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Edward
May 22nd, 2004, 09:49 PM
http://www.wirednewyork.com/manhattan/soho/soho_broome2_22may04.jpg




http://www.wirednewyork.com/manhattan/soho/soho_broome_22may04.jpg

Gulcrapek
May 22nd, 2004, 10:17 PM
Very life-in-motion snatching.

Edward
October 24th, 2004, 08:20 PM
From the series "Crossing Broadway". (Although it's Houston in the first picture...)


http://www.wirednewyork.com/manhattan/soho/crossing_broadway1.jpg (http://www.wirednewyork.com/manhattan/soho/)




http://www.wirednewyork.com/manhattan/soho/crossing_broadway2.jpg (http://www.wirednewyork.com/manhattan/soho/)




http://www.wirednewyork.com/manhattan/soho/crossing_broadway3.jpg (http://www.wirednewyork.com/manhattan/soho/)




http://www.wirednewyork.com/manhattan/soho/crossing_broadway4.jpg (http://www.wirednewyork.com/manhattan/soho/)




http://www.wirednewyork.com/manhattan/soho/crossing_broadway5.jpg (http://www.wirednewyork.com/manhattan/soho/)

abricot
November 8th, 2004, 05:03 AM
Cool pics

ligel
November 8th, 2004, 06:48 AM
I like NY.

Edward
August 24th, 2005, 11:39 PM
Morning in SoHo (http://www.wirednewyork.com/manhattan/soho/).

http://www.wirednewyork.com/manhattan/soho/soho_morning.jpg (http://www.wirednewyork.com/manhattan/soho/)

NYatKNIGHT
August 25th, 2005, 03:16 PM
Oh yeah, baby. (in my best Austin Powers accent)

HarlemRep
August 25th, 2005, 09:12 PM
can we get some more of the girl in the teal top? Pleeeeeeeeeeeease?

NewYorkYankee
August 25th, 2005, 09:38 PM
I like the two 'twin' girls in the middle of the thread!

DancingWithWolves
December 27th, 2005, 03:16 AM
yeah!

RicanPrincipessa
July 10th, 2006, 12:22 AM
Thanx so much for the pics!


I plan on moving to SOHO in 6mnths so seeing some pics ahead of time keeps me motivated about my big move! :)

lofter1
October 22nd, 2006, 11:32 AM
Is this a new outdoor sculpture that has been installed on a rooftop in SoHo (on Wooster Street just south of Grand)?

Alas, no ...

It is a mock-up of a hoped-for "roof-top addition" (aka penthouse). The Landmarks Commission requires "site-line" studies to show the visual impact of proposed additions within the SoHo Historic District. All sorts of different materials are used to build the mock-ups, which are then photographed and presented to LPC as part of the owner's application.

In this case someone has added a twist: The "shoes" seen hanging from the wire in the first pic are not real shoes, but rather cardboard cut-outs that have been tied together and tossed over the wire!

Voila! The mundane transformed ...

***

ablarc
October 22nd, 2006, 11:39 AM
What a crock! None of those scenes are worth honoring. Any building that's built (hopefully soon) in the vacancy that makes these views possible will obscure the rooftop addition anyway. Don't these busybodies have anything better to do? They could go out and do something useful. Maybe dish out food in a soup kitchen?

lofter1
October 22nd, 2006, 01:57 PM
whoa, ablarc ...

The site line studies are for the purpose of showing what will be visible from the sidewalk across the street from the front of the building ... a position where none of the proposed structure in those pics will be visible.

At this time there is no proposal for the small parking lot to the north of this building (that's where you'll find the "shoes on the wire"). There is, however, a proposal that has been approved for the site (http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showpost.php?p=93829&postcount=859) on the large parking lot to the south (and which sits across West Broadway from the SoHo Grand Hotel).

The point of "site line" studies is to avoid POS such as can be found along Church Street just north of the WTC, certain sites along Broadway in what is now NoHo and -- perhaps most egregiously -- this one FUGLY POS on Fulton (http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showpost.php?p=115149&postcount=17) near City Hall (a building which is not under the jurisdiction of the LPC):

https://extranet.emporis.com/files/transfer/6/2006/07/476902.jpg

ablarc
October 22nd, 2006, 02:04 PM
^ Yeah, but they don't need full-size wire-frame models to know the difference between a project that's Ok and one that isn't. This is imperial government.

ablarc
October 22nd, 2006, 02:11 PM
^ Yeah, but they don't need full-size wire-frame models to know the difference between a project that's Ok and one that isn't. This is imperial government.

Also, who says that nothing visible can enhance a view? There isn't a man-made vista that can't be improved; perfection eludes mankind.

What can you really tell from this extravagant demand made by the powers-that-be. I'm supposed to be professionally equipped to extract information from incomplete documentation, but this tells me less than drawings.

I could have told you in advance from drawings that the example you posted would be a piece of shit. And a wire-frame would have contributed not a whit to my ability to predict that. Now imagine that addition with appropriate detailing and ornamentation. Not so bad, huh?

It has nothing to do with massing.

lofter1
October 22nd, 2006, 02:31 PM
One problem has been that in certain projects (an example: the Kaufman fiasco (http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showpost.php?p=108010&postcount=63) on Pearl Street) architects / developers say they plan to do one thing and then after it's built it is found to be another thing entirely.

So how do you watch out for that kind of BS?

On a happier note, more on the approved proposal for the parking lot to the south of this site HERE (http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showpost.php?p=126825&postcount=1124)

ablarc
October 22nd, 2006, 02:41 PM
One problem has been that in certain projects developers say they plan to do one thing and then after it's built it is found to be another thing entirely.

So how do you watch out for that kind of BS?
Well, wire-frames don't address this problem. If the developer is criminally-inclined he'll build something else anyway. If he does that, put him in jail like anyone else who breaks the law. Do that, and the problem will vanish overnight.

MikeKruger
October 23rd, 2006, 01:46 PM
Dean DeLuca's expensive, but you take your food home in nice bags....

Ninjahedge
October 23rd, 2006, 02:14 PM
http://www.tribecatrib.com/newssept03/front_new_hotel.htm

With pictures (320 Pearl)

lofter1
May 9th, 2007, 04:37 PM
495 Broadway / NEW ERA BUILDING (http://www.nyc-architecture.com/SOH/SOH032.htm) (just north of Broome) newly restored (scaffolding came down today) ...

http://i130.photobucket.com/albums/p242/Lofter1/SoHo/495Bway_01a.jpg

http://i130.photobucket.com/albums/p242/Lofter1/SoHo/495Bway_01b.jpg

How she looked pre-restoration ...

http://www.nyc-architecture.com/SOH/Pict0319.jpg

http://www.nyc-architecture.com/SOH/SOH032.htm

http://mailer.e-flux.com/mail_images/1141073337si.jpg (http://www.swissinstitute.net/)

http://www.e-flux.com/displayshow.php?file=message_1141073337.txt

The_Other_White_Meat
May 31st, 2007, 02:02 PM
I love all these pictures, they really capture the essence of the city.

lofter1
August 13th, 2008, 05:10 PM
Coming soon to SoHo, a couple of doors to the north of the New Era Building at 76 Mercer Street ...

Rock and Roll Hall of Fame
Branches Out to New York

NY TIMES (http://www.nytimes.com/2008/08/14/arts/music/14hall.html?ref=arts)
By BEN SISARIO
August 14, 2008

The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame is coming to New York City.

On a blocked-off street in SoHo on Wednesday, Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg stood with Billy Joel, the veteran music executive Clive Davis and officials from the hall, to announce that the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum, which opened its flagship building in Cleveland in 1995, would open a New York annex in November.

“This is where Ed Sullivan met the Beatles, where Lou Reed took a walk on the wild side,” the mayor said.

Artifacts that will be on view at the annex flanked the mayor’s podium. On either side were guitars owned by Johnny Ramone and Eric Clapton, behind them was a phone booth from CBGB, and a few feet away stood Bruce Springsteen’s first car, a banana-yellow 1957 Chevrolet Bel Air convertible.

The 25,000-square-foot annex, at 76 Mercer Street, will be the museum’s first expansion outside Cleveland and will include exhibitions on Hall of Fame inductees and on the history of rock in New York. It will also house temporary and traveling exhibitions from the Cleveland headquarters, museum officials said.

http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2008/08/14/arts/Rock650.jpg
Seth Wenig/Associated Press
Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg in an item that will be on view at

the Hall of Fame annex: Bruce Springsteen’s 1957 Chevy.

The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Foundation was founded in 1983 by a group of music industry executives, and since 1986 most annual induction ceremonies have been at the Waldorf-Astoria, but the museum has never had a physical presence in New York.

About half a million people visit the Cleveland building each year, the museum said. Its president, Terry Stewart, said the annex was part of a strategy to increase its visibility over all and drive tourist traffic to Cleveland.

“The ability to establish these outposts in other cities,” Mr. Stewart said, “allows us to join the ranks of other famous not-for-profit institutions and museums like New York’s Guggenheim, the U.K.’s Tate and the Louvre out of Paris.”

The speakers celebrated New York’s contributions to rock history, reminiscing about concerts in historic clubs and theaters, many of them — like CBGB, the Bottom Line and Max’s Kansas City — no longer in existence.

Mr. Joel, who last month played the final two concerts at Shea Stadium, said that he had planned to donate the Mets jersey he had been given at those concerts but “that jersey is in a road case on its way to Hong Kong.” Instead, he brought a baseball bat given to him by David Wright of the Mets and a plaque celebrating Mr. Joel’s 12 sold-out nights at Madison Square Garden in 2006.

“New York gave me my words and my music,” Mr. Joel said, “and rock ’n’ roll gave me a place for that music to live.”


Copyright 2008 The New York Times Company

lofter1
August 13th, 2008, 05:13 PM
Rock & Roll Hall of Fame Annex in SoHo

Mayor Bloomberg's PRESS RELEASE (http://www.nyc.gov/portal/site/nycgov/menuitem.c0935b9a57bb4ef3daf2f1c701c789a0/index.jsp?pageID=mayor_press_release&catID=1194&doc_name=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.nyc.gov%2Fhtml%2Fom%2Fht ml%2F2008b%2Fpr313-08.html&cc=unused1978&rc=1194&ndi=1)

http://www.rockannex.com/

http://www.rockannex.com/images/header.jpg

lofter1
August 13th, 2008, 05:24 PM
http://www.rockhall.com/images/rock-hall-of-fame.png (http://www.rockhall.com/)

Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Annex to Open in New York City

http://www.rockhall.com/pressroom/rock-hall-to-open-annex-nyc/

Cleveland, OH- This fall, New York City’s love of music will hit a high note. The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum will open a 25,000 square foot ANNEX location in the heart of Soho at 76 Mercer Street. This experiential, technologically advanced exhibition will focus on the greatest moments in rock history and will resonate with everyone from the casual music fan to the seasoned rock enthusiast.

The Annex will take visitors beyond the typical museum experience, and engage people in a dynamic and immersive music journey that recalls some of the defining moments in rock and roll history through the artists that changed our world. Visitors will discover the moments ignited by music revolutionaries like John Lennon, Madonna, Jimi Hendrix and Bob Dylan. The exhibits will highlight rock and roll’s impact on music, allowing visitors to discover, or rediscover, their connection to it all.

“New York City has a longstanding reputation as the land of opportunity for aspiring artist and musicians, and as a result some of the most internationally-celebrated musical performers of this Century have had their start right here on our streets,” said Mayor Michael Bloomberg. “It’s only fitting that the role our City has played in launching the careers of so many of the world’s most talented artists be recognized and honored with the opening of the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Annex.”

The Annex will showcase selected artifacts from the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum’s vast collection. The Annex will also extend the Museum’s mission to honor key cities that have helped shape the history of rock and roll.

“Establishing outposts like these is becoming a strategy of other major institutions,” said Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum CEO Terry Stewart, citing the Guggenheim Museum of New York, Britain’s Tate Modern and the Louvre in Paris as examples. “These projects allow museums to extend their reach, but also provide space to travel exhibits and allow curators to display some of our priceless artifacts for the first time outside of Cleveland.”

The iconic Museum in Cleveland, designed by I.M. Pei, is the centerpiece and starting point for the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame’s telling of the story of rock and roll. The 150,000 square-foot facility celebrates the history and impact of rock music with exhibits, films, interactive kiosks, education programs and public events.

“Rock and roll is embedded in the history of our times and has changed the world around us,” said co-founder of Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and editor and publisher of Rolling Stone Magazine Jann Wenner. “The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum and now its extension, the Annex, help us to illustrate in a tangible way music’s impact on the cultural, social and political history of the modern era.”

The experience begins as soon as visitors enter the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Annex.

-- Hall of Fame: This initial area pays tribute to each and every artist inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and introduces, ignites and primes the audience.

-- Immersive Theater: An engaging and dynamic movie experience that uses immersive audio and visual technology to highlight some of the most explosive performance moments in rock history including Bob Dylan, The Beatles, Chuck Berry, Elvis Presley, The Who and Patti Smith.

From this point on, visitors will receive a set of high-quality PX200 Sennheiser stereo headphones and a state-of-the-art wireless audio system. As visitors walk freely around the exhibit, they will hear only relevant music specific to the gallery zones they are experiencing.

-- Roots & Influences: A visual and musical discovery of how yesterday’s music legends have influenced the chart-toppers at the forefront of today’s music scene; bringing to life musical timelines of genres such as R&B, Hip Hop and Blues Rock. Hear how the best selling albums of 50 Cent and Notorious B.I.G. have been shaped by the genius of James Brown, and how Velvet Underground has guided Coldplay’s expressive style.

-- Moments to Movements: This area within the Annex will take visitors on a journey of the musical moments that created and defined powerful movements, and showcases many exciting and rare rock items. Examples include a white Vox electric guitar from The Beatles that has never been showcased elsewhere, the necklace Jimi Hendrix wore at Monterey Pop Festival in one of the most notable live performances ever, and the handwritten lyrics to ‘U.S. Blues’ by The Grateful Dead. An electrifying soundtrack brings these items to life throughout this gallery.

-- New York Rocks: As an ongoing homage to a city that has been so integral in music history, the Annex will have a permanent “New York Rocks” exhibition that will include an oversized interactive map to highlight key locations around Manhattan that have musical significance, including Studio 54 and The Chelsea Hotel. The gallery also includes the notebook in which Billy Joel wrote all the lyrics for “The Stranger” album, the ‘Big Suit’ worn onstage by David Byrne in Talking Heads, and many of the physical elements, including the front awning and cash register, from the recently closed CBGB, the infamous club that is so entrenched in New York rock history.

-- Cleveland Rocks: The Annex will include special exhibits and displays that give visitors a taste of the larger experience at the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum in Cleveland. These exhibits will showcase elements of the Cleveland Museum’s collection and engage in the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame experience via visitation, membership, online participation and/or philanthropic support.

-- Other highlights throughout include an untitled, handwritten poem by Jim Morrison, Elvis Presley’s motorcycle jacket, Michael Jackson’s velvet jacket from “We Are The World”, John Lennon’s Record Plant Piano, Bruce Springsteen’s 1957 Chevy and much, much more.

About the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum

The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum is the nonprofit organization that exists to educate visitors, fans and scholars from around the world about the history and continuing significance of rock and roll music. It carries out this mission both through its operation of a world-class museum that collects, preserves, exhibits and interprets this art form and through its library and archives as well as its educational programs.

The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Annex NYC is proudly sponsored by Best Buy, Diesel for Bloomingdales, Citi and Gibson. Additional supporting partners include Sony, Sennheiser, Klein + Hummel, Kohler and Brocade Home.

