering to young affluent Northeast customers.

STT757
September 14th, 2006, 11:01 PM
There's a couple of rail proposals here, first to build a station where the NJ Transit Philadelphia-Atlantic City Line meets the River Line Light Rail. It would allow travelers to transfer from the Light Rail River Line to NJ Transit's Atlantic City line and Vice versa, the two lines cross near the Delaware river.

The next proposal is to build a station on the NJ Transit Atlantic City rail line at Atlantic City International Airport. The third proposal is to build a light rail from the Atlantic City Casinos-Atlantic City International Airport.


NJ Transit may add rail stop on way to Trenton

September 14, 2006
ATLANTIC CITY — NJ Transit wants to link its growing Atlantic City rail line with one of its underperforming routes to give customers easier access to Trenton and other destinations in the northern end of the state.
The proposal would create a new station where the Atlantic City Line crosses the River Line light rail system near Pennsauken in Camden County.

That would mean, for instance, that Atlantic City Line riders could board the River Line without having to first take a PATCO train from Lindenwold to Camden.

NJ Transit Senior Director of Statewide Planning Jerry Lutin told more than 100 people attending “Improving the Way,” a forum designed to outline Atlantic County's transportation needs, that the agency is currently studying whether the proposal is feasible.

Meanwhile, officials with the South Jersey Transportation Authority, or SJTA, said they want another stop on the Atlantic City Line, this one at Atlantic City International Airport. SJTA operates the airport.

SJTA Chief Engineer Sam Donelson said SJTA believes the stop could be a success, particular if it's built as a sort of park-and-ride lot that could draw users from fast-growing Egg Harbor Township.
SJTA spokeswoman Sharon Gordon said the stop also could help attract more air carriers who look for different modes of transportation to take customers from an airport to their eventual destination. That destination for Atlantic City International customers would primarily be Atlantic City, she said.

Wednesday's transportation forum at Atlantic City Convention Center featured officials from SJTA, NJ Transit, the state Department of Transportation, New Jersey Turnpike Authority and Atlantic County discussing the transportation needs of the county.

County officials say finding ways to improve the transportation system is critical, as a growing population and tourism base is straining existing roadways. They note how the county added 18,000 new residents since the 2000 Census, and more than 33 million tourists visit the region every year.

One thing that was clear from the forum is that the traffic conditions could get worse, in part because of expected casino projects in Atlantic City.

John Payne, president of Atlantic City operations for Harrah's Entertainment, who was among those attending the forum — primarily involved with government, business, transportation and planning agencies — said the city could need more than 20,000 new employees if all proposed casino projects are built. The casino projects could increase the number of gaming hall visitors by 60 percent in three to four years, he said.

“There is gridlock today,” he said. “What's going to happen when we move forward. The decisions you make today are incredibly important.”

Payne said one possible solution to easing transportation problems could be a light rail line running between the city and Atlantic City International.

Panel members addressed various projects, ranging from adding additional lanes to the Garden State Parkway and Atlantic City Expressway, finding better ways to improve traffic flow and fixing overloaded intersections, streets and bridges.

NJ Transit officials say the Atlantic City Line is the fastest growing of their rail lines. It carried a record 1.1 million riders in fiscal year 2005.

The River Line opened millions of dollars over budget and a year-and-a-half behind schedule, and the state attorney general's office even investigated why it was built. The line at one point was losing $20 million per year.

However, ridership has been growing annually.

Lutin said NJ Transit has considered building the link between the River Line and Atlantic City Line for some time.

He said the connection would make it easier for state employees living in places like western Atlantic County to get to Trenton. It also would provide an easier way for people riding the Atlantic City Line to eventually link up with the Northeast Corridor Line, which extends to Newark and New York City, he said.

Earlier this year, NJ Transit approved a three-year trial of an Atlantic City-New York City train funded by the Casino Reinvestment Development Authority and three casinos.

Lutin said the train should be operating in December 2007.

The River Line light rail system runs 34 miles between Camden and Trenton. It has 20 stops along the Delaware River's Route 130 corridor. The system serves as link with the larger transportation networks of NJ Transit, Amtrak, PATCO and SEPTA.


The Atlantic City Line runs between the rail terminal in Atlantic City and 30th Street Station in Philadelphia. It has stops in Absecon, Egg Harbor City, Hammonton, Atco, Lindenwold and Cherry Hill.

Fabrizio
September 15th, 2006, 03:29 AM
STT:

"..these rundown abandonded neighborhoods and build gated retirement communities right inside Atlantic City."

A GATED community right inside AC?

Wha? That would be the surest way to ruin the city even further.

AC needs more developments like "The Walk" and townhouses respecting a street grid.

AC right now is a string of self contained casinos: once you enter there´s no reason to leave and interact with the rest of the city. I came in from Philadelphia to the Borgata by highway...went under tunnels...to underground parking... took an elevator up....had dinner...and left repeating the process. Never setting foot outside. That´s what most folks do. The casinos are designed that way.... the casinos are booming but still: it´s BAD urban design.

The B´walk has become a hopeless stretch bounded by blank walls and mirrored glass.

They can build all the "Hard Rock" (isn´t that a brand name that´s horribly passe´ BTW?) Hotels they want....but it won´t but the "City" back into AC.

JCMAN320
September 22nd, 2006, 07:38 PM
NJ group betting on another new casino in Atlantic City

9/22/2006, 4:49 p.m. ET
By GEOFF MULVIHILL
The Associated Press

(AP) — Even after a round of ambitious casino expansions in the last few years, there's still room for Atlantic City's gambling world to keep growing, industry insiders say.

That's good news for developers who are working on bringing two new casinos to town and replacing one of the 12 already there.

News of the latest deal, reported by The Philadelphia Inquirer in Friday's newspapers, has a former casino executive joining the former executive director of the New Jersey Casino Reinvestment Development Authority in an agreement to buy an 11-acre site with plans to put a new casino on it.

One of the partners, Wallace Barr, the former CEO of Caesar's, confirmed the deal to the newspaper. Neither he nor Curtis Bashaw, who had run the development authority, returned calls Friday from The Associated Press seeking details.

Analyst Adam Steinberg, who follows the casino industry for Morgan Joseph & Co., said he expects the gambling hall will be a high-end development and probably one of the smaller casinos in the resort city.

Atlantic City, once known to attract low-rolling gamblers on day trips, has been booming since 2003's opening of the Borgata, which features upscale restaurants and a spa. It was the first new casino in the resort in more than a dozen years.

Since then, several existing casinos have expanded, and followed the Borgata in adding high-end dining and shopping options.

"There definitely seems to be a realization now that you can get the younger, wealthier crowds that you couldn't get before," Steinberg said.

In a report he wrote for his company earlier this month on the prospects of more casinos in Atlantic City, Steinberg noted that each new casino in Las Vegas attracts additional visitors while helping the existing ones.

John Payne, the regional president for Harrah's Entertainment, which owns four Atlantic City casinos, agreed that there's plenty of room to grow.

There are 134,000 hotel rooms in Las Vegas," Payne said. "We only have 15,000. I believe there's a lot of great opportunity left."

The tract Barr and Bashaw plan to buy is now owned by the Atlantic City Hilton Casino Resort. It is near that hotel and on the southern edge of the Boardwalk's row of casinos; the price will be $85 million, according to Steinberg's report.

More details are known about plans for two other new casinos.

Morgan Stanley in May bought 20 acres for a casino next to the Showboat Casino Hotel.

Pinnacle Entertainment Inc., agreed earlier this month to buy the Sands Casino. The new owner plans to close the venerable gambling hall in November, tear it down and replace it with a new one.

___

On the Net:

The Philadelphia Inquirer: http://www.philly.com

STT757
September 24th, 2006, 11:09 PM
SJTA push may refuel A.C. airport hotel plans

EGG HARBOR TOWNSHIP — Atlantic City International Airport operators will make another attempt to get what they say is a needed hotel for the facility.

The South Jersey Transportation Authority, or SJTA, which operates the airport, will ask for proposals next month for some kind of hotel complex on a 13.5-acre site near the airport circle and bordered by Delilah and Tilton roads.

While the requests will be general, SJTA wants a proposal that includes a mix of hotel, meeting and retail space to meet the potential needs of the growing local aviation business, according to SJTA spokeswoman Laurie Brewer. The SJTA would enter into a lease
SJTA would enter a lease agreement with the developer picked for the project, she said.

SJTA officials consider a hotel key to attracting more carriers to Atlantic City International, she said, because carriers are more willing to use an airport with a nearby hotel.

SJTA officials said other reasons for wanting a hotel include an expected 60 percent jump in airport customers in the next two years, growing activities at the nearby Federal Aviation Administration’s William J. Hughes Technical Center, and plans for an aviation research park to be built near the airport circle.
Brewer said these projections translate into a growing number of travelers who want to stay in a hotel near the airport and an increased need for meeting and conference space.

“Everybody can see there is considerable growth heading our way,” she said.

Having a hotel near Atlantic City International makes sense if its operators want to be a larger player in the regional air-traffic market, said Paula B. Hochstetler, president of the Airport Consultants Council, an international association involved with airport development.

“It’s an amenity that can make all the difference when it comes to companies and organizations choosing to use a particular airport,” she said.

Hochstetler said an airport can also provide something that airport operators really need — money that’s not linked to aeronautics.

Traditional non-aeronautical revenue comes from things like parking fees and concessions, she said. Many airport operators are trying to bolster those revenues by adding stores and, in some cases, golf courses, she said. A few are also involved in oil-drilling operations.

SJTA officials believe Atlantic City International can increase the number of carriers and customers in the next few years.
They’re confident they can pick up spillover business from overcrowded major airports like Philadelphia International Airport and Newark Liberty International Airport.
SJTA also is investing millions of dollars to upgrade Atlantic City International.

Runways and taxiways have been improved. A new baggage handling and screening facility is being built that will free up space in the airport terminal. New escalators will make it easier for travelers to move through the terminal. Groundbreaking will occur soon on a planned $24.6 million parking garage.

SJTA also wouldn’t mind getting its own stop for NJ Transit’s Atlantic City Line, which could provide rail service between the airport and Atlantic City.

There were plans several years ago for a $15 million all-suite hotel to be built at the airport as part of a development project that included a parking garage. The hotel project never made it off the drawing board.

While there is as yet no timetable regarding the new airport development plans, Brewer said SJTA is anxious to get a hotel for the airport.
“We really want to be ahead of the curve in terms of the development of this site and providing amenities that are needed,” she said.

Courtyard Marriott
Hampton Inn

STT757
September 24th, 2006, 11:15 PM
New transit study will look at what's coming down the road

ATLANTIC CITY — Nearly 35 million visitors crammed the highways, rail routes and airport terminal last year in volumes that have city officials alternately smiling and grimacing.
While the record amount of tourism has been a catalyst for economic growth, there are fears that the transportation network may be overwhelmed by so much casino-bound traffic.

With possibly four new casinos expected to open in the next five to 10 years, two state agencies are undertaking a regional transportation study to make sure the planes, trains and automobiles don't become gridlocked.

Thomas D. Carver, executive director of the Casino Reinvestment Development Authority, said planners will have to “think outside the box” to integrate billions of dollars in new investment and thousands of new gaming employees into the city's narrow transportation infrastructure — a “cul-de-sac,” as he called it.

“If the casinos invest all of this money and we can't get people into this region, we're in serious trouble,” Carver said.

CRDA board members gave preliminary approval Tuesday for the transportation study, although the cost and the amount of time it will take to complete are not yet known. The casino authority will work with the state Department of Transportation on the project, but regional agencies such as the South Jersey Transportation Authority likely will be part of the effort.
Carver said the study will analyze all aspects of the region's transportation system, including highways, local streets, bus traffic, rail service and Atlantic City International Airport.

“The whole gamut of issues that we face in the future have to be looked at,” he said.

Key projects will include the proposed widening of the Garden State Parkway south of Toms River, rail routes, better traffic flow on the Pacific Avenue casino strip and more commercial airline service.

Currently, about 80 percent of the visitors drive into Atlantic City, placing a great emphasis on the resort's three main entry highways. To ease some of that strain, the study will consider light rail service and analyze ways to make the Atlantic City airport more accessible to travelers.

The CRDA is already helping to underwrite the cost of new express train service that will bring casino gamblers from New York beginning late next year. Borgata Hotel Casino & Spa, Harrah's and Caesars have formed a partnership to help the CRDA finance the $23.5 million rail route.

Atlantic City Mayor Bob Levy, a member of the CRDA's board of directors, said local transportation projects should include street widenings, improvements to Pacific Avenue and the creation of evacuation routes to help residents escape from flooding on the barrier island, particularly in the Chelsea Heights neighborhood.

Levy said the transportation study would complement the city's new master plan now under way. He characterized the region's older transportation studies as simply too outdated to handle the needs of a rapidly growing city, especially with so much new casino construction at stake.

“We have to do another study because much of Atlantic City is changing,” Levy said. “Nothing can happen until we address the transportation issues.”


They need to really push for additional airlines at ACY, they should try to "land" Jetblue. Expanding the Garden State Parkway lanes is a no brainer, building a Atlantic City Light rail to connect the Marina, Convention Center, Board Walk and Airport is the next step. NJ has done well with Light Rail in Hudson County, Newark and along the Delaware River, Atlantic City is the next step. Building a rail station on NJ Transit's Philadelphia-Atlantic City rail line will help attract customers to the airport as a reliever to congested PHL.

STT757
September 26th, 2006, 09:46 AM
Steve Wynn is coming back to Atlantic City.


It's no mirage: Vegas' Wynn again drawn to Atlantic City
Tuesday, September 26, 2006

Steve Wynn, the man who was anointed king of the casino industry after he remade Las Vegas in the 1990s, wants to roll the dice on Atlantic City -- again.

Wynn had a private audience Friday with Gov. Jon Corzine and state Sen. William Gormley at the Tropicana Casino and Resort in Atlantic City, and was later spotted walking along Atlantic Avenue with the powerful Republican senator from Atlantic County. The casino mogul was in town to advance his latest plan for a casino.

Corzine welcomed the idea of Wynn's return to New Jersey, three government officials said, but he did not go into too much detail about the plans. Instead, Corzine told Wynn that Gary Rose, the governor's economic development czar, would lead the discussions.

A call to Wynn's office was not returned. Gormley, the casino industry's top political ally, said Wynn is "a very nice guy. It was very nice to see him."

"Obviously, people would like to see people like Steve Wynn in New Jersey," Gormley said. "I would say it was a very positive meeting about New Jersey."

Wynn's return would further help turn Atlantic City into a tourist destination, attracting more of a younger crowd than quarter-toting seniors. While the opening of Borgata three years ago has brought signature restaurants, retail outlets and shows geared to a younger crowd, a Wynn casino would catapult the seaside resort into a higher level, analysts said.

"The Borgata has made it so that everyone realizes there is high-end demand there, that it exceeds what Borgata can provide," said CIBC World Markets analyst Mike Liebman. "If he would build a Wynn Atlantic City, it would be phenomenal -- the type of (venue) Atlantic City needs."

The casinos Wynn builds lure celebrities as well as tourists who want to see and be seen with high rollers. The Mirage, Treasure Island, Bellagio and Wynn Las Vegas set the standard all of Vegas now follows, with celebrity chefs, upscale shops, trendy nightclubs and big-name entertainment.

He first remade Las Vegas in the 1990s with an exploding volcano at Mirage and choreographed waterfalls at Bellagio, then came back in the 21st century with Wynn Las Vegas, a $2 billion homage to understated elegance. His most recent venture is a casino in Macau, the top gambling resort in Asia.

"I don't think Steve Wynn is interested in building a run-of-the-mill Atlantic City casino resort," said Joe Weinert, vice president of Spectrum Gaming Group. "He wants to move the market in a meaningful way and be the marquee property, as he did in Las Vegas and as he is doing in Macau."

Wynn isn't the only developer who wants in on A.C. Earlier this month, Pinnacle Entertainment announced it would buy the Sands, tear it down and build a $1.5 billion casino on the site. An arm of Morgan Stanley has agreed to buy 20 acres next to the Showboat and is planning to partner with a casino operator to build a gambling hall there. And former Caesars Entertainment Chief Executive Wally Barr and the former head of the Casino Reinvestment Development Authority, Curtis Bashaw, are looking to build a casino next to the Hilton.

Meanwhile, MGM Mirage still owns dozens of acres in the Marina District next to Borgata. The company has said it plans a major development there once it's finished its $7 billion CityCenter development project in Las Vegas.

Atlantic City now has 12 casinos.

Wynn's private session with Corzine was not listed on the governor's schedule. But the governor was already in Atlantic City for a speech to the Utility & Transportation Contractors Association's annual convention, also held at the Trop.

Wynn made his interest in Atlantic City known to officials earlier this summer, and his agents have in recent months been scoping out Bader Field, a historic airport that sits on 130 acres and is scheduled to shut down Sept. 30. The airport, once one of the busiest and one of the first places ever used by pilots to take off and land, had in recent years been used as a training ground.

It is also one of the few places large enough to draw the interest of a developer like Wynn, whose plans seem to get grander with each resort.

But officials familiar with Wynn's conversation with Corzine said the two did not talk about the airport, mainly because the governor has already told key administration officials and lawmakers that he does not want to rush into any redevelopment at Bader.

Atlantic City spokesman Nick Morici said any talk of Bader Field development plans is premature.

The son of a bingo parlor operator, Wynn first came to Atlantic City in 1980 with the opening of the Golden Nugget, a slick, trendsetting casino that lured all of the city's high rollers and was the place to be seen. It quickly became one of the city's most profitable casinos.

Wynn also became a bit of a celebrity there, appearing in commercials with Frank Sinatra. He sold the Nugget in 1987 to Bally Manufacturing, vowing never to return to Atlantic City.

Less than a decade later, he changed his mind, announcing grand plans to build three casinos in Atlantic City's Marina District. The plan sparked a fury after the state agreed to kick in $220 million towards a $330 million tunnel connecting the area to the Atlantic City Expressway, making it easier for gamblers to get to Wynn's casinos.

But Wynn's company was bought by MGM Grand -- now MGM Mirage. The site is now home to Borgata, which MGM owns in partnership with Boyd Gaming.


http://www.nj.com/news/ledger/index.ssf?/base/news-9/1159249454224510.xml&coll=1&thispage=2

MikeW
September 26th, 2006, 03:31 PM
New York should just legalize casino gambling and put AC to sleep.

JCMAN320
September 26th, 2006, 03:45 PM
Not happening Mike. Mike is a Jersey hater!! :)

Kris
October 17th, 2006, 05:29 AM
October 17, 2006
As Atlantic City Builds Up, the Whirl of Steel Pier Stops
By ROBERT STRAUSS

http://graphics10.nytimes.com/images/2006/10/17/nyregion/600_pier.jpg
Steel Pier in Atlantic City was once center stage for Frank Sinatra and other acts. Now the site will be redeveloped by Trump Entertainment.

ATLANTIC CITY — Like an aging beauty desperate to keep up with the younger competition, this half-faded resort has signed up for another face-lift.

It is hardly a new phenomenon here, where a second generation of casinos has given the city another life. Like the Miss America Pageant, Steel Pier — which provided a stage for the likes of a diving horse and Ricky Nelson, Charlie Chaplin and Frank Sinatra — is the latest piece of Atlantic City’s past to be shed.

The amusement park and arcade, the pier’s final incarnation over the last decade, finally closed its doors on Sunday. Trump Entertainment Resorts Inc., which has owned the Boardwalk property since 1993, says it plans to develop the 1,000-foot-long pier into something completely new, though whether that is a condo or casino space, shops or a hotel, is not yet known.

Not everyone here clings to the city’s storied past; rather, others tuck away the memories, only to bring them out like an old photo album every now and then.

“As long as I can get in a rolling chair, buy a sandwich at the White House, and smell the salt air,” said Vicki Gold Levi, who with a former Esquire editor, Lee Eisenberg, wrote, “Atlantic City: 125 Years of Ocean Madness.” “I will still love Atlantic City. We may have lost Miss America and Steel Pier, but, heck we got Mr. Peanut back and lots of stores and restaurants, too.”

In the past three years, several of the city’s famous fixtures — sometimes shoved aside by the increasingly acquisitive hotel and casino operators — have decided to try their luck elsewhere. Miss America, which had been a mainstay since 1921, left town last year for Las Vegas and cities unknown. Bader Field, the first place in the world known as an “air-port,” closed last month after 86 years. Even in the iconography of board games, the city has slipped: Parker Brothers decided to market a multicity version of Monopoly, whose original model has only Atlantic City streets as well as a handful of local railroads and utilities.

Atlantic City, which for years sold itself as the “Queen of Resorts,” declined precipitously in the 1960’s, and run-down housing and vacant storefronts still pepper the city.

But today, there is a newfound enthusiasm for yet another revival; at least three casinos have towers reaching more than 400 feet under construction or in the planning stage. Four new retail complexes with designer everything are either open for business or will be by next year. And Pinnacle Entertainment Inc., a Nevada-based casino company, bought the Sands Casino site last month for $250 million and plans to knock it down and start over with a $1.2 billion complex.

“Atlantic City, if you study the history, always had risings like a Phoenix,” said Ms. Gold Levi, who lives in Manhattan now but grew up in the resort when her father was the city’s official photographer from 1939 to 1964. “The original wooden structures had fires. The Army Air Force took over in World War II. Gambling came in the 1970’s. This will be a new era.”

In truth, Miss America had become a clichéd property, and Bader Field was replaced by the modern Atlantic City International Airport, about seven miles west of the city. Steel Pier had been renovated and well cared for by the amusement park operators, but it was an attraction mostly for children, not exactly the market Atlantic City is after these days.

And it was a far cry from its heyday, when as Ed Hurst, who broadcast a dance show from the pier for 20 years, put it, “There were three featured movies in three different theaters, a minstrel show in the Casino Theater, headliners in the Music Hall Theater.”

Today it is higher-gloss casinos, bigger-name entertainment, upscale shopping and restaurants that are the newest version of this randy old city. When the hip-hop music producer Jay-Z wanted a second outlet for his 40/40 Club, he chose a spot not far from the old 500 Club, where Sinatra hung out and Dean Martin was first paired with Jerry Lewis.

Where Don Rickles and Johnny Mathis were the big draws at the casinos only a decade ago, acts ranging from the Rolling Stones and Madonna to the Killers and John Legend have fall dates here. Not too many years ago, Boardwalk emporiums hawking beach towels and cheap jewelry were the standard shopping areas near the windowless casinos. Today, the Piers at Caesars and the Walk, a high-end outlet mall, are destinations that vie with the craps tables.

“You wouldn’t have gone to Michigan and Arctic without an armed guard not so long ago,” said Mr. Hurst, a leading Philadelphia disc jockey, who from 1958 to 1978 broadcast a popular “American Bandstand”-like television show on summer Saturday afternoons from Steel Pier. “Now it’s chic. It’s hard to complain about losing the old Atlantic City when you see that.”

Even the investment firm Morgan Stanley has joined the gold rush, buying a 20-acre parcel at the north end of the Boardwalk. And a consortium led by a former casino executive, Wallace Barr, is buying a site at the south end of the city. Stephen Wynn, who once owned the Golden Nugget Casino here, is said to be looking into the Bader Field property even though it is not currently zoned for casino development. And the Borgata, Harrah’s and the Trump Taj Mahal will all soon have new hotel-casino towers.

So it is not surprising that Steel Pier — which for almost 50 years featured a young woman astride a horse plunging 40 feet into a 12-foot-deep tank of water — could not keep up with the Las Vegas look and feel that Atlantic City aspires to.

Even Mr. Hurst, who for a generation of rock ’n’rollers was the face of Steel Pier, had to concede the other day: “Only a few years after we started the show, they booked fewer and fewer top acts. Air travel was getting cheaper. People slowly started not coming to Atlantic City.”

http://graphics10.nytimes.com/images/2006/10/17/nyregion/1017-met-PIERmapWEB.gif

Copyright 2006 The New York Times Company

American Gaming Guru
October 19th, 2006, 02:00 PM
Just a few quick notes reading some of the more recent posts:

There are said to be at least 3 new resorts (by Morgan Stanley/Kevin DeSanctis, Pinnacle (Sands site) and Barr/Bashaw) on the way. But announcing a new resort development in AC that never makes it to grand opening is unfortunately an old tradition in AC.