The Rock & Roll Hall of Fame ANNEX NYC will open in November at 76 Mercer Street in Soho. Advance tickets will be available through http://www.RockAnnex.com (http://www.rockannex.com/) in October.

NOTE: Admission to the Annex will be a whopping $26.00 !!!!!

lofter1
August 13th, 2008, 05:43 PM
76 Mercer is within the grand old 5-story Cast Iron and brick building at 503 - 511 Broaday aka 74 - 82 Mercer Street.

An Old Navy (http://www.timeout.com/newyork/venues/soho/9554/old-navy) takes up the Broadway side (503 Broadway).

There's a NYSC (http://www.healthylivingnyc.com/find-it/business/607/1) gym upstairs.

http://www.healthylivingnyc.com/find-it/includes/resize_primary.php?bus_id=607 (http://www.healthylivingnyc.com/find-it/gallery/607/1)

According to DOB the CELLAR is being renovated for a MUSEUM (Permit Issued 8.04.08 (http://a810-bisweb.nyc.gov/bisweb/JobsQueryByNumberServlet?requestid=4&passjobnumber=110144923&passdocnumber=01)); they've been clearing it out for months (formerly it housed a rag trade wholesale business):

GENERAL CONSTRUCTION IN CELLAR FOR PROPOSED MUSEUM.
CHANGE OF USE AND EGRESS AND ALL EXTERIOR WORK TO GROUND
LEVEL FACADE FILED UNDER SEPARATE ALTERATION TYPE 1 APPLICATION.
THIS APPLICATION IS LIMITED TO INTERIOR WORK ONLY.
The architect of record: VICTORIA BENATAR ARCHITECT PLLC (http://www.victoriabenatar.com/)

brianac
August 20th, 2008, 06:05 PM
Soho Activists Sore Over Apple Store Mania


by Chris Shott (http://www.observer.com/node/36088) | August 20, 2008

aharon rothschild/metro

Metro today reports on residents' backlash against the ever-popular Apple Store (http://ny.metro.us/metro/local/article/Apple_store_crowds_irk_some_neighbors/13387.html) on Prince and Greene Streets:

“We’ve been suffering ever since they moved in [six years ago],” said Sean Sweeney, director of the SoHo Alliance and Greene Street resident, who ticked off a litany of complaints ranging from noise from steam cleaning the façade in the middle of the night or from the HVAC equipment on the roof to the hordes of people who line up for new gadgets — and allegedly leave behind heaps of trash.
The final straw — which prompted Sweeney to fire off a letter this week to elected officials — was last Tuesday’s Jonas Brothers concert held at the store, attracting thousands of screaming tweeners for several hours to Sweeney’s block “like it was Shea Stadium and the Beatles.”


Read Mr. Sweeney's full letter after the jump.

To:
MBPO and elected officials, Apple SoHo management, SoHo Residents and Businesses

Dear Manhattan Borough President Stringer,
The residents and businesses of SoHo desperately need your help regarding constant problems we have with Apple SoHo. I contacted Shaan Khan, your Director of Community Affairs, and he has agreed to facilitate a meeting between the surrounding high-end stores owners, local residents and Apple SoHo representatives and other elected officials to find a solution to these problems.

Since the Apple SoHo store moved in six years ago, it has become the worst neighbor in SoHo. No bar, nightclub or construction site comes close to ruining continually our quality-of-life like Apple SoHo has. This is very disappointing since the many Mac users in SoHo initially welcomed the store.

Even before the store opened, the SoHo Alliance was receiving construction complaints from residents and businesses, and there have been over a dozen complaints filed with the Department of Buildings since then.

However, the final straw occurred last Tuesday, August 12th with an in-store performance by the Jonas Brothers, who recorded "Jonas Brothers Live" for Apple's i-Tunes. This concert attracted thousands of young teenage girls who SCREAMED INCESSANTLY on the street for hours for their idols, blocking traffic, injuring one resident in the crush, and inconveniencing scores of other people and businesses;

This concert for the Jonas Brothers was like the Beatles at Shea Stadium. The screaming was that loud. However, residential Greene Street is not Shea Stadium.

To see what a mob scene this was, visit:

http://blog.limewire.com/posts/3310-Jonas-Brothers-stop-Soho-traffic (http://blog.limewire.com/posts/3310-Jonas-Brothers-stop-Soho-traffic)

A commenter on that blog writes:
I waited 17 hours in line, to be mobbed by millions of girls.
We left crying because my friend couldn't breathe and had a panic attack.
The whole thing was stupid and disorganized.

To get an idea of the screaming, check out: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TN8V71lpOK8 (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TN8V71lpOK8)
Now please imagine this on the public street, constantly, for hours and hours when people are trying to work, rest or relax!

Another blogger notes the 'huge, insane, loud' line of screamers:
http://www.9to5mac.com/jonas-brothers-soho-apple-store (http://www.9to5mac.com/jonas-brothers-soho-apple-store)
These regular music performances by Apple may violate the Zoning Resolution, the Certificate of Occupancy, and the Public-Assembly-permit requirement (they have no P.A.). There is a 68-seat theater on the mezzanine level, but I could find no C of O permitting such a use on the
NYC Department of Buildings website. However, USA Today reported ( http://www.usatoday.com/life/music/news/2008-08-12-jonas-bros-nyc_N.htm (http://www.usatoday.com/life/music/news/2008-08-12-jonas-bros-nyc_N.htm) ) that 450 people 'mobbed' inside the store (not to mention the hundreds and hundreds left outside all day screaming and blocking pedestrian and vehicular traffic on the street). This is clearly a Pubic Assembly violation as well as a fire-safety hazard.
Perhaps a call to the FDNY during the next concert, bringing it to an end mid-performance, is in order. Nor would Apple welcome a lawsuit if one of these young girls were struck by a car while blocking vehicular traffic.

However, there are many other examples of irresponsible corporate behavior by Apple SoHo:
- construction occurring after midnight on the public sidewalk with loud power machinery several times in 2006;
- illegal night-time construction without a permit, keeping neighbors awake in 2002, 2006 and 2007; (see the numerous DOB complaints: http://a810-bisweb.nyc.gov/bisweb/ComplaintsByAddressServlet?requestid=1&allbin=1007985 (http://a810-bisweb.nyc.gov/bisweb/ComplaintsByAddressServlet?requestid=1&allbin=1007985) )
- lies to me and the Manhattan Borough President's Office by the manager, Paul Fradin, that Apple SoHo had night permits for this work when in fact it didn't;

- crowds for Apple SoHo on a regular basis that necessitate police barricades, adding to pedestrian crowding, preventing access to high-end businesses on Greene Street and subsequent diminution of income, as well as restricting residents access to their homes;

- subsequent litter left by these crowds who often number in the hundreds, and who line up and even camp out overnight on public sidewalks, giving SoHo the appearance of a homeless encampment;

- Apple employees during their breaks lounging, eating, smoking, littering - in effect, trespassing - on nearby people's stoops;

- a newly installed HVAC unit with little or no sound mitigation or baffling with very loud noise emanating into residences. Possibly you can see if an inspector from the Department of Environmental Protection can do a sound-meter reading, since the new Noise Law severely restricts noise coming into people's homes.

- flood lights on the roof often kept on all night, glaring into people's homes;

- etc, etc.

Everyone in the vicinity of Apple SoHo has been contacting me for a solution. We need assistance to curb this egregious corporate behavior. It is gratifying that your office is willing to initiate a facilitation of these problems.

Thanks for your office's offer, looking forward to working to alleviate these problems.

Regards,
Sean Sweeney, Director
SoHo Alliance
cc:
Martin Connor, NYS Senate
Deborah Glick, NYS Assembly
Shaan Kahn, Office of the Manhattan Borough President
Brad Hoylman, Chair, CB #2, Manhattan
Bob Gormley, District Manager, CB #2, Manhattan
David Gruber, Chair, Business and Institutions Committee, CB #2, Manhattan
Arthur Kriemelman, president, SoHo Alliance
Robert Riccobono, president, 150 Greene Street Corp.


Sean Sweeney, Director
SoHo Alliance


http://www.observer.com/2008/real-estate/soho-activists-sore-over-apple-store-mania

© 2008 Observer Media Group,

lofter1
August 21st, 2008, 12:08 AM
Just wait until the R 'n' R Museum opens around the corner and a couple of blocks down -- on a stretch of Mercer that has been quiet for years.

brianac
October 7th, 2008, 04:49 AM
A Clothing Shop Moves Up, and a Dance Company Must Move Out

By DANIEL J. WAKIN (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/reference/timestopics/people/w/daniel_j_wakin/index.html?inline=nyt-per)
Published: October 6, 2008

They are two classic New York stories.

http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2008/10/07/arts/taylor190.jpgJosh Haner/The New York Times
Above, 552 Broadway, between Prince and Spring Streets, where the company of Paul Taylor, top, must leave its second-floor home.

Related
Times Topics: Paul Taylor (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/reference/timestopics/people/t/paul_taylor/index.html)
http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2008/10/06/arts/paul.jpg Andrea Mohin/The New York Times
Paul Taylor with his company.

One is the young dancer who came to the city, worked with the creative legends of the 1950s and ’60s and become a cultural lion. The other is the Holocaust survivor who arrived after the war, ran a clothing factory and took a real estate gamble that paid off.

For 20 years their lives have intersected at a building at 552 Broadway, in
the heart of SoHo. The dancer is Paul Taylor (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/reference/timestopics/people/t/paul_taylor/index.html?inline=nyt-per), whose company has its home on the second floor of the building. The businessman is Milton Steinberg, who owns it.

Now other forces of New York — neighborhood metamorphosis and the insane rents that can come with it — are driving them apart.

A Banana Republic store on the first floor wants to expand upward, and Mr. Steinberg has agreed. The Paul Taylor Dance Company (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/reference/timestopics/organizations/t/taylor_paul_dance_co/index.html?inline=nyt-org) has lost its lease and must be out by April 15.

“How can we compare the money they paid?” Mr. Steinberg, 84, said in a recent interview. “I feel we should get market rent, which is available.” As SoHo has been transformed from a neighborhood of lofts and manufacturing concerns into a major retail grazing ground, not just ground-level spaces but also upper stories are becoming prime rental properties.

“I have my children,” Mr. Steinberg said. “I have a partner who’s very sick. Everything is on my neck.”

Mr. Steinberg fretted that he would be seen as the evil landlord but said that he had refrained from raising the dance company’s rent for at least five years and was a regular contributor to the company (as Taylor officials confirmed). “Things change,” he said. “I feel very bad.”

Change is an understatement. Stores like Best Buy, Adidas, Urban Outfitters, Levi’s, Steve Madden (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/reference/timestopics/people/m/steven_madden/index.html?inline=nyt-per) and Sephora have come to dominate the stretch of Broadway near Mr. Taylor’s headquarters, sending rents skyward. When the dance company moved in 20 years ago, said John Tomlinson, its general manager, “this was where work got done, not where people shopped.”

Now, he added, it is “the world’s largest outdoor shopping mall.”

The company is scrambling to find new space that a nonprofit organization can afford. The search is complicated by the special needs of a dance company. Dance studios need to have wide-open areas without columns, and the ceilings must be at least 14 feet high, to preserve the foreheads of dancers being lifted into the air. Mr. Taylor, 78, who did not respond to several messages left with company officials, is said to have looked at seven or eight sites, none perfect.

“I don’t have the option of being pessimistic,” Mr. Tomlinson said. “It’s got to happen.” The company has several leads, he said. “One of these things will break through.”

Adding to the problem is Mr. Taylor’s insistence that the company stay in Manhattan rather than find a cheaper rent in Brooklyn, where many small dance companies and studios have found refuge. “He feels very strongly he should be able to succeed in his hometown,” Mr. Tomlinson said, “and his hometown is Manhattan.”

The company’s real estate efforts are overseen by a board member, Elise Jaffe, who well understands its plight. Ms. Jaffe is the senior vice president for real estate of Dressbarn, another national clothing retail chain. “The correlation is there, that I do deals like Banana Republic does to expand the chain,” she said. “This is a unique situation. Paul Taylor only needs one home.”

The Taylor company took a lease on the floor in 1987, spending about $1 million on a major renovation. The space houses two studios,
administrative offices, changing rooms, an archive and storage.

A lease extension was negotiated in 2002, with rent of about $36 a square foot for 10,000 square feet, or about $360,000 a year, said Edson Womble, the company’s finance director. While Mr. Steinberg declined to say what Banana Republic had offered him, second-floor space on Broadway can now go for well over $100 a square foot, real estate brokers said. Banana Republic officials did not respond to several phone messages.

Mr. Steinberg said he came to New York in 1946 after spending a year in concentration camps, including Mauthausen in Austria. He started a sportswear manufacturing company at 611 Broadway and moved the business several times before ending up at 15th Street near the West Side Highway.

He bought 552 Broadway, which is between Prince and Spring Streets, in 1966. “Somebody came and offered us a deal to make an investment,” he said. “My wife took out the last dollar from what she saved up.” They paid, he recalled, about $435,000. For years the property provided little income. Now, he said, “the sky’s the limit, what they offer me lately.”

While Mr. Steinberg was building his clothing business, Mr. Taylor arrived in New York in 1952 to study dance. He was soon performing for Martha Graham, Merce Cunningham (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/reference/timestopics/people/c/merce_cunningham/index.html?inline=nyt-per) and George Balanchine (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/reference/timestopics/people/b/george_balanchine/index.html?inline=nyt-per), and he began choreographing for himself and other dancers two years later. The company is now an established fixture on the international dance scene.

Few of the shoppers at Banana Republic one day in late September were likely to have known that as they nosed about the little black dresses and trench coat styles of the chain, which proclaims that its inspiration is “the buzz of the city.”

http://www.nytimes.com/2008/10/07/arts/dance/07tayl.html?ref=nyregion

Copyright 2008 (http://www.nytimes.com/ref/membercenter/help/copyright.html) The New York Times Company (http://www.nytco.com/)

lofter1
October 7th, 2008, 12:10 PM
So sad ^ especially considering that places like Banana Republic will see sales drop in the coming months and therefore the expansion will be found to be unnecessary.

Meanwhile the neighborhood loses another core creative entity.

NYC4Life
October 8th, 2008, 01:34 PM
NY Post

VICTORIA'S NEW PLACE

Posted: 4:34 am
October 8, 2008


VICTORIA'S Secret has just inked a deal worth $100 million for a 24,000 foot duplex spread in SoHo at 591-593 Broadway.

But the 15-year lease is for a space that doesn't yet exist. That's because Aurora Capital, which controls the retail in the building, is moving a "mountain," a lounge and a lobby to build a 60 foot swath of glass frontage to accommodate the sexy Angels.

The deal was made possible by getting current tenant Eastern Mountain Sports, represented by Bruce Katz of Katz & Associates, to move to 18,000 feet in Thor Equities' 530 Broadway.

Additionally, area staple, the Lounge, will simply be shuttered. And the building entrance between the two storefronts is being shuffled off Broadway to Mercer St. where the new lobby will have a larger, high-speed elevator.

Aurora Capital, which is controlled by Bobby Cayre, Alex Adjmi and Jared Epstein, also owns 600 Broadway, where Hollister's flagship has taken the retail and 568 Broadway, which has Armani A/X, Forever 21 and others.

Richard Hodos of CB Richard Ellis represented the Limited's Victoria's Secret in the deal for a 12,000 foot ground and ditto in the basement.
Ground floor spaces on that block run from $400 to $600 a foot. No one returned calls for comment but for the Limited which had none anyway.
*

Lehman Brothers new owner, Barclay's, has just gobbled up 60,000 feet in Queens on the 10th to 12th floors of the One MetLife Plaza tower. The deal is a sublease from MetLife in the building owned by Brause Realty.