With that said; this market is completely underserved and would explode if new resorts were built. The city is literally busting at the seams as it is. It is now fashionable to see and be seen in AC. Does it still have bad areas..a resounding YES, but progress can easily be seen throughout the city and AC is on its way to becoming the Queen of Resorts it once was.

Other notes:

Yes, AC desperately needs more air service. Jet Blue would be a fantastic addition.

Also, I understand the South Jersey Transportation Authority (SJTA) met recently to address infrastructure/transportation issues. A light rail/monorail that linked everything up would be ideal as suggested.

If you have not been to a Trump Hotel recently, I would suggest taking another look. More so at Trump Plaza. The place looks great and the more lucrative customer base seems to be back again. The re-design appears to be working out well.

More on Hard Rock....A few years back before Trump Castle became Trump Marina, Trump negotiated with The Rank Group (owner of Hard Rock) to convert the Castle to a Hard Rock Hotel/Casino (I believe the official name was going to be "Hard Rock Hotel Casino at Trump Marina"). For reasons that I do not know, the transaction never happened. Trump went ahead and re-branded the Castle as “Trump Marina” and gave it a younger-crowd feel. This was very successful and marked a great turn-around for the property until Borgata arrived. Rightfully so, this incredible resort stole a great portion of the Marina customer base (and Taj’s) and it’s President (who is now president of The Borgata)!

There are rumors that Rank is very much interested in bringing a Hard Rock branded Casino to AC. It would be a MAJOR player in my mind. We shall see……

American Gaming Guru
October 19th, 2006, 04:00 PM
What remained in no way resembled the Steel Pier.

Donald tried to revive it a few years ago by first trying to strike a deal with Six Flags to operate it. When that did not pan-out, he tried brining back the rides and old attractions (I believe a wish of Mark G. Etess, the 1st president of the Taj, who tragically died in the infamous helicopter crash shortly before the Taj opened). Unfortunately animal protectionists went nuts when he brought back “The Diving Horse”. So the diving horse attraction was scrapped and what remained was cheap carnival amusements that can be transported and found at any neighborhood fundraiser. It actually made the boardwalk side of the Taj look trashy in my opinion.

Building another classy destination (hotels rooms, casino, shops, restaurants etc) would be more of a tribute to the original Steel Pier.

G_Money
October 19th, 2006, 04:11 PM
I was in AC this past weekend, stayed at the Borgata, and let me tell you, The Trump Marina from the outside, looks like the biggest POS next to the Borgata.

I'm 25 yr old male, and I'll admit my fav AC hotel is the TAJ (Borgata is too boojie and pretentious) but me and my friends were saying, if they just built newer hotels like the Borgata, and a few more airlines in here, thered be much more to do here as people would stay longer than a night.

It only makes sense, people WANT TO PAY TOP MONEY FOR THE TOP HOTELS. Why else would anyone pay 565 a night to stay at the bogata when harrahs and marina are right next door for 200???

STT757
October 19th, 2006, 08:10 PM
There are said to be at least 3 new resorts (by Morgan Stanley/Kevin DeSanctis, Pinnacle (Sands site) and Barr/Bashaw) on the way

Does that include Steve Wynn, Wynn is back in Atlantic City eyeing the recently closed Bader Field Property.

They need to do what ever is necessary to "land" Jetblue, with Southwest dominating PHL they are not going to come to Atlantic City, nor is Jetblue going to go to Philadelphia to compete head to head with Southwest.

These routes are what the SJTA and the casinos should be trying to attract to Atlantic City International Airport.

Jetblue:
Boston, Ft. Lauderdale, Ft.Myers, Las Vegas, Orlando, Tampa, West Palm Beach.

Airtran:
Atlanta, Chicago Midway

Continental:
Cleveland, Newark

DL:
JFK

US Airways:
Charlotte, Pittsburgh

United:
Washington Dulles, Chicago Ohare

American:
Miami.

STT757
October 19th, 2006, 08:18 PM
My favorite Atlantic City Casino is Tropicana, the Quarter is so much fun. My fiancee and I love P.F. Changs and Carmines.

Trump hopefully will be investing some serious money into his properties to catch up to Tropicana and Borgata, I would look to what Tropicana has done with the Quarter, and what Ceasars has done with the Pier.

That Trump almost partnered with Hard Rock on the Marina property is something I did not know, the Marina is the perfect property for such an Investment. I can only hope they try to bring Hard Rock Hotel to Atlantic City again.

Atlantic City is on the way up, this time is for real IMO.

Other improvements that need to be made.

Light Rail to connect the Casinos, Convention Center, NJ Transit Rail Station and the Atlantic City International Airport.

Widening of the Garden State Parkway, and the Atlantic City Expressway.

Direct entrances to Atlantic City International Airport from the Garden State Parkway and Atlantic City Expressway.

Dedicated year round daily rail service between New York City/Northern New Jersey and Atlantic City, something no longer than 2.5 hours.

American Gaming Guru
October 20th, 2006, 11:37 AM
You got it right G Money. Trump Marina was my favorite property before Borgata opened. Now I look out of the window, of my room at Borgata, and can’t help but think that it does look like a POS! At one point during Trump’s bankruptcy restructuring, the T in Trump Maria was out! The Donald of the 1980’s would never stand for that. But we can’t blame him for an ugly looking building. Hilton actually built it, did not get licensed by the NJ CCC and then Trump bought it from them and opened it as Trump’s Castle. In the very beginning, they were even utilizing Hilton casino chips.

It’s too bad, because Trump Marina was a really fun place (virtually pioneering the market to a younger “hip” crowd) and is still quite comfortable. Trump actually did a nice rehab on the rooms there recently. Many of my friends still stay there since rates are more reasonable and then party at Borgata/Trop/Taj.

Who knows what the future holds for that property. It is in a fantastic location. One impediment is that MGM owns a sizable chunk of land next to it bordering the inlet/Brigantine bridge. Ideally Trump should look to purchase that land from MGM, tear down the Marina and build all over again (as also suggested by various gaming analysts). Two problems though. (1) Would MGM be willing to sell? (2) Does Trump Entertainment Resorts have the capital to undertake such a project? My own thoughts are mixed, but off the bat, I would say no to both of them.

One final note about the Marina. It was originally envisioned to have another hotel tower (possibly 1,000 more rooms or so??). In the early 1990’s Trump had proposed building it and even had design work on exterior and interior going on. It would have been a great addition to that property. Its base (casino, restaurants etc) could absorb that capacity and it would have provided AC with more desperately needed hotel rooms.

I can keep going on and on……

Some other notes:

The 3 possible casino additions that I mentioned DO NOT include a property by Wynn. I only wanted to include ones that are more definitive. Everyone knows Wynn wants to be back in AC. Speculation is that he is interested in developing Badar Field as was mentioned. This is an A+ site for a Wynn resort and could be one of the greatest casino development sites ever available. There are a few obstacles involving that site that would need to be ironed out still before gaming is considered (if you want to know them, I would be happy to discuss more).

In regards to a Toll Brother’s development…Bruce Toll recently purchased boardwalk property (former Playboy/Atlantis/Trump Regency/Trump World’s Fair site) to build a massive residential project (rumored). Further details at this time are not known, but rumors are circulating that he will announce something soon. My own feelings are that it could be one of the greatest casino sites in AC. How could this be accomplished with a non-casino land use restriction currently on the property (Trump put it on the property before it was sold to limit competition) may you ask? Well Trump himself envisioned purchasing the West Hall of Boardwalk Hall which I do not believe is protected by national landmark status (does anyone know?) and combining its footprint with that of Trump World’s Fair and constructing a massive new resort on that site. Similar to Trump Plaza, it would be ideally located at the foot of the AC expressway, adjacent to The Walk, on the beach & boardwalk and connected to Boardwalk Hall. It does not get much better than that. But as his company was taking a dive he cut a deal with shareholders to sell the Trump World’s Fair site and deliver proceeds from the sale to them as a condition to the company’s bankruptcy reorganization. So Toll bought the property which as I mentioned has a land use restriction that does not permit a casino. BUT WHAT ABOUT WEST HALL??? Toll has said that he would love to utilize West Hall in his development. Why not build a huge new casino/resort with the gaming portion limited to the footprint of the West Hall? My instincts tell me that this could be done, but my knowledge of the West Hall and the New Jersey Sports and Exhibition Authority’s intentions (the West Hall’s owner) are limited. Anyone have this knowledge?

On Jet Blue. My only feeling is that AC International’s only real player (Spirit Airlines) flies to most of Jet Blue’s Florida destinations already. Jet Blue should come in and offer routs to the west (AC to Vegas???). I must say that Spirit seems very committed to AC International. They are a good airline that actually started out of AC International as a charter. Hopefully they can add more flights as they grow.

STT757
October 24th, 2006, 04:30 PM
Trump, Wynn deal may be in the cards
Talks involve sale of A.C. casino
Tuesday, October 24, 2006

It seems Steve Wynn wasn't interested in just the Mets when he visited Donald Trump last week.

The Las Vegas casino king and the Atlantic City gambling mogul, prominently seen together behind home plate during the Mets' Game 7 loss to the St. Louis Cardinals on Thursday night, were talking about a deal that would dramatically alter Atlantic City.

Two people with knowledge of the negotiations said Wynn wants to build a casino on the boardwalk, and his preferred site includes 12 acres where the Trump Plaza sits. The people spoke on the condition they not be identified because the talks are in the preliminary stage.

Although Wynn usually prefers dozens of acres of land for his huge gambling creations, he is drawn to the Plaza because of its prime location at the foot of the Atlantic City Expressway, the sources said. If a deal were to go through -- and the sources cautioned the negotiations could ultimately fall apart -- Wynn would tear down Trump's casino and build his own.

But Trump, whose name is on three Atlantic City casinos, wouldn't be scaling back on the seaside resort altogether. He is interested in building a residential tower in front of the Trump Taj Mahal. The deal also might include a swap for land that Wynn owns in Las Vegas, the sources said.

Gov. Jon Corzine, who was approached by Wynn in September, declined to comment yesterday. Wynn did not return calls seeking comment, and Trump spokeswoman Rona Graff said Trump insists that reports of a deal over the Plaza are "not true."

Sen. William Gormley, the powerful Republican who holds sway with the casino industry, said of the Trump-Wynn appearance at the Mets game: "They're two highly successful individuals, both of whom have meant a lot to Atlantic City.

"Given that we have a governor who understands Atlantic City and given two business people of their caliber, it would be great to see something happen," said Gormley, who has taken a lead role in ushering Wynn back to New Jersey after a decade-long absence. "It would be great for Atlantic City."

An agreement to sell any of the Trump casinos would have to be approved by Trump Entertainment Resorts' board of directors. Trump is chairman of the board and the company's largest single shareholder.

A deal between the two biggest names in the gambling business would solve problems for both casino bosses, industry observers said. Wynn, who once vowed never to return to A.C. when he sold the Golden Nugget in 1987, would gain a foothold in the country's second-largest gambling market and give his customers who live on or visit the East Coast a place to gamble.

Trump, who is under pressure from investors to diversify his casino holdings beyond Atlantic City, would get an influx of cash to invest elsewhere.

Trump Resorts has yet to report a profit since the company emerged from Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection in May 2005. Because all of its casinos are in Atlantic City, it was the hardest hit by the three-day government-imposed casino shutdown over the summer.

Trump Resorts is currently vying for a casino in Philadelphia, but it wants to expand beyond the Northeast. Last month, Trump Resorts announced it had hired Eric Hausler, formerly a casino analyst with Bear Stearns, as its senior vice president of development. His job: identifying "opportunities to expand the Trump brand," according to a company press release.

The problem is cash. The company needs to find a way to expand without taking on more debt. It emerged from Chapter 11 with $1.25 billion in debt and a $500 million line of credit.

"The thing with Atlantic City is that it's a pretty solid market, but it's a seasonal market," said Morgan Joseph analyst Adam Steinberg. "I'd like to see them diversify away from Atlantic City and doing it so they don't take on more leverage."

A big obstacle in the way of a sale of any of the casinos is that Trump has veto power over the transaction. If he waives his veto right, the company would give him up to $100 million in tax indemnification for personal tax liabilities he would incur from the sale.

Wynn, who has built some of the most recognizable casinos, from Bellagio to Wynn Las Vegas, first came to Atlantic City in 1980 when he opened the Golden Nugget, a slick trendsetting casino that lured high rollers and became home to Frank Sinatra. It quickly became one of the city's most profitable casinos. But Wynn left seven years later because of the state's harsh regulatory climate, vowing never to return to Atlantic City.

Wynn was close to returning to Atlantic City in the 1990s with plans for three casinos in the Marina District. His company, then called Mirage Resorts, signed a controversial deal with the state of New Jersey, which agreed to kick in $220 million toward a $330 million tunnel to the Marina District. Mirage subsequently was bought by rival MGM Grand, and only one casino, Borgata, has opened there.

More recently, Wynn has sent Richard "Skip" Bronson, a former Mirage director and Wynn's point man in A.C. in the 1990s, to scope out places in Atlantic City. Both men have been at Gormley's home to discuss potential sites. And last month Wynn traveled to A.C. for a private audience with Corzine to discuss prospective sites.

Tearing down the older casinos to build bigger more modern casinos hopefully is going to totaly reshape Atlantic City,for the better.

Fabrizio
October 24th, 2006, 05:08 PM
The Tropicana?

OMG. I took a walk through that place about a year and a half ago. I couldn´t believe they´d still make places like that. While the Borgata hits some sophisticated interior-design notes, the Tropicana has a laughable Cuba theme going, complete with a fake piazza. It´s 1974 gross. A masses-with-fat asses, leisure-suited kinda place. The Borgata understands that catering to that crowd is not were the future is.

Worse still is the fact that the Trop turns it´s back to the boardwalk and beach and has created fortress-like walls along the street. It´s a mess.

G_Money
October 24th, 2006, 06:25 PM
Build more borgata type casinos, and people will come. I truly think its that simple. I dont believe the seasonal excuses becuase last i heard, vegas was cold in the winter too. The casinos in AC blow. Theyre old, theres nothing but old people around (no offense to the older crowd). If they want to make money they have to cater to the free spenders in there 20's 30's.

They should tear them all down. And start over. Vegas did it.

G_Money
October 24th, 2006, 06:37 PM
Build more borgata type casinos, and people will come. I truly think its that simple. I dont believe the seasonal excuses becuase last i heard, vegas was cold in the winter too. The casinos in AC blow. Theyre old, theres nothing but old people around (no offense to the older crowd). If they want to make money they have to cater to the free spenders in there 20's 30's.

They should tear them all down. And start over. Vegas did it.

Fabrizio
October 24th, 2006, 07:14 PM
The funniest thing about the Cuban piazza at the Trop is that there´s a 1950s Buick sitting in it. Slightly junky...the way Cuba is filled with old American cars. I´m surprised they didn´t have shoe-less kids begging for money. All of this is surrounded by the ringing slot machines nearby.

I felt like I was in an episode of the Simpsons.

millertime83
October 25th, 2006, 01:05 PM
Trump, Wynn talk casino deal

ATLANTIC CITY, N.J., Oct. 24 (UPI) -- U.S. casino mogul Steve Wynn and developer Donald Trump are discussing a deal that reportedly involves property in Atlantic City, N.J.

Wynn wants to build a casino on the city's boardwalk, the Newark (N.J.) Star-Ledger reported Tuesday, and his preferred site includes 12 acres where the current Trump Plaza sits.

For his part, Trump is interested in building a residential tower in front of the Trump Taj Mahal. Also, investors in Trump's Atlantic City properties have urged him to diversify his casino holdings beyond the New Jersey site, a move that might be easier if he sells acreage to Wynn.

Any deal between the two businessmen might also include a swap for land that Wynn owns in Las Vegas, the newspaper reported, citing anonymous sources.

Fabrizio
October 25th, 2006, 06:19 PM
What Atlantic City really needs is some great architecture. A hotel/casino designed by a star architect.

EVERYTHING built there since casino gambling came in has been ugly stuff, stuck in a 1970´s Las Vegas time-warp. Do a hotel designed by Jean Nouvel, get in Phillipe Stark. No one in the year 2006 wants to see fiberglass palm trees.

What I really liked about the interior of the Borgata is that the design doesn´t talk down to the customer. No marketing team telling one another what the hicks want.

American Gaming Guru
October 25th, 2006, 06:56 PM
My own opinion is that the Trump/Wynn Trump Plaza deal is wild speculation and most likely untrue. Although it is a great site and both could benefit by such a proposal. We shall see.....

investordude
November 29th, 2006, 03:03 AM
http://www.nytimes.com/2006/11/29/nyregion/29smoke.html?adxnnl=1&pagewanted=1&adxnnlx=1164787221-K3IeThhwVVhCou1s/+ahqw

My take on this is a very large population of affluent people dislikes the smoking in casinos. I think this will benefit Atlantic City if they market that they have the no-smoking casinos.

submachine
December 22nd, 2006, 12:28 AM
Dedicated year round daily rail service between New York City/Northern New Jersey and Atlantic City, something no longer than 2.5 hours.

Is this going to happen? I'd rather take a train to AC than a bus to Mohegan Sun or Foxwoods.

jersey7
December 22nd, 2006, 05:29 PM
http://www.nytimes.com/2006/11/29/nyregion/29smoke.html?adxnnl=1&pagewanted=1&adxnnlx=1164787221-K3IeThhwVVhCou1s/+ahqw

My take on this is a very large population of affluent people dislikes the smoking in casinos. I think this will benefit Atlantic City if they market that they have the no-smoking casinos.

I think it will have more of a negative consequence than positive if it were to be that casinos would be fully non-smoking facilities. Rather, they should be required to make non-smoking areas to accommodate those who despise it and a smoking area for others.

JCMAN320
December 22nd, 2006, 05:50 PM
I believe the line from NY Penn, Secaucus Junction, Newark Penn, and EWR to AC should be up and running by summer of 07. I'll double check though.

JCMAN320
December 23rd, 2006, 10:54 PM
Boardwalk Hall's the bait to reel in Wynn
Legislator proposes remaking landmark to sweeten deal for new casino at Trump Plaza

Saturday, December 23, 2006
BY JUDY DeHAVEN AND JOSH MARGOLIN
Star-Ledger Staff

In the latest proposal to lure casino magnate Steve Wynn back to New Jersey, Boardwalk Hall would be transformed into a multi-level retail mall akin to Union Station in Washington, D.C., preserving the shell of the historic landmark and its pipe organ while allowing the gambling mogul to incorporate it into his larger vision for a casino in Atlantic City.

The plan, which is being brokered by Sen. William Gormley, the powerful Atlantic County Republican who holds sway in the casino industry, would include shops and restaurants on different tiers inside Boardwalk Hall, which currently houses a concert and hockey arena. It would be part of a larger casino complex on the site of Trump Plaza, which Wynn would acquire from Donald Trump's casino company. In return, Wynn would build a new arena for Atlantic City.

The proposal was outlined by five people familiar with the plan who did not want their names used because the deal is still in the works. Gormley presented it to Gov. Jon Corzine's staffers on Thursday, and he's scheduled to meet with Wynn's people in the coming days, the sources said.

Reached yesterday morning, Gormley declined to comment on the specifics of the proposal, but said: "Mr. Wynn has a great interest in Atlantic City. We're proud of the heritage of Boardwalk Hall.

"Wouldn't it be great to have both?" Gormley asked.

Wynn did not respond to a request for comment. Donald Trump, chairman of Trump Entertainment Resorts, which owns Trump Plaza, declined comment through spokeswoman Rona Graff.

Gormley, who has made the deal a priority, has been working behind the scenes for weeks to hammer out an agreement between Trump and Wynn, two titans of the industry who were once bitter enemies but who have recently become friends.

Wynn has made it known he wants back in A.C., and met with Corzine twice during the fall.

In an interview last month, Corzine said enticing Wynn back to New Jersey would be "one of the missing ingredients" to help Atlantic City reach "the absolute pinnacle in the industry." Wynn is credited with remaking Las Vegas into a world destination, and is seen by many in the industry as having the Midas touch.

But Boardwalk Hall emerged as a major stumbling block for his plans. When it opened in 1929, it was a national marvel, the largest building of its kind in the world and home to the Miss America pageant for more than 50 years. It is on the National Register of Historic Sites, and preservationists have been fighting to restore the world's largest pipe organ, which is housed inside.

Owned by the New Jersey Sports and Exposition Authority, Boardwalk Hall underwent a $90 million renovation in recent years and is now the setting for hockey games, concerts and boxing events, many sponsored by the casinos.

Wynn originally proposed tearing down Boardwalk Hall, but that would be politically risky for Corzine, who does not want to appear to be giving A.C. away to a casino boss, especially Wynn.

Wynn, who built the Golden Nugget, now the Atlantic City Hilton, left the state in 1987 vowing never to return. When he re-emerged in the mid-1990s, he convinced the state to build a $330 million tunnel linking the Atlantic City Expressway to three casinos he planned to build in the Marina District. But his company, Mirage Resorts, was bought by a rival, and only one -- Borgata -- has been built.

So Gormley came up with a compromise, even having SOSH Architects in Atlantic City draw up plans, two of the sources said. Tom Sykes, a SOSH Architects partner, did not return a call for comment.

Even if Wynn accepts the plan, the deal is far from complete.

Although Wynn and Trump appeared together at a Mets playoff game to discuss the sale of Trump Plaza, the two companies have yet to formally discuss a deal.

One issue: Wynn is used to building big. The Trump Plaza site consists of 12 acres; Boardwalk Hall would add another seven. But Wynn would want more, and that may take time to assemble. One landowner, the elderly widow Vera Coking, owns an old boarding house in the shadows of Trump Plaza and has held onto her property for decades.

Coking has beaten back two tycoons before Wynn -- first porn king Bob Guccione, who built a steel structure around her house before he ran out of money, and later Trump, who wanted to condemn her property for an expansion.

In a conference call with investors Oct. 31, Trump said: "We could build around her (Coking) if necessary, and possibly that will happen."

But in an interview earlier this month, Coking said she'd be willing to sell -- for the right price.

Speaking from inside the glass door of her dilapidated, three-story building, Coking said she wants "millions, millions, millions" for her property.

"I want to sell," Coking said. "He (Trump) doesn't want to sell to me.

"He wants to put money in his pocket," she said, "and I want to put money into my pocket."

------

Judy DeHaven may be reached at jdehaven@starledger.com or (973) 392-7804. Josh Margolin may be reached at jmargolin@starledger.com or (609) 989-0267.


I'm not sure if I like this idea. Boardwalk Hall is a landmark known all over the country for the big boxing cards, which I love boxing being from Jersey City and Hudson County with it's great storied pugelistic history. I hope the new arena will bring more revenue if they do build one and keep it some historic aspects of Boardwalk Hall.

American Gaming Guru
December 27th, 2006, 04:53 PM
Here is an update about the NYC to AC Rail Line from the Press of Atlantic City:

A.C. rail line trial to begin by next year
By J. STAAS HAUGHT Staff Writer, (609) 272-7253
Published: Friday, December 15, 2006
ATLANTIC CITY — A dedicated rail line to and from New York took another step closer Thursday to boarding its first passengers.
The three casinos and two state agencies — NJ Transit and the Casino Reinvestment Development Authority — involved in the project formally signed off on the three-year trial, saying they expect to move the first trains out of the station by this time next year.

The Borgata Hotel Casino & Spa, Harrah's Atlantic City and Caesars Atlantic City earlier this summer formed a partnership to partially fund a weekend-only, dedicated line between New York's Penn Station and the Atlantic City Rail Terminal.

The partnership, called Atlantic City Express Service, or ACES, will spend $15 million to buy eight, bi-level, luxury rail cars and is splitting with CRDA the $4 million in operating costs. The CRDA will spend $4.5 million to lease three diesel locomotives during the three-year test run.

The Friday-Saturday-Sunday lines would usher casino visitors from Manhattan to the resort in well-appointed rail cars designed to get them in an Atlantic City state of mind. The run, about 2 hours, 40 minutes, with one-stop, would likely cost riders about $100, though casino officials say price isn't the key factor.

“This isn't a pricing issue. We believe it's a convenience issue. We know there is a demand for this, from our research, for customers to come here and relax and enjoy themselves on the way in,” said Larry Mullin, president and chief operating officer at Borgata.

A dedicated line between the two cities has been tried before, but NJ Transit ditched the six-year trial in 1995 after concluding the little-used “Gambler's Express” was a financial failure.

Mullin said things will be different this time, with the three partner casinos looking to build rider demand with targeted marketing and foster customer loyalty with rail cars that remind of the host casinos.

“We hope that as soon as you get on the train, you'll find a difference,” he said. “There will be amenities on there that will get you thinking of Atlantic City.”

I expect this to be a hit. No yuppies from NYC take the bus and gas prices have driven up limo pricing too. At $100 (round trip I hope) this will be a good deal. Coupled with cocktails and casino promotion, I see it as a no-brainer.

The smoking ban is another matter. As much as I dislike smoking, I do see it as essential for any successful casino venture. Let’s face it, the average gambler smokes, drinks or both at the same time.
http://images.google.com/images?q=tbn:-Spd-ekGBcVLEM:http://content.answers.com/main/content/wp/en/thumb/a/ac/120px-Sein_ep504.jpg (http://content.answers.com/main/content/wp/en/thumb/a/ac/120px-Sein_ep504.jpg)
Eliminating smoking eliminates a major part of the equation for a large amount of people. The argument is mainly being pushed by casino workers. They claim that it is bad for their health. I would imagine the same of coal mine workers and firemen. But THEY CHOOSE THEIR OWN PROFESSION AND PLACE OF EMPLOYMENT!

The argument for and against continues.......

American Gaming Guru
December 27th, 2006, 05:14 PM
Apparently I was wrong on this one! It seems that a Trump/Wynn negotiation is very much alive….weather a deal will happen or not is another matter. They do propose an interesting dilemma. The historic Boardwalk Hall vs. a huge investment in AC. As the previous article highlights, the current proposal is to preserve the facade, roof, and pipe organ of Boardwalk Hall, while at the same time making an additional 3 billion investment in AC.

Boardwalk Hall must be preserved and the current proposal is not all that bad. But the jury is still out on the overall plan. Boardwalk Hall is a national treasure and is currently set up as a modern concert and sporting venue.

Another hurdle/interesting story about the Trump/Wynn proposal is that one piece of land that would be essential to the development is the appx. 2 acres of land that formally occupied the Playboy/Atlantis/Trump Regency/Trump World’s Fair site. This property is now currently owned by Bruce Toll of Toll Brothers fame. He bought the property out of a bankruptcy sale from former Trump Hotels and Casino Resorts (THCR) Equity holders. He paid appx. $25,150,000 by out-bidding Donald Trump who was looking to by the property personally. The property does have a non-casino Land Use Restriction enacted by the previous owner (THCR). But I imagine that it could be lifted if Trump Entertainment Resorts (formally THCR) buys the property back from Mr. Toll as part of a Trump/Wynn development. Sources close to the situation have confirmed that Trump/Wynn is already placing calls of interest to Mr. Toll.

To be continued…….

American Gaming Guru
December 27th, 2006, 05:24 PM
I thought that a few of you out there might find this article interesting (From the Press of Atlantic City):

Seminoles ready to Rock Atlantic City

By DONALD WITTKOWSKI Staff Writer, (609) 272-7258
Published: Sunday, December 24, 2006
ATLANTIC CITY — Think of bingo halls and what comes to mind? It's not hard to conjure up images of a church basement filled with little old ladies feverishly tracking the numbers on their score cards.

Those small-time bingo stereotypes, however, were destroyed by the Seminole American Indians in 1979. The Florida-based tribe opened the first high-stakes Indian bingo hall at that time, starting what has grown into an estimated billion-dollar casino enterprise.
The Seminoles own and operate seven Florida casinos, including two Hard Rock gaming, hotel and restaurant complexes in Tampa and Hollywood. On Dec. 7, they stunned the gaming world by announcing a $965 million takeover of the Hard Rock chain — 124 restaurants, five hotels, two casinos and more than 70,000 pieces of rock-n-roll memorabilia from the franchise's world-famous music collection.
Overseeing the Seminoles' breathtaking rise is a man who, like the tribe, started modestly in the gambling business in 1979. In those days, James Allen toiled as a cook at Bally's Park Place, now known as Bally's Atlantic City.
“I was working at three jobs at that time — as a cook at Bally's and at the Point Diner in Somers Point and making pizzas at the old Jukebox Pizzeria, which had shops in Ocean City, Somers Point and Northfield,” Allen recalled.

Allen, 46, is now making dough in other ways. He serves as chief executive of the Seminoles' gaming operations and orchestrated the Hard Rock purchase from British casino operator Rank Group Plc.


“The Hard Rock brand is in 45 different countries across the world,” Allen said. “I think that one of the greatest assets of that brand is that it has been around for 37 years and it has never gotten tired.”
Hard Rock has been sniffing around Atlantic City for a few years in hopes of building a casino project. So far, its presence in Atlantic City is limited to a Hard Rock Cafe restaurant at the Trump Taj Mahal Casino Resort. Allen said that may change under the Seminoles' new ownership.
“Hard Rock has certainly looked at the Atlantic City market under the previous owners for the past two or three years and considered building a casino hotel. I think that would be our interest, to include a casino hotel,” he said.
No specific sites are in mind, nor have the Seminoles even begun the planning process for a casino. But Atlantic City remains a top priority in the tribe's growth strategy as it seeks to spread its influence on a national and international scale, Allen noted.
“The Atlantic City market is extremely attractive to us for the Hard Rock brand. Obviously, the success of the town in the last five years demonstrates the strength of the market,” he said.
A Hard Rock Atlantic City casino would represent a triumphant return for Allen. The cook-turned-CEO story almost sounds like fodder for Hollywood cinema.
Allen climbed into the management ranks at Bally's after starting as a cook. After working at Bally's, he was a purchasing manager with Hilton Hotels. He later joined Donald Trump's gaming empire, holding a variety of vice president positions during a nine-year stay.
Leaving Atlantic City, he worked in Colorado's casino industry for a time. His cross-country career trek later took him to Connecticut, where he served as senior vice president of operations at the Mohegan Sun casino. Then he headed to the Bahamas to work at the Atlantis casino.
He started working on the Seminoles' Hard Rock projects in Tampa and Hollywood as an executive with the Cordish Co., the group that developed the complexes. He was hired by the Seminoles in 2001.
If Allen does make it back to Atlantic City as a casino CEO, he won't have to worry about having someplace to live. He maintains a vacation home in nearby Linwood and holds investment properties in Somers Point and Longport. It's doubtful, though, that he'll need his old job back at the Point Diner.

STT757
December 27th, 2006, 10:18 PM
Wow, some exciting things are starting to happen with Atlantic City. It's perfectly suituated to really develop into a Regional destination, they need to ride this wave of momentum to make long term investments to make the extra push into legitimate tourist destination.

The rail service is a good start, they are running the trains via Amtrak's Northeast corridor through Philadelphia and onto NJ Transit's existing Atlantic City Line. There's a better option which could cut that 2:40 minute trip down to 2 hours flat, the former Blue Comet route which ran from Jersey City's CNJ Terminal to Atlantic City still exists, although it's inactive between Lakehurst NJ and Winslow Jct. With State and Private sector investments they can bring the former Blue Comet route through the Pine Barrens back to service, this time running trains from NY Penn through the CNJ (Blue Comet Route) to connect with the existing Atlantic City line near Winslow Jct.

This could allow for 7 day a week operations, both express service for Casino traffic and local service for commuters.

They also need to work on luring more airlines to Atlantic City airport, Jetblue, Airtran, Continental, American, United, US Airways, NWA etc. to join Spirit and Delta.

NJ Transit has been pioneering Light Rail along the Hudson, Newark and Delaware River. They need to develop an Atlantic City Light Rail that connects the Boardwalk and Marina Casinos, Convention Center and Atlantic City International Airport.

American Gaming Guru
January 19th, 2007, 01:12 PM
Surprising Wickipedia has a good account of casino development history in AC. I can think of a few more that were not included in the "Planned but not developed" category, but they do a nice job.

Check out the link: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Atlantic_City,_New_Jersey

It also reiterates some of the new development rumors and proposals.

JCMAN320
January 29th, 2007, 12:18 AM
Report: Casinos benefiting from anti-blight funds

1/28/2007, 4:13 p.m. ET
The Associated Press

ATLANTIC CITY, N.J. (AP) — The agency created to redirect casino revenue to revitalize downtrodden areas in the city and around New Jersey has given more than 20 percent of the money back to the casinos to subsidize improvements and expansion, according to published reports.

According to a report in Sunday's New York Times, the Casino Reinvestment Development Authority, created in 1984, has given $400 million to the casinos for projects such as:

The construction of 13,000 new hotel rooms, including 800 in a tower under construction at the Trump Taj Mahal;

_an IMAX theater at the Tropicana Casino and Resort;

_the House of Blues music club;

_"parking lot beautification" at the Showboat and road signs for Resorts and the Taj Mahal;

_$4.5 million toward new express train service from Manhattan to Atlantic City that is being largely funded by the Borgata, Caesars and Harrah's casinos.

The agency's executive director defended the disbursements as necessary to keep Atlantic City competitive with other East Coast resorts.

"That CRDA money is being used to grow the industry, protect the financial well-being of the state of New Jersey and keep the development of Atlantic City rolling forward," Thomas D. Carver said. "The growth of the industry, and the addition of more rooms, relates directly to the continued development of Atlantic City as a resort destination, not just for gaming but for entertainment and other attractions as well."

Critics of the policy include David Sciarra, who was working as a deputy public advocate when he helped write the legislation that created the reinvestment authority.

"It was not set up to finance industry-related projects because the industry clearly has the resources to do that," Sciarra said. "This is a betrayal of the very promise that was made to the citizens: That the casinos would have a social responsibility to invest a small percentage of their revenue through the CRDA to help make sure residents, especially the poor, had better housing and neighborhoods."

Under laws established by the state legislature in 1984, the casinos pay 8 percent of their gross revenues to the state's Casino Revenue Fund, which pays for programs to assist the elderly and people with disabilities. They must also choose between paying another 2.5 percent into the fund or 1.25 percent to the reinvestment authority. All have chosen the latter.

The reinvestment authority has paid out $1.8 billion since its formation. Counting the money given back to the casinos, Atlantic City receives more than 80 percent of the authority's largesse. Yet blocks of run-down buildings and seedy motels catering to drug dealers and prostitutes still sit in the shadow of the casinos.

A change in direction for the reinvestment authority began in 1993 when state legislators required the authority to provide $100 million to add hotel rooms for convention visitors. Three years later, it voted to make another $75 million available.

"We needed an incentive because we had enjoyed exclusivity on the East Coast and knew gaming was only going to expand in other jurisdictions, and that the Atlantic City casinos could take their capital dollars somewhere else," said state Sen. William L. Gormley, R-Atlantic, the gambling industry's leading supporter in state government.

___

Information from: The New York Times, http://www.nytimes.com

American Gaming Guru
January 30th, 2007, 12:29 PM
From the Philly Inquirer (a little old-news, but it is in the media recently since it appears the the Trop's new owners have decided to continue with this project):

Atlantic City may soon get first boutique hotel

The Tropicana wants to put one next to its Boardwalk casino. An enclosed bridge is being proposed to connect the sites.

By Suzette Parmley

Inquirer Staff Writer

http://www.philly.com/images/philly/inquirer/16547/273810290116.gif



ATLANTIC CITY - This resort, known primarily as a gambler's mecca, may soon have its first upscale hotel.
The Tropicana Casino is negotiating with developers to build Atlantic City's first "boutique" hotel - a luxury hotel on a small scale - on a two-acre site next to the casino on the Boardwalk. The site is a parking lot between California and Belmont Avenues, just northeast of the Tropicana and separated from the casino by a condominium tower.
Tropicana's president and chief executive officer, Fred A. Buro, said this week that the proposed hotel would be linked to the casino by an enclosed connector bridge.
"We have several developers bidding on it," Buro said in an interview. "A developer will buy the site and select an operator."
Buro said Tropicana would build the connector bridge to the casino and its mega-entertainment, retail and dining complex called the Quarter.
Buro said Columbia Sussex Corp., the new parent company of the Tropicana, could not begin talks on developing the hotel until it completed its acquisition of Aztar Corp., which owned the Tropicana Casinos in Atlantic City and Las Vegas. The sale was completed about two weeks ago.
The proposed hotel could have as many as 500 rooms and give Tropicana, which leads the resort's 11 casinos in hotel rooms with 2,129, a boost as its archrival - the Borgata Hotel Casino & Spa - prepares to open a $400 million, 800-room hotel tower later this year.
Buro said that in addition to the two-acre parcel, there is also the potential to develop a site on the other side of the Tropicana, which is currently a Holiday Inn, into another hotel that would also be linked by connector bridge to the casino. He said Tropicana was also exploring adding a tower to the casino. Combined, the three projects could add 1,500 to 2,000 hotel rooms to Tropicana's inventory.
He said the Tropicana would not own the rooms in the two non-casino hotels, but would partner with the developers and negotiate for a block of rooms.
"It's about rooms," Buro said. "Atlantic City is rooms-constrained, and we recognize that."
After the Quarter opened in November 2005, the Tropicana regained the title of having the most hotel rooms in Atlantic City. It has about 15 percent of the resort's 14,513 hotel rooms.
By comparison, Las Vegas has more than 120,000 rooms.
Philadelphia, where two casinos are expected to be built along the Delaware River waterfront, has 10,124 hotel rooms in Center City.
Industry observers say the lack of hotel rooms continues to be an issue for Atlantic City as it tries to morph into an overnight destination.
"The Convention Center really needs 20,000 rooms to support it," said gambling analyst Larry Klatzkin of New York-based Jefferies & Co. Inc. "It's still not able to support it."
Buro said the Tropicana was in the midst of trying to expand as competitors around it were adding multimillion-dollar hotel towers.
The Borgata has 1,971 rooms, second to the Tropicana, but its new tower will give it the lead.
Harrah's and the Trump Taj Mahal will open towers next year that will add an additional 1,548 rooms to the market.
"What Tropicana is interested in is creating a critical mass of stuff on their end of the Boardwalk," said Chuck Bragitikos, president and cofounder of Vibrant Development Group, which was previously the strategic adviser for Aztar and now is for Columbia Sussex and for California Avenue Ventures L.L.C., which owns the two-acre parcel. "We're looking to catalyze the development of a boutique-size hotel and condo tower, which we see as missing in the market."
Bragitikos said the new hotel would also provide meeting rooms and additional parking near the Tropicana, which would aid the casino because parking lots are consistently full on Fridays and Saturdays.
"Our prospective is that there is really a void in the market for a high-touch, high-quality boutique hotel that really builds upon the market that Borgata proved exists - which is younger and more affluent," he said.
Bragitikos said major markets like New York, Los Angeles and San Francisco all have upscale boutique hotels.
"There are tons of boutique hotels out there in those cities, but nothing in Atlantic City," he said.
Bragitikos said their plan was to bring in the developer to put together the capital to build the hotel, and secure an operator or brand.
Mitchell Gurwicz, one of the principals of California Avenue Ventures, the landowner, said the site was among the "very few parcels left in Atlantic City that is slightly two acres or more that's vacant, from Boardwalk to Pacific Avenue" - known as the casino zone.
"It's the next logical expansion parcel for the Tropicana," he said. "It's a premier site that has the potential for a hotel tower that will give fantastic views of the ocean, and with the connector and proper design, you can actually maintain a retail and entertainment presence from the Boardwalk straight through the Quarter, which right now is split by the casino floor."

clubBR
January 30th, 2007, 12:40 PM
When George Pataki's Indian casino's open in the Catskills, I'd personally rather go there. 50 miles from Manhattan, compared to the 150 miles to AC, i'll save the money from gas and use it to gamble even more. I think opening some sort of entertainment resort in the Catskills is a good idea; as a New York's Las Vegas.

JCMAN320
January 30th, 2007, 12:43 PM
Alantic City is great city and a historic one at that. AC will always be a magnet for people and is a well established historic city. I rather go the shore than the mountains thank you very much!!!!

Syrinx
February 1st, 2007, 10:50 PM
Two of the slots parlors in the Philly area opened in the past month. With two more being delayed because of Philadelphia zoning issues. The Slots parlors that are open, one in Chester(Delaware County) and one in Bensalem(Bucks County) are each taking in $70 M dollars worth of bets per week with a gross revenue of $7 M each per week.

I think the Philadelphia market was 25 % of Atlantic City's clientelle. AC is going to take a hit and within 5 years the Philadephia casinos will most likely get table games. Delaware which also has slots, is presently in discussion about getting table games and sports betting.(DE. is 1 0f 3 states eligible for legalized sports betting)

And its simply a matter of time before NY starts grabbing a piece of the pie as well. That $6 Billion dollar a year nut that AC has been pocketing is about to end.

JCMAN320
February 1st, 2007, 11:03 PM
I saw and interview on the news and they interviewed people on the boardwalk from Philly and said that people will still come to AC for the expeirence. Philly still has limitations I forget what they are exactly but they still don't have the same allowances that AC has.

I'm sorry but Atlantic City will always be a destination and thats the way it is so suck it up!!!!

Syrinx
February 2nd, 2007, 09:30 AM
lol, suck what up? Just stating some facts and if Pennsylvania wasn't such a draconian political mess they would have put an even bigger fear into Atlantic City.

Steve Wynn proposed building a billion dollar complex in center city Philly but backed out when he found out about the 53% state tax on casino revenue. Pa. went into this entire gambling process completely wrong. Eventually PA. is going have to adjust that outrageous tax to remain competitive and you have to assume that there will be casinoes in Manhattan, Brooklyn and Long Island within 10 years.

Atlantic City will remain strong but the monopoly is over. They maxed out, its downhill from here, at least as far as gambling revenue is concerned..

JerzResident
February 3rd, 2007, 09:44 AM
Two of the slots parlors in the Philly area opened in the past month. With two more being delayed because of Philadelphia zoning issues. The Slots parlors that are open, one in Chester(Delaware County) and one in Bensalem(Bucks County) are each taking in $70 M dollars worth of bets per week with a gross revenue of $7 M each per week.

I think the Philadelphia market was 25 % of Atlantic City's clientelle. AC is going to take a hit and within 5 years the Philadephia casinos will most likely get table games. Delaware which also has slots, is presently in discussion about getting table games and sports betting.(DE. is 1 0f 3 states eligible for legalized sports betting)

And its simply a matter of time before NY starts grabbing a piece of the pie as well. That $6 Billion dollar a year nut that AC has been pocketing is about to end.

Doubt it, AC is growing while Philly and Upstate just started building. The water front is the X factor for AC as well, nothing can replace gambling with a view of the atlantic ocean

Syrinx
February 3rd, 2007, 01:53 PM
Doubt it, AC is growing while Philly and Upstate just started building. The water front is the X factor for AC as well, nothing can replace gambling with a view of the atlantic ocean

That beach is a hell of a selling point for 3 months during the summer, the 3 months during the winter it acts as a detriment of cold open wind swept atmospheric hell. The other 6 months the ocean and beach are neutral. Besides the goal of the casinoes isn't to provide fabulous views, contrary their goal is to keep you from seeing anything other than a slot machine or black jack table. Their only mission is to seperate you from your bank account.

When the day comes that both Manhattan and downtown Philly get full blown casinoes those sites will overwhelm Atlantic City's 3 month of beach time. NYC will canabalize the metro NY and points north market. Philly will attract the Bal-DC Philly and points west market. I'd be very nervous about the future if I were A.C..

JCMAN320
February 3rd, 2007, 05:26 PM
How the hell are you so sure that NY would approve all that? Just another typical NY'er nervous about Jersey and how it's growing by leaps and bounds and want to take it down so they'll have no competition!!

jersey7
February 3rd, 2007, 07:41 PM
Syrnix, JerzResident was talking about views of the atlantic ocean, and you go blabbering off about beaches in the summer. Last time I've been there 2 weeks ago, I thought the ocean looked just as great as it did in the summer from the Caesars where I stayed. Besides, Harrahs(and Caesars), Wynn, Trump, and the others who own property in Atlantic City that are building in New York or Philly are going to use that as a luring tool to bring people to Atlantic City since they have significant amount of investment in the billions there already.

JCMAN320
February 15th, 2007, 03:10 PM
Height restrictions on A.C. casinos likely to be relaxed

2/15/2007, 11:14 a.m. ET
The Associated Press

ATLANTIC CITY, N.J. (AP) — A new casino envisioned for this gambling resort could become New Jersey's tallest building if the City Council, as expected, eases height restrictions on skyscrapers.

The council is poised to vote next week on a measure raising the limit from the current 485 feet to 800 feet on a plot of land just north of the Showboat Casino Hotel.

A building that high would be the tallest in New Jersey, topping the current champion, the 781-foot Goldman Sachs office in Jersey City.

But the likely developer said the building probably won't reach 800 feet.

"That would be very tall, and the taller you get, the more expensive it becomes to build," Revel Entertainment Chairman and CEO Kevin DeSanctis told The Press of Atlantic City for Thursday's newspaper. But he said the company wants a visually stunning, landmark structure.

Now that Bader Field, the historic airport near the downtown area, has closed, officials say previous restrictions on how high buildings can be are no longer needed.

Last year, the city agreed to raise the height restriction for much of the Marina district to 560 feet to accommodate expansion of Harrah's Atlantic City Casino. The nearby Borgata Hotel Casino & Spa is Atlantic City's tallest, at 480 feet.

City planning director Bill Crane said he expects more tall buildings to rise along the Boardwalk because there is little room to expand horizontally. The current height limit for most of the Boardwalk casino zone is 385 feet.

"Now that Bader Field's closed, no pun intended, the sky's the limit," he said.

The Revel redevelopment area also includes the city-owned Garden Pier. Revel and the city have been talking since last fall about buying and rebuilding the pier, which was built in 1912 and once housed one of the resort's largest ballrooms.

JerzResident
February 15th, 2007, 06:40 PM
Excellent article JCMAN, AC is the only casino town that is mentioned in the same breath as Las Vegas. NY and Philly cant compete.

MidtownGuy
February 15th, 2007, 07:17 PM
Would be nice to see AC grow a tall, interesting skyline along the water. Could look really amazing with some creative architecture.

JerzResident
February 15th, 2007, 09:13 PM
Would be nice to see AC grow a tall, interesting skyline along the water. Could look really amazing with some creative architecture.

That would be cool, AC having a skyline full of casinos, that would definetly be different

lofter1
February 15th, 2007, 10:21 PM
It could use a little something ...

http://www.ronsaari.com/stockImages/newJersey/AtlanticCitySkyline2.jpg
© Ronald C Saari
http://www.ronsaari.com/stockImages/newJersey/AtlanticCitySkyline2.php

JCMAN320
February 19th, 2007, 11:19 PM
Secaucus Junction stop I suggest and EWR Station.

New York-to-Atlantic City train may bypass New Jersey stops

2/19/2007, 12:31 p.m. ET
By DAVID PORTER
The Associated Press

NEWARK, N.J. (AP) — New Jersey's gambling mecca will soon be more easily accessible by rail — just not if you live in New Jersey.

The 2 1/2-hour Express train service from New York to Atlantic City, scheduled to begin in late 2007 or early 2008, has no planned stops in the Garden State.

Details are being finalized for the new the service, dubbed "ACES" for Atlantic City Express Service. But in the current scenario, the trains would run nonstop on the Northeast Corridor tracks from New York to just north of Philadelphia, then head east and continue nonstop to Atlantic City.

"Our initial thoughts are to go directly from Penn Station with no stops to Atlantic City," said Michael Walsh, regional vice president for development at Harrah's Atlantic City. "As things develop we may stop at other places."

Auggie Cipollini, senior vice president and chief administrative officer of the Borgata Hotel Casino & Spa, said it's still possible there will be a stop in New Jersey.

"We're still open to it," Cipollini said. "It's something we're going to have to partner with NJ Transit to see whether or not that's feasible."

The casinos are calling the shots because they are footing the bill for the new train service. A joint venture involving the Borgata, Caesars Atlantic City Hotel Casino and Harrah's Atlantic City is purchasing eight double-level cars for approximately $15 million, and the Casino Reinvestment Development Authority will lease four locomotives for another $4.5 million.

The casinos make no bones about the fact they are looking beyond New Jersey to penetrate the New York City market, specifically 20- and 30-somethings with disposable income who may have balked in the past at the idea of riding a bus to Atlantic City.

Cipollini referred to research that has shown that while population in New York's five boroughs is increasing, the number of car registrations is decreasing.

"We're using this train as an acquisition tool to expose folks in New York City to Atlantic City," Walsh said. "We know there's a lot of individuals who don't have cars or don't want to rent cars, and this will provide a more convenient way for them to visit Atlantic City."