Josh Kurlioff and Paul Glickman of Cushman & Wakefield along with the Jones Lang LaSalle team of Lloyd Desatnick and Peter Riguardi represented MetLife which got between $38 for the first few years and $42 for the rest of the term. A CB Richard Ellis team represents Bar clay's and no one would comment on the deal.
*
Word on the street is that the Queen of the Sky scrapers, Darcy Stacom of CB Richard Ellis has advised bidders for the Helmsley Park Lane Hotel that the estate is not in a rush to sell.

"They have pulled back and are monitoring the market because they know everyone will have a hard time chasing down partners and lenders in this environment," snitched one source.

Meanwhile, the hotel - which was originally thought to sell for as much as $800 million but was most recently fetching bids in the $600 million range - is booking overnight stays through the end of next year. Some bidders were considering condos but are wary of the low ceilings while others want to maintain it as a hotel.
*

A Cushman & Wakefield report has found commercial velocity slowing, vacancy rates increasing and rents falling - and the expectation is for even further deterioration in the market.

Joseph Harbert of C&W said vacancy rates could go from the current overall 7.4 percent to the 9 and 10 percent range by the beginning of the next quarter.



Copyright 2008 NYP Holdings, Inc. All rights reserved.

lofter1
October 8th, 2008, 02:11 PM
VICTORIA'S NEW PLACE


VICTORIA'S Secret has just inked a deal worth $100 million for a 24,000 foot duplex spread in SoHo at 591-593 Broadway.

... The deal was made possible by getting current tenant Eastern Mountain Sports ... to move to 18,000 feet in Thor Equities' 530 Broadway.

Additionally, area staple, the Lounge, will simply be shuttered ...


That new Victoria's site is just south of Houston on the west side of Broadway; VS has been one block south (http://www.globest.com/news/1261_1261/newyork/174335-1.html) at the SW corner of Broadway and Prince for 10 (?) years (565 Broadway,opposite Dean & Deluca and Prada).

Good to hear that Eastern Mountain will still be in the area; their new site at 530 Broadway (http://www.thorequities.com/property.aspx?id=127) will be just north of Spring on the east side of Broadway (it was formerly a Skecher's shoe store):


According to Bob Mayerson, COO of Eastern Mountain Sports, the new location "will allow us to open a full-size flagship store in a prime location in Soho, with a significantly expanded product offering for our customers in Manhattan."


The end of The Lounge will be no loss -- adios, trash dump :cool:

brianac
October 18th, 2008, 04:45 AM
Soho

The Strangers Next Door

http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2008/10/19/nyregion/19hous.span.jpg G. Paul Burnett/The New York Times
For a once-elegant building on Macdougal Street, peeling paint and unwelcome visitors.

By CAROLINE H. DWORIN
Published: October 17, 2008

AS dusk sets in on Macdougal Street, the rats who inhabit No. 43 lope out into the shadows, two, three, four at a time. They make their home on this otherwise elegant block in a vacant four-story building at King Street, directly across the street from the Cooke Center Academy, a private high school whose students hang out on the closed-off street.

Neighbors call the structure many things: a blight, a menace, a mystery.

The building, an 1846 red brick row house, is boarded up and covered in graffiti, its once-grand cornice in poor condition, the paint on the doors of its cracked Greek Revival entryway peeling off in crimson flakes the size of thumbnails. A weathered violation notice from the city’s Department of Buildings, dated Aug. 1, flaps on the door.

“It’s been unoccupied for around 20 years,” said Andrew Berman, the executive director of the Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation. “Although it’s really only in the last year or two it’s become both a health hazard and a safety hazard.”

Although residents have complained for months about rats scurrying about the building, the most recent indication of the building’s problems occurred on Sept. 16, when the property failed an inspection by the city department of health for signs of rodent activity.

“We baited the exterior of the building’s property within the week,” said Rick Simeone, the director of pest control services at the health department. But neighbors are skeptical about whether that action will solve the problem.

According to local residents, the rodents are nothing new, nor are problems with the building’s structural integrity. A hatch in the roof that had been left open for months allowed rain to flood the floors. Yellow X’s were spray-painted on the sides of the building by the Fire Department, indicating that the structure is hazardous, and that firefighters should enter with caution.

According to officials of the Landmarks Preservation Commission and other city agencies, multiple letters to the owners’ post office box have gone unopened and telephone calls have gone unanswered.

“With recalcitrant owners, it sometimes does take quite a long time to get work done,” said John Weiss, the deputy general counsel of the Landmarks Preservation Commission.

According to the Buildings Department’s Web site, the building is owned by Abraham and Arthur Blasof, who neighbors believe are brothers.

Despite eight attempts, neither could be reached by phone. No number was available for Abraham Blasof. Arthur Blasof’s number was answered by a man who identified himself as Walter and said he was a relative of Mr. Blasof’s. He said he believed the building on Macdougal continued to be occupied.

http://www.nytimes.com/2008/10/19/nyregion/thecity/19hous.html?ref=thecity

Copyright 2008 (http://www.nytimes.com/ref/membercenter/help/copyright.html) The New York Times Company (http://www.nytco.com/)

lofter1
October 18th, 2008, 09:41 AM
That ^ great little corner property at 43 MacDougal (http://a810-bisweb.nyc.gov/bisweb/PropertyProfileOverviewServlet?boro=1&houseno=43&street=macdougal+street&requestid=0&s=A03C41B885B461E4F46BD08866A7430E) is
within the Charlton - King - Vandam Historic District (http://www.nyc-architecture.com/SOH/SOH009.htm):

http://www.gvshp.org/images/ch-king-vdmap.jpg

It sits opposite a part of the South Village (http://www.gvshp.org/southvillage.htm) which has been proposed
for designation & protection by The Landmarks Preservation Commission.

http://www.gvshp.org/images/CopyofMapforNewsletter06large_002.jpg

brianac
October 18th, 2008, 11:35 AM
Lets hope the owners will let someone help them, or at least let the authorities do something with the building.

NYC4Life
October 18th, 2008, 12:10 PM
Coincidently, Back in June, I took a pic of this building, not knowing how much of a significance it has.

http://forum.skyscraperpage.com/showthread.php?t=153703

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v638/GhettoRicanBx/Brooklyn/Lower%20Manhattan/Lower%20Manhattan%202/Graffiti.jpg

brianac
October 18th, 2008, 01:16 PM
Thanks for the photo NYC4.

Lots of nice pics on the link, thanks.

NYC4Life
October 24th, 2008, 04:40 PM
The Villager

Updated On 10/24/08 at 03:25PM
Developers lure residents with bicycles

http://s3.amazonaws.com/trd_three/images/54374/black_bike_ladies_articlebox.JPG (http://ny.therealdeal.com/assets/54374)
Bicycle from A Black Bike


Peter Manning and Robert Siegel, the developers of 211 Elizabeth, a 15-unit building at 211 Elizabeth Street in Soho, are offering new residents free custom bicycles made by Dutch company A Black Bike. Prices for the bikes start at $950, according to the bike company's Web site (http://www.ablackbike.com/). Units in the building, which has a bicycle storage room, range from 750 to 2,189 square feet and begin at $1.55 million. (http://ny.therealdeal.com/articles/new-residential-developments-51)

lofter1
October 24th, 2008, 04:51 PM
That swell new building ^ at 211 Elizabeth / 16 Prince has it's very own thread (http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/16 Prince Street) (but could use a thread title change).

lofter1
November 17th, 2008, 06:32 PM
SoHo's Little Singer Gets Dressed Up Once Again

CURBED (http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/SoHo's Little Singer Gets Dressed Up Once Again)
November 17, 2008

http://curbed.com/uploads/2008_11_561BwayAwning1.JPG
New steel and leaded glass awning at 561 Broadway.

The Little Singer building at 561 Broadway, the fanciful 1903 masterpiece
by architect Ernest Flagg, has recently been dressed up with some original
detailing which had been removed over the years. An awning of metal and
leaded glass once again runs along the Broadway facade above the
newly-Mango'ed windows (http://racked.com/archives/2007/09/04/storecasting_mango_to_sweeten.php). In the years before the Singer went up here,
this lot was the site of Henry Wood's Marble Hall, a 2,000 seat theater
which was home to Christy's Minstrels and other "black-face" theatricals
popular in the years before and after the Civil War when this part of town
was New York's entertainment center.

Now, Richard Levine of Bone / Levine Architects (http://www.bonelevine.net/), who has offices on the
upper floors of the Little Singer and is in charge of restoration work at the
building, designed and executed (http://a810-bisweb.nyc.gov/bisweb/JobsQueryByNumberServlet?requestid=3&passjobnumber=110014289&passdocnumber=01) the newly-installed awnings, copying the
originals as much as possible. This project was done with nary a noise
from nimbys, unlike a new glass canopy proposed for the Public Theater (http://curbed.com/archives/2008/11/13/public_theaters_monumental_changes_revealed.php) in
neighboring NoHo. During that next downtown stroll take a look up at the
Singer facade and consider some work well done. Meanwhile, enjoy a
virtual tour of the Singer's spectacular penthouse (http://www.fulopassociates.com/561_Broadway/index.html), which went on the
market in April and is available to anyone who can stitch together a mere
$8 million.

http://curbed.com/uploads/2008_11_561BwayAwning2.JPG
Brackets installed on the Broadway facade to hold up the new awning.

http://curbed.com/uploads/2008_11_561BwayAwning3.JPG
The crew from Bone / Levine attaching the awning.

http://curbed.com/uploads/2008_11_561BwayAwning4a.JPG
The completed awning framed by Ernest Flagg's filigree.

http://curbed.com/uploads/2008_11_561BwayAwning4b.JPG
The original 1903 Singer building (l.) and the 2008 version (r.).

http://curbed.com/uploads/2008_11_561BwayAwning6a.JPG
How the Little Singer looked at the beginning of the 20th Century.

http://curbed.com/uploads/2008_11_561BwayAwning7.JPG
Until 1877 this lot housed a huge theater, home to popular Minstrel Shows.

http://curbed.com/uploads/2008_11_561BwayAwning8.JPG
561 Broadway (c.) when the upper floors were home to Henry Wood's Marble Hall theater.

http://curbed.com/uploads/2008_11_561BwayAwning9a.JPG
The original awnings (l.) and the facade without awnings, circa 2002 (Photo: Hubert J. Steed).

http://curbed.com/uploads/2008_11_561BwayAwning10.JPG
The newly-replicated awnings in place on the Little Singer facade.

http://curbed.com/uploads/2008_11_561BwayAwning11.JPG
Looking through the beveled glass.

http://curbed.com/uploads/2008_11_561BwayAwning12.JPG
Studded surface will discourage snow from collecting.

http://curbed.com/uploads/2008_11_561BwayAwning13.JPG
The original faced and the edge of the new awning.

http://curbed.com/uploads/2008_11_561BwayAwning14.JPG
The 88 Prince Street facade, sans awnings.

http://curbed.com/uploads/2008_11_561BwayAwning15.JPG
The Little Singer out-shining its neighbors on Broadway.

· Storecasting: Mango To Sweeten Up Broadway (http://racked.com/archives/2007/09/04/storecasting_mango_to_sweeten.php) [Racked]
· Projects Preservation Singer Building (http://www.bonelevine.net/)
· Public Theater's Monumental Changes Revealed (http://curbed.com/archives/2008/11/13/public_theaters_monumental_changes_revealed.php) [Curbed]
· SOHO Penthouse (http://www.fulopassociates.com/561_Broadway/index.html) [John Fulop Associates]

[B]561 broadway

195Broadway
November 18th, 2008, 08:18 PM
SOHO, home of the $53,000 amp.
















$7,950,000 penthouse/ 150 amp service

195Broadway
November 18th, 2008, 08:38 PM
Could there be any doubt as to their shared heritage?
So lovely to look at.

http://www.nebraskahistory.org/images/sites/mnh/quilt2/87671265.jpg
http://curbed.com/uploads/2008_11_561BwayAwning1.JPG
This building deserves nothing less. This is one of those rare moments when it was done right.
http://curbed.com/uploads/2008_11_561BwayAwning12.JPG

brianac
December 12th, 2008, 04:35 AM
Downtown's Ohio Theatre Likely to Close (http://blogs.villagevoice.com/music/archives/2008/12/downtowns_ohio.php)

Posted at 1:00 PM, December 9, 2008

http://blogs.villagevoice.com/music/assets_c/2008/12/ohiotheatre-thumb-400x300.jpg (http://blogs.villagevoice.com/music/Images/ohiotheatre.jpg)
Photo via konoa.com (http://www.kanoa.com/)

Before 66 Wooster Street became the Ohio Theatre (http://www.sohothinktank.org/ourcurrentseason.htm) and various apartments, it had a former life as a textile factory. Theatrical legend has it that before the first performance--in what was then called the Open Space--the cast and crew went down on hands and knees, armed with magnets, pulling decades of dropped pins and needles from the floorboard.

Many years later, the Ohio is on pins and needles again. The building that houses the Ohio is being sold, and in a few weeks or months the Ohio Theatre will almost certainly cease to exist.

Robert Lyons, artistic director of Soho Think Tank, a nonprofit group that administers the Ohio and produces the OBIE-award winning Ice Factory Festival, describes the situation: "In one way or another, our days are numbered. It's just a matter of what that number is. We're trying to finish the season lined up through June. We could possibly still be here in the summer for Ice Factory '09. It could all end as soon as the end of January." While Lyons is currently in talks with the building's prospective buyer, he dismisses the idea that the Ohio will have any long-term future.

"That doesn't seem like it's in the cards," he says. If the new owner allows the current season to finish up, audiences can bid farewell to the Ohio through its remaining scheduled shows, among them Target Margin's 10 Blocks on the Camino Real, Eisa Davis's Angela's Mix Tape (produced by New Georges), and Clubbed Thumb's annual Summer Works festival.

The building's current owners--William Hahn and Charles Magistro, who declined to comment for this article--made the decision to sell with some reluctance, according to Lyons. Apparently, maintenance expenses and preservation of the façade required by the city created an untenable financial burden. "They couldn't sustain this long-term support of the space," says Lyons. He does, however, credit Hahn and Magistro with their support of the theater over the past 20 years, in which they always kept the space's rent well below market value.

In those 20 years, as a rental space and a producing theater, the Ohio has hosted local companies and visiting artists such as Rude Mechs, Pig Iron, Salt, ERS, the Foundry, Les Freres Corbusier, Riot Group, and Undermain. The Ohio has been remarkable not only for its talent roster, but also for its physical beauty. David Herskovits, the artistic director of Target Margin, regrets the loss of "the size of it, the height of the ceiling, the expanse of it, amazing and unusual for a small alternative space....

It's big and grand, but has its own kind of funkiness." Maria Striar, the cofounder of Clubbed Thumb, remarks, "It's devastating. It's been a home for a whole generation of Downtown theater.... It's right in the heart of Downtown where slowly almost everything that belonged to the arts is being chiseled away."

Lyons, who says he currently wavers between feelings of "great despondency" and feelings of gratitude for the two decades he's run the space, also links the Ohio's shuttering to a more general trend. "It's not the first cultural institution to succumb to real-estate pressures," he says.