Under the current proposal, the service would operate on the weekends, with two departures planned from New York on Friday and one from Atlantic City. Four trains would leave from each destination on Saturday and three would depart Atlantic City on Sunday.

Adding trains to the crowded Northeast Corridor should not lead to more delays, because they won't run during the week between 7:30 a.m. and 9:30 a.m., the peak weekday hours for tunnel traffic, NJ Transit spokesman Dan Stessel said. The evening rush hour is not as congested, he added.

"We have the capacity and ability to provide this service on the casinos' behalf without it impacting service to our existing customers," Stessel said.

Fares have not been finalized, according to Cipollini, but he said they will be competitive with Amtrak's Acela service between New York and Philadelphia, which currently costs between $76 and $112 each way. There will likely be a two- or three-tier pricing structure that will reflect modifications to the train interiors such as added food and beverage service and roomier seating, he said.

The three casinos will pay for those modifications to the cars and will also pay for train crews supplied by NJ Transit.

It also might be tough to get a seat at the last minute. Up to 75 percent of the seats can be reserved for customers who book packages or receive complimentary tickets through the casinos.

For NJ Transit, the new service will not be its first to Atlantic City: the agency took over the operation of Amtrak's Philadelphia-to-Atlantic City line in the mid-1990s after Amtrak relinquished it because of low ridership. The line makes several stops in southern New Jersey and costs $7.50 each way. In fiscal 2006, ridership increased 9 percent, beating the systemwide average increase of 6 percent.

NJ Transit currently runs about a dozen bus lines from points around the state to Atlantic City, but no direct train service from northern and central New Jersey that doesn't involve a transfer in Philadelphia.

Atlantic City Councilwoman Joyce Mollineaux is an advocate of train service between Trenton and Atlantic City. Stessel said the issue is already on the agency's radar.

"We've had preliminary discussions with Amtrak," he said. "It's something we've talked about and something we're interested in pursuing."

American Gaming Guru
August 21st, 2007, 04:56 PM
Here are some links to look at details/renderings & facts about all the new hotel towers currently under construction in Atlantic City:

Trump Taj Mahal Expansion:

http://209.155.107.25/corporate/TRMP_Nov_InvPres.pdf


The Water Club a signature hotel by Borgata:

www.thewaterclubatborgata.com (http://www.thewaterclubatborgata.com)

http://cmsimg.courierpostonline.com/apps/pbcsi.dll/bilde?Site=BZ&Date=20060326&Category=SPECIAL15&ArtNo=603260309&Ref=V2&MaxW=300 (http://cmsimg.courierpostonline.com/apps/pbcsi.dll/bilde?Site=BZ&Date=20060326&Category=SPECIAL15&ArtNo=603260309&Ref=V2&MaxW=300)


Harrah's Expansion:

http://cmsimg.courierpostonline.com/apps/pbcsi.dll/bilde?Site=BZ&Date=20060326&Category=SPECIAL15&ArtNo=603260309&Ref=AR&MaxW=300& (http://javascript<b></b>:NewWindow(685,685,'/apps/pbcs.dll/misc?url=/misc/zoom.pbs&Site=BZ&Date=20060326&Category=SPECIAL15&ArtNo=603260309&Ref=AR');)

Fabrizio
August 21st, 2007, 05:06 PM
Thanks for these, but gosh....more hotels that are self enclosed islands. Where is the "City" in Atlantic City?

---

Interesting to see the skyline photo of Atlatic City posted by Lofter above.

Believe it or not, Atlantic City once had what was regarded by many as the most beautiful skyline in America after NYC :

It was known as "the million dollar skyline"... all of the buildings shown below existed up until the mid 1970s:

http://www.rootsweb.com/~usgenweb/nj/atlantic/postcards/pier.jpg

http://www.upenn.edu/ARG/archive/price/price.html

http://www.nps.gov/archive/edis/edisonia/graphics/08110003.jpg

http://www.lcpgraphics.org/inventories/jennings/hotels/JenningsP9479-12345Shelbourne.jpg

http://www.rootsweb.com/~usgenweb/nj/atlantic/postcards/dennis.jpg

---

66nexus
August 21st, 2007, 10:27 PM
4716

Yeah this thing is supposed to be 557ft! And I think that glass dome is 90ft (one of the largest in the world)

66nexus
August 21st, 2007, 10:31 PM
Here are some links to look at details/renderings & facts about all the new hotel towers currently under construction in Atlantic City:

Trump Taj Mahal Expansion:

http://209.155.107.25/corporate/TRMP_Nov_InvPres.pdf


The Water Club a signature hotel by Borgata:

www.thewaterclubatborgata.com (http://www.thewaterclubatborgata.com)

http://cmsimg.courierpostonline.com/apps/pbcsi.dll/bilde?Site=BZ&Date=20060326&Category=SPECIAL15&ArtNo=603260309&Ref=V2&MaxW=300 (http://cmsimg.courierpostonline.com/apps/pbcsi.dll/bilde?Site=BZ&Date=20060326&Category=SPECIAL15&ArtNo=603260309&Ref=V2&MaxW=300)


Harrah's Expansion:

http://cmsimg.courierpostonline.com/apps/pbcsi.dll/bilde?Site=BZ&Date=20060326&Category=SPECIAL15&ArtNo=603260309&Ref=AR&MaxW=300& (http://javascript%3Cb%3E%3C/b%3E:NewWindow%28685,685,%27/apps/pbcs.dll/misc?url=/misc/zoom.pbs&Site=BZ&Date=20060326&Category=SPECIAL15&ArtNo=603260309&Ref=AR%27%29;)

That's a nice rendering of Trump II. And the Water Club is almost complete.
More non-gaming options means more net revenue and less dependence on gaming revenues (not mention nongaming options as an edge against competing casinos which are taking big chunks of the pie)
I think AC needs a faster service to AC. The train-line being constructed from NY to AC still takes approx. 2hrs.

kliq6
August 22nd, 2007, 08:44 AM
lol, suck what up? Just stating some facts and if Pennsylvania wasn't such a draconian political mess they would have put an even bigger fear into Atlantic City.

Steve Wynn proposed building a billion dollar complex in center city Philly but backed out when he found out about the 53% state tax on casino revenue. Pa. went into this entire gambling process completely wrong. Eventually PA. is going have to adjust that outrageous tax to remain competitive and you have to assume that there will be casinoes in Manhattan, Brooklyn and Long Island within 10 years.

Atlantic City will remain strong but the monopoly is over. They maxed out, its downhill from here, at least as far as gambling revenue is concerned..

mark my words, you will never see a casino in NYC!!

American Gaming Guru
August 23rd, 2007, 05:24 PM
Fabrizio,

You make an excellent point. There is much to be excited about in AC and all the currently under development and proposed projects are sure to make this city as exciting as it once was.

To get more to your point though, take a look at these successful projects which I believe to be vital to AC's revival and survival.

Boardwalk Facade Redevelopment Project:

http://www.njcrda.com/pr-boardwalk-facade.html (http://www.njcrda.com/pr-boardwalk-facade.html) (project details and renderings)

http://www.cityofatlanticcity.org/documents/press/facadecollage.pdf (http://www.cityofatlanticcity.org/documents/press/facadecollage.pdf) (some pics of the 1st phase)

The Walk:

Developed by The Cordish CO. This development has been outrageously successful and is in the middle of bringing and designing additional phases of this city center redevelopment/revitalization to market.

http://www.acoutlets.com/ (http://www.acoutlets.com/)

http://www.cordish.com/sub.cfm?section=newdev&venueID=8 (http://www.cordish.com/sub.cfm?section=newdev&venueID=8)

http://www.philly.com/philly/business/8909112.html (http://www.philly.com/philly/business/8909112.html)

http://www.pressofatlanticcity.com/business/story/7495852p-7392063c.html (http://www.pressofatlanticcity.com/business/story/7495852p-7392063c.html) ( a good article on the overall project)

Fabrizio
August 24th, 2007, 02:37 AM
Thanks so much for all of this. Interesting stuff. I am looking forward to reading it all.

I knew that guidelines had been developed but did not know work had already begun. And I was not aware that "The Walk" has been expanded. All very good news.

If you get more info please post it.

---

American Gaming Guru
August 28th, 2007, 09:58 AM
Hello All,

This morning, Revel Entertainment began wetting our appetites for more information about the new resorts planned for Atlantic City.

The article says that renderings should be out next week. Until then, enjoy the story from the link below.

http://www.pressofatlanticcity.com/top_three/story/7498500p-7395079c.html (http://www.pressofatlanticcity.com/top_three/story/7498500p-7395079c.html)

lofter1
August 28th, 2007, 10:34 AM
The towers will soar 700 feet high, becoming the tallest buildings in town and dwarfing anything else currently on the Boardwalk ...

... 20-acre oceanfront tract ... bordered by New Jersey, Oriental and Metropolitan avenues ...


That would seem to put the Revel project somewhere around here \/ , eh?

***

OmegaNYC
August 28th, 2007, 10:48 AM
Just don't land on Broadwalk.. ^^

JCexpert558
August 30th, 2007, 04:45 PM
This is just a thought but do you guys think that there is ever going to be any buildings on the islands of Atlantic city. Also I think that Atlantic City could surpass Las Vegas because Atlantic City has two atractions. The beach, and the casinos. Las vegas only has one atraction. The casinos.

66nexus
August 30th, 2007, 05:06 PM
This is just a thought but do you guys think that there is ever going to be any buildings on the islands of Atlantic city. Also I think that Atlantic City could surpass Las Vegas because Atlantic City has two atractions. The beach, and the casinos. Las vegas only has one atraction. The casinos.

Okay when you say 'buildings' do you mean commercial skyscrapers? I definitely don't think that will happen anytime soon. Besides, the casinos are pretty tall lol

JCMAN320
August 30th, 2007, 05:36 PM
AC International Airport to get $5 million

by South Jersey News Online
Thursday August 30, 2007, 4:30 PM
From staff reports

EGG HARBOR TWP. -- The New Jersey Department of Transportation announced that the Atlantic City International Airport will receive $5 million in federal funds to begin to expand the airport apron - a move that will improve the flow and safety of taxiing aircraft and will pave the way for doubling gate capacity.

"I commend our federal legislators for their tenacity in pursuing federal funds for this worthwhile project," said Governor Jon. S. Corzine, who has strongly endorsed the apron expansion program at the airport. "This past July, the Atlantic City International Airport tallied its highest passenger count ever. Clearly, these types of infrastructure improvements are needed for the airport to keep pace with the growth it is already experiencing."

Due to the efforts of U.S. Senators Frank Lautenberg and Robert Menendez and Congressman Frank A. LoBiondo (NJ-02), the Federal Aviation Administration has committed to provide $5 million toward an expansion program that will ultimately double the size of the airport apron.

"This funding is vital because [the airport]] is adding new destinations every year and serving more passengers than ever before. I am pleased that we were able to work with Senators Lautenberg and Menendez and Congressman LoBiondo to convince the Federal Aviation Administration to invest in this critical improvement program here in Atlantic City," said NJDOT Commissioner Kris Kolluri, who also serves as chairman of the South Jersey Transportation Authority, which owns and operates the airport.

Passenger traffic at Atlantic City International Airport is expected to reach a record 1.2 million in 2007. The airport accommodated 110,000 passengers in July, the busiest month on record for the airport. During the first six months of 2007 overall traffic at the airport increased 27 percent, from 554,092 passengers through the end of July 2006 compared to 705,537 passengers through the end of July this year.[/B]

"More and more people are flying to our state for business and for pleasure. Our airports need to be ready to accommodate that increase in travel," said Senator Lautenberg, a member of Senate Commerce Committee and the aviation subcommittee that oversees funding for airports. "These funds will improve capacity at Atlantic City Airport and pave the way for more passengers. I am proud to have helped deliver these much-needed funds."

"The expansion of the Atlantic City International Airport opens wider another gateway to all our great state has to offer," said Senator Menendez. "I firmly believe that improving transportation infrastructure is not just about moving goods and people more effectively; it is about improving quality of life and protecting our environment. I commend Governor Corzine and NJDOT Commissioner Kolluri for working with me in efforts to ensure strong, safe and efficient transportation options for air travelers in New Jersey."

The increase in commercial service is due to an expansion of destinations available through the airport, including Delta Airlines nonstop daily service to Atlanta, launched in mid-June 2006 and Spirit Airlines daily nonstop service to Las Vegas, launched in May 2007.

"With record levels of visitors coming to South Jersey, I am pleased to help secure these critical federal funds for the expansion of the Atlantic City International Airport," said Congressman Frank LoBiondo, a member of the House Aviation Subcommittee. "I appreciate the continued partnership with Governor Corzine, Commissioner Kolluri and
the FAA to improve and strengthen our state's transportation infrastructure."

The apron expansion is part of an overall long-term airport improvement program that includes an expansion of gate capacity from seven to fourteen, the installation of "common use technology" that expands counter capacity by allowing airlines to use existing Atlantic City International Airport networks and desk space as needed without the expense of establishing and maintaining their own on-site networks and work stations.

Current infrastructure improvements at the airport include the construction of a $24.5 million parking garage and cosmetic upgrades, including new flooring, signeage and lighting, in the terminal. In addition the project will bring the aircraft apron up to current standards, as well as improve safety for aircraft movement and support personnel.

JCexpert558
September 2nd, 2007, 05:36 PM
Is that $2 billion project still happening in A.C:confused:

giselehaslice
September 3rd, 2007, 08:16 PM
Hopefully those new renderings of the revel entertainment casino will be released soon...they said that they would be released within a week, and this news was let out on tuesday...right?

Anyway, I beleive that this project will be FANTASTIC and it will bring another very high end product to Atlantic City.

And regarding the Wynn Rumors, I hope that Bader Field gets a "Wynn Atlantic City", and maybe an "Encore @ Wynn" to make it even more Vegas-esque!

American Gaming Guru
September 4th, 2007, 09:59 AM
Not sure what the $2 billion development is. Between Revel Entertainment/Morgan Stanley & Pinnacle Entertainment; however, there will be two massive resorts constructed that will together exceed $2 billion of investment.

I also agree with giselehaslice. Bring WYNN on! Bader would certainly be best used as a mixed use development that must include a premium resort such as Wynn. I also; however, agree with critics on two arguments. (1)That the land must be sold at fair market value. AC is too hot to give away land like it did to Wynn the first time (although necessary at the time to encourage new large-scale development aka resulting in Borgata thus far). The city of Atlantic City itself also needs a large cash-infusion to help revitalize the city through more investment in its police force, good quality housing and infrastructure. And (2) that available Boardwalk frontage resort/casino zoned land be developed first.

Fabrizio
September 4th, 2007, 10:32 AM
The city of Atlantic City itself also needs a large cash-infusion to help revitalize the city through more investment in its police force, good quality housing and infrastructure. And (2) that available Boardwalk frontage resort/casino zoned land be developed first.

AC will never compete head on with Las Vegas until it rebuilds its self as a city.

2 blocks off the Boadwalk and it's STILL a dump after 30 YEARS of legalized gambling. 30 years!

I am glad to see all of these casino developements... but sorry... most of them are wrong headed.

You drive underground... get out of your car... take an elevator up. You gamble, shop, eat.. in a sealed climatized environment.

You take the elevator down. Get back in your car and onto the expressway...

Never setting foot in Atlantic City.


---

66nexus
September 4th, 2007, 11:57 AM
AC will never compete head on with Las Vegas until it rebuilds its self as a city.

2 blocks off the Boadwalk and it's STILL a dump after 30 YEARS of legalized gambling. 30 years!

I am glad to see all of these casino developements... but sorry... most of them are wrong headed.

You drive underground... get out of your car... take an elevator up. You gamble, shop, eat.. in a sealed climatized environment.

You take the elevator down. Get back in your car and onto the expressway...

Never setting foot in Atlantic City.


---

I guess you don't know too much about the Walk...or the Pier at Caesar's. Or the fact that AC isn't that far off in gambling revenues vs the Vegas Strip. Many have said that off the Vegas Strip (approx. 4 miles long) the place is dump.
Contrary to popular belief, legalized gambling does not a good city make. That should be a catalyst of which AC is just now starting to realize

ps: AC has bigger concerns than Vegas: Penns casinos and NY casinos take a nice chunk of market away. AC is just starting to add more non-gaming attractions in the last 5 years

Fabrizio
September 4th, 2007, 12:44 PM
The Pier is a perfect example of anti-urbanism. In any other world class sea-side resort you would have this thing lined with terraces upon terraces open in the summer with out-door dining etc.

What do we get? Again a pretty much enclosed shopping mall that could be anywhere... here it just happens to be out over the ocean.

The Pier's glamorous walkways along the sea :

http://www.flickr.com/photos/iirraa/539828444/

http://www.flickr.com/photos/iirraa/539829372/in/set-831508/

http://www.flickr.com/photos/7678268@N08/442918724/

lovely:

http://www.flickr.com/photos/iirraa/306775231/

http://www.flickr.com/photos/bgwilson89/219418604/

kliq6
September 4th, 2007, 01:17 PM
This is just a thought but do you guys think that there is ever going to be any buildings on the islands of Atlantic city. Also I think that Atlantic City could surpass Las Vegas because Atlantic City has two atractions. The beach, and the casinos. Las vegas only has one atraction. The casinos.

Vegas has one other thing, Sex industry. This alone will keep Vegas on top.

66nexus
September 4th, 2007, 01:22 PM
The Pier is a perfect example of anti-urbanism. In any other world class sea-side resort you would have this thing lined with terraces upon terraces open in the summer with out-door dining etc.

What do we get? Again a pretty much enclosed shopping mall that could be anywhere... here it just happens to be out over the ocean.

The Pier's glamorous walkways along the sea :

http://www.flickr.com/photos/iirraa/539828444/

http://www.flickr.com/photos/iirraa/539829372/in/set-831508/

http://www.flickr.com/photos/7678268@N08/442918724/

lovely:

http://www.flickr.com/photos/iirraa/306775231/

http://www.flickr.com/photos/bgwilson89/219418604/


But this thing wasn't built from the ground up. It ALREADY was a pier jutting over the ocean. I for one, definitely prefer the PAC over the 'million dollar' derelict pier.
I personally never really enjoyed the Boardwalk, I think the Walk is a much more pleasant stroll and it's very well groomed.

4802

-I see what you're saying about enclosed or city-within-city style architecture but it's still much better than AC had in a long time. Vegas' forum shops are very much like the PAC.
-The reason I think the casino hotels expanding is good is because AC definitely has a shortage of hotel rooms versus the amount of visitors they get annually.

66nexus
September 4th, 2007, 01:25 PM
I think any new casinos are good for AC because it increases the city's tax base and gives AC more of a overnight resort feel. Not to mention that it shows that AC is still a viable and live market in which companies would want to invest (even non-gaming companies like Morgan Stanley)

Fabrizio
September 4th, 2007, 01:30 PM
"I personally never really enjoyed the Boardwalk, I think the Walk is a much more pleasant stroll and it's very well groomed. "

Yep, a much more pleasant stroll. Self contained, sanitary, bland decor and architecture with all the chain stores and francises you can find in about a million other "upscale" malls around the US.

-----

This is great for AC but it's STILL nothing but a strip mall. These are not city streets:


4802

66nexus
September 4th, 2007, 01:39 PM
"I personally never really enjoyed the Boardwalk, I think the Walk is a much more pleasant stroll and it's very well groomed. "

Yep, a much more pleasant stroll. Self contained, sanitary, bland decor and architecture with all the chain stores and francises you can find in about a million other "upscale" malls around the US.

Okay, then what does that make most Boardwalk shops? about thousands of low-end dollar stores with the same 'bland decor' that make up what...about 90% of the Boardwalk? Which would you rather have? The Walk beats the Boardwalk by leaps and bounds.

-That ENTIRE 8-block span was blighted before the Walk was built. Seeing national retailers isn't uncommon in any mall, what'd you expect?
-Beggars can't be choosers, and AC definitely should not and would not have been picky about this one.

-And here's a question for you:
what exactly about the Walk is self-contained?:confused: It's an outdoor shopping district with absolutely NO borders, if anything, the Boardwalk is more contained

66nexus
September 4th, 2007, 01:41 PM
"I personally never really enjoyed the Boardwalk, I think the Walk is a much more pleasant stroll and it's very well groomed. "

Yep, a much more pleasant stroll. Self contained, sanitary, bland decor and architecture with all the chain stores and francises you can find in about a million other "upscale" malls around the US.

-----

This is great for AC but it's STILL nothing but a strip mall. These are not city streets:

So what if it's a strip mall? I don't understand why you see that as a bad thing:confused:. What else would it be? A hotel? A restaurant with an 8-block spanning parking lot?
And YES, they ARE city streets

giselehaslice
September 4th, 2007, 02:02 PM
okay people, stop the bickering...

Atlantic City HAS come a LONG way from what it was 5 years ago. If people want to hate, then its their loss, and they will be very sorry for dissing the place when it becomes the hottest thing around.

Nobody can deny that the place has spruced itself up big time, and nobody can deny that people have their eyes set on this place. Look, their are Billions of dollars being invested in Casinos/resorts, and millions upon millions of dollars being invested in new condominium towers.

If you have nothing nice to say, dont say it all.

JCexpert558
September 4th, 2007, 03:53 PM
Alright lets straighten this out. Ok Fabrizo, your right how Atlantic City is kind of messed up and could use some work. Your right to 66Nexus how Atlantic City is Having alot of development. So you guys are both right. There does not have to be a debate about this.:D

JCexpert558
September 4th, 2007, 04:07 PM
Also I agree with you giselehaslice about how theres billions of dollars being invested in Atlantic City. I also don't think that those neighboring states will not surpass A.C because theres lots of expensive projects all around Atlantic City. I know that lots of people want Wynn to build in A.C. But I heard that lots of progects over there will be lost. Well at least Pinnacle that will be building on the sands resort in A.C.:)

giselehaslice
September 4th, 2007, 08:30 PM
http://www.pressofatlanticcity.com/top_story/story/7499581p-7396386c.html

read this article that shows another new boutique hotel development named "the chelsea".

This continues to show how Atlantic City is morphing into Las Vegas' younger sister (or brother).:cool:

JCMAN320
September 4th, 2007, 09:13 PM
It's great to see the Chelsea and all these new developments. The Walk is out doors and is a city street with new shops; it is not a strip mall. Those streets were run down and AC needed this it connects the Convetion Center/Rail Station with the Boardwalk. Don't hate because AC refuses to take the back seat to LV.

STT757
September 4th, 2007, 09:45 PM
New Jersey needs to bring Light Rail to Atlantic City, connecting the Boardwalk, convention center, marina and the Airport. This would have a dramatic effect on development, as has been seen along the Hudson Bergen Light rail ROW.

66nexus
September 4th, 2007, 10:55 PM
New Jersey needs to bring Light Rail to Atlantic City, connecting the Boardwalk, convention center, marina and the Airport. This would have a dramatic effect on development, as has been seen along the Hudson Bergen Light rail ROW.

That's actually a very good idea

American Gaming Guru
September 5th, 2007, 09:34 AM
I too saw the story about "The Chelsea" this morning. I think I talked about it earlier in a previous string. Curtis Bashaw is a great developer and only brings to market high-end/high quality products. You can check out his Cape May Resorts at www.capemayresorts.com (http://www.capemayresorts.com/). This is a huge win for AC. The current Howard Johnson and Holiday Inn hotels are dumps. Additionally, this will be another project that helps spruce up the downtrodden pacific avenue which in my opinion needs a major facelift since it is a major thoroughfare and really a front door to the beach and boardwalk.

Also, light rail suggestion...another great idea. I am curious if the CRDA transportation study (talked about briefly here: http://www.pressofatlanticcity.com/business/story/7497390p-7393825c.html (http://www.pressofatlanticcity.com/business/story/7497390p-7393825c.html)) recommends one. The only obstacle I would see is the Jitney Owners Association objecting to it.

American Gaming Guru
September 5th, 2007, 09:53 AM
What does eveyone think of this one?

A.C. Council looks to ban free casino shuttles

By ELAINE ROSE Staff Writer, (609) 272-7215
Published: Wednesday, September 5, 2007

ATLANTIC CITY (http://www.inform.com/Atlantic+City) - The "Total Express" buses that ferry gamblers between Harrah's Entertainment (http://www.inform.com/Harrah%27s+Entertainment+Inc.) casinos may be scuttled under an ordinance scheduled to be introduced at tonight's City Council meeting.

The ordinance, citing traffic congestion and the long-standing tradition of jitney transportation in Atlantic City, would prohibit casinos from using vehicles with more than 10 seats on city streets for the purpose of taking customers between casinos.

The Atlantic City Jitney Association (http://www.inform.com/Atlantic+City+Jitney+Association) has said that the free shuttles have caused substantial economic losses for their 190 drivers. The jitney drivers are planning a protest this afternoon with a procession of the 13-seat buses starting at 3 p.m. at Harrah's Atlantic City (http://www.inform.com/Harrah%27s+Atlantic+City) and ending at City Hall in time for the 5 p.m. meeting.

Harrah's Entertainment started its shuttle service in October, providing free rides between its four properties - Harrah's, Caesars Atlantic City (http://www.inform.com/Caesars+Atlantic+City), Bally's Atlantic City (http://www.inform.com/Bally%27s+Atlantic+City) and the Showboat Casino Hotel (http://www.inform.com/Showboat+Atlantic+City) - for anyone who produced a "Total Rewards" slot-club card. The cards are free for the asking to anyone age 21 or older.

The jitney association, whose drivers own their buses and keep the fares they collect, said the shuttles were causing them economic hardship as visitors took the free Harrah's buses instead of paying $2 to ride the jitneys.

In late May, Harrah's said demand to use the service was overwhelming and restricted use of the shuttles to hotel guests and players with higher-tier slot cards. But the jitney association said that did little to help them.


Harrah's spokeswoman Alyce Parker (http://www.inform.com/Alyce+Parker) said Tuesday evening she could not comment on the proposed ordinance, as she was not aware of it.
To e-mail Elaine Rose (http://www.inform.com/Elaine+Rose)
at The Press:
ERose@pressofac.com (ERose@pressofac.com)
Links by inform.com (http://inform.com/)

Fabrizio
September 5th, 2007, 10:47 AM
This is good news about "The Chelsea". These people have taste and are guaranteed to do a good job.

Re Pacific Ave: Unfortunately long stretches of Pacific Avenue are forever lost. Much of it now serves as the back side of casinos. Unfortunately it's one of the City's main streets. Those overhead walkways further insure that visitors never have to actually set foot in Atlantic City.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/vegasrob/292711120/

American Gaming Guru
September 5th, 2007, 11:12 AM
Fabrizio, I totally agree. Hopefully the Pinnacle, Revel and The Chelsea projects will distinguish themselves by opening up to Pacific Avenue as well as the boardwalk.

JCMAN320
September 5th, 2007, 11:35 AM
Most of those buildings were built with the walkways when AC was a much different place than today. Same way the Gateway complex in Newark was built in the 1980s when the ad. was work in Newark with out ever actually being in Newark.

Hopefully these new developments will fix this problem wiht the lack of pedestrian traffic.

Fabrizio
September 5th, 2007, 11:37 AM
re: "The Chelsea": What would be smart would be to take the entire Chelsea area and landmark it. Offer incentives to restore the old homes. Develop a plan to knit the neighborhood together from the Boardwalk to Pacific, to Atlantic and beyond with strict design guidlines. Ban things like parking garages and blank walls and so forth (unfortunately those are the things so much of the new development in Atlantic City offers the street.)

Do in Chelsea what was done in So. Beach Miami (or at least in Cape May). It could become the chic, elegant part of Atlantic City and work as a "real" neighborhood.


---

66nexus
September 5th, 2007, 12:55 PM
I believe there is some kind of new 'Boardwalk aesthetic standard' being implemented in order to restore the Boardwalk and facades to past splendor. (I think the House of Blues was one example as it replaced the Showboat's boring plain facade with a nice club entrance)
4803

The problem with casinos was that when they were built, they were completely modeled after their Vegas counterparts (clunky/big-box), and no one wanted to build off of the Boardwalk.
I hope PInnacle and the others don't follow this model as someone stated earlier

giselehaslice
September 5th, 2007, 02:03 PM
Does anyone have any news on the Revel Entertainment casino? The renderings are supposed to be released soon (if they did'nt already release them).

66nexus
September 5th, 2007, 02:18 PM
Most of those buildings were built with the walkways when AC was a much different place than today. Same way the Gateway complex in Newark was built in the 1980s when the ad. was work in Newark with out ever actually being in Newark.

Hopefully these new developments will fix this problem wiht the lack of pedestrian traffic.

Ironically enough, a big complaint about the Walk is that it is centered around busy streets and there have been calls for a pedestrian bridge

American Gaming Guru
September 5th, 2007, 03:35 PM
No Revel plans out yet. I am anxiously awaiting them too.

Ironically, the man who set in-place the boardwalk redevelopment is now investing in it...big! Together with The Chelsea and a potential boutique casino on land south of the Hilton (former Dunes/AC High school site which I previously have talked about), Curtis Bashaw seems to be leading the charge. Here are two articles (both from the AC Casino Journal) below that talk about the facade improvements and other things to come:

1st from 2005:

Boardwalk Believer

Curtis Bashaw's promising first year at CRDA
by Roger Gros (http://www.casinoconnectionac.com/authors/Roger_Gros)
As he looks back on a year since he took over as executive director of the Casino Reinvestment Development Authority (CRDA), Curtis Bashaw sees accomplishments, turmoil and possibilities.
"I am more convinced than ever that Atlantic City is on the brink of blowing the lid off this town," he says. "To see the hunch validated by the success of the Borgata; to see The Walk expanding; to see the Tropicana so enthusiastic about The Quarter that they're willing to look at an entire other block adjacent to them for a new tower; this is significant activity taking place that tells me we're Vegas in 1989."
As it was in Vegas after the opening of the Mirage that year, Atlantic City has begun to get recognition as a quality destination resort, at least within the Northeast region. As a quasi-public agency, the CRDA has primed the pump in local development, using measures passed by the legislature that have allowed the casinos to get credits from their CRDA funds toward expansion, whether it is hotel rooms, restaurants, retail or meeting space. Bashaw cites a recent bill that establishes five separate "entertainment districts" that qualify for the CRDA credits.
"We see them as devices that are real lynchpins to stabilize and keep the momentum going for Atlantic City's future," he says. "It's a significant tool for the CRDA. We've recently approved the first of the new five districts for the Borgata for the next phase of development, which is valued at $550 million."
Boardwalk Benefits


Bashaw brought a new set of eyes when he came on board last year. One of his mantras is "Let the past inform the future," stressing the importance of the historically significant and successful elements of Atlantic City. He has focused on the Boardwalk as being the centerpiece of the city, and wanted to emphasize its redevelopment.
"We've been able to get people to think of Atlantic City as a brand and the Boardwalk in particular is the icon that anchors that brand," he says.
With $100 million of CRDA funds in hand, he established some design parameters for the Wooden Way.
"Design guidelines are fine," he says, "but if there's no money to implement them, we'll be limited to one new project at a time. This fund will enable us to go backwards and restore properties that are there now. We are working with non-gaming properties, whether it's a mom-and-pop operation or a tenant in a store. We will partner with them, with the cooperation of the Special Improvement District, to improve the facades and other parts of their buildings."
Bashaw says casinos have been working with the CRDA on a voluntary basis, which frees up even more money.
"This allows us to bond some other revenue sources independent of a mandate from the legislature," he says.
Cooperation between all the parties has thus far been exemplary, says Bashaw.
"Working with the casino executives and the city stakeholders in that effort has been very rewarding," he says. "We're already beginning to see the fruits of those design guidelines as it relates to the façade at the House of Blues at Showboat and overall a new attitude with the way Caesars is approaching the restoration of the Claridge. Resorts just came in and let us know they wanted to restore their façade, as well."
On The Right Track


One of the recent thrusts of the CRDA is an effort to establish train service between New York City and Atlantic City. Currently, the only way connect by rail between the two cities is through Philadelphia, which can be at least a four-hour excursion. Bashaw wants to cut that to less than three hours and make it a unique experience.
"The track is all there, it's just organizing with Amtrak and New Jersey Transit the rights-of-way and things of that nature," he says. "We want to be helpful at the CRDA in providing the train cars we need and make sure it's a special experience."
He agrees that the majority of Atlantic City's market will continue to drive, but thinks a convenient rail link would open up new markets.
"Most people who live in the suburbs would continue to drive to Atlantic City," he says. "The market we're aiming at don't have automobiles and live in Manhattan or one of the other boroughs of New York."
In addition to transportation to the city, Bashaw says the CRDA is seeking to round out its longtime commitment to housing that will benefit Atlantic City in other ways. With real estate values rising in Atlantic City, Bashaw believes an opportunity exists to bring more affluent residents and owners to town.
"We're trying to leverage the momentum in the marketplace to help stimulate market-rate housing projects that would round out the demographics in Atlantic City, as well as capture the second-home market buyer," he says.
It is this ability to see the big picture that has set Bashaw apart. He feels his mission is to communicate the accomplishments of the CRDA throughout the state.
"It's been a goal to be more ambassadorial and carry the message that there is a casino dividend that is spread around the state of New Jersey. That's not anything we should be ashamed of. I've been willing to travel a little bit more to visit projects or to take checks at press events, or to go to Trenton. I think that helped to raise awareness of how the CRDA works."
But Bashaw wants Trenton to understand that the CRDA isn't just a bank.
"I try to not only show what we've accomplished but also demonstrate our limits," he says. "We're not just some big piggybank down here; that there are enabling legislation, rules and procedures that you must satisfy to become a part of our plans."
Politics As Usual


As a nominal Republican, Bashaw is markedly non-political. His ascent to the post at CRDA was a result of a chance meeting with then-Governor James McGreevey when the governor was staying at Bashaw's Cape May hotel, Congress Hall. A discussion about the lure and attraction of the Jersey Shore piqued McGreevey's interest in Bashaw and the rest is history.
"It's not every day you have a sitting governor as a guest at your hotel, so I took advantage and did a little proselytizing about the Shore," explains Bashaw. "That resonated with him. Aside from checking out all my credentials and putting me through the gauntlet before getting this job, he called up the first week I was on the job and told me not to forget about the Shore."
Bashaw has been able to handle the rough-and-tumble world of South Jersey politics, particularly those in Atlantic City, where for more than two years Mayor Lorenzo Langford and City Council President Craig Callaway have been conducting a running feud. It's delicate balance for Bashaw.
"We meet frequently with members of city council and with the mayor," he says. "Certainly, I wish, like a lot of observers do, that there was more unanimity within the city government structure. For a non-partisan government, there's a lot of rivalry. I don't think that serves the city's interest as well as it could. But I feel a real cooperation from every department, city council and the mayor's office."
He values his relationship with the casino executives, who he credits with creativity and enthusiasm.
"I have felt welcomed as a peer and I've learned from them immeasurably," he says. "I think they've valued my opinion. It's been a dynamic relationship. There's that prodding and give and take that takes place in any business relationship, but there's been a real sense of espirit de corps. The vision that everyone has to see the town as a brand start to unfold is exciting. Everyone is sort of bitten with that bug right now right down the line. They're a great group of people who want to see the business succeed here."

Than another Q&A from 2007:

Q&A with Curtis Bashaw


by Frank Legato (http://www.casinoconnectionac.com/authors/Frank_Legato)
http://www.casinoconnectionac.com/Thumbs/phpThumb.php?src=/img/B7BCF62D-32FB-C766-B36C-2C8F00941312/Curtis_Bashaw.jpg&w=225
Before returning in 2005 to his former role as a prominent Cape May hotelier, Curtis Bashaw reshaped the Casino Reinvestment Development Authority. As executive director of CRDA, Bashaw led efforts to re-brand the Jersey Shore as a cohesive tourist destination, and oversaw improvements to Atlantic City that included the Walk retail center and revitalization of the Boardwalk. More recently, Bashaw partnered with former Bally’s chief Wallace Barr on an as-yet-unspecified new casino project for the southwest corner of the Boardwalk, and has forged a new venture to transform the adjacent Holiday Inn and Howard Johnson Boardwalk hotels in the Chelsea neighborhood into an upscale boutique hotel the likes of which have not been seen before in Atlantic City.
Casino Connection Managing Editor Frank Legato talked with Bashaw about his newest plan recently at his Congress Hall hotel in Cape May.
Casino Connection: After you left CRDA, we thought you’d go back to Cape May and become the gentleman hotelier. Instead, you’ve remained involved in Atlantic City. Tell us what you’ve been doing since leaving the CRDA.
Bashaw: The CRDA was really a full-time job for me, and I did spend a great deal of time after leaving the CRDA sort of connecting with my own company both in the New York and Cape May offices. We have continued to work on opportunities to participate in the Atlantic City market, but this time from the private-sector side.
CC: Can you tell us about your latest plan to create a boutique hotel?
Bashaw: We recently closed on the purchase of the Holiday Inn and Howard Johnson, both located on Chelsea Avenue between Pacific and the Boardwalk. Our vision there is to close the hotels after the summer, combine them and renovate them into a 337-room upscale boutique hotel, similar to the Gansevoort in New York, or the W or the Mercer—one of these independent but stylish properties that cater to an upscale market.
CC: This is a new concept for Atlantic City. Will it be comparable to those kinds of hotels in quality?
Bashaw: First of all, we are going to add amenities to this property that will really be top-shelf. There will be a rooftop pool with cabanas, and food and beverage service that will create quite a scene. There will be two awesome bars and restaurants, a spa with 6,000 square feet, bikes, room service, and an excellent concierge. We absolutely think that even though it is a new concept for Atlantic City, it is high time that Atlantic City had this kind of product to round out the offerings that have come to town in the last few years.
CC: We’ve heard that you’ll be working with the Tropicana to dedicate blocks of rooms to its customers. Is that the case?
Bashaw: We have had just very preliminary discussions with the Trop folks. We believe that there is a huge market for this product with or without blocks of rooms being committed to gaming properties.
CC: What kind of room rates do you expect? Is it going to be a step up, a step down?
Bashaw: We are going to have two room types in the property. The Holiday Inn has a pretty large tower on top of the parking decks, and those rooms will be at the top of the market—sort of a Four-Star product—and they will be priced that way. The Howard Johnson’s rooms we are going to call the Cabana Rooms, and they will be more of a mid-market product that will cater to younger folks and people who want to be on the Boardwalk and in town with a fun, hip, vibey product that they won’t have to break the bank to stay in.
CC: There’s a small ballroom in the Holiday Inn right now. Will you go after small meetings and conferences?
Bashaw: We will have a ballroom and meeting space, and will continue to do meetings, weddings and conferences at the facilities. We expect to grow this business. We think it is an important business for the mid-week as well as the wedding business, which will really be a wonderful thing on weekends. We have done a ton of weddings in Cape May at Congress Hall. We do over 70 a year, and we are expecting to take that franchise also to Atlantic City.
CC: Do you expect to work with the Atlantic City Convention and Visitors Authority?
Bashaw: Absolutely. You know their work is essential in our view to the long-term health of Atlantic City as a resort destination, and we look forward very much to working with them.
CC: Do you think this may provide a spark for others to get involved in Boardwalk properties?
Bashaw: The Boardwalk is Atlantic City’s Strip. It is an international icon, and to me it’s the obvious place to be. I’m sure others will feel that way as well, and we will see a real energy come to the Boardwalk over the next few years.
CC: Is the market ready for more non-gaming hotels?
Bashaw: Atlantic City is ripe for new hotels. We could double or triple the inventory of rooms in my view, and not make a dent in the demand. The gaming facilities are adding hotel rooms, but they reserve most of their rooms for their rated players, and now that we have all this new slew of amenities from restaurants to entertainment to clubs to shopping, it is not easy, on a weekend in particular, for a person who is not a rated player to just call up and get a room. So we absolutely think there is room for non-gaming properties.
CC: How do you view Atlantic City in terms of new competition from Pennsylvania and New York?
Bashaw: I am a firm believer that critical mass and location are everything. Atlantic City has been a resort for 100 years. We have 11 casinos we have a 30-year head start on these other gaming districts, and fortunately, we have a tax rate in New Jersey that encourages capital investment. These other jurisdictions are adding slot machines, and absolutely there will be a short-term impact, but as the population expands, as gaming becomes more acceptable as an amenity to a full-body vacation, we are going to see some of these new regional gaming jurisdictions really serve as a feeder market for us. So I am confident that if we do our jobs well in making sure that Atlantic City is an all-around destination, we will see continued growth and prosperity.
CC: Where do you see Atlantic City in five or 10 years?
Bashaw: I really think Atlantic City is going to reclaim its rightful place as a world-class resort. It was a resort for 100 years before it was a gaming town, and I think we are coming right back at it. If you look at the history of places like South Beach or places like Las Vegas, they went through a time that was less than world-class, and both of those places have been very tenacious in rebuilding their image and seeing growth. All of those sign posts are there for Atlantic City. The fundamentals are in place, and we believe Atlantic City is going to claim its place again as one of the world’s great destinations in the next 10 years.

Fabrizio
September 5th, 2007, 04:18 PM
All good news.

Please note that as models for development he mentions South Beach and places like the Mercer, the Gansevoort... neigborhoods and locales that came about because of restored HISTORIC districts.

South Beach was not destroyed by life sucking self-contained mega developments. The Ganservoort sits in the historic meatpacking district... the Mercer in SoHo.

Along with the big casinos Atlantic City would do well to LANDMARK and restore parts of the city and create real viable neighborhoods if it wants to also be a non-gaming destination.


--

giselehaslice
September 5th, 2007, 04:31 PM
fabrizio, that would be a wonderful idea. I beleive that Atlantic City should have a vibrant 'downtown' with nice stores, outdoor restuarants, and things that would make it more of a City.

Regarding the Boutique Casino south of the Hilton by Bashaw will be really nice, and will create a great bookend to the boardwalk.

In my opinion, I think that Atlantic City should also be a very good potential candidate for a W Hotel, and other luxury hotels that have very high profile clientele.

All of these things would definatley help create more of a City and Resort all in one. :rolleyes:

66nexus
September 5th, 2007, 04:45 PM
All good news.

Please note that as models for development he mentions South Beach and places like the Mercer, the Gansevoort... neigborhoods and locales that came about because of restored HISTORIC districts.

South Beach was not destroyed by life sucking self-contained mega developments. The Ganservoort sits in the historic meatpacking district... the Mercer in SoHo.

Along with the big casinos Atlantic City would do well to LANDMARK and restore parts of the city and create real viable neighborhoods if it wants to also be a non-gaming destination.


--

The problem is that any casinos would definitely suck away some of AC's land just given the mere size of these projects.
-I concur, they definitely should landmark/restore sections. AC still has a few old landmarks like Claridge, Resorts, and Boardwalk Hall, but these are only some of the few there are left
It seems that casino developers want HUGE swaths of land to build upon (ie Wynn wanting Bader Field) The advantage Vegas has is space, above all else. AC's on a tiny island

-It's like how Caesar's built their huge parking deck behind their Boardwalk casino whereas Tropicana built their second tower right on top of a parking deck (it's just a better use of the space)

-I would actually like a Wynn AC but NOT if that meant other companies like Pinnacle would pull out.

66nexus
September 5th, 2007, 04:52 PM
fabrizio, that would be a wonderful idea. I beleive that Atlantic City should have a vibrant 'downtown' with nice stores, outdoor restuarants, and things that would make it more of a City.



AC actually has more stores, restaurants in its downtown than most cities its size. However, I wouldn't advocate that the Walk go from being 13 blocks to being the only thing that is in downtown AC. AC would definitely do well with a 'village' type of scene.

Fabrizio
September 5th, 2007, 05:24 PM
Another big casino is nice but right now, AC needs its own version of this:
http://www.flickr.com/photos/princessd/978790141/

giselehaslice
September 5th, 2007, 05:29 PM
^ Right, that is exactly what I thaught of too.

The Boardwalk is definatley another area that could use improvement of stores and restaurants. I think that a Cheesecake factory, Grand Lux Cafe, and such would do great on the Boardwalk...

Fabrizio
September 5th, 2007, 05:41 PM
That would be great also, but remember, CheeseCake Factory etc are chains that people can find everywhere , what AC needs is a real neighborhood with it'sown distinctive clubs, restaurants, cafes, galleries and shops.

66nexus
September 5th, 2007, 06:18 PM
Another big casino is nice but right now, AC needs its own version of this:
http://www.flickr.com/photos/princessd/978790141/

Oh could you imagine? That exact photo on the Boardwalk would be awesome

giselehaslice
September 5th, 2007, 06:43 PM
^yes, the boardwalk would be absolutely beautiful if it all looked like that...
The only way that will happen is if the casinos refacade thier boarwalk frontage to make it look more "City/resortlike" and add the outside cafes and foliage.

Actually, this is already starting with the boardwalk refacading program that applies this "village" style to the bwalk. :)

American Gaming Guru
September 5th, 2007, 07:57 PM
I got a big Ahhhhhh out of that South Beach photo too. Nice stuff.

giselehaslice
September 5th, 2007, 10:02 PM
In this week's issue of Atlantic City Weekly in Pinky's Corner, the possibility of a CityCenter east arises again. As Stated in the article, there should be a definitive answer if AC will get it. :D

Also, it says that atop the new Harrahs tower, which will be the tallest in the city, will house a new restaurant which just happens to be the swank central park eatery, tavern on the green. :cool:

http://www.acweekly.com/view.php?id=7244&issue_id=196

Scroll down to the bottom of the article, and you will find what I stated above in a more "formal" column format.

American Gaming Guru
September 6th, 2007, 10:30 AM
giselehaslice, we must read the same rags! I was anxious to post Pinky's observations and the following article from The Press. Looks like you beat me on at least one of them! Pinky's corner is great.

CRDA seeks consultant for Bader Field study

By MAYA RAO Staff Writer, (609) 272-7221
Published: Thursday, September 6, 2007
ATLANTIC CITY (http://www.inform.com/Atlantic+City) - The Casino Reinvestment Development Authority (http://www.inform.com/Casino+Reinvestment+Development+Authority) said Wednesday that it is requesting proposals for the selection of a consultant to study financial development alternatives for Bader Field.
Since Atlantic City closed the historic airport there last fall, the fate of the nearly 150-acre site along Albany Avenue has prompted discussion among city, casino and state officials on how it can best be used at a time when the city is seeing rapid growth.
In June, CRDA Executive Director Tom Carver (http://www.inform.com/Tom+Carver) told the Senate Tourism and Gaming Committee that the state agency envisioned more casinos there eventually - a viewpoint that has put him at odds with some gaming interests.
Pinnacle Entertainment Inc. (http://www.inform.com/Pinnacle+Entertainment+Inc.), which is planning to develop a $1.5 billion casino in place of the former Sands Casino Hotel (http://www.inform.com/Sands+Atlantic+City), has previously said that it would walk away from those plans if Bader Field is rezoned for casino development. Harrah's Entertainment Inc. (http://www.inform.com/Harrah%27s+Entertainment+Inc.), which owns four of the city's 11 casinos, has also expressed opposition to further casino development there.
In a statement, Carver said a state-city task force would carry out the CRDA's assessment of the best use for Bader Field - one that would bring the greatest financial returns for Atlantic City. The task force includes the CRDA, the city and the State Office of Economic Growth (http://www.inform.com/State+Office+of+Economic+Growth).
The task force said in a statement that it was committed to ensuring that no new major facility, such as a casino, will be allowed to start construction there until all permits have been issued and all funding is in place for the necessary roadway connections between the city and Bader Field. "Without necessary roadway connections and until other transportation-related issues are dealt with, development on Bader Field will not be possible," the statement said.

kliq6
September 6th, 2007, 10:42 AM
City Center East in AC is a def possibility

JCMAN320
September 6th, 2007, 10:56 AM
Atlantic City looking really, really strong.

JCMAN320
September 6th, 2007, 12:22 PM
NJ TRANSIT TO CREATE BUS AND RAIL INTERCONNECTIVITY AT A.C. RAIL TERMINAL
Convenient connection at the terminal for coastal bus line

August 27, 2007
Contact: Joe Dee (973) 491-7078

NEWARK, NJ — NJ TRANSIT will launch intermodal service at the Atlantic City Rail Terminal on September 1, 2007 to better serve customers whose trips include bus and rail components and to provide convenient bus service to the Atlantic City Convention Center, located at the rail terminal.

The No. 552 bus, which provides service to popular coastal destinations including Wildwood and Cape May, will originate and conclude trips at the rail terminal instead of at the Atlantic City Bus Terminal, which is located three blocks away. All trips will continue to serve the bus terminal.