"Soon we're going to have a city without any cool theater spaces.... [New York needs] to protect our cultural jewels like this." While institutions such as the Performing Garage, the Drawing Center, and Here Arts Center remain, the Ohio's closing--and its likely conversion into a retail space--further completes Soho's transformation from artists' haven to shopper's paradise.--Alexis Soloski

http://blogs.villagevoice.com/music/archives/2008/12/downtowns_ohio.php

Copyright © 2008 Village Voice LLC (http://www.villagevoice.com/about/)

Bronxbombers
December 13th, 2008, 11:26 PM
Downtown's Ohio Theatre Likely to Close (http://blogs.villagevoice.com/music/archives/2008/12/downtowns_ohio.php)

Posted at 1:00 PM, December 9, 2008

http://blogs.villagevoice.com/music/assets_c/2008/12/ohiotheatre-thumb-400x300.jpg (http://blogs.villagevoice.com/music/Images/ohiotheatre.jpg)
Photo via konoa.com (http://www.kanoa.com/)

Before 66 Wooster Street became the Ohio Theatre (http://www.sohothinktank.org/ourcurrentseason.htm) and various apartments, it had a former life as a textile factory. Theatrical legend has it that before the first performance--in what was then called the Open Space--the cast and crew went down on hands and knees, armed with magnets, pulling decades of dropped pins and needles from the floorboard.

Many years later, the Ohio is on pins and needles again. The building that houses the Ohio is being sold, and in a few weeks or months the Ohio Theatre will almost certainly cease to exist.

Robert Lyons, artistic director of Soho Think Tank, a nonprofit group that administers the Ohio and produces the OBIE-award winning Ice Factory Festival, describes the situation: "In one way or another, our days are numbered. It's just a matter of what that number is. We're trying to finish the season lined up through June. We could possibly still be here in the summer for Ice Factory '09. It could all end as soon as the end of January." While Lyons is currently in talks with the building's prospective buyer, he dismisses the idea that the Ohio will have any long-term future.

"That doesn't seem like it's in the cards," he says. If the new owner allows the current season to finish up, audiences can bid farewell to the Ohio through its remaining scheduled shows, among them Target Margin's 10 Blocks on the Camino Real, Eisa Davis's Angela's Mix Tape (produced by New Georges), and Clubbed Thumb's annual Summer Works festival.

The building's current owners--William Hahn and Charles Magistro, who declined to comment for this article--made the decision to sell with some reluctance, according to Lyons. Apparently, maintenance expenses and preservation of the façade required by the city created an untenable financial burden. "They couldn't sustain this long-term support of the space," says Lyons. He does, however, credit Hahn and Magistro with their support of the theater over the past 20 years, in which they always kept the space's rent well below market value.

In those 20 years, as a rental space and a producing theater, the Ohio has hosted local companies and visiting artists such as Rude Mechs, Pig Iron, Salt, ERS, the Foundry, Les Freres Corbusier, Riot Group, and Undermain. The Ohio has been remarkable not only for its talent roster, but also for its physical beauty. David Herskovits, the artistic director of Target Margin, regrets the loss of "the size of it, the height of the ceiling, the expanse of it, amazing and unusual for a small alternative space....

It's big and grand, but has its own kind of funkiness." Maria Striar, the cofounder of Clubbed Thumb, remarks, "It's devastating. It's been a home for a whole generation of Downtown theater.... It's right in the heart of Downtown where slowly almost everything that belonged to the arts is being chiseled away."

Lyons, who says he currently wavers between feelings of "great despondency" and feelings of gratitude for the two decades he's run the space, also links the Ohio's shuttering to a more general trend. "It's not the first cultural institution to succumb to real-estate pressures," he says.

"Soon we're going to have a city without any cool theater spaces.... [New York needs] to protect our cultural jewels like this." While institutions such as the Performing Garage, the Drawing Center, and Here Arts Center remain, the Ohio's closing--and its likely conversion into a retail space--further completes Soho's transformation from artists' haven to shopper's paradise.--Alexis Soloski

http://blogs.villagevoice.com/music/archives/2008/12/downtowns_ohio.php

Copyright © 2008 Village Voice LLC (http://www.villagevoice.com/about/) I will see SoHo next summer. Does anyone what does SoHo means? I don't understand what does SoHo means.

lofter1
December 14th, 2008, 12:03 AM
SoHo means "South of Houston" and refers to the blocks that lie on the south side of Houston Street, one of Manhattan's main east <> west thoroughfares. Houston Street (pronounced HOW'-stun) runs from the East River to the Hudson River and is divided at Broadway into East Houston Street and West Houston Street, with numbers running larger the farther Houston Street moves away from Broadway. Houston Street borders these neighborhoods to the north: Alphabet City, the East Village, NoHo (North of Houston), Greenwich Village and the West Village. To the south: The Lower East Side, Little Italy [NoLIta], SoHo, [Hudson Square] [South Village]. Houston Street (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Houston_Street) is named for William Houstoun (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Houstoun_(lawyer)), the spelling later bowdlerized into Houston.

SoHo for a time was known as Hells Hundred Acres (http://riseandsprawl.blogspot.com/2006/07/hells-hundred-acres.html), so dubbed by the FDNY due to the large number of troublesome fires (http://nyfd.com/history/wooster/wooster_street.html) in the big old loft / warehouses now recognized around the world as the Cast Iron buildings which make up SoHo, once the hotbed of Art in America ...

Artistic failure in America (http://www.artisticfailure.com/category/artistic-failure-in-america/)

As promised (http://www.artisticfailure.com/2008/01/15/where-can-an-exiled-artist-go/), here’s another story of what happens when an artist is exiled by the community or neighborhood he helps (re-)build into a vibrant and hip art district. This time the artist, Dean Fleming, became “exiled” by choice.

Scene: It was the heady 1960s; for the past decade-plus, America’s comfortable and prosperous middle class had been fleeing the country’s cities for the newly built suburbs, leaving huge openings in various city districts for all sorts of opportunistic elements to move in. Such a district in New York City, in 1962 sometimes called “Hells Hundred Acres,” was described by Richard Kostelanetz in his book on SoHo (http://www.amazon.com/Soho-Rise-Fall-Artists-Colony/dp/0415965721/ref=pd_bbs_5?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1200765277&sr=8-5) thusly:

“The area below Houston Street [in New York City] was an industrial slum that I might have walked through reluctantly on the way from Greenwich Village to its north or Chinatown to its east. Industrial debris littered streets that were clogged with trucks and truckers during the working daytimes but deserted at night… I first became aware of someone actually residing in the nineteenth-century industrial slum in 1965 when I was introduced on Canal Street to a Korean artist [Nam June Paik] who had just arrived in America and rented a nearby ‘loft,’ which was a word new to me at the time… I later learned of such urban pioneers as Alison Knowles, who, in the late 1950s, had rented space in an industrial building on Broadway just north of Canal Street, where she lived with her husband-to-be, Dick Higgins… By the time I relocated downtown, first to the East Village in 1966, I became aware of artists who had rented large open space in which they worked and, incidentally, lived… [the author mentions Yoko Ono, Robert Rauschenberg, the writer Donald Barthelme, Chuck Close, and many others in the text that follows].”
Dean Fleming, a California native, came of age as an artist in New York in the 1960s. A contemporary and friend of sculptor Mark di Suvero (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mark_di_Suvero), Fleming worked initially in a catchy, trendy (but not earth-shatteringly original) minimalist-geometric style, and he had a few years of success in the gallery scene of the time. Fleming also was, along with di Suvero, a co-founder, in 1963, of the Park Place Gallery (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Park_Place_Gallery) in SoHo, which is often called the first cooperative gallery in the district. Kostelanetz doesn’t seem to make mention of the space, but Wikipedia explains, “the gallery showcased works by younger, less established artists with an emphasis on Geometric abstraction, shaped canvas, Hard-edge painting, Op Art, paradoxical geometric objects, and experimental art. Many of the sculptors, painters and other artists who exhibited in Park Place Gallery were interested in cutting edge architecture, electronic music, and minimal art.”

Bronxbombers
December 15th, 2008, 05:49 PM
SoHo means "South of Houston" and refers to the blocks that lie on the south side of Houston Street, one of Manhattan's main east <> west thoroughfares. Houston Street (pronounced HOW'-stun) runs from the East River to the Hudson River and is divided at Broadway into East Houston Street and West Houston Street, with numbers running larger the farther Houston Street moves away from Broadway. Houston Street borders these neighborhoods to the north: Alphabet City, the East Village, NoHo (North of Houston), Greenwich Village and the West Village. To the south: The Lower East Side, Little Italy [NoLIta], SoHo, [Hudson Square] [South Village]. Houston Street (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Houston_Street) is named for William Houstoun (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Houstoun_(lawyer)), the spelling later bowdlerized into Houston.

SoHo for a time was known as Hells Hundred Acres (http://riseandsprawl.blogspot.com/2006/07/hells-hundred-acres.html), so dubbed by the FDNY due to the large number of troublesome fires (http://nyfd.com/history/wooster/wooster_street.html) in the big old loft / warehouses now recognized around the world as the Cast Iron buildings which make up SoHo, once the hotbed of Art in America ...

Artistic failure in America (http://www.artisticfailure.com/category/artistic-failure-in-america/)

As promised (http://www.artisticfailure.com/2008/01/15/where-can-an-exiled-artist-go/), here’s another story of what happens when an artist is exiled by the community or neighborhood he helps (re-)build into a vibrant and hip art district. This time the artist, Dean Fleming, became “exiled” by choice.

Scene: It was the heady 1960s; for the past decade-plus, America’s comfortable and prosperous middle class had been fleeing the country’s cities for the newly built suburbs, leaving huge openings in various city districts for all sorts of opportunistic elements to move in. Such a district in New York City, in 1962 sometimes called “Hells Hundred Acres,” was described by Richard Kostelanetz in his book on SoHo (http://www.amazon.com/Soho-Rise-Fall-Artists-Colony/dp/0415965721/ref=pd_bbs_5?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1200765277&sr=8-5) thusly:

“The area below Houston Street [in New York City] was an industrial slum that I might have walked through reluctantly on the way from Greenwich Village to its north or Chinatown to its east. Industrial debris littered streets that were clogged with trucks and truckers during the working daytimes but deserted at night… I first became aware of someone actually residing in the nineteenth-century industrial slum in 1965 when I was introduced on Canal Street to a Korean artist [Nam June Paik] who had just arrived in America and rented a nearby ‘loft,’ which was a word new to me at the time… I later learned of such urban pioneers as Alison Knowles, who, in the late 1950s, had rented space in an industrial building on Broadway just north of Canal Street, where she lived with her husband-to-be, Dick Higgins… By the time I relocated downtown, first to the East Village in 1966, I became aware of artists who had rented large open space in which they worked and, incidentally, lived… [the author mentions Yoko Ono, Robert Rauschenberg, the writer Donald Barthelme, Chuck Close, and many others in the text that follows].”
Dean Fleming, a California native, came of age as an artist in New York in the 1960s. A contemporary and friend of sculptor Mark di Suvero (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mark_di_Suvero), Fleming worked initially in a catchy, trendy (but not earth-shatteringly original) minimalist-geometric style, and he had a few years of success in the gallery scene of the time. Fleming also was, along with di Suvero, a co-founder, in 1963, of the Park Place Gallery (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Park_Place_Gallery) in SoHo, which is often called the first cooperative gallery in the district. Kostelanetz doesn’t seem to make mention of the space, but Wikipedia explains, “the gallery showcased works by younger, less established artists with an emphasis on Geometric abstraction, shaped canvas, Hard-edge painting, Op Art, paradoxical geometric objects, and experimental art. Many of the sculptors, painters and other artists who exhibited in Park Place Gallery were interested in cutting edge architecture, electronic music, and minimal art.”

Thank you lofter1 for explaining the SoHo means South Of Houston. A street in New York City is called Houston.

lofter1
December 15th, 2008, 10:32 PM
Hopefully you read the posting and understand that the name of Houston Street has nothing to do with Texas -- where they pronounce the word in a very stange way and unlike the pronounciation here in NYC.

Merry
April 4th, 2009, 06:18 AM
Yeah, I know it's NYC and "location, location, location" and all that, but $315,000 for this :eek:...you've got to be joking...but what am I saying? It can be the same here in Oz too when the market has its way.


Friday, April 3, 2009

So, what does $315,000 buy you in Soho these days? This charming little spot at 150 Sullivan Street, for one! Says the reader who tipped us off to this gem: "I think the couch is in the kitchen. Next to the stove." And says the brokerbabble, in a case of minor understatement: "Needs a little 'TLC', then you'll have a great place to live."
http://realestate.nytimes.com/ImageProxy.aspx?L=3492-DP90331464&W=379&H=286&U=http://nytfsboimages.gabriels.net/PackageImages/front_of_building.jpg
http://realestate.nytimes.com/ImageProxy.aspx?L=3492-DP90331464&W=379&H=286&U=http://nytfsboimages.gabriels.net/PackageImages/living_room_%285%29.jpg
http://realestate.nytimes.com/ImageProxy.aspx?L=3492-DP90331464&W=379&H=286&U=http://nytfsboimages.gabriels.net/PackageImages/living_room_%281%29.jpg
http://realestate.nytimes.com/ImageProxy.aspx?L=3492-DP90331464&W=379&H=286&U=http://nytfsboimages.gabriels.net/PackageImages/living_room_%283%29.jpg
http://curbed.com/archives/2009/04/03/thats_rather_hideous_rare_stovesofa_in_soho.php

NY Times listing (http://realestate.nytimes.com/sales/detail/3492-DP90331464/ny-usa/2C%28040%28CC986%28B22-B33-A4-A8-B64%29%29%29--0765-076-00-loc/1-beds/NEW-LISTINGS-%28PAST-7-DAYS%29-posted/0-800000-price/PRICE-HIGH-sort/10-p/46-1091849--297-0134696--297-0134692--80-1123084--959-6Z133-252W20-1--1041-3605L1--44-1530935--3492-DP90331464--241-160148--241-160152-ls/68-t)

Merry
April 11th, 2009, 03:25 AM
http://www.thevillager.com/villager_310/tru.jpg
This Prince St. mural by Richard Haas depicting Soho cast-iron architecture could be covered up by a developer who hopes to construct a building on the current one-story store site at 110 Prince St.


Trompe l’oeil muralist warily eyes new Soho project



By Patrick Hedlund

A famous Soho mural vandalized by graffiti last summer might be facing another threat — this time from a developer looking to construct a building next door that would effectively mute the 1975 artwork.

The landmark trompe l’oeil mural, painted by artist Richard Haas on what was the blank east wall of 112 Prince St. near the corner of Greene St., depicts the building’s cast-iron facade and has become a celebrated piece of public art in the neighborhood.

Last September graffiti taggers let loose on the mural, covering the bottom portion of the five-story-tall piece with spray paint and prompting a response from Haas on the need to take action.

The point could be moot, however, if the developer decides to build a new structure on the site of the neighboring one-story property. Camper Shoes, which has a store at the corner of Prince and Wooster Sts., wants to demolish the existing single-story building at 110 Prince St. to construct a new headquarters, which, under zoning law, could rise as high as the adjacent six-story cast-iron building bearing Haas’s mural.
Any building more than one story tall would at least partially block the artwork, if not cover it completely.

“What’s going to happen to the mural?” asked Soho Alliance Director Sean Sweeney, noting that his organization would not be opposed to the scale of the new building, only its effects on the mural. “Should we go extremely NIMBY?” he contemplated.

Camper Shoes’ attorney planned to meet with the Alliance last week.
One possible solution would be for Haas to paint a new piece on an available nearby wall; but the artist explained that the climate has changed more than three decades since the original work went up — leading to hundreds more by Haas worldwide.

“The irony, of course, is this was the premier piece that led to tens of thousands of pieces all over the world,” said Haas. The artist noted he encountered a similar situation at the Fontainbleau Hotel in Miami, where another of his trompe l’oeil murals was lost with the hotel’s demolition, despite staunch community opposition. “It is something that in most cultures would be preserved, period,” he stated.

Haas added he is open to the possibility of painting another mural in a different location, but that available space and the city’s use of uncovered walls for advertisements might present a challenge.

“Absolutely,” he replied when asked about doing another Downtown piece. However, he pointed out, “There are very few walls of that type that are still around that are highly visible.”

The building at 112 Prince St. is afforded protections by being in Soho’s Cast-Iron Historic District, and the mural “would be treated as a significant feature of that building,” said Lisi de Bourbon, a spokesperson for the Landmarks Preservation Commission. “The commission would consider it in its deliberations over the appropriateness of any proposed structure for that site” at 110 Prince St., she said.

The Alliance believes the developer would have no trouble getting permission to demolish the one-story “taxpayer” structure — an action which nevertheless requires approval by the L.P.C. because of its location in the historic district. However, de Bourbon added, “It’s not necessarily a done deal. The commission can be quite exacting about what qualifies as appropriate for a historic district.”

Regardless, Haas believes it will take a mighty effort to protect his mural from the forces of real estate.

“The city would have to get involved proactively in seeing the value of that piece,” Haas said. “I’ve never seen a developer yet who didn’t go the full distance.”

http://www.thevillager.com/villager_310/trompeloeil.html

http://www.richardhaas.com/murals/112princeafter.jpg

http://www.richardhaas.com/zmuralfr.html

Merry
December 11th, 2009, 06:47 PM
Soho's Richard Haas Faux Facade Be Saved?

December 11, 2009, by Sara

http://curbed.com/uploads/2009_04_soho.jpg
[Photo courtesy epicharmus/Flickr (http://www.flickr.com/photos/epicharmus/2842686594/)]

The situation is looking less dire but more confusing down at 112 Prince Street, where Camper Shoes announced plans earlier this year to build an up-to-five-story commercial headquarters that would effectively block out artist Richard Haas' trump l'oeil mural at the corner of Prince and Greene Streets. The Villager reports that the developer no longer plans to obscure the whole mural, but will build a two- or three-story structure instead. Victory for the Haas-heads? Not exactly. Haas himself thinks a three-story building would ruin the mural: "'If you're going to have two stories' above the original first floor...'I think you've compromised it too much.'"

Because the building falls within the Soho Cast-Iron Historic District, the Landmarks Preservation Commission also gets to offer its opinion. But no one seems quite sure what LPC is issuing an opinion on, because it's unclear when construction could start or what the developer can actually afford to build. Adding to the mess (sorta), the owner of 112 Prince put in a request in October for the city to wash the graffiti tags off the mural, but the cleaning would also erase part of the mural itself. The mayor's office has the building on the list to be scrubbed, but while everyone is busy trying to untangle the situation, the city plans to wait for the landlord's confirmation before moving ahead with the clean up.

Soho Mural Movement (http://thevillager.com/villager_345/mixeduse.html) [Villager]
Soho's Faux Facade Threatened By New Building 'Obliteration' (http://curbed.com/archives/2009/04/01/sohos_faux_facade_threatened_by_new_building_oblit eration_.php) [Curbed]

http://curbed.com/archives/2009/12/11/could_sohos_richard_haas_faux_facade_be_saved.php# more

ablarc
December 14th, 2009, 11:33 AM
Trompe-loeil buildings on lot-line walls should always be regarded as temporary.

Build the five-story building.

lofter1
December 14th, 2009, 11:52 AM
I can't see any way, from a legal point of view, how the existence of a trompe-loeil painting on the side of one building (no matter how terrific and memorable it is) could be used to minimize the rights of the property owner next door from developing that lot to the legally allowable height. Seems that for LPC / CPC to dis-allow development of that lot in line with existing zoning in order to save the view of the painting would qualify as an unlawful "Taking" by a government agency.

Better that those agencies focus on saving real buildings of worth, rather than faux representations.

ZippyTheChimp
December 14th, 2009, 12:10 PM
The city would have to purchase the air rights to compensate the owner.

Not going to happen.

Derek2k3
December 14th, 2009, 09:21 PM
It'd be nice if they construct something as beautiful as the painting.

NYatKNIGHT
December 15th, 2009, 10:41 AM
Right, that should be the requirement.

Merry
December 29th, 2009, 08:11 PM
Wonderful :).

Soho Gem Unwraps Itself for the Holidays

December 29, 2009, by Pete

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Sometimes a facelift is the perfect antidote to the seasonal blues. The old Haughwout Building at 490 Broadway in Soho stripped off its construction netting last week to show off a full makeover, revealing a switch from the former drab brown to a fresh blue-gray. It's part of a renovation by increasingly ubiquitous firm ODA (which has offices at 494 Broadway) to create a new Bebe emporium in a space that Staples once called home. The cast-iron palazzo, built from a design by architect John P. Garvey with a nod to Jacapo Sansovino's 1537 Biblioteca Marciana in Venice, is also getting some major work done inside, including structural refitting that will open up the first floor to new retail space above. Expanding the retail beyond the ground level returns this one to its roots.

The E. V. Haughwout Company opened in 1857, offering some competition to Tiffany a block to the north. The floors above Broadway were filled with silver, cut glass, china, chandeliers and other assorted riches. The Cosmopolitan Art journal declared that it was, "... one of the most imposing and beautiful buildings in the city, this monster manufacturing and sales establishment embraces more in value and interest than any single building in the world." A few years later Mary Lincoln found it the perfect place to buy some fancy china for the White House. Once the "aspirational women's fashion brand" opens up here maybe another First Lady will drop in for a little shopping.

Storecasting: Staples Swapped Out For a Bebe (http://racked.com/archives/2009/01/20/storecasting_staples_swapped_out_for_a_bebe.php) [Racked]
Office for Design & Architecture (http://www.oda-architecture.com/) [oda-architecture.com]

http://curbed.com/archives/2009/12/29/restored_soho_gem_unwraps_itself_for_the_holidays. php

lofter1
December 29th, 2009, 09:02 PM
This is a big improvement (aside from the fact that now there isn't a stationary store for blocks in any direction).

I never liked the tan paint job.

When I first moved down here the Haughwout Building had been left untended for decades and had achieved a nasty but beautiful patina of soot and dirt and grit that rendered it a crusty black. It was as if the entire facade of cast iron had been put through a blow torch, but it still survived and served it's purpose as a working loft building. And it was full of mystery.

The grey is better than the drab brown, but I wish they'd opted for a darker hue.

Garvey's inspiration for the EV Haughwout Building: Jacopo Sansovino's Biblioteca Marciana (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Biblioteca_Marciana)

The windows on the original (http://www.fuenterrebollo.com/Heraldica-Piedra/Venezia/san-marcos/marcos-11.jpg) are a tad better.

More at Flickr (http://www.flickr.com/photos/15490726@N05/1659956388/)

http://ipt.olhares.com/data/big/197/1978714.jpg

http://olhares.aeiou.pt/a_biblioteca_marciana_foto1978714.html

Merry
January 1st, 2010, 10:33 PM
A Quiet Pocket of SoHo

By CHRISTIAN L. WRIGHT

http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2010/01/03/realestate/03crosby_CA0/articleLarge.jpg
Crosby Street doesn’t usually have a very populated look.

http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2010/01/03/realestate/03crosby_CA1/popup.jpg
Savoy, at the corner of Prince, has its bustling side.

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The Crosby Hotel, center, which the London-based Firmdale opened in September, draws newcomers.

AT 11:30 on a Friday morning in December, SoHo was teeming.

On Broadway, Topshop overflowed with the aggressively chic; getting to the shoe racks at Bloomingdale’s required at least one strategic hip-check; at Uniqlo, there were more people poring over the skinny jeans and affordable cashmere than there are gulls above a successful trawler. And never mind the sidewalk; it was an impossible-to-navigate sea.

Meanwhile, just one block east, all was quiet on Crosby Street. Along the narrow cobblestone path, the solitude was pierced only by the UPS man waving to the doorman as he passed by 30 Crosby and a slim fellow in a well-cut car coat walking his Rhodesian Ridgeback. By afternoon, when the fireplaces were lighted at Savoy, the restaurant on the corner of Prince Street and Crosby, the pedestrian traffic hurrying to the east and to the west was heavy, but only a girl in a knit cap carrying a big bolt of fabric turned south onto Crosby, into the eastern territory of the SoHo-Cast Iron Historic District.

“Crosby Street is just off the beaten track,” said Craig Markham, the director of marketing and public relations for Firmdale Hotels, the London-based company that opened the Crosby Street Hotel in September. “It’s a little bit quirky.”

Indeed, when the Firmdale sales team started introducing the new hotel to long-established, top-level travel agents in New York City, some said, “Now, where exactly is Crosby Street?”

The new hotel seems to be the crowning touch of the five-block stretch of Crosby that runs south of Houston Street to Howard Street, where the tourists don’t really seem to go, where residential real estate prices hover around $5 million per condo, where unusual shops manage to thrive and where the atmosphere is very much old SoHo: sleepy, arty, industrial, mysterious.

The nonprofit Housing Works Bookstore Cafe anchors the northern end; the coveted designer Derek Lam just opened a gleaming glass-front shop at the southern end; and along the way are the unspoiled details of a bygone era.

There are red brick buildings marked with the backward Z’s of old fire escapes, cast-iron facades of 19th-century factories that don’t rise over 10 stories, great big warehouse windows and slate-tiled roofs that borrow from European design. There are antiques and objets to be found (like an initialed Saxon armorial beaker, c. 1720, or a perfectly plausible daddy longlegs made of blown glass at De Vera), and funny little storefronts — Saturdays Surf NYC, Michele Varian housewares, Ñ 33 Crosby tapas bar — that could easily be mistaken for private residences.

Stepping onto Crosby Street is a bit like entering a botanical garden in the middle of an urban throng. Minus the flowers, of course. Against some odds, Crosby Street has managed its revitalization without losing its character.

When Lucy Wallace Eustice, a founder and an owner of the handbag company M Z Wallace, opened her first shop in 2000, she chose Crosby “because of its character — the forgotten street of SoHo.” Megabrands like Chanel and Apple have opted for coordinates closer to the heart of SoHo, while the one-off stores along Crosby hark back to the days when artists lived and worked in the loft spaces and Dean & Deluca was just a small grocery known as Giorgio’s.

Not so long ago, Crosby was little more than a supply street to the big buildings on Broadway (shoppers don’t seem to notice that there’s an alternate entrance to Bloomingdale’s on Crosby that’s much more low-key than the main doors on Broadway), and in fact, the street’s backdoor status may have served to protect it.

Three years ago, when Nathan Kornfeld bought his 4,000-square-foot full-floor loft at No. 30, between Broome and Grand Streets, he didn’t know the street well enough to realize how lucky he was.

“The Upper East Side is really dense and not as casual,” said Mr. Kornfeld, a partner at the private equity firm Patron Capital. “We looked in TriBeCa, but this was the best value. There are not a lot of lofts of this vintage and this size. It’s kind of unique.”

Apartment 3A at 30 Crosby Street, a 4,100-square-foot open loft with pine floors, single slab marble countertops and a fireplace, is currently for sale for $4.9 million.

Residential real estate at the high end has suffered during the recent economic downturn and, according to industry analyses, no neighborhood has been immune. Corcoran reports that in the third quarter of 2009, the median price of an apartment in Manhattan was $799,000, an 18 percent drop from the year before.

These days, properties on Crosby Street are selling well above market average. For instance, a 2,678-square-foot second-floor apartment in the six-unit Bayard House at 76 Crosby went quickly into contract this month for $4.35 million, or $1,624 per square foot (the third-quarter median was $1,012).

And a four-bedroom duplex at 55 Crosby is on the market for $5.8 million. It offers 25-foot ceilings and the fact that the architect Frank Gehry once owned it. On the other hand, the 6,000-square-foot penthouse reconfigured into a flaming, soaring rock ’n’ roll vision by the singer Lenny Kravitz and his designer, Benjamin Noriega-Ortiz, at 30 Crosby has languished on the market at $14.9 million.

While the rest of SoHo has changed drastically, even in recent years, Crosby Street has resisted commercial transformation. Peter Hoffman, who opened the restaurant Savoy in 1990 — arriving in the neighborhood long before Balthazar and with a then-idiosyncratic farm-to-fork notion — remembers a different time and place. “The block between Prince and Houston in the early ’90s — there was a lot of crack getting smoked there,” he said.

For many years, his light on the corner of the dark street was a beacon. Now, of course, there’s the MoMA Design Store opposite. And just a block down, a black GMC Yukon idles outside the set-back entrance to the Crosby Street Hotel, where rates start at $495 a night. Construction on the 270-room Mondrian Hotel (scheduled to open early this year) — which will rise above downtown Manhattan from 150 Lafayette Street, the thoroughfare that runs parallel, to the east — may be a harbinger of change.

But for now, Crosby remains a little residential secret, sandwiched between commercial boulevards. “It’s very quiet,” Mr. Kornfeld said. “Unless it gets rowdy at Ñ.”

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/01/03/realestate/03crosby.html

lofter1
January 1st, 2010, 10:47 PM
Many more folks walking up and down Street Crosby this holiday season than in the past.




A Quiet Pocket of SoHo

By CHRISTIAN L. WRIGHT

... even in recent years, Crosby Street has resisted commercial transformation. Peter Hoffman, who opened the restaurant Savoy in 1990 ... remembers a different time and place. “The block between Prince and Houston in the early ’90s — there was a lot of crack getting smoked there,” he said.

For many years, his light on the corner of the dark street was a beacon. Now, of course, there’s the MoMA Design Store opposite.


Mr. Wright got this wrong.

Savoy is at Crosby & Prince. The MoMA store is at Crosby & Spring -- a block to the south, opposite Balthazar, not Savoy.

Derek2k3
January 2nd, 2010, 11:24 AM
Yeah, I know it's NYC and "location, location, location" and all that, but $315,000 for this :eek:...you've got to be joking...but what am I saying? It can be the same here in Oz too when the market has its way.

http://realestate.nytimes.com/ImageProxy.aspx?L=3492-DP90331464&W=379&H=286&U=http://nytfsboimages.gabriels.net/PackageImages/living_room_%281%29.jpg
So you enter the apartment and directly to your left is the stove? What flow.
Note the typical NYC door with 5 locks on it.

Merry
January 30th, 2010, 02:35 AM
Apart from the scaffolding and netting, what a lovely street corner assemblage. The building right on the corner wasn't too badly rehabbed (at least it's still standing).


Haunted Old Soho Factory Getting Rid of Its Ghosts

January 29, 2010, by Pete

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(click to enlarge)

Before Soho became the cast-iron capital, it was home to little lots of brickage like the one still standing at 497 Broome Street near West Broadway. For years this former factory has been standing derelict, the ground floor boarded up and the bricks above beginning to crumble. Now, according to a plan found on the website of Studio China Architecture + Design (http://www.studio-china.com/497broome.html), its four floors are being redone and "the revitalized building will house modern office, store front and an artist's work and living space." One new feature will be a light well at the center, running the full height of the building, tying together the various interior spaces. No doubt,

Back in 1885 there was a fire in the top-floor factory where ear muffs were made; a young lass found herself aflame (http://query.nytimes.com/gst/abstract.html?res=9803E6DF123FE533A25756C2A9669D94 649FD7CF), causing a panicked crush of girls rushing for the stairs. And in 1893 the proprietor of a mask and toy factory in the building, not so joyful amidst all that fun, poisoned himself by ingesting a dose of paris green (http://www.periodictable.com/Items/033.10/index.html). Now, to bring this one back to life, renovation has begun. The old fire escape above Broome has recently come down, and the building's face is covered in netting, hiding the broken window frames and crumbling brownstone sills. The current owner, 497 Broome Street Realty, came upon the place following a tax lien sale (http://a836-acris.nyc.gov/Scripts/DocSearch.dll/Detail?Doc_ID=2009082400648001) in August 2009. Principal Eddie Hanna sure is pleased with the plan (http://www.studio-china.com/testimonials.html) for the future at 497 Broome, which should send those ghosts of the past packing.