“We expect our customers will appreciate this route extension, especially during inclement weather,” said NJ TRANSIT Executive Director Richard Sarles. “It reflects our ongoing commitment to create intermodal connections that maximize the value of our services and enhance customer convenience.”

Upon arrival at the Atlantic City Rail Terminal, rail customers will be able to step aboard a No. 552 cruiser-style bus to their shore destination. The 552 also serves the Crest Haven County Complex in Middle Township, Cape May Court House, the Lions Senior Center in Wildwood, Rio Grande, Villas and Cape May.

Coastal residents will benefit from a direct bus connection to events at the Atlantic City Convention Center. The 552 also serves the Ocean View Park & Ride, located along the Garden State Parkway. The facility offers residents the convenience of parking there and completing their trip to Atlantic City with a comfortable, hassle-free ride aboard the bus.

JCexpert558
September 6th, 2007, 05:53 PM
I wonder when Atlantic City will have a building something like the proposed building thats 1555 feet tall in Las Vegas. It deverves that from all that development thats going on.

JCexpert558
September 6th, 2007, 06:02 PM
Also its hard to believe that the population of Atlantic city is like 50,000. But I bet by 2010, it will be at least 150,000.:D

66nexus
September 6th, 2007, 06:02 PM
I wonder when Atlantic City will have a building something like the proposed building thats 1555 feet tall in Las Vegas. It deverves that from all that developmen thats going on.

For a small coastal city 1555ft is kinda extreme but it'd still be nice I guess lol. Strangely enough, AC's skyline will be taller than Newark's in less than 5 years...interesting

66nexus
September 6th, 2007, 06:06 PM
Also its hard to believe that the population of Atlantic city is like 50,000. But I bet by 2010, it will be at least 150,000.:D

I think the populace is only around 39,000

JCexpert558
September 6th, 2007, 06:13 PM
I hope it looks better than Newarks skyline because the the skyine looks dull like it does not look like theres alot of activity going on

giselehaslice
September 6th, 2007, 08:03 PM
speaking of skylines, in this webcam I found, you can constantly check construction of the new water club @ borgata, and the new harrahs tower. When the new citycenter starts construction, you will also be able to see the whole thing from this continually updated camera.

Heres the Link:
http://acua.com/alternative/a_projects_dsply.cfm?id=275

Its pretty cool, considering you can see the skyline plus the windmill turbines. :rolleyes:

JCMAN320
September 6th, 2007, 08:21 PM
Love the windturbines in the skyline. Also funny enough that JC already has the 5 largest buildings in the state and soon the top 8. Also oddly enough JC and AC will have bigger skylines than Newark and hopefully sometime soon JC will become bigger than Newark.

66nexus
September 6th, 2007, 08:55 PM
Love the windturbines in the skyline. Also funny enough that JC already has the 5 largest buildings in the state and soon the top 8. Also oddly enough JC and AC will have bigger skylines than Newark and hopefully sometime soon JC will become bigger than Newark.

Although some of us are hoping Newark will still be the largest:D

66nexus
September 6th, 2007, 08:56 PM
I hope it looks better than Newarks skyline because the the skyine looks dull like it does not look like theres alot of activity going on

AC's skyline looks very bright at night. And Newark's skyline is always lit up. Newark's skyline is nice and tidy but it's short. Thankfully it isn't as close to NY so it can stand out in it's own way, but it's short nonetheless

JCexpert558
September 7th, 2007, 05:40 PM
Although some of us are hoping Newark will still be the largest:D
Actually I think that Newark has been the big city for to long time so I think that A.C or JC city should become the big city of NJ

Fabrizio
September 7th, 2007, 05:46 PM
LOL. AC doesn't even have a supermarket.

giselehaslice
September 7th, 2007, 06:04 PM
Ac might not have a supermarket, but it does have many nice markets inclding Zeytina in the Quarter @ tropicana, and it has 2 at the pier at caesars including eden gourmet and Giorgio's markets.

Fabrizio
September 7th, 2007, 06:50 PM
My point is that AC is nowhere near big city status. And despite the casinos, it is actually in many ways, much less of a city today than it was up until the 1970's. That is why AC needs plans to heal the city part.

Right now, with the exception of a few bright spots, it is largely a slum hosting self-contained billion dollar casinos.

Not much of a city.

giselehaslice
September 7th, 2007, 08:10 PM
http://www.hotelchatter.com/story/2007/9/7/101912/3993/hotels/The_Boutique_Hotel_Trend_Moves_to_Atlantic_City_wi th_The_Chelsea_House

This link shows what looks like a preliminary rendering of what "The Chelsea" might look like.. I like the sort of glitzy/vegas-esque neon, lets just hope the interior is more like a W hotel or something like that...

JCexpert558
September 7th, 2007, 09:35 PM
My point is that AC is nowhere near big city status. And despite the casinos, it is actually in many ways, much less of a city today than it was up until the 1970's. That is why AC needs plans to heal the city part.

Right now, with the exception of a few bright spots, it is largely a slum hosting self-contained billion dollar casinos.

Not much of a city.
F that crap, It is more of a city than it ever was. Atlantic City was not as good in the 1970s then it is in at the moment. Atlantic city does't need anything to change its look. I mean it could use some small touches like get rid of the dangerous neighborhoods, but other than that, nothing should change.

Marv95
September 7th, 2007, 09:52 PM
Besides the boardwalk, what else is there? Seriously, it's mosty wasteland/ghetto. They can't just focus on JUST the boardwalk area.

And this ant-Newark crap is just comical for a thread that has nothing to do with it...

giselehaslice
September 7th, 2007, 10:41 PM
Okay, I think that everyone knows that AC could use alot of work.

Lets acknowledge that AC does have bad neighborhoods, although they are'nt particularly dangerous. It does Need Work with alot of things, but do you happen to remember what Times Sqaure used to look like? Hopefully you do, and you will then know that 'Rome was not built in a day' (as cliche as that might be).

There are soooooooooooo many positive things happening in AC. Lets just try to focus on the positive things, which is what this thread is ALL about. Its not about putting down Newark or whatever, its about development in Atlantic City and please, lets try to keep it that way.

Fabrizio
September 8th, 2007, 04:32 AM
"Lets just try to focus on the positive things, which is what this thread is ALL about. "

No. That's not what this thread is about nor is it what this forum is about.

A mature debate means looking at all sides to the story.

The thread title says "Atlantic City Seeks New Image: Las Vegas's". That's a huge topic and to see what AC needs to do to match Vegas' image also means giving a good hard look at the present situation. What are you guys afraid of?

The thread is NOT entitled, "Let's cheerlead for AC!"

---

As far as the comments about Atlantic City's population: The city currently stands at a bit over 40,000. Interestingly enough, it is estimated to be LOSING inhabitants.

Despite the glittering casinos the city LOST 10,000 inhabitants from between 1970 and 1990. During the 90's, despite gambling in full swing, there was only a modest gain. But estimates are for loses between 2000 and 2005. Right now, the city's population may well be LESS than it was in 1980.

Scroll down to demographics:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Atlantic_City,_New_Jersey

---

ChelseaHouse rendering: the tower part is fine. Glitzy 1960's style... OK.

But WHAT is that blank wall at the bottom? Is thing sitting on a parking garage?

Here we go... more of the same...


---

giselehaslice
September 8th, 2007, 11:37 AM
^haha guess ur right, i'd much rather have all 600,000 cars that would have usually been in various garages parked out on the street anyway.

and also-If this thread is looking at AC in comaprison to Las Vegas, then why in the world are we talking about this "South Beach"? i was out in Vegas in July, and let me tell you, there is nothing "South Beach" about it. Yeah, there are a few outdoor cafes here and there, but it is nothing to the extent of south beach.

There are tons of gargages in Las Vegas, and there are also alot of garages in Miami Beach, actually which are now built at the base of every condo tower which i've seen being built there.

The fact is that people drive cars, they need a place to park them. They arent gonna walk from NY to atlantic city...

Maybe we should change this thread to "Atlantic City Seeks New Image: South Beach's"

Fabrizio
September 8th, 2007, 12:12 PM
Re: South Beach. Follow the thread.

It was first brought up in AmericanGamingGuru's post. Curtis Bradshaw ( executive director of the Casino Reinvestment Development Authority) also mentions it as a point of reference for Atlantic City:

http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showpost.php?p=184841&postcount=144

----

re: parking: must the alternatives be 600,000 cars parked on the street OR 600,000 cars parked in parking garges that line streets with blank walls? (as that rendering seems to show?) Couldn't there be a more creative way to handle the situation?

---

"i was out in Vegas in July, and let me tell you, there is nothing "South Beach" about it. Yeah, there are a few outdoor cafes here and there..."

Vegas is not sleeping. In it's quest to become a world-class city, one that is not dependent soley on casino revues. It is rebuilding it's downtown with the new Union Park developement, which is described as being:

"a place that will appeal to those seeking an urban experience or lifestyle in an authentic downtown environment."

"Planned as a true urban neighborhood with avariety of housing types, including apartments,condominiums in both low- and high-rise configurations;street-level brownstones, walk-ups and mid-rise mixed-use with retail on the first level. "

"Throughout Union Park,street level retail and restaurants will be situated in various locations,and will be the key element along the street presently referred to as “The Promenade,”Union Park’s north-south access. “The Avenue”will provide yet another important location for dining and shopping,as retail areas act as a critical connection between the major districts,linking together the other elements of the community".

It should be noted that this development will ALSO include:1.9 million square feet of Class A office space, a performing arts center and a research hospital.

Parking BTW is handled in separate structures, rooftops and kept to the perifery.

I understand the exitement about The Walk and a rooftop restaurant at Harrah's... but this is what Las Vegas is up to:

ATT: pdf files:

http://www.unionparkvegas.com/UPMediaKit022307.pdf
http://www.lasvegasnevada.gov/files/UnionParkMasterPlan.pdf

---

66nexus
September 8th, 2007, 01:11 PM
Why not build the structure right on top of the parking structure? (saves space like the Tropicana tower) Or incorporate the parking deck into the overall design of the building (much like University Center in Newark). I've also seen parking structures that actually have storefront space (it could work if done right)

66nexus
September 8th, 2007, 01:15 PM
Re: South Beach. Follow the thread.


Parking BTW is handled in separate structures and kept to the perifery.

I understand the exitement about The Walk and a rooftop restaurant at Harrah's... but this is what Las Vegas is up to:

ATT: pdf file:

http://www.unionparkvegas.com/UPMediaKit022307.pdf

---

The thing is that Las Vegas has the physical space to actually keep parking structures separate. AC is tiny so parking decks will stand out no matter what. Maybe they should consider a SUPER-DECK at Bader Field, with shuttles to the Marina and Boardwalk

JCexpert558
September 8th, 2007, 08:00 PM
When I look at wikapedia, it says that Atlantic City is 39.0 Kilometer sqaure . Is A.C actualy bigger than it all ready is icluding the islands.

66nexus
September 8th, 2007, 08:10 PM
When I look at wikapedia, it says that Atlantic City is 39.0 Kilometer sqaure . Is A.C actualy bigger than it all ready is icluding the islands.

...Nope

American Gaming Guru
September 10th, 2007, 10:29 AM
I think The Chelsea pic looks a bit cliché, but I would expect the final product to be much more sophisticated judging by the developer's previous developments.

On another note, if my memory serves me right, The Holiday Inn (aka The Chelsea project) does stand on a parking deck. I think they are pretty much unavoidable in AC as massive amounts of parking are needed and the water table is probably very high preventing underground parking (at a reasonable construction price anyway).

One good example of incorporating parking into a development is undoubtedly The Quarter at the Trop. They dressed up the parking deck nicely and seamlessly incorporated the hotel tower and adjoining amenities.

On the topic of AC as a city and this forum etc. I would also argue that without the casinos, I too would be hard-pressed to refer to it as a real city as well. Beyond the boardwalk, The Walk and Marina District, the city in general is really shabby and in my opinion a real shame considering the potential of some of the greatest real estate on the East Coast. With that said; however, I do believe that there have been some great strides within the past few years to make it a more integrated resort that serves both residents and tourists alike.

Also, I would think that this string did start with a different purpose, but it caught our attention right? Let’s just go with it! AC will never be Vegas and by all means, do we really want it to be????

66nexus
September 10th, 2007, 11:20 AM
I think AC is just too small to achieve that 'real' city status. It, like a lot of Jersey shore towns, is a resort town. For a city of 40k its 'downtown' isn't bad at all.
-The areas off the Boardwalk, or the Walk/Marina aren't areas for tourists and tourists have no reason exploring these areas.

Vegas is more than 10x larger than AC. The fact that a small NJ city even gets compared to it actually says a lot to me. It can be argued that Vegas doesn't even have 'real' city traits.

AC's suburbs are very nice but they're outside city limits

Fabrizio
September 10th, 2007, 11:54 AM
Atlantic City was once very much a real city. And I'm sorry, maybe I'm missing something but apart from "the walk" it's downtown is the pits.

The downtown (off the boardwalk) once featured the things you would expect like a large department store (Lit Brother's, comparable to Macy's at the time) in a magnificent art-deco building, a number of movie theatres like the beautiful Beach on Pacific avenue (2 more on Atlantic), as well as plenty of beautiful shops and restaurants catering to residents. Pacific Avenue, Altantic Avenue and the side streets where very pleasant places.

It should also be noted that long before gambling, AC featrured some of the hottest night clubs in the US (none were on the b'walk) like the legendary 500Club (Sinatra sang there, Lewis & Martin started there... all the big names through the 40's, 50's and 60's played it) and the Harlem Club.

Not to mention all the names that played Steel Pier.


Remember that in 1960, the population of AC was around 60,000 compared to under 40,000 today.

AC boasted beautiful residential neigborhoods in the Chelsea section and the inlet.Even the high school was located right in the city next to "the monument".

AC also featured some magnificent architecture worthy of New York, Chicago or Philidelphia such as the Traymore, the Marlborough-Blenheim, the Claridge, Haddon Hall, the Dennis, the Shelbourn etc. Not to mention the fanciful library building.... right in the center of town.

Unfortunately most of the architecture in AC post-gambling has been pretty dreadful.


----

http://www.flickr.com/photos/videoal/293601483/

http://www.princetonantiques.com/phaerialview.jpg
http://www.princetonantiques.com/ac_images/hotels%20-%20casinos/slides/2795.html
http://www.princetonantiques.com/ac_images/hotels%20-%20casinos/slides/2796.html

---

Re parking Holiday Inn: I stayed at the Holiday Inn when it was Teplitsky's, Kosher Hotel catering mainly to Philadelphians. (I'm not Jewish...it's a long story, but I had a great time.)
I don't remember parking under the building.


---

66nexus
September 10th, 2007, 01:48 PM
It can't be argued that AC 'had' a lot to offer. And sure it was the place to be, but that was before airlines made long-distance tourism possible.

-It should be noted that in the decades just before gambling was legalized, AC was in shambles and those old buildings of 'great' architecture were abandoned and derelict.

-The businesses/restaurants weren't bombed out, they couldn't keep up financially because no one was going to AC anymore. It'll be awhile before we see the mom and pop shops go up again. There's nothing wrong with international retailers/restaurants as long as it isn't you're ONLY option. I think AC's just starting to realize the potential

Even a population of 60,000 is a small city
Some would argue that the architecture is bad. I think of that when I think of the Taj Mahal or Trump Plaza (but then look at the old casinos in Vegas) But then I think of the Borgata, and Harrah's new tower etc. Art Deco was great but Art Deco is dead. The Resorts new 'Art Deco' tower is hideous

Those pictures of South Beach are great but people have to realize that AC just isn't there yet, moving forward, but certainly not there.

66nexus
September 10th, 2007, 01:50 PM
Atlantic City was once very much a real city. And I'm sorry, maybe I'm missing something but apart from "the walk" it's downtown is the pits.

The downtown (off the boardwalk) once featured the things you would expect like a large department store (Lit Brother's, comparable to Macy's at the time) in a magnificent art-deco building, a number of movie theatres like the beautiful Beach on Pacific avenue (2 more on Atlantic), as well as plenty of beautiful shops and restaurants catering to residents. Pacific Avenue, Altantic Avenue and the side streets where very pleasant places.

It should also be noted that long before gambling, AC featrured some of the hottest night clubs in the US (none were on the b'walk) like the legendary 500Club (Sinatra sang there, Lewis & Martin started there... all the big names through the 40's, 50's and 60's played it) and the Harlem Club.

Not to mention all the names that played Steel Pier.


Remember that in 1960, the population of AC was around 60,000 compared to under 40,000 today.

AC boasted beautiful residential neigborhoods in the Chelsea section and the inlet.Even the high school was located right in the city next to "the monument".

AC also featured some magnificent architecture worthy of New York, Chicago or Philidelphia such as the Traymore, the Marlborough-Blenheim, the Claridge, Haddon Hall, the Dennis, the Shelbourn etc. Not to mention the fanciful library building.... right in the center of town.

Unfortunately most of the architecture in AC post-gambling has been pretty dreadful.


----

http://www.flickr.com/photos/videoal/293601483/

http://www.princetonantiques.com/phaerialview.jpg
http://www.princetonantiques.com/ac_images/hotels%20-%20casinos/slides/2795.html
http://www.princetonantiques.com/ac_images/hotels%20-%20casinos/slides/2796.html

---

Re parking Holiday Inn: I stayed at the Holiday Inn when it was Teplitsky's, Kosher Hotel catering mainly to Philadelphians. (I'm not Jewish...it's a long story, but I had a great time.)
I don't remember parking under the building.


---

The picture of that hotel on 'princetonantiques' is still standing today, and the Claridge too

unknown memory
September 10th, 2007, 02:45 PM
I really don't think AC will come that close to Las Vegas's image but as a city, it is starting to shape up a bit more. I was there last month walking down the boardwalk. It was alright but I don't know. Nothing there was that impressive. I don't go to AC for casinos or to shop. I go there to find an experience that I can't find anywhere else. Yet, can't help to feel a bit disappointed about being there.

Take a drive through some of the streets and it looks pretty much like a city.

What makes Las Vegas stand out isn't just the casinos or the resorts. On the strip, it has all these extra side attractions that brings in the tourists. It helps cater to those who don't gamble too. The volcano. The gondola ride. The talking statues in Ceasers. The two rides on that very high tower. The roller coaster at the NYNY hotel. The M&M World store. The Coca-cola store. The pirate ship show. Cirque Du Soleil. AC will probably not have these but at least, it does have the beach. And yet, I've never been to AC's beach. Always visit other places along the shore to get a beach. Hehe. ^__^

I was sort of impressed with The Quater but really didn't find that there was much to do in there either except go to the food store. I'm raising my eyebrow at the plan of bringing a wedding chapel to AC but besides all those other future plans, nothing really exciting to my eyes.

Fabrizio
September 10th, 2007, 03:06 PM
Yes the Clridge is standing and gives a glimse of the old AC. Note the hideously tacky white pathway tubes they've constructed around it. Does THIS ( link below) look like a first class resort? This isn't the backside but looking from the b'walk:

http://www.flickr.com/photos/vegasrob/292711397/in/set-72157594367203458/

Fortunately the Sands is coming down and the Claridge is being restored. But this is the face AC presented to the public for too long.

Haddon Hall still exists too. It's beautiful brick has been sealed over with WHITE paint. Beyond ugly. Here you can see it through the BEACH BLOCK parking lots and general desolation:

http://www.flickr.com/photos/iirraa/320883211/

Here it is originally next the the Chalfonte... now parking: http://www.rootsweb.com/~usgenweb/nj/atlantic/postcards/chalfonte.jpg

The Dennis has also been painted over and exists somewhere within the Ballys complex.... if you can find it:

(note the classy paint job)

http://www.flickr.com/photos/davekilpatrick/28526034/

Beautiful Bally's:

http://www.flickr.com/photos/vegasrob/292711836/
http://www.flickr.com/photos/vegasrob/292711762/
http://www.flickr.com/photos/vegasrob/292712154/

The height of hip sophistication:
(Note BTW that the windows and doorways are all FAKE )

http://www.flickr.com/photos/elissacorsini/224915981/in/set-72157594251661740/

Guys I want to know: WHAT could be tackier?:
http://www.flickr.com/photos/normy/92441064/

The magnificent Dennis as it originally appeared:
http://www.rootsweb.com/~usgenweb/nj/atlantic/postcards/dennis.jpg
http://www.emporis.com/en/il/im/?id=317028


---

66nexus
September 10th, 2007, 03:19 PM
The Sands is hideous. But it was built in the 70s.
You ever see the Trop Vegas:

http://www.destination360.com/north-america/us/nevada/las-vegas/tropicana-spa.php

Bally's WWW theme is outdated and poorly themed, and the colors are horrific. (they should turn those facades into actual restaurants or stores IMO)
I read in an article (and I agree) that AC is where Vegas was perhaps in the 80s: just starting to take off but not in flight

If the current course is maintained I give AC 5 years and do think it'll be the 'it' spot

66nexus
September 10th, 2007, 03:27 PM
Also, if CityCenter East ever happens I think that'll officially steal the flame of the Boardwalk area. The Marina district seems to currently represent the 'new' in AC hotel construction (at least until the Boardwalk breaks ground with the Hilton and Pinnacle)

JCexpert558
September 10th, 2007, 08:47 PM
I think that AC could surpass Las Vegas as a city late in the future.

Fabrizio
September 11th, 2007, 04:00 AM
"late in the future" ?

Well, that doesn't sound very encouraging.

----

AC is losing population and this year, casino revenues are down.

There is competion now from other locales. I think AC will continue to lose day-trippers because of gas prices.

So AC needs vacationers who choose to stay there for a few days, a week. People who come in from Europe, Asia etc. to actually vacation there.

Certainly change is on the way, there is lots of good news about upcoming projects, but I really believe that at the present, many people who go to AC expecting a glamourous, glittering city... go away disappointed, never to return.

When AC could depend on day-trippers it was easy. Bus them in. Drive them past the slums, the broken down shacks, the empty lots...straight to the casinos and then back again.

Let's face it: no one was actually going to Atlantic City, they were going to Resorts, or to the Taj, or to Bally's.

But now if AC wants to become a destination for travellers it's going to have to get the "city" part in order...in a big way.

---

http://news.777.com/2007-08/atlantic-city-casino-revenue-fall

--

American Gaming Guru
September 11th, 2007, 03:30 PM
I too think the Dennis Hotel looks hideous. Bally’s and eventually Harrah’s were looking to buy the piece of real estate directly in-front of the hotel that fronts the boardwalk form the Schiff Brothers. The CRDA through a study on boardwalk design standards (I believe originally commissioned by Bashaw) recommended the demolition of the structure and the opening/exposure/renovation of the courtyard and hotel. Here is the link to the CRDA Boardwalk Design Standards Study:

http://www.njcrda.com/ac_boardwalk.html (http://www.njcrda.com/ac_boardwalk.html)

It provides some great photo comparisons of the boardwalk of old and new. Architectural enthusiasts should enjoy it.

Here are the latest developments and references. It looks like Harrah's might actually be following through with the CRDA's recommendation. That would truly be a wonderful gift back to the architecture of the boardwalk!

From the Courier Post:

By WILLIAM H. SOKOLIC
Courier-Post Staff
ATLANTIC CITY
For years, a two-story row of retail shops and offices hid the once-luxurious courtyard of the Dennis Hotel. But come next year, the eyesore will be no more.
The Casino Reinvestment Development Authority gave preliminary approval Tuesday to fund a portion of a $40 million plan to demolish the storefronts and reopen the courtyard, now a part of Bally's Atlantic City.
The authority will put up $15 million of the cost.
"The stores are inconsistent with the rest of the architecture," said Joseph Dougherty, a lawyer with Bally's.
The stores and offices have until the end of the year to vacate, he said.
Harrah's Entertainment, which owns Bally's, bought the building from Robert and Abe Schiff, who own much of the boardwalk property not in casino hands. Until this year, the brothers, who have their offices on the second floor of the complex, refused to accept offer after offer from Bally's.
When Harrah's dangled $38.5 million in front of them, the Schiffs decided to part with the 26,600-square-foot parcel just down the block from Boardwalk and Park Place.
Bally's has no plans to build in the courtyard.