497 Broome Street (http://www.studio-china.com/497broome.html) [Studio China]

http://curbed.com/archives/2010/01/29/haunted_old_soho_factory_getting_rid_of_its_ghosts .php

ablarc
January 30th, 2010, 08:42 AM
... what a lovely street corner assemblage. The building right on the corner wasn't too badly rehabbed (at least it's still standing).
All buildings like that should be automatically preserved for evermore.

lofter1
January 30th, 2010, 11:46 AM
Fortunately that whole bunch are protected, as that SE corner of Broome / West Broadway sits within the LPC protected Soho Cast-Iron Historic District.

Blocks to the west across West Broadway (hopefully) will be equally protected once LPC designates the Soho expansion (http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?t=9886), which has been debated (http://curbed.com/archives/2009/05/14/sohos_borders_may_spread_say_men_with_visual_aids. php), calendered and heard (http://curbed.com/archives/2009/10/27/curbedwire_a_historic_preservation_threepack.php) -- but not yet voted upon by the Commission.

Merry
February 23rd, 2010, 05:22 AM
Hudson Square now really, I suppose.


Little Red's High School Expands Into Historic Townhouse

February 22, 2010, by Pete

http://cdn3.curbednetwork.com/cache/gallery/4018/4376046267_181276953b_o.jpg
42 Charlton Street gets the finishing touches.

http://cdn0.curbednetwork.com/cache/gallery/4071/4376794122_789b72f20f_o.jpg (http://curbed.com/archives/2010/02/22/little_reds_high_school_expands_into_historic_town house.php)

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The Little Red School House, progressively educating NYC's youngsters since 1921, is finishing up the first phase of the expansion (http://lrei.org/buildingforaction/pg4_b.html) of its Elisabeth Irwin High School on Charlton Street down in Soho. The plan from ABA Studio (http://www.abastudio.com/) connects the original gothic-inspired five-story school building to a three-story brick townhouse next door at 42 Charlton Street, and adds room for another 60 inquisitive young minds. From the street it all looks perfectly historical, and that's how it had to be since the school sits within the little Charlton-King-Vandam Historic District. But behind the landmarked facades there's all sorts of new stuff, including a renovated theater auditorium, a new performing arts center and a batch of state-of-the-art classrooms overlooking an enclosed courtyard. The rear of the townhouse has an abstracted light-reflecting screen, enclosing exterior passageways and keeping things cool inside. That's "cool" in the temperature sense, of course. We all know these kids are hopeless dweebs.

Building for Action - Charlton Street Renovation (http://lrei.org/buildingforaction/pg4_b.html) [lrei.org]
Little Red Elisabeth Irwin High School (http://www.abastudio.com/) [ABA Studio]

http://curbed.com/archives/2010/02/22/little_reds_high_school_expands_into_historic_town house.php

lofter1
February 23rd, 2010, 09:29 AM
The LREI claims on their website that they're in Greenwich Village. It's in an in-between zone.

Merry
February 25th, 2010, 04:28 AM
^ Mmmm, confusing. I always use my trusty Manhattan Block By Block (http://www.amazon.com/Manhattan-Block-Street-Atlas/dp/1878892231/ref=pd_sim_b_1) for neighbourhoods.

Merry
February 25th, 2010, 04:30 AM
Solving a Mystery Covered by 137 Years of Paint

By JAMES BARRON

http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2010/02/24/nyregion/pain24a-cityroom/pain24a-cityroom-blogSpan.jpg
32 and 34 Greene Street in Soho, once long ago, and now once again, painted creamy off-white.

They went with a shade close to the “second generation” color — not the original brown from 1873 and not the blue from the 1970s, but a creamy off-white.

The team that renovated the cast-iron loft buildings at 32 and 34 Greene Street wanted to know what color the buildings had been when they were new. There were no photographs from that long ago. The team found out by analyzing tiny paint samples.

The architect on the project, Daniel J. Allen, scraped thumbnail-size chunks off the front walls and sent them to be looked at by a paint expert in Virginia, Susan L. Buck. She focused her microscope and trained ultraviolet light on the samples and found that the two buildings had 13 “generations,” or layers, of paint.

The images of the samples look like a too-close glimpse of deli sandwich — turkey with tomatoes, no lettuce. Near the top were two orange layers, probably primers, Mr. Allen said. The building’s blue period, it turns out, followed greens, grays and tans. The layers were not dated, so the renovation team could only guess at how long the buildings wore each color before they were painted over with a new look.

The buildings, Mr. Allen said, are “of a perfect moment.”

“They are post-Civil War boom buildings,” he said, completed when New York had become a major port. “It’s growing fast, there has to be a place to put all this stuff,” he said. “SoHo becomes the dry goods district, which is everything: clocks, machinery, printing presses, whatever is coming off the boat. You need these substantial buildings to put them in.”

And SoHo needed them fast. “Each was completed in only six and a half to seven months, which is one of the reasons cast iron was so popular: you could create this kind of mass-produced grandeur almost overnight,” Mr. Allen said. “The construction was so cookie cutter, so easy to do — assemble the walls, drop in the framing. It allowed people to get buildings with great detail and impress the hell out of their neighbors.”

By December 2006, when Veronica Mainetti, the head of the Rome-based Sorgente Group, a firm that concentrates on historic properties, heard about the buildings, they were in “terrible shape,” she said. The facade was flaked and corroded. Pigeons were nesting in the cornices. “Where there was metal,” Mr. Allen added, “it was paper-thin.”

And the building’s fire escapes — probably installed, Mr. Allen said, after the Triangle shirtwaist factory fire, the infamous 1911 sweatshop inferno — had damaged the cast iron.

The renovation saved 95 percent of the original facade, with new windows that weigh the same as the originals and go up and down with the same kind of chain mechanism. The team had new sheet metal fabricated for the cornices. “We were able to save 30 percent of the 34 Greene Street cornice,” Mr. Allen said. “We had to replicate the 32 in its entirety.”

Will the cornices last 137 years, the way the originals did? “We’ll do better,” Mr. Allen said. “Our supports are stainless steel. Theirs was a combination of iron straps and wood. Lasted a while.”

The renovation team had to coordinate its work on the paint with the Landmarks Preservation Commission because the buildings are within the SoHo-Cast Iron Historic District.

But first Mr. Allen had to scrape the samples to send to Dr. Buck. “The trick is to try and get the whole sample, and with a piece of wood that’s easy, because you actually gouge into the wood a little bit and get all the layers of paint and a little bit of wood,” Mr. Allen said. “With a cast iron building, you have to be sure you get down to the iron, but you can’t take the iron. You’d crack it because it’s brittle.”

Dr. Buck matched the colors she found in the samples to a color available now — Benjamin Moore Revere Pewter. But Ms. Mainetti said the team decided to use a different Benjamin Moore color, Navajo White.

“It’s funny that it’s so common a color,” she said. “Navajo White almost replaced white in inside environments, and that’s what was there, on the outside, very, very early.”

http://cityroom.blogs.nytimes.com/2010/02/24/solving-a-mystery-covered-by-137-years-of-paint/#more-137997

Merry
March 12th, 2010, 06:11 AM
Landmark Soho Penthouse Hits the Market With New Look

March 11, 2010, by Joey

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Now here's the Singer Building we know and love. Note the great New Museum view.

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Dating back to 1904, Soho's Singer Building is a neighborhood icon thanks to its prominent Broadway location and one of the most eye-catching facades in town, a wrought iron and terra cotta masterpiece designed by Ernest Flagg. The 12-story former manufacturing building is now a co-op (units were originally live/work spaces for artists), and the 3BR, 2.5BA penthouse has just popped up on the market asking $4.495 million. We're calling it the Singer Surprise, because while we weren't expecting the loft to mirror the classic detailing on the outside of the building, we sure weren't expecting this either. The renovated 3,000-square-foot space "exudes a level of contemporary sophistication," boasts the listing (http://www.rrnycrealty.com/address.php?property_ID=40), and had Tony Montana survived those 10,000 gunshot wounds, we could see this as his ultimate Manhattan pied-a-terre. There's a bigger, art-filled unit on the seventh floor asking $6.995 million (http://www.meiselrealestate.com/mre/propDetailSales.php?autoNum=192#), but we'll take the views and the cheaper price tag and impose our own bad taste on the place.

Listing: 561 Broadway #PHA (http://www.rrnycrealty.com/address.php?property_ID=40) [R & R Realty]

http://ny.curbed.com/archives/2010/03/11/landmark_soho_penthouse_hits_the_market_with_new_l ook.php?o=1

ablarc
March 12th, 2010, 11:14 AM
^ Paint the sprinkler system white, so it's less obtrusive.

Also, if the end wall were white instead of black, there would be better light distribution: softer, with less glare.

lofter1
July 1st, 2010, 10:54 AM
Tourists Beware:

Bad Case of Bedbugs Closes Hollister Soho

RACKED (http://ny.racked.com/archives/2010/07/01/breaking_bad_case_of_bedbugs_closes_hollister_soho .php)
by Cynthia Drescher
Thursday, July 1, 2010

Why would a store that's still shiny and new be closed for "maintenance" during a prime summer shopping day? Better ask Hollister in Soho, because the Wall Street Journal reports that their massive flagship was closed yesterday on account of bedbug infestation.

Although employees claim that bedbugs were only affecting "certain isolated areas of the store," Gothamist (http://gothamist.com/2010/07/01/bedbugs_shut_down_hollister_store_i.php) makes the excellent point that bedbugs only feed at night, and Hollister Soho is almost completely dark at any given time. It also doesn't help that an employee of the store called his workplace a "bedbug breeding ground."

The story gets even juicier! While the store is shut, full time employees are being paid but not the part-timers, and Hollister has stationed three shirtless models outside to tell potential customers that the store is closed until further notice.

Because bedbugs love clothing and wood, Hollister will have to turn itself upside down and inside out to completely get rid of the little bloodsuckers. Although employees believe that the store will reopen in a day or two, we'd recommend giving it a wide berth for a bit or you know...perhaps shop places with atmospheres less conducive to bedbug sexytime.

Now turn out all your recent Hollister Soho purchases and inspect them, and let the lawsuits begin. Trust that we'll be following this story closely.

stache
July 1st, 2010, 12:00 PM
Wait till this happens at Saks!

JanetJay
July 1st, 2010, 08:00 PM
These pics make me miss New York.

Merry
July 10th, 2010, 12:15 AM
Crocs Treads Lightly with Soho Flagship

(http://blog.archpaper.com/wordpress/archives/category/east)Rebecka Gordan

http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4142/4778105820_00fc2284bc.jpg
The 1818 structure has been meticulously restored, along with a storefront
dating from around the 1920s.

When shoe retailer Crocs set its sights on Soho, the blogosphere didn’t hesitate grouching about the rubber clog emporium’s arrival at the corner of Spring and Wooster streets. What was feared as an assault of global branding, however, has become an unlikely symbol of a sea change for New York City’s Landmarks Preservation Commission, which pushed for a modern, glassy volume in the heart of the historic cast-iron district.

http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4082/4777472865_2fa4b137f0_b.jpg
The rear addition was kept intentionally modest so as not to
overwhelm the historic house.

The project began in 2006, when Crocs signed a 20-year lease for 4,800 square feet for its New York flagship. At that time, the three-story corner house was in bad shape. Built in 1818 as a single-family residence, it had undergone six renovations and most recently housed a Tennessee Mountain restaurant. Because of its age and location, any alterations of the Federal-era building needed LPC approval, and thus began a year-long saga with five public hearings that resulted in the unusually contemporary structure in the center of Soho.

Heading up design work for both building exteriors, New York architect William J. Rockwell proposed a restoration for the old townhouse based on a photograph from the 1920s. The first twist Rockwell encountered concerned a three-story, 1925 garage attached to the old house, which had undergone many alterations and was set to be demolished. To replace the structure, Rockwell suggested a simple building that resembled the old garage**. But to his surprise, LPC preferred a modern transitional glass piece instead. The idea was that the townhouse would be better expressed if accompanied by an almost invisible structure, which at the same time could reinforce the street wall along Wooster.

“The fact that it could be more transparent and modern was very exciting,” said Rockwell. “In the ten last ten years, Landmarks has been more and more interested in different expressions if it can serve the purpose of representing history,” he added. “And in this case it does.”

http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4079/4777472697_e24dfd6d15.jpg
On Wooster Street, the glass facade completes the street wall.

http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4121/4778106238_82bc4dff43.jpg
The structural glass allows views through to the original building.

complete article (http://blog.archpaper.com/wordpress/archives/8219)

The Benniest
July 10th, 2010, 01:18 AM
I pass by this almost everyday for work, and it always makes me shiver. Ha! But that might be because I'm not a fan (at all) of Crocs. The building though is interesting... ;)

ablarc
July 10th, 2010, 08:39 AM
Design Research aesthetic. Ben Thompson would be pleased. (And so am I.)

Ninjahedge
July 15th, 2010, 01:20 PM
Croks suk, but I am impressed by its almost noticible insignificance.

It is so small and simply stated compared to the other classics directly bordering it, it stands out. Different and noticable not by being outrageous, but by being its original, unassuming self.

GG!

Derek2k3
August 24th, 2010, 07:56 AM
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moonman82's Photostream (http://www.flickr.com/photos/25830962@N06/tags/architecture/)

lofter1
September 5th, 2010, 12:25 PM
Katty corner across Broome / West Broadway from this one ...




Haunted Old Soho Factory Getting Rid of Its Ghosts

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Before Soho became the cast-iron capital, it was home to little lots of brickage
like the one still standing at 497 Broome Street near West Broadway.

... the recently erected Tommy Hilfiger outpost, in faux cast iron, now stands ...

http://www.theshophound.typepad.com//the_shophound/images/tommyblack.jpg

Back in the day, when the El ran up West Broadway, two old stalwarts stood on that corner ...

http://wirednewyork.com/images/nycbw/101.jpg

Derek2k3
October 13th, 2010, 10:35 PM
Finished 2 or 3 years ago, a new cast-iron building. It looks a little off to me.

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This site could use a redevelopment.
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lofter1
October 13th, 2010, 11:40 PM
That 1-story store at 454 Broadway, Amsterdam, was in the late 1980's a restaurant by nearly the same name (nearly the same sign, too): Amsterdam's (http://www.nytimes.com/1992/03/08/news/sunday-dining-sojourning-in-soho-today-two-after-strolling-choices.html). At the time it was one of the first new eateries with good food (http://www.nytimes.com/1994/09/04/nyregion/good-eating-where-culinary-art-is-thriving-too.html) to open up in this part of Soho, back before any of the current retail had gone in. When they opened nearly all of the surrounding storefronts all the way up to Houston were pretty much wholesale (office furniture, fabric) or empty. The guy who runs that store is a crook (http://www.crainsnewyork.com/article/20100223/SMALLBIZ/100229957).

Merry
November 13th, 2010, 09:48 PM
Suddenly, SoHo Heeds Law on Artists’ Lofts

By CHRISTINE HAUGHNEY

As SoHo’s iron-boned, sprawling lofts became gold mines over the past two decades, co-op boards, banks, brokers and the city itself winked at a rule requiring that they be reserved for working artists.

But over the last year or so, something odd began to occur: people started paying attention to the rule.

Apartments, even those in buildings with the prestige of famous residents, have languished on the market. Banks began withholding mortgages. Co-op boards began ordering residents to apply to the city for certification as artists.

And last year, for the first time anyone could remember, the city rejected as many applications as it approved, in a cryptic process that mystifies those who have gone through it.

The bottom has not dropped out, and the typical artist will still be unable to afford to move in. But the sudden re-awakening of the artist-in-residency requirement is making it hard for SoHo to keep up its real estate vibe.

At 158 Mercer Street, for example, one buyer who offered $8.2 million, the asking price, for a loft several months ago backed out after his lawyer warned him about the artist requirement.

The sellers’ broker, Jan Hashey, cut the price to $6.9 million but found no takers, and three other apartments in the 22-unit building have been for sale for more than three months, even though the building has the requisite star power: among the residents is Jon Bon Jovi (a certified artist, to boot).

“At these prices, buyers’ attorneys are very loath to advise people to put that kind of investment into something that’s limited,” said Ms. Hashey, who is also a certified artist. “It’s like a lien on the property.”

No one can say for sure what caused the re-awakening of the artist proviso, though tightened lending requirements by banks appear to be one reason. Although artists have for years pressed the city to more aggressively enforce the rule, the two agencies with the largest roles in SoHo real estate deny they are doing anything different, and available records do not shed much light.

The rule, rooted in city zoning laws dating back at least three decades, covers nearly all owner-occupied residential buildings in roughly five dozen blocks north of Canal Street.

The laws permitted the use of these former industrial spaces as residences, so long as each apartment contained an artist certified by the city.

It has never been entirely clear who qualifies as an artist; the applications and even the names of the two judges who decide are not available to the public. Some SoHo residents have questioned how Mr. Bon Jovi and the hotelier André Balazs, among others, could obtain certification, since neither would seem to require a SoHo space for their work, one of the major criteria for certification, along with educational credentials and a body of work that has been displayed and written about in the previous five years.

The city said it could not divulge the judges’ rationale, and representatives of both men declined to comment. “The law defines artists broadly and includes a variety of disciplines,” said Danai Pointer, a spokeswoman for the Department of Cultural Affairs.

The city’s Department of Buildings would not grant permanent certificates of occupancy to these buildings unless each apartment had a certified artist. But for years, the department, which had more pressing issues to worry about, effectively overlooked the fact that many residents were not artists by repeatedly granting these buildings temporary certificates.

And co-op boards asked their progressively wealthier buyers simply to sign a document that became known as the SoHo letter, which acknowledged that the buyer knew about the requirement and could be asked to produce proof of certification if anyone asked, which almost no one ever did.

But banks, which have been tougher on all kinds of borrowers as a result of the foreclosure crisis, are now skittish about giving loans in buildings that have an artist-in-residency requirement, said Eric Appelbaum, president of Apple Mortgage. Banks worry that if mortgaged apartments go into foreclosure, the artist rule may make them harder to resell.

Buyers who can pay all cash but have no certification are meeting resistance from co-op boards suddenly worried about the buildings’ long-term legal status, and the future marketability of apartments. Even current residents have been asked to seek certification by some buildings, agents say, though they said they knew of no one being forced to leave for lack of it.

Some agents and co-op board members say that the Buildings Department has become more insistent, declining to renew temporary certificates of occupancy in some cases. The building at 158 Mercer, for example, has not had one since March 2008, despite having been granted more than 40 since the early 1980s.

But the Buildings Department said that 158 Mercer had other issues, including tests of the building’s smoke detectors and repairs to the elevators that the city has not approved. “There has been no change in department policy toward enforcing artist-in-residence requirements,” said Carly Sullivan, a Buildings Department spokeswoman.

Amy Gotzler, a spokeswoman for Brown Harris Stevens, which manages 158 Mercer, said the building was “working with the Department of Buildings to reinstate their temporary certificate of occupancy.”

The Department of Cultural Affairs has certified roughly 3,400 artists since 1971, but the number of applicants shrank as the lofts filled out and the requirements began to be ignored. From 2003 to 2008, the department certified 164 artists and rejected 11.

But in 2009, the department accepted 14 artists and rejected 14. This year there have been 6 rejections and 14 acceptances.

City officials could not explain this sudden stinginess. “We are not seeing any major changes in the pattern or overall amount of these requests,” Ms. Pointer said.

A review of some rejection letters with names redacted, obtained through Freedom of Information Act requests, provides something of a tinted view of the neighborhood’s art scene, and of art criticism. The judges rejected a jewelry maker for producing work that was too commercial and a photographer whose pieces did not show enough “focus, quality and commitment.” Others were turned down for being a student, a “hobbyist” or an “interpretive artist.” One rejection letter stated that “while your work as an advocate and adviser to artists working in film is surely valuable to the film community, this role does not fit the legislative criteria of the Artist Certification Guidelines (http://www.nyc.gov/html/dcla/html/about/artist.shtml).”

Sean Sweeney, director of the civic group the SoHo Alliance, said that brokers had approached him about trying to persuade the city to do away with the artist-in-residence regulation. Mr. Sweeney, who has lived in SoHo for 33 years, said he had declined to do so; he said one West Broadway co-op tried to evict one artist because he could not help pay for his building’s lobby renovation.

Echoing the tension that still exists between the old SoHo and new, Mr. Sweeney added that he would rather see a banker’s closing fouled up “than to see a pioneer evicted because that financier’s trophy wife wants a crystal chandelier in the lobby.”

But Meg Siegel, a Sotheby’s real estate broker, said the requirements had outlived their time and had only held up an already sluggish market.

“Why don’t we come to some respectful decision with the artists who live here?” she said, suggesting perhaps a “fabulous sculpture praising the people who were pioneers.”
“SoHo,” she added, “is living a big charade.”

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/11/12/nyregion/12soho.html?ref=realestate

Merry
February 11th, 2011, 04:30 AM
Soho residents strike back, slam business district plan


By Aline Reynolds

A hotly debated business improvement district for Soho is close to materializing. The proposal, approved by the City Planning Commission last week, now only awaits approval by the City Council.

But many Soho residents vehemently oppose a business improvement district, or BID, contending that it will lead to more crowds in an area that is already jampacked with tourists and shoppers from elsewhere in the city.

The BID, which would extend between Canal and East Houston Sts. along Broadway, would provide sanitation; public safety and visitor services; marketing, promotion and advertising; holiday lighting; and streetscape and storefront improvements.

“Some people look at this and say, ‘It’s a BID — all you want to do is make the neighborhood more crowded, and have more tourists coming here,’ ” said Brian Steinwurtzel, co-chairperson of the BID’s steering committee, formed in June 2009 to create the BID proposal.

“We’re not saying we’re only for that,” he continued. “What we’re saying is there are already all these stores and traffic. We have to figure out a way to deal with it, and we think the BID is the best and proven way to deal with it.”

If the BID wins approval, commercial property owners and residents in mixed-use commercial co-op buildings will have to pitch in around $5,000 per year toward the services, according to Steinwurtzel. All other residents, meanwhile, will have to contribute a token fee of $1 per year.

The planned district was approved unanimously by City Planning on Jan. 26. The City Council wouldn’t disclose a tentative timeline for its vote.

In a report, City Planning recommended that the Soho BID include a residential reimbursement plan that would compensate co-op residents for the annual fees. Co-op residents are legally required to pay the same sum toward a BID that commercial property owners do, according to city Department of Finance regulations.

This co-op residents’ fee was a chief reason why Community Board 2 rejected the proposal. The board’s January resolution states, “There is no mechanism in place to ensure that all residential owners not be assessed more than $1 annually, as is custom in all BID’s in New York City.”

Another point of contention is the more than $50,000 slated for visitor services and marketing of the district. In assessing residents’ concerns, City Planning advised the BID’s steering committee to specify the intended use of the money toward these services.
“Specifically,” Planning’s report states, “this plan should expressly state that funds are included for providing signage and other way-finding tools for identifying the location of businesses, such as a logo and map, as well as providing information to the public about the unique historical character of the district.”

full story in The Villager (http://www.thevillager.com/villager_407/sohoresidents.html)
(http://www.thevillager.com/villager_407/sohoresidents.html)

Merry
February 25th, 2011, 04:49 AM
...showed a young black girl in a pink dress and the words “the most dangerous place for an African-American is in the womb.” OMG, that ^ is how they address a problem \/:


...it addresses a stubborn truth that 60 percent of black babies do not make it out of the womb.

Not only won't the problem be solved, they've offended and antagonised so many people, and they are not addressing reality, only postulating an ideal.



Anti-Abortion Billboard to Be Removed

By LIZ ROBBINS

The outdoor advertising company that put up a controversial billboard sponsored by a group opposing abortion decided to remove it on Thursday because employees in the Mexican restaurant below the sign were harassed by people angered by the billboard’s message, the company said.

“It’s down, or at least it should be coming down soon,” Peter Costanza, the general manager for Lamar Advertising, said in a telephone interview on Thursday. “Why did I take it down? Yesterday, somebody came into the restaurant harassing the waiters and waitresses. I don’t want any violence to happen around the buildings there.”

A woman who answered the phone at Lupe’s East L.A. Kitchen, the Mexican restaurant beneath the billboard, on the corner of Sixth Avenue and Watts Street, said restaurant staff members were too busy for her to comment on the situation, and she would not confirm that any employees had been harassed. The restaurant, she said, has no affiliation with Lamar Advertising or the group opposing abortion.

“It wasn’t about politics,” Mr. Costanza said, adding that it was more about safety.
The anti-abortion group, Life Always, which is based in Texas, had a news conference in Manhattan on Wednesday to discuss the opening of an advertising campaign intended to reach black women. The billboard, located a half-mile from a Planned Parenthood center in SoHo, showed a young black girl in a pink dress and the words “the most dangerous place for an African-American is in the womb.”

The campaign, according to leaders of Life Always and New York church leaders opposing abortion who attended the news conference, was in response to the high rate of abortions in New York City, particularly among black women. A recent report by the city’s Department of Health and Mental Hygiene said that the abortion rate in 2009 was 41 percent. The rate among black women was 59.8 percent.

Life Always officials likened abortion to genocide, and those comments, coupled with the billboard, enraged city officials.

Bill de Blasio, the city’s public advocate, on Wednesday called for the billboard’s immediate removal. Christine C. Quinn, speaker of the City Council, issued a statement saying: “To refer to a woman’s legal right to an abortion as a ‘genocidal plot’ is not only absurd, but it is offensive to women and to communities of color.”

Letitia James, a City Council member who represents parts of Brooklyn, said she was outraged that Life Always members had said they decided to post the billboard to coincide with Black History Month. Ms. James said she had talked to concerned citizens throughout the day and night on Wednesday, and she directed her staff to start an online petition. Ms. James said she asked MoveOn, the liberal activist group, to post the petition. It went online around 10 a.m. on Thursday, and included Mr. Costanza’s name.

In addition, the Women of Color Policy Network, a research and policy institute at New York University, wrote a letter to Mr. Costanza on Thursday. In a statement, the institute said it had received confirmation from Mr. Costanza that the billboard would be taken down.

Mr. Costanza said he was not inundated by phone calls or e-mails pleading for the billboard’s removal. The billboard, 29 feet high and 16 feet wide, was erected Tuesday night, and it had been scheduled to be up for at least three weeks, the Rev. Stephen Broden, the founder of Life Always, said on Wednesday.

Hal Kilshaw, a spokesman for Lamar Advertising, said that the advertisement had complied with the company’s policy. “It’s our belief that people have a right to express their message,” he said, adding that advertisers must have a disclaimer saying who is sponsoring the message.

“We would have left it up,” he added. “But Peter has become concerned because the wait staff in the restaurant below was harassed by people who objected to the message.

There were talks about a protest tomorrow, and he was worried about their safety.”

Ms. James said that before Lamar had decided to pull the ad, she had planned to hold a news conference with the Rev. Al Sharpton on Friday under the billboard.

In a statement, Life Always said it “strongly disagrees with Lamar Outdoor’s decision to remove the billboard in SoHo, but the billboard’s message holds true, and truth has a place in the public square. The intent of the board is to call attention to the tragedy and the truth that abortion is outpacing life in the black community.”

The Rev. Michel Faulkner of the New Horizon Church in Harlem, who attended the Wednesday news conference with Life Always, said in the same statement:
“While this billboard causes a visceral reaction from many African-Americans, it addresses a stubborn truth that 60 percent of black babies do not make it out of the womb. We must do something now.

“Instead of challenging the design of the ad, we should ask why the message is true and how can we change the fact that the leading cause of death for African-Americans is abortion.”

City officials voiced relief over the billboard’s removal.

“We won!” Ms. James said.

Mr. de Blasio, in a statement, said: “In the few short days since this billboard was put up, countless New Yorkers responded with collective revulsion to the divisive and ugly nature of its message.”

Joan Malin, the president of Planned Parenthood of New York City, said in a statement that the organization was “pleased that Lamar Advertising has heard the voices of thousands of New Yorkers.”

http://cityroom.blogs.nytimes.com/2011/02/24/anti-abortion-billboard-to-be-removed/

Merry
February 25th, 2011, 05:35 AM
Mother of Girl Pictured on SoHo Anti-Abortion Billboard Wants Image Removed

Tricia Fraser said it was inappropriate to make her 6-year-old daughter the face of a controversial message.

By Gabriela Resto-Montero

http://s3.amazonaws.com/sfb111/story_xlimage_2011_02_R1577_SoHo_Controversial_Abo rtion_Billboard_02232011.jpg
Six-year-old Anissa Fraser's mother, Tricia Fraser, said that she wants her daughter's
photo off a controversial anti-abortion billboard currently on display in SoHo.

SOHO — The mother of a child model used in an anti-abortion group's controversial billboard said she wants her daughter's photo off the ad, MyFox New York reported.

Tricia Fraser said that the photo of her 6-year-old daughter, Anissa, used by the Dallas-based group Life Always in a three-story billboard that says "The most dangerous place for an African American is in the womb" should be taken down.

"It's bad enough you're saying this about African Americans, but then you put a child with an innocent face," Fraser said to MyFox New York.

"I just want the image off of it. Use another image — just not hers," she told the tv station.

Fraser said the photo of Anissa, which shows the little girl wearing a pink dress with a bow in her hair, was taken two years ago when she took Anissa and her three siblings to a modeling agency.

She signed a release form knowing that the pictures of her children could be used as stock photos, MyFox New York reported.

A spokesperson with Life Always told MyFox New York that the photo was obtained through a stock photo agency.

The billboard, located at Sixth Avenue and Watts Street, went up earlier this week and was quickly condemned by residents and local politicians.

Leaders with the pro-life group maintained that the message was intended to bring attention to high rates of abortion within the African American community.

"We want the community to think about the impact of abortion," Pastor Stephen Broden, a leader of the church, told DNAinfo.

Regardless of the intent, Fraser said she wanted her daughter's image removed.

"I would never endorse something like that," she said to MyFox New York. "Especially not with my child's image."

http://www.dnainfo.com/20110224/greenwich-village-soho/mother-of-girl-pictured-on-soho-antiabortion-billboard-wants-image-removed#ixzz1ExvULRSu

lofter1
February 25th, 2011, 07:34 AM
That billboard was taken down last night:

Controversial Anti-Abortion Billboard Removed (http://www.dnainfo.com/20110224/greenwich-village-soho/controversial-antiabortion-billboard-be-removed)

Ninjahedge
February 25th, 2011, 08:03 AM
The anti-abortion group, Life Always, which is based in Texas, had a news conference in Manhattan on Wednesday to discuss the opening of an advertising campaign intended to reach black women.