From the minutes of the CRDA's last Board Meeting 8/21/07:

1. RESOLUTION OF THE CASINO REINVESTMENT DEVELOPMENT AUTHORITY
GRANTING PROJECT APPROVAL AND ESTABLISHING A FUND RESERVATION IN
THE AMOUNT OF $15,680,786.00 FOR THE BALLY’S BOARDWALK PROJECT

The resolution was read by title. Ms. Nancy Wattson, Chief Financial Officer, provided a description of the proposed action and introduced Mr. Michael Walsh and Mr. Joseph Dougherty, Esq., representing Harrah’s Entertainment.
The Vice Chair elicited discussion from the Members, and then opened the matter to the public for comment. Upon hearing no public comment, the Vice Chair requested a motion to adopt the resolution. A motion was made by Mr. Boyce and seconded by Mr. Kehoe.
Resolution No. 0757
was approved by a vote of 13-0.

Fabrizio
September 11th, 2007, 03:50 PM
This is GREAT news.

The Casinos in AC have for too long turned their back on the city. They have played to the lowest in terms of taste and style. The Borgata has shown that people can handle sophistication.

I ask you: WHO in the year 2007 could actually fall for that corny "wild west" theme that Bally's offers? What kind of crowd are they trying to attract? Besides the fact that you are in Atlantic City with it's own history and culture...thank-you-very-much. They had a lot of nerve to ruin the B'walk they way they have with that blight.

And I personally don't know anyone who would be attracted to the dreadful Tropicana Havana themed disaster. I can understand why their revenues are falling too.

And I hope Trump can learn a few things from the Borgata and get rid of all that Taj crap.

Themes can work if it's done lavishly and with a wink (like Ceasars and The Bellagio) but mostly the world has moved on.

American Gaming Guru
September 11th, 2007, 05:00 PM
If I recall correctly the Holiday Inn was originally constructed as "The Diplomat". Also, I looked up a satellite photo. It does appear that the Holiday Inn stands on a parking deck.

Here are some pretty cool views:
http://maps.live.com/default.aspx?v=2&cp=qjrs2f8swgd6&style=o&lvl=1&tilt=-90&dir=0&alt=-1000&scene=14935032&encType=1


http://maps.live.com/default.aspx?v=2&cp=qjrqm18swfmt&style=o&lvl=1&tilt=-90&dir=0&alt=-1000&scene=14934699&encType=1 (http://maps.live.com/default.aspx?v=2&cp=qjrqm18swfmt&style=o&lvl=1&tilt=-90&dir=0&alt=-1000&scene=14934699&encType=1)

http://maps.live.com/default.aspx?v=2&cp=qjrry88swf36&style=o&lvl=1&tilt=-90&dir=0&alt=-1000&scene=5238937&encType=1 (http://maps.live.com/default.aspx?v=2&cp=qjrry88swf36&style=o&lvl=1&tilt=-90&dir=0&alt=-1000&scene=5238937&encType=1)

American Gaming Guru
September 11th, 2007, 05:05 PM
Here is a great shot of The Dennis as is:

http://maps.live.com/default.aspx?v=2&cp=qjsdfm8sxhz7&style=o&lvl=1&tilt=-90&dir=0&alt=-1000&scene=5238641&encType=1

66nexus
September 11th, 2007, 05:53 PM
VERYVERY good news. I kinda wish Bally's wouldn't build in the courtyard though and hope they extend the greenery up to the Boardwalk. It'd be nice to have some green on the B-walk.
It is definitely great to have those stores removed.

Caesar's has HUGE amounts of parking only for their building to be that small. If they ever expanded hotel space they probably would do right by just building on top of those huge decks. Vegas has a similar setup, but then Vegas has the room to do it right. AC should use the space wisely.

Fabrizio
September 11th, 2007, 06:10 PM
re: Holiday Inn: As you can see in the photo posted below, the Holiday Inn does seem to have a parking garage.

Note that the HowardJohnsons will also be part of "The Chelsea" and as you can read in the article, before it became a Howard Johnson's it was called Teplitsky's... and indeed there is no parking garage.

And yes, I believe you are right, it was originally contructed as the Diplomat and housed a popular restaurant called The Colony.

I got my national chains mixed up.

http://www.pressofatlanticcity.com/top_story/story/7499707p-7396527c.html

JCexpert558
September 11th, 2007, 07:44 PM
Im just wondering how dow you guys put those pictures, and articles in your posts?:confused:

American Gaming Guru
September 13th, 2007, 01:22 PM
Just copy and paste them into the message box. Its pretty easy.

Did anyone catch this today?

Company presents proposal for sky gondolas around A.C.

By ELAINE ROSE Staff Writer, (609) 272-7215
Published: Wednesday, September 12, 2007
ATLANTIC CITY (http://www.inform.com/Atlantic+City) - Las Vegas (http://www.inform.com/Las+Vegas) has its gondolas on a canal inside the Venetian Resort Hotel Casino (http://www.inform.com/The+Venetian). And if Cynthia Cortopassi (http://www.inform.com/Cynthia+Cortopassi)'s dream comes true, visitors to Atlantic City can ride around town in airborne gondolas suspended from a cable.

Cortopassi, of TS Creations in Egg Harbor Township (http://www.inform.com/Egg+Harbor+Township), presented her plan for "Atlantic City Chariots of the Sky" Tuesday morning at the monthly meeting of the Boardwalk Committee (http://www.inform.com/Boardwalk+Committee).
The cable line, which could move 2,400 people in an hour, would run along the beach side of the Boardwalk from the Atlantic City Hilton (http://www.inform.com/Atlantic+City+Hilton) to Maine Avenue, up to Gardner's Basin and across the inlet to the Marina District, and along side the connector back into town, Cortopassi said. It would have 11 or 12 stops along the way, including one at the rail terminal.
The system would allow visitors to leave their cars in a garage and travel around town in enclosed "gondolas" on a daily pass that would cost about $6, Cortopassi said. The cars would ride 30 or 40 feet above the ground, but would be higher over the water so as not to interfere with boat traffic.
"It detoxifies the visitor from stress," Cortopassi said. "They totally relax while viewing the scenery," and thus may be inclined to stay longer and spend more money.

The plan also would get cars off the road, leaving city streets open for buses, jitneys and cabs, Cortopassi said.

It would cost about $250 million to $300 million to build the system, which would consist of towers planted in the ground and connected by a cable that would carry about 350 enclosed cars holding no more than eight people each, Cortopassi said. Each car, designed to look like a beach cabana, would play videos promoting Atlantic City's casinos and other attractions. Gaming halls might wish to purchase more upscale cars to accommodate their premium players.
The system would be made by Doppelmayr CTEC (http://www.inform.com/Doppelmayr/Garaventa+Group) of Salt Lake City (http://www.inform.com/Salt+Lake+City), which has built more than 13,000 cable-car systems in more than 70 countries, Cortopassi said. It would take about a year to construct.
The project is still in its earliest phases, but must be included in the city's master plan if it is to happen, Cortopassi said. She has met with several local and state organizations and still needs to get sponsors to commit to the plan.
Cortopassi said she plans to work with the Atlantic City Jitney Association (http://www.inform.com/Atlantic+City+Jitney+Association) and possibly expand its area of service, rather than be competition for the 13-seat buses that have provided transportation in the resort since 1915.
Atlantic City has bandied about proposals for monorails and other alternative forms of transportation for years, but none of them have come to fruition.
Boardwalk Committee Chairman Pinky Kravitz (http://www.inform.com/Pinky+Kravitz) said he was excited to see the plan for the cable-car system, even if actual construction is several years away.
"We need to get people up off the ground," Kravitz said.
To e-mail Elaine Rose (http://www.inform.com/Elaine+Rose) at The Press:
ERose@pressofac.com (ERose@pressofac.com)
Links by inform.com (http://inform.com/)

JCMAN320
September 13th, 2007, 02:04 PM
I love this idea go for it.

66nexus
September 13th, 2007, 02:49 PM
Definitely should go for it. perhaps it would be from the Convention center and parts of the B-walk?

Fabrizio
September 13th, 2007, 03:19 PM
It's a bad idea... they can all it what they want, but it's an elevated transportation system along the BEACH side of the b'walk. Will never happen for about a million sound reasons.

FORWARD thinking would mean parking lots on the outside of town with electric busses shipping people in. Make the service free... sposored by the casinos.

ALSO: convert Atlantic City's world famous Jitney system to electric buses. Have an international design competition. Something exciting that will make news. Have it run on Atlantic as well as pacific: would spur growth on Atlantic. Ticket price? Free.

Build on what you have and make it shine.

JCMAN320
September 13th, 2007, 05:31 PM
They have those gondolas at Seaside Heights and they are a huge hgit and it doesn't take away from pedestrain life at all.

JCexpert558
September 15th, 2007, 09:20 AM
How tall will Morgan stanleys building be? I once heard 800 feet but is that still true:confused:

American Gaming Guru
September 15th, 2007, 10:26 AM
GlobeSt.com Commercial Real Estate News and Property Resource
UPDATE Last updated: September 14, 2007 07:58am
Mega-Resort Starts Permit Process
By Eric Peterson
ATLANTIC CITY-The overall gaming numbers may continue to weaken here, but the next big hotel/casino project is taking a step forward anyway. Revel Entertainment’s proposed mega-project for 20 boardwalk/oceanfront acres has entered the permitting process with an application for a state Coastal Area Facility Review Act permit. Revel has simultaneously filed a site plan application with this city’s planning division.
As reported by GlobeSt.com (http://www.globest.com/news/893_893/newjersey/160104-1.html), Revel Entertainment, headed by long-time casino exec Kevin DeSanctis, first unveiled very general plans for the site in April. The two permit applications just filed flesh out those plans a bit more, spelling out a proposal for two hotel towers with 1,900 rooms each. Also part of the plan is a total of 150,000 sf of casino space and upwards of 500,000 sf of retail, dining and entertainment space.
“The submission of our Cafra and city planning applications are important milestones, because with their approval we will have established the appropriate regulatory framework to obtain the building permits necessary to start construction,” says DeSanctis, who founded the locally based Revel in 2006. “We look forward to continuing our work with local and state authorities and gaming regulators to develop a distinctive beachfront casino entertainment resort.
“It will help define the future of Atlantic City, while creating jobs, tax revenues and other sustainable economic benefits for the region,” he says. The site itself is at the northern end of this city’s oceanfront, and features more than 1,000 feet of beach frontage. As reported by GlobeSt.com (http://www.globest.com/news/893_893/newjersey/160104-1.html), Morgan Stanley subsidiary Ventura AC owns the property, and Morgan Stanley is provided substantial financial backing for the yet-to-be-named project.
And the hotel towers could become the tallest building in the state, topping the current champ, the 781-foot Goldman Sachs tower in Jersey City. Earlier this year, the city council raised the site’s height limit from 485 feet to 800 feet, and the towers are expected to hit that number.
Revel has also lined up its design and construction team for the project. On board are Tishman Construction Corp. as construction manager, Arquitectonica as design architect, BLT Architects as executive architect and architect of record, and SOSH Architects as associate architect.

Copyright © 2007 ALM Properties, Inc. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part without permission is prohibited.
For reprint information call 410-571-5893 or e-mail afaulkner@remedianetwork.com (http://www.globest.com/cgi-bin/udt/fdc.collector?client_id=globest&form_id=maileditform&link_id=28).

66nexus
September 18th, 2007, 02:37 AM
Two 800ft towers in AC.? Those things will be visible for miles. I hope it isn't just talk though because that'd be off the hook lol. Fill in the blanks of the city and AC could become a nice national resort, and not so much just a regional one.

Fabrizio
September 18th, 2007, 06:15 AM
The fact that the towers are tall is nice but the greatness of this project will be in how all of that boardwalk frontage is handled. And the beach blocks here are very long... let's see if they will be walkable and interesting.

JCexpert558
September 18th, 2007, 06:46 AM
For some reason I think that jersey is having a phase of building tall buildings. I mean 800 ft. Thats taller than most buildings in Boston Miami and other cities. Also we will have our first building over 781m! and look at the Metropolitan in Jersey City it's 775m with 64 floors.

American Gaming Guru
September 18th, 2007, 02:12 PM
Business going down, buildings going up

By JUDY DeHAVEN

Star-Ledger Staff


Atlantic City, NJ, May 27, 2007 — Two years ago, Kevin DeSanctis, then the chief operating officer of the Pennsylvania-based casino operator Penn National, took the stage at Atlantic City's yearly gaming conference and made a prediction that drew snickers from the pro-New Jersey crowd.
DeSanctis said once Philadelphia's slot parlors were open, up to 60 percent of the 2.2 million people living within a 90-minute drive of Atlantic City could opt to gamble in Pennsylvania instead of A.C.
Fast forward to 2007, and DeSanctis' prediction seems to be coming true. Philadelphia's two slot parlors haven't even opened yet, but others in eastern Pennsylvania, along with one in Yonkers, N.Y., have given Atlantic City a pounding. Total A.C. casino revenue fell 4 percent for the first four months of the year, gross operating profits are down nearly 6 percent, and analysts are predicting 2007 will go down as the first year in history that casino revenues decline.
Why, then, is DeSanctis now making a huge bet on Atlantic City -- a $2 billion plan, backed by Wall Street giant Morgan Stanley, to build a casino resort along the Boardwalk? And he's just one of several industry heavyweights angling to enter the market, not quit.
Atlantic City's casino industry is at a crossroads. On the one hand, it faces threats on all sides -- intensifying competition from new or soon-to-open gambling parlors in neighboring states, new smoking restrictions that have turned off many gamblers, and a movement to unionize dealers.
On the other hand, there is billions of dollars of fresh investment in major hotel expansions and at least two new casinos, with two others in the early planning stages. There's a momentum building that some say could spur A.C. to finally become an overnight destination, the kind of resort boosters have hoped for since the first pair of dice was thrown 29 years ago.
Down the Boardwalk from the casino planned by DeSanctis, Pinnacle Entertainment wants to replace the Sands with a $1.5 billion casino. Las Vegas gambling titan Steve Wynn is eyeing a return to A.C. So is former Caesars Entertainment CEO Wally Barr, who, along with former Casino Reinvestment Development Authority Executive Director Curtis Bashaw, bought 11 acres next to the Hilton, which also is considering a $1 billion expansion. And MGM Mirage is once again drawing up plans for a casino to be built next to Borgata, which MGM co-owns with Boyd Gaming.
All this is in addtion to hotel towers currently under construction at three existing casinos; plans by Bashaw to convert two old Atlantic City hotels into what he calls one "hip,groovy" noncasino hotel; and an expansion of the outlet stores at the foot of the Atlantic City Expressway.
But while prospective developers are upbeat, the business climate is anything but. The Tropicana has laid off hundreds of workers since it was acquired by Columbia Sussex last fall. And analysts said pressures on A.C. have curtailed efforts by Donald Trump's casino company to regroup after emerging from Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection two years ago -- forces that may be complicating the company's attempts to sell some or all of its assets, since all of Trump's casinos are in Atlantic City.
And there's another wrinkle: Some say private equity's move into gambling may not be good for the industry.
Many now doubt Harrah's Entertainment, which owns four A.C. casinos, will move ahead with its much-anticipated $1 billion redevelopment of Bally's now that it is being acquired by two top private equity firms, Texas Pacific Group and Apollo Management.
Some believe Trump Resorts could soon fall into the hands of a private equity firm as well. If it did, nine of the city's 11 existing casinos would be controlled by private equity.
"I don't necessarily see leveraged buyouts as a positive for the gaming industry because they leverage up to buy back stock rather than invest in the market," Lehman Bros. analyst Jane Pedreira said.

'AN UNTAPPED MARKET'


Speaking from his office on Atlantic Avenue, DeSanctis, CEO of Revel Entertainment, said if he were asked to give a speech on Atlantic City today, it would be no different than the one he gave two years ago at the East Coast Gaming Congress.
"What I said was very simple: Atlantic City is a tremendous market," DeSanctis said. "And it's an untapped market. However, in order to reach that market you have to create facilities that would make people want to drive to Atlantic City."
DeSanctis said when he gave his speech, there was a feeling among A.C. operators that the Pennsylvania slot parlors would be little more than warehouses with slot machines. He thought they were overlooking the fact that the bulk of their customers play the slots and eat at the bufffets.
Pennsylvania would have all that -- and offer a more convenient option to many gamblers.
"If you're going to sit here and hope that because they're slot parlors you're going to keep your customer, you're going to get hurt," DeSanctis said. "That's what I said. And I would say it today. And, frankly, it's happening."
But customers in Pennsylvania will drive past their local slot parlor if A.C. can offer them something other than gambling, DeSanctis said.
The model, of course, is Las Vegas. Vegas and A.C. have roughly the same number of visitors -- 38.9 million a year for Vegas, 34.5 million for A.C.
But Las Vegas has eight times more hotel rooms than Atlantic City -- 133,000 versus 16,000. And it gets 61 percent of its revenue from nongambling activities -- restaurants, shops and shows. For Atlantic City, the figure is just 11 percent.
Pedreira of Lehman Bros. said the A.C. operators are in a Catch-22: They just need to build more hotels and offer more nongambling activities to grow the market, but they can't justify the expense until they attract more conventioneers. And visitors with expense accounts won't pack A.C. until the resort has more hotel rooms because the casinos now reserve most of the rooms for gamblers.
"They can't really sell rooms today to a convention customer because they don't have enough nongaming amenities to make money off of them," Pedreira said. "So they'd be just displacing a gaming customer. So, they would have to build more rooms.
"But that requires a lot of capital investment."
When DeSanctis and other prospective casino developers look for an A.C. prototype, it is Borgata. When it opened in July 2003, its hip lounges and restaurants brought a sense of style to a city long known as a cheesy resort.
Borgata quickly exceeded expectations, breaking records in just about every category. It has attracted a new, younger gambler who is more likely to play the tables than the slots. And it is consistently at the top in revenue and gross operating profits.
Borgata has not stood still. Last summer it opened an expansion, doubling the size of its poker room and introducing A.C. to celebrity chef restaurants. Next year it will open another hotel.
But even Borgata has felt some pain. While casino revenue is up 5 percent through April, slot revenue has fallen 2.4 percent. To get those slot players back, Borgata has jacked up its promotional expenses to nearly $60 million in the first quarter -- more than any other casino, and an increase of 13 percent over last quarter. And it has started a marketing war with its Marina rival Harrah's, which increased its promotional spending 19.5 percent, to $44.1 million.
Marketing wars in Atlantic City are legendary. Time and again, the casinos have thrown "comps" at gamblers to get them in the doors and drive up revenue. But Harvey Perkins, vice president of Spectrum Gaming Group, said this one is different because Borgata and Harrah's do not have bus programs and, therefore, are going after a more profitable gambler. And both are building new hotels that will need to be packed with gamblers.
"In the case of Borgata and Harrah's, battling for the premium customer makes sense," Perkins said. "They are seeing a need, perhaps, for additional, new-customer acquisition at the premium level to start those towers off with high occupancy rates."
Borgata's chief operating officer, Larry Mullin, who has denied he is in a marketing war, downplays the effect of competition from neighboring states.
"Longer-term, we will recover and continue to grow," Mullin said. "We're very confident and very bullish on this market. We believe that the market is healthy."

SHIFTING SANDS


The Sands Casino Hotel may have closed last November, but activity has not stopped.
Its new owner, Las Vegas-based Pinnacle Entertainment, has been busy emptying the casino. This fall, it plans to demolish the legendary casino to make way for a $1.5 billion resort.
But during a recent trip to A.C., Pinnacle Chief Executive Dan Lee said the company is still monitoring the market. He said certain developments could make him rethink his plans for the Sands.
Lee said he is not concerned the state may ban smoking at casinos altogether. (Currently, smoking is allowed on 25 percent of the gambling floor.) And he is not worried by competition from nearby states. He also said he wouldn't be bothered if Pennsylvania were to allow table games in addition to slots, because its 54 percent tax rate would make operating them expensive; New Jersey's tax rate is 8 percent.
But if New Jersey were to allow slots at the Meadowlands Racetrack, Lee said, that could be "a deal-stopper." So could a decision by the state to allow a rival casino company to build a gambling resort on Bader Field, a historic airport that recently shut down.
In a city with few developable plots left for a casino, Bader Field's 130 acres have caught the eye of many operators, including Wynn. But Gov. Jon Corzine has said he does not want to rush into redevelopment of the airstrip. On Friday, Atlantic City Mayor Robert Levy announced the formation of a task force to study the options.
If the state allowed casinos on Bader Field, that would draw "people away from the Boardwalk district, so we end up with crack addicts and the hookers, and you end up with a competitor who doesn't have to deal with that," Lee said. "We'd say, 'You know what? We made a mistake. We'll sell the land at a $50 million loss and move on.' "
So, while Atlantic City is anxiously anticipating billions of dollars of investment, "whether they all get developed is another story," Prudential Securities analyst Joel Simkins said.

BETTING ON A.C.


Casino companies aren't alone in wagering on A.C.
The once-blighted base of the Atlantic City Expressway is now home to outlet shops, eateries and the 40/40 Club, owned by hip-hop mogul Jay-Z. More is on the way.
David Cordish, who developed the area, called "The Walk," with the backing of the Casino Reinvestment Development Authority, recently announced plans to double the size of the district. The CRDA, a powerful state agency, oversees the investment of fees paid by the casinos.
"I have no idea why (the casinos) do not add massive entertainment (and) retail," Cordish said. "The market is clearly there, and we have proven this fact. The sales of our tenants, fashion, food and entertainment are off the charts."
Cordish was the third developer for the site. The others bailed.
"You might say they bet wrong and had the glass-half-empty view," Cordish said. "We see Atlantic City as the glass half full."
Bashaw, the Cape May developer who used to serve as head of CRDA, is another believer.
His group, Cape Advisors, has rounded up investors to buy the Holiday Inn and Howard Johnson hotels. They plan to close them in the fall, give them a $90 million facelift and reopen them next year.
Bashaw has also partnered with Barr, the former Caesars CEO, to buy property for a casino. But because Bashaw is barred from working for an Atlantic City casino for two years after leaving his CRDA post, he declined to discuss plans. The prohibition ends this fall.
Bashaw did say Atlantic City interest is at an all-time high.
"The stars, in my view, are aligned for a rebirth," Bashaw said. "We've got a stable regulatory environment. We have a critical mass of gaming. And now these emerging nongaming activities seem to be doing well.
"This lends itself to a market where, for people who play in real estate, Atlantic City is on their radar screen," he said. "In acquiring things we acquired, we had to go to the capital markets. And they believed the story."
"People are putting their money into the town."

American Gaming Guru
September 19th, 2007, 09:16 AM
Casinos look to make a splash with water-themed hotel towers

By DONALD WITTKOWSKI Staff Writer, (609) 272-7258
Published: Wednesday, September 19, 2007
ATLANTIC CITY (http://www.inform.com/Atlantic+City) - Borgata (http://www.inform.com/Borgata+Hotel+Casino+%26+Spa) will have The Water Club. Harrah's (http://www.inform.com/Harrah%27s+Entertainment+Inc.) is building the Waterfront Tower. Which one will open first? And does it really matter, other than for bragging rights?
This much is known: the Borgata Hotel Casino & Spa and next-door rival Harrah's Atlantic City (http://www.inform.com/Harrah%27s+Atlantic+City) are preparing to open new hotel towers early next year that will dramatically redefine the Marina District's skyline.
Harrah's disclosed new details of its Waterfront Tower by announcing Tuesday that it plans to open the 44-story project in phases. The first 12 floors will debut sometime in the first quarter of 2008, with the remaining stories opening through July.
Harrah's is rushing to add rooms to meet overwhelming demand at the casino hotel, which consistently has an occupancy rate of more than 90 percent. The project will increase Harrah's hotel inventory by nearly 60 percent, to a total of 2,591 rooms.
"We need as many rooms coming online as fast as possible," Harrah's spokeswoman Alyce Parker (http://www.inform.com/Alyce+Parker) explained of the reason for the tower's phased opening.
When completed, the tower will have 961 rooms and will soar 525 feet high, making it the tallest building in Atlantic City. It will be the centerpiece of a $550 million expansion. Earlier this year, Harrah's opened 172,000 square feet of retail, dining and entertainment attractions, including a pool and spa complex underneath a striking, 90-foot-high glass dome.
"The opening of the Waterfront Tower will complete the debut of the 'new' Harrah's Atlantic City," R. Scott Barber (http://www.inform.com/R.+Scott+Barber), the casino's senior vice president and general manager, said in a statement. "Our $550 million expansion project has truly transformed the Harrah's property into a major resort destination."
Amenities include 104 suites and eight super-suites for high rollers. On the first floor will be a "Taste of the Shore" food court reflecting some of the region's favorite casual dining outlets. They include Ben & Jerry's Ice Cream, Philadelphia (http://www.inform.com/Philadelphia) Pretzels, Starbucks (http://www.inform.com/Starbucks+Corporation), Sack O' Subs and Primo Pizza (http://www.inform.com/Primo+Pizza). There will also be a new 24-hour cafe called Reflections.
Meanwhile, Borgata is preparing to open the 800-room Water Club boutique-style hotel sometime early next year. Like Harrah's, Borgata has not yet announced the grand opening date.
However, unlike Harrah's, Borgata will open its 43-story tower all at once, not in stages. Larry Mullin (http://www.inform.com/Larry+Mullin), Borgata's president and chief operating officer, said The Water Club will function as its own separate hotel instead of being a mere addition to the casino.
"It will be a separate hotel with its own general manager, its own in-room dining program, its own retail and its own sensibility," he said. "It's part of the campus here, but it is its own property."
The Water Club name is inspired by the five swimming pools and luxurious "spa in the sky" that are part of the project. When completed, the $400 million tower will boost Borgata's hotel inventory to about 2,800 rooms. Similar to Harrah's, the occupancy rate at Borgata is more than 90 percent.
Although both towers are heading for a grand opening in early 2008, Mullin downplayed any suggestions that Borgata and Harrah's are dueling to get their projects finished first. He said the opening of any hotel tower is a welcome addition to room-starved Atlantic City.
"We didn't start this to beat anybody to the punch," he said. "More rooms by anyone is good for the market. We just need more rooms in the market. That's the big challenge now."
Across town on the Boardwalk, Trump Taj Mahal Casino Resort (http://www.inform.com/Trump+Taj+Mahal) is building a 40-story tower that consists of nearly 800 rooms. Trump plans to open the first 20 stories of the $255 million project by Labor Day weekend and the rest of the floors in phases through the end of the year.
To e-mail Donald Wittkowski (http://www.inform.com/Donald+Wittkowski) at The Press:

Fabrizio
September 19th, 2007, 09:36 AM
It will be interesting to see what their new tower is like.

As it is now, the Harrah's complex is just ugly/cheap looking.


Enticing?:

http://www.theatlanticcitycasinos.com/harrahs.html

lofter1
September 19th, 2007, 10:05 AM
Do gamblers looking for a fix really give a hoot about architecture and how things look?

Isn't the point of "gaming architecture" to suck the suckers in via visual cues that make them less logical than they might normally be?

This is a special area of design vis a vis human behavior -- it's about breaking down barriers and making people more likely to empty their pockets. Not all that different in some ways from retail design, but on mega-steroids.

I've been to AC once, LV twice. Enough for me. Neither hold any allure.

Fabrizio
September 19th, 2007, 10:28 AM
Yes, you are right.

But now with competition so tight, with legal gambling in so many places... maybe there is a step up, something beyond the formulas of the past?

lofter1
September 19th, 2007, 11:20 AM
Perhaps ^^^

But isn't it the aim of the gambling czars to keep people inside and emptying their pockets?

Maybe their thinking is that giving the gamblers something interesting to look at outside the gaming areas actually works against their interests.

If the buildings are really banal & ugly the folks will simply stay inside and continue to toss money on the table -- rather than stroll about admirinng the architecture.

A conundrum for those who could care less about gambling.

American Gaming Guru
September 19th, 2007, 02:22 PM
Actually, the casinos are trying to go to exterior appeal. They are taking a tip from the old Steve Wynn play book that if you build something pretty spectacular on the exterior, that people would be more enticed to see what is inside (think Mirage, Wynn, Bellagio, Treasure Island etc). Modern casino resort construction these days is usually attractive at the base and really just plain in the towers. Harrah's is doing just that. The entranceway etc was remodeled recently and is quite attractive.

AC casinos were often criticized for being nothing but "slot boxes". With new competition in play, they better start offering more of an exterior appeal that draws customers in or they can kiss their business goodbye!

Hopefully the Revel and Pinnacle casino projects on the Boardwalk will accomplish something meaningful.

Fabrizio
September 19th, 2007, 03:07 PM
Also when something is beautiful or spectacular it is advertising on the skyline. Harrah's AC is junk.

---

Not my personal taste... but THIS is world-class and should be the kind of view from the marina :

http://www.flickr.com/photos/sutanto/419748208/

http://www.flickr.com/photos/rebelshooter/953389419/

http://www.theatlanticcitycasinos.com/harrahs.html

http://www.flickr.com/photos/iirraa/44069784/


---

66nexus
September 19th, 2007, 11:30 PM
AC casinos were often criticized for being nothing but "slot boxes". With new competition in play, they better start offering more of an exterior appeal that draws customers in or they can kiss their business goodbye!

Hopefully the Revel and Pinnacle casino projects on the Boardwalk will accomplish something meaningful.



Yup. Borgata is DEFINITELY the new standard. If the newer guys don't either meet or exceed they may as well not build.

Funny how a casino like Trump Plaza still stands.

Fabrizio
September 20th, 2007, 03:51 AM
Also: as we see here, something like the Bellagio isn't even tall. Who cares? Tall is nice, but it's the details. Look at the low buildings.... look how that embankment is so beautifully done. That's the stuff that's important because that's the stuff people have to deal with.

When I hear that this or that will be the TALLEST building in New Jersey... my reaction? : zzzz....zzzz....zzzz.....

http://www.flickr.com/photos/rebelshooter/953389419/

American Gaming Guru
September 20th, 2007, 09:36 AM
I totally agree! zzzzzzzzzzz

Wouldn't it be great to see a company build a grand resort that throws back to the heyday of AC? Brick, Arches, expansive vistas etc? Now that would be powerful. Bally’s could carve out a real niche by restoring The Dennis as a high-end hotel.

Fabrizio
September 20th, 2007, 10:13 AM
What is so stupid about Atlantic City: an example: the Bellagio in Las Vegas spends MILLIONS to design low structures in a mediterranian style... tile roofs, arches... the whole deal.... while Atlantic City does everything to DESTROY the same.

Compare this photo of the Bellagio:
http://www.searchingcities.com/bellagio-vegas-towers.jpg

with an old post card of Haddon Hall:
http://www.rootsweb.com/~usgenweb/nj/atlantic/postcards/chalfonte.jpg

A big hotel fronted by low rise meditteranian-style structures !

(Of course in AC they PAINT it over in white paint and build a tacky art-deco thing next door.)

I'm not saying that the old Haddon Hall building can compare with the Bellagio, but style-wise it is the real thing. Imagine it as the base of a new great resort complex.

66nexus
September 20th, 2007, 10:44 AM
The Bellagio, Wynn Vegas, etc. all came after Vegas' mega-resort construction boom in the 90s. The older casinos in Vegas have pretty much the same bland charm as AC's casinos do now.
Hopefully, the Borgata can spark the new wave of (architecturally superior on every level) mega-resort casinos. Much the way the Mirage did for Vegas.

AGG changing the Dennis hotel to a grand hotel of old is not only a good idea, but also it would save Bally's from having to expand hotel space with a new tower

66nexus
September 20th, 2007, 10:50 AM
Tall buildings can be nice if done right. They can compliment low-rise architecture

The buildings and Vegas may be short but they are by no means small. They are massive horizontally (and like Caesar's Palace, can have multiple large structures this size). May be minus the Marina district, AC doesn't have the physical space so it should reuse whatever existing buildings it can.

MikeW
September 20th, 2007, 11:19 AM
You have to realize that there are major functional issues that drive casino-hotel design. And while there is some room for variation, they all have to deal with the same issues.

For example, the casino itself should be a broad unitary single story flat space. Meandering or multistory casinos have been done, but don't work as well as big, open ones. So the casino structure itself, when devoid of decoration, usually ends up looking something like a warehouse.

Multi-thousand room hotel towers all have similar issues. The rooms can only be so big, they and they all need windows, so the most efficient shape for them is the slab. You can join slabs into Ys and crosses, but the basis is still the slab.

American Gaming Guru
September 20th, 2007, 01:53 PM
66 Nexus, Bally's currently utilizes the Dennis as hotel rooms. With that said, they will probably construct more hotel rooms anyway. Cheers to them. AC NEEDS ROOMS! Right?

Mike W also brings up some good points. Think Playboy/Atlantis/Trump Worlds Fair, and Aladdin in Vegas. You cant get very creative with casino space in American gaming, a large single slab is preferable and thus probably hurts the architectural freedom of the designers. That’s why most of the old AC hotels were destroyed.

The new Vegas hotels do it right because, as Mike W points out, they have land! It has always been a major obstacle in AC. I think Trump once pointed out when getting ready to open the Taj that since land was so scarce he could not justifying building a Volcano (obviously referring to the Mirage) in AC.

Fabrizio
September 20th, 2007, 02:57 PM
"The new Vegas hotels do it right because, as Mike W points out, they have land! It has always been a major obstacle in AC. I think Trump once pointed out when getting ready to open the Taj that since land was so scarce he could not justifying building a Volcano (obviously referring to the Mirage) in AC."

Up to a point but t's mostly excuses. Quality architects and creativity can over come plenty of obstacles.

Maybe Trump couldn't build a volano but he did have enough room to build a horrid cheap looking monstrosity.

Yokels only... right THIS way:

http://www.arrakeen.ch/usaaug98/136%20%20Atlantic%20City%20%20Taj%20Mahal.jpg

-------------

MikeW
September 20th, 2007, 03:36 PM
The issue become efficiency, especially when the project is gigantic, as these casinos usually are. Architect creativity usually translates to adding inefficiencies. It's one thing to tack on some sort of decoration to a basically efficient but boring structure to jazz it up. It's an entire different thing to design an inefficient structure in the first place for the sake of aesthetics. At that point it comes down to the question is if the added income the aesthetics can offset the added expenses caused by the inefficient design.


"The new Vegas hotels do it right because, as Mike W points out, they have land! It has always been a major obstacle in AC. I think Trump once pointed out when getting ready to open the Taj that since land was so scarce he could not justifying building a Volcano (obviously referring to the Mirage) in AC."

Up to a point but t's mostly excuses. Quality architects and creativity can over come plenty of obstacles.

Maybe Trump couldn't build a volano but he did have enough room to build a horrid cheap looking monstrosity.

Yokels only... right THIS way:

http://www.arrakeen.ch/usaaug98/136%20%20Atlantic%20City%20%20Taj%20Mahal.jpg

-------------

Fabrizio
September 20th, 2007, 04:11 PM
Efficiency would be a big box with a logo on it.

We are beyond that and the public is demanding more.


http://www.whiteoaks.com/mojo/2005-12-27-vegas/1200/IMG_0703.jpg

http://www.cityofatlanticcity.org/images/historypics/AtlanticCity1917_jpg.jpg

66nexus
September 20th, 2007, 06:44 PM
66 Nexus, Bally's currently utilizes the Dennis as hotel rooms. With that said, they will probably construct more hotel rooms anyway. Cheers to them. AC NEEDS ROOMS! Right?


I was actually referring to 'high-end' hotel rooms as you stated earlier, or nice modern upgrades.

It is without question that Vegas has the space to build as I mentioned before. But just because AC doesn't have the space doesn't mean it can't be nice. They'll probably just opt to go vertical and that's fine if they do it right. AC doesn't have to have Vegas-style layouts for it to be nice. Additionally, I don't even think AC should even use Vegas as a model in a lot of cases

MikeW
September 21st, 2007, 10:09 AM
Where they've deviated from the Vegas model is where they've failed. I've seen a number of vertically oriented casinos in AC, none have done very well.

FWIW, the most succesful of the AC casinos is the Borgata. That hues very closely to the Vegas model.

Vegas is the center of the gaming universe. It's also the laboratory where all gaming ideas are experimented with. They've found, by expensive trial and error, what works and what doesn't.


I was actually referring to 'high-end' hotel rooms as you stated earlier, or nice modern upgrades.

It is without question that Vegas has the space to build as I mentioned before. But just because AC doesn't have the space doesn't mean it can't be nice. They'll probably just opt to go vertical and that's fine if they do it right. AC doesn't have to have Vegas-style layouts for it to be nice. Additionally, I don't even think AC should even use Vegas as a model in a lot of cases

66nexus
September 21st, 2007, 02:25 PM
Where they've deviated from the Vegas model is where they've failed. I've seen a number of vertically oriented casinos in AC, none have done very well.

FWIW, the most succesful of the AC casinos is the Borgata. That hues very closely to the Vegas model.

Vegas is the center of the gaming universe. It's also the laboratory where all gaming ideas are experimented with. They've found, by expensive trial and error, what works and what doesn't.

The Vegas model simply doesn't work in AC. It's physically impossible. You can't have small village city charm AND big box gambling.

The Borgata is successful indeed, but don't forget it's also the newest in over a decade. Most of Vegas' old casinos before the Mirage have the same bland charm and decor as most of AC's current casinos. AC is just now starting to go through its construction boom much the way Vegas went through its own construction boom in the early 90's.

Not for nothing, but AC has never went truly vertical. Most of Vegas' casinos are taller than most every AC casino. BUT as far as vertical: not for gaming space, that should be ground floors, but the hotel towers don't have to be these huge designed boxes.

ps. Macau overtook the Vegas strip as the gambling center, and if projected growth continues it'll unseat Vegas altogether

JCexpert558
September 21st, 2007, 09:42 PM
Well really I dont see how AC cant have a Vegas design because Im seeing alot of that at the moment, and it is not like AC will have any other designs of its own.

MikeW
September 22nd, 2007, 12:58 PM
AC? Charm?! Now there are two words I never thought I'd see in the same sentence.

In some ways you are correct. The boardwalk has a lot in common with Fremont Street in downtown Vegas. And if you know anything about Vegas, you know that, as the strip is booming, downtown is dying. This only further validates what I said before.

The difference with the Borgata is that the built it out in the boonies of AC, where they had the land to do it correctly. As far as the boardwalk goes, they're either going to have to figure out how to get with the program, or the casinos there are going to continue declining. I'm interested to see what Pinnicle is going to do with their project.

Most of the pre-Mirage Vegas casinos have been inploded. There are only a few left now, and those are implosion-bait themselves. The probably do need to demolish and consolidate several of the boardwalk casinos, in order to come up with something competitve.


The Vegas model simply doesn't work in AC. It's physically impossible. You can't have small village city charm AND big box gambling.

The Borgata is successful indeed, but don't forget it's also the newest in over a decade. Most of Vegas' old casinos before the Mirage have the same bland charm and decor as most of AC's current casinos. AC is just now starting to go through its construction boom much the way Vegas went through its own construction boom in the early 90's.

Not for nothing, but AC has never went truly vertical. Most of Vegas' casinos are taller than most every AC casino. BUT as far as vertical: not for gaming space, that should be ground floors, but the hotel towers don't have to be these huge designed boxes.

ps. Macau overtook the Vegas strip as the gambling center, and if projected growth continues it'll unseat Vegas altogether

66nexus
September 22nd, 2007, 05:48 PM
AC? Charm?! Now there are two words I never thought I'd see in the same sentence.

In some ways you are correct. The boardwalk has a lot in common with Fremont Street in downtown Vegas. And if you know anything about Vegas, you know that, as the strip is booming, downtown is dying. This only further validates what I said before.

The difference with the Borgata is that the built it out in the boonies of AC, where they had the land to do it correctly. As far as the boardwalk goes, they're either going to have to figure out how to get with the program, or the casinos there are going to continue declining. I'm interested to see what Pinnicle is going to do with their project.

Most of the pre-Mirage Vegas casinos have been inploded. There are only a few left now, and those are implosion-bait themselves. The probably do need to demolish and consolidate several of the boardwalk casinos, in order to come up with something competitve.

The Borgata could've been built right were Pinnacle is going to put theirs and it still would've been successful. It was the newest and best. AC had not seen anything like it since gambling was legalized. I think it's less about the size of casino and more about the modern amenities. Hotel rooms in AC were nasty and outdated before Borgata even showed up.

It's no secret that Downtown Vegas is rugged out. All of the new mega-casinos were built along the strip.

You've agreed with my point by saying that Vegas' pre-Mirage casinos are almost all gone. This is already starting to happen in AC. with the Sands
It seems what the Mirage did for Vegas, the Borgata is doing for AC.

MikeW
September 23rd, 2007, 06:35 PM
The Borgata could've been built right were Pinnacle is going to put theirs and it still would've been successful. It was the newest and best. AC had not seen anything like it since gambling was legalized. I think it's less about the size of casino and more about the modern amenities. Hotel rooms in AC were nasty and outdated before Borgata even showed up.


You saying that but that isn't the way it worked. The Borgata was a joint veture between two big LV gaming companies, Boyd, (a big locals casino operator out there), and Mirage (which became MGM Mirage). Between the two of them, they have as much gaming knowledge, experience, and resources of any organization in the business, and more than most. As you say, they could have bought a Boardwalk property to build the Borgata on. They didn't. They chose to put it out in the stix of AC (the Marina District). Why? My guess is they wanted someplace that had the land to build the casino in the layout they wanted, and not have the property dictate the layout. Would it have been as successful if it were shoehorned onto the Boardwalk? Obviously the companies who built it didn't think so.




It's no secret that Downtown Vegas is rugged out. All of the new mega-casinos were built along the strip.

You've agreed with my point by saying that Vegas' pre-Mirage casinos are almost all gone. This is already starting to happen in AC. with the Sands
It seems what the Mirage did for Vegas, the Borgata is doing for AC.

The question is why? And why did the new development hit the Strip and not downtown. I think the answer is that the companies could build what they wanted on the strip, but where too space constrained downtown.

conan
September 23rd, 2007, 06:44 PM
There was a fire at the Borgata's new Water Club, which is under construction, today.

http://pressofatlanticcity-proxy.nandomedia.com/ips_rich_content/637-borgatafire_001.jpg

http://www.pressofatlanticcity.com/top_story/story/7503991p-7401337c.html

66nexus
September 23rd, 2007, 06:52 PM
You saying that but that isn't the way it worked. The Borgata was a joint veture between two big LV gaming companies, Boyd, (a big locals casino operator out there), and Mirage (which became MGM Mirage). Between the two of them, they have an much gaming knowledge, experience, and resources of any organization in the business, and more than most. As you say, they could have bought a Boardwalk property to build the Borgata on. They didn't. They chose to put it out in the stix of AC (the Marina District). Why? My guess is they wanted someplace that had the land to build the casino in the layout they wanted, and not have the property dictate the layout. Would it have been as successful if it were shoehorned onto the Boardwalk? Obviously the companies who built it didn't think so.



The question is why? And why did the new development hit the Strip and not downtown. I think the answer is that the companies could build what they wanted on the strip, but where too space constrained downtown.

I'm not saying that the companies wouldn't PREFER to build on open land; Hell, most of any type of commercial developer prefers to build on open land because they don't have to be constrained to street grids/networks (as you stated). It's just easier. BUT that doesn't mean you can't do it right in smaller spaces.

How do you know if a smaller Borgata wouldn't have been successful on the B-walk? I think the least of the B-walk's casinos worries should be space. I mean, that tacky 80's architecture just doesn't do it.
-There's casinos like Hilton AC that are willing to spend 1 Billion in upgrades instead of just building a new casino in the Marina
-MGM and Boyd chose the Marina, but Pinnacle and the others believe in the Boardwalk.

American Gaming Guru
September 24th, 2007, 11:56 AM
I saw the Water Club fire myself last night on the news. As reported in a few news stories (including The Press) it looks more devastating then it actually was. I certainly hope so! I was anxiously awaiting its opening.

giselehaslice
September 24th, 2007, 03:02 PM
Yeah I read that about the Water Club^, which sucks.

I dont think it will have any effect on the place when it opens though.

Anyway, has anyone heard anything about the Pinnacle or Revel Casino plans?

American Gaming Guru
September 24th, 2007, 03:43 PM
Not a word on either. Still waiting!

66nexus
September 24th, 2007, 03:52 PM
Yeah I read that about the Water Club^, which sucks.

I dont think it will have any effect on the place when it opens though.

Anyway, has anyone heard anything about the Pinnacle or Revel Casino plans?

I still think plans are being put together and the continued breakdown of the Sands site is underway

Fabrizio
September 24th, 2007, 04:12 PM
MikeW writes: "Vegas is the center of the gaming universe. It's also the laboratory where all gaming ideas are experimented with. They've found, by expensive trial and error, what works and what doesn't."

And time marches on and new standards are set...because the public has been there and done that.

A revitalized boardwalk where gamers, tourists, folks for a night on the town, can stroll from hotel to hotel for gambling, for shows, for restaurants could be an huge draw... the b'walk could return as a center for action, for being seen... much more interesting than being stuck out at the marina or Bader field.

It will be curious to see how the Pinnacle and Revel will handle their boardwalk frontage. I guarantee you they will both be a throwback to AC's past... if not in architectural style.... certainly in usage.

My bet is the boardwalk will return as the focus in AC.

MikeW
September 24th, 2007, 04:35 PM
This hasn't been the case in Vegas, where the pedestrian friendly downtown casino zone is dying as the auto-centric strip is in the middle of a epic boom.

It doesn't appear to be the case in AC. I also want to see what pinnacle comes up with.


MikeW writes: "Vegas is the center of the gaming universe. It's also the laboratory where all gaming ideas are experimented with. They've found, by expensive trial and error, what works and what doesn't."

And time marches on and new standards are set...because the public has been there and done that.

A revitalized boardwalk where gamers, tourists, folks for a night on the town, can stroll from hotel to hotel for gambling, for shows, for restaurants could be an huge draw... the b'walk could return as a center for action, for being seen... much more interesting than being stuck out at the marina or Bader field.

It will be curious to see how the Pinnacle and Revel will handle their boardwalk frontage. I guarantee you they will both be a throwback to AC's past... if not in architectural style.... certainly in usage.

My bet is the boardwalk will return as the focus in AC.

giselehaslice
September 24th, 2007, 04:43 PM
Yes, I also beleive that the Boardwalk will again become the main destination. I just think that they should get some type of monrail system in order to disperse the crowds between the oceanfront and the marina district.

Also, while browsing Skyscraperpage.com on Atlantic City's development page, there was a post about some new developer and thier "TOP SECRET" atlantic City Project. Does anyone know about this?

http://www.digeorgeatlantic.com/

66nexus
September 24th, 2007, 05:15 PM
MikeW writes: "Vegas is the center of the gaming universe. It's also the laboratory where all gaming ideas are experimented with. They've found, by expensive trial and error, what works and what doesn't."

And time marches on and new standards are set...because the public has been there and done that.

A revitalized boardwalk where gamers, tourists, folks for a night on the town, can stroll from hotel to hotel for gambling, for shows, for restaurants could be an huge draw... the b'walk could return as a center for action, for being seen... much more interesting than being stuck out at the marina or Bader field.

It will be curious to see how the Pinnacle and Revel will handle their boardwalk frontage. I guarantee you they will both be a throwback to AC's past... if not in architectural style.... certainly in usage.

My bet is the boardwalk will return as the focus in AC.

Also, with fingers crossed, Hilton's 1 billion expansion. I just hope they do it right is all.

66nexus
September 24th, 2007, 05:17 PM
Yes, I also beleive that the Boardwalk will again become the main destination. I just think that they should get some type of monrail system in order to disperse the crowds between the oceanfront and the marina district.

Also, while browsing Skyscraperpage.com on Atlantic City's development page, there was a post about some new developer and thier "TOP SECRET" atlantic City Project. Does anyone know about this?

http://www.digeorgeatlantic.com/

Not sure of anyone else but before you posted this I've never heard of it before. It's probably a condo or other type of residential development company.

Fabrizio
September 24th, 2007, 05:31 PM
It's fishy. A quick search turns up really nothing about "DiGeorge Atlantic" .

And WHY does their home page feature an interior rendering of Jean Nouvel's building on 11th ave in NYC? I wonder if they know this "DiGeorge" company is using it...


http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showpost.php?p=169284&postcount=50

66nexus
September 24th, 2007, 05:37 PM
It's fishy. A quick search turns up really nothing about "DiGeorge Atlantic" .

And WHY does their home page feature an interior rendering of Jean Nouvel's building on 11th ave in NYC? I wonder if they know this company is using it...

You know...I thought that skyline in the background looked familiar! (Not used to seeing JC in renderings) lol