There is a difference between reaching out to a person and reaching out and smacking a person.

Their statement is BS. They meant to stir the pot and get things seething.

OTOH, maybe it reached the people they really wanted to get to. The republican base in Texas and other areas that actually fund the organization. Sometimes a message is not meant for the people it is targeted at, but for the ones that are doing the targeting.

Merry
March 1st, 2011, 05:02 AM
Freedom of expression does not mean having the right to publicly offend particular groups of people with such ignorance and tunnel-vision. The person who wrote this doesn't get it.


Where Freedom of Expression Runs Headlong Into the Impulse to Censor

By CLYDE HABERMAN

New York, never at a loss for self-congratulatory words, regards itself as the most tolerant of cities, a place where one may express any thought freely. It is true. In New York, one may articulate any idea whatsoever — as long as that idea parallels popular opinion.

Stray too far from generally accepted wisdom, though, and you are asking for trouble.

The latest to discover this reality is a Texas group called Life Always, which bought billboard space in SoHo to deliver an anti-abortion message rooted in recent statistics from the city’s Department of Health and Mental Hygiene. They showed that in 2009, 41 percent of all pregnancies here ended in abortion. The abortion rate for black women was even higher, almost 60 percent.

Up went the billboard on a building at the corner of Avenue of the Americas and Watts Street. It showed a black girl with these words above her head: “The most dangerous place for an African American is in the womb.”

Was this anti-abortion statement subtle? Hardly. Accurate? Depends on your politics. Offensive? For some people, yes. Out of step with mainstream thought in New York? For sure. And so, a few days ago in this most tolerant of cities, a raft of elected officials wasted no time calling for the billboard’s removal.

Lickety-split, the sign came down.

The reason given by the owner of the space, Lamar Advertising Company, was that workers in a Mexican restaurant beneath the billboard had been harassed in some unspecified manner and there were fears for their safety. Maybe. But the fact remained that the message had annoyed some very important people. As soon as they squawked, action followed.

Some who objected to the sign complained that it was provocative. Of course it was. Since when is the American concept of free speech confined to opinions that are nice and safe and unlikely to cause a ripple?

Some also saw the message as racist. Clearly, it was racial. But racial and racist are not one and the same. (A question has also arisen as to whether use of the girl’s image was authorized, but that is a side issue.)

This plain act of censorship was not isolated. Rather, it fit into an established New York pattern of squelching unpopular opinions. Examples over the past decade abound.

A group called Project USA put up billboards along the Brooklyn-Queens Expressway questioning the wisdom of mass immigration. Politicians in this city of immigrants protested. The billboards came down.

A Nigerian-born pastor rented billboards on Staten Island and filled them with various translations of Leviticus 18:22, which in the King James version says, “Thou shalt not lie with mankind, as with womankind: it is abomination.” The signs did not call on people to attack gay New Yorkers or even make faces at them. They merely carried the biblical verse. But politicians complained, and those billboards, too, were taken down.

Almost as a counterpoint, strong objections in powerful circles killed bus-shelter advertisements in the Bronx that promoted a free health information line for gay men and lesbians.

During the Republican National Convention in 2004, a provocative antiwar message was not allowed on a Times Square billboard. A year later, a labor union’s campaign likening Wal-Mart to a menacing Godzilla was rejected for a Staten Island billboard. Two years ago, Christian-themed books denouncing homosexuality in strong language were removed from the racks of a CVS Caremark store in Chelsea.

The impulse to censor shows no sign of withering.

Bill de Blasio, the public advocate and one of the influential figures who demanded removal of the anti-abortion billboard, saw no assault on free speech. There should never be a law prohibiting this sort of sign, Mr. de Blasio said, “but to have a serious debate, to have people express their outrage, and then to have a private owner of the advertising space decide that it was ultimately not appropriate, that to me is a functioning democracy.”

Not quite, said Norman Siegel, a leading civil liberties lawyer. To him, freedom of expression took a hit.

“The principle of free speech is easy when the speech is something that’s popular and noncontroversial,” Mr. Siegel said. “The real test is when you disagree with the content of the speech and you still defend the right of someone to articulate the message.”

The city, he said, just flunked that test.

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/03/01/nyregion/01nyc.html?ref=nyregion

infoshare
March 1st, 2011, 09:06 AM
The person who wrote this doesn't get it.



IMHO the person who wrote this (http://wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?t=4874&p=353941&viewfull=1#post353941) does 'get it' . Cheers Mate!

Quote:
This plain act of censorship was not isolated. Rather, it fit into an established New York pattern of squelching unpopular opinions. Examples over the past decade abound.

lofter1
March 1st, 2011, 10:05 AM
This is not censorship. No one forced the company to remove the sign. Those in opposition raised their voices, the sign company weighed the economic costs of keeping it up or taking it down and they decided to remove it.

The group got their message out, in a much bigger way than if no one had said a thing.

Wouldn't be surprised if the way things turned out was considered as part of the message strategy all along.

ZippyTheChimp
March 1st, 2011, 10:42 AM
I love how this is "a New York pattern."

As if...

Ninjahedge
March 1st, 2011, 11:20 AM
So going into Austin Texas and putting a sign up saying "Jesus was a liar" would somehow be embraced with open arms and a contingent of supporters saying "we believe that this is free speech incarnate and should stay as long as they want!"

GMAB.

It was a racial slur aimed at raising ire. Why point out that a black woman is more likely to get an abortion than anyone else if your intent is to protest abortion? That is being racist. True or not, it does NOTHING to help the original message other than bring attension to it by making it insulting.

The whole issue of Leviticus is a sweet one as well. We had THAT on here a while back. There are MANY passages than can be put up from the Bible that can and will insult people. People of that era were racist homophobic religious zealots. You thnik that, even from a "moderate and tolerant" source, a book from that era would be an accurate representation of all that is and should be over 2000 years later?

The bottom line is this. NY will allow just about anything to be put up, but "tolerating" it is another story.

You are allowed to say "F-you" to someone on the street, but they are allowed not to like it.

lofter1
March 2nd, 2011, 11:33 AM
This plain act of censorship was not isolated. Rather, it fit into an established New York pattern of squelching unpopular opinions. Examples over the past decade abound.

Would this fit into that pattern?

9/11 Family Members Object to Play Sponsored by Ground Zero Mosque Group (http://www.dnainfo.com/20110302/downtown/911-family-members-object-play-sponsored-by-ground-zero-mosque-group)

lofter1
March 2nd, 2011, 06:09 PM
A Squelching Success. The pattern continues ...

9/11 Play Canceled After Objections Over Muslim Group's Involvement (http://www.dnainfo.com/20110302/downtown/911-family-members-object-play-sponsored-by-ground-zero-mosque-group)

DNA Info (http://www.dnainfo.com/20110302/downtown/911-family-members-object-play-sponsored-by-ground-zero-mosque-group)
March 2, 2011
Updated 12:29 PM

LOWER MANHATTAN — A play about the devastating impact of 9/11 was canceled after a controversy over the involvement of a Muslim group that wants to build a mosque near Ground Zero.

The show, "Performing Tribute," traces the stories of six real people whose lives were forever changed on 9/11 and has received wide acclaim since it debuted in 2008.

But 9/11 family members objected to a performance scheduled for Wednesday night at the Interchurch Center in Harlem, because one of the event's sponsors is the Cordoba Initiative, a major proponent of the 13-story mosque and community center on Park Place.

Shortly after a group of family members voiced their concerns and encouraged people to attend the performance to protest, director Donna Kaz announced that she was canceling the show because the space was too small to accommodate the growing crowd.

The Harlem venue only had about 100 seats, and many more people responded saying they planned to attend, Kaz said Wednesday afternoon. She hopes to reschedule the performance elsewhere but has not decided whether the Cordoba Initiative will remain a sponsor.

Rosaleen Tallon, a Yonkers resident whose firefighter brother was killed on 9/11, helped lead the objections to the show.

"We're so relieved," Tallon, 39, said Wednesday afternoon.

"We don't want 9/11 exploited by the Cordoba Initiative to further their effort to build a mosque at Ground Zero," Tallon said earlier in the day, before the show was canceled. "This is very upsetting to us."

"Performing Tribute" originated from volunteers at the Tribute WTC Visitor Center, who tell their 9/11 stories during walking tours of the area. Kaz wove six of their experiences together into the play, which started as a fundraiser for the Tribute Center ....

Copyright © 2009 - 2011 Digital Network Associates dba DNAinfo.com

Ninjahedge
March 3rd, 2011, 07:40 AM
These people are so frigging hateful.... :mad:

It REALLY makes my blood boil that the ONLY reason they give is a tenuous connection not to any significant factor, but to a non-major sponsor of the commemorative play that is Muslim. Nothing else.

I would like to look up some other things in Rosaleen's life that she may be purchasing or "supporting" through her own consumption and "remind" her "nicely" that she is, in fact, supporting communists, socialists, muslims and Terrorists.... :rolleyes:

londonlawyer
March 4th, 2011, 11:35 PM
This reminds me of when the play Rachel Corrie was initially blocked in NY.

ablarc
March 6th, 2011, 12:52 PM
Freedom of expression does not mean having the right to publicly offend particular groups of people with such ignorance ...
Alas, it might: http://blog.syracuse.com/opinion/2011/03/readers_comment_on_free_speech.html

Westboro Baptist Church, SCOTUS 8-1.

Merry
March 6th, 2011, 11:15 PM
^ Thanks for posting that, ablarc.


The real question here is how have we managed to come so far from the original intentions of the framers of our Constitution? The Bill of Rights, which includes the First Amendment’s right to free speech, originated as a way to limit the power of the federal government. What irony, then, that today we have nine justices who sit on the Supreme Court — the highest judicial body in the United States — who wield their power and authority in interpreting that amendment. If that’s not power by the government, then I’ll just eat my federal tax returns.

^ Yes, indeed, it's truly perplexing. But that's politics. Separation of logic from justice.

lofter1
March 6th, 2011, 11:24 PM
Would we rather have a government group deciding what we can't say and meting out punishment if we do, rather than stating that we're all free to say pretty much whatever we like -- no matter how misguided (http://wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?t=24617&p=354498&viewfull=1#post354498) it might be?

ZippyTheChimp
March 7th, 2011, 02:17 AM
The real question here is how have we managed to come so far from the original intentions of the framers of our Constitution? The Bill of Rights, which includes the First Amendment’s right to free speech, originated as a way to limit the power of the federal government. What irony, then, that today we have nine justices who sit on the Supreme Court — the highest judicial body in the United States — who wield their power and authority in interpreting that amendment. If that’s not power by the government, then I’ll just eat my federal tax returns. One of the "original intentions of the framers of our Constitution" was to create a Supreme Court, as was done in Article III. What they did in this case was exactly as intended.

The irony is that no matter what the ruling was, the Supreme Court would be doing the same thing that Joyce Kusak-McGuire is complaining about - "wielding power in interpreting a (Constitutional) amendment." Her argument that the First Amendment limits the power of the federal government better fits the case for the Westboro Baptist Church.

She was more to the point here
But when freedom of speech impinges on another person’s freedom, privacy and emotional well-being, then I have to ask, just what are we protecting?...where she simply disagreed with the ruling.

Ninjahedge
March 7th, 2011, 07:56 AM
I just find it interesting that someone can hurt someone as much as they want with "free speech", unless they stand to lose money or some other thing.

You can call out "Gay" as if it were a curse at a funeral and hurt those in attendence, but god forbid you say somethnig bad about a celebrity! You could be sued for libel!

The problem we are facing with these guys is that they are not ignorant enough. They read up on their law enough to know who they can and who they can't insult.

The constitution may protect the people, but is sure does a hell of a lot more for money.

lofter1
August 16th, 2011, 10:30 PM
What's going down with the neighbors in SoHo ...

The dirty facts behind the SoHo BID (http://sohonobid.files.wordpress.com/2011/08/110803_de_talkingpoint_dirtybid_2a.pdf)

Ninjahedge
August 17th, 2011, 08:58 AM
loft, the article was a bit unclear. It states all the crap behind the BID, but I did not see much information on what the BID was about...

Did I miss something?

lofter1
August 18th, 2011, 12:00 AM
The locals have a blog:

SoHo NO BID (http://sohonobid.wordpress.com/2011/05/24/say-no-to-the-soho-business-improvement-district/)

Merry
November 18th, 2011, 10:13 PM
What is that sad pile next door?


Ear Inn Re-beamed

by Kelsey Keith

http://ny.curbed.com/uploads/GV055-EAR-INN.jpeg


West Soho: The historic Ear Inn has been closed for a few days, but not to worry: it's just a bit of structural renovation (http://ny.eater.com/archives/2011/11/historic_ear_inn_undergoes_renovations.php). The owners had to install $100,000 worth of wood beams alongside the building's 200-year-old originals.

http://ny.curbed.com/archives/2011/11/18/ear_inn_rebeamed_juliet_closed_le_baron_may_soon_a rrive.php

ZippyTheChimp
November 18th, 2011, 10:42 PM
What is that sad pile next door?Long gone.

Now Urban Glass House (http://wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?t=6194&page=8).

londonlawyer
November 18th, 2011, 10:50 PM
The Ear Inn is a little gem. It's almost as beautiful as Christie Brinkly's vag when she was in her prime, and that's pretty amazing!!!!

http://images.askmen.com/galleries/model/christie-brinkley/pictures/christie-brinkley-picture-1.jpg

http://school.discoveryeducation.com/clipart/images/tissuebox4c.gif

Merry
November 18th, 2011, 11:19 PM
Long gone.

Now Urban Glass House (http://wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?t=6194&page=8).

Thanks, Zippy.

Ninjahedge
November 21st, 2011, 12:17 PM
What is that sad pile next door?


Ear Inn Re-beamed

by Kelsey Keith

http://ny.curbed.com/uploads/GV055-EAR-INN.jpeg


West Soho: The historic Ear Inn has been closed for a few days, but not to worry: it's just a bit of structural renovation (http://ny.eater.com/archives/2011/11/historic_ear_inn_undergoes_renovations.php). The owners had to install $100,000 worth of wood beams alongside the building's 200-year-old originals.

http://ny.curbed.com/archives/2011/11/18/ear_inn_rebeamed_juliet_closed_le_baron_may_soon_a rrive.php

Yay!

After working down there for a while and visiting regularly about 2X a month (great burger/Guiness), seeing the neighboring building going up without the proper underpinning and seeing the Ear settle and being forced to put in "temporary" timber shoring was disconcerting.

Guarantee that $100K came from the neighboring developers.

lofter1
December 17th, 2011, 10:39 AM
Some interesting info from a Preservation Tech Notes (http://www.nps.gov/tps/how-to-preserve/tech-notes/Tech-Notes-Glass02.pdf) report [pdf] on cast iron vault lights seen along sidewalks throughout SoHo, specifically related to recent restoration work outside 542-544 Broadway.

Note the use of these round glass lens inserts:

"Prismatic pendant (or "saw-tooth") lenses were often used in place of the basic lenses because the angled projections
on the underside of the prism bent light rays, directing them to the inner reaches of the lower levels."


Imagine if all these vault lights above subway platforms were still in place and functional, and how much that would improve the underground experience.

Repair and Rehabilitation of Historic Sidewalk Vault Lights

Cas Stachelberg Higgins & Quasebarth Historic Preservation Consultants
Chad Randl Technical Preservation Services National Park Service

14551

14552

14553

14554

14555

lofter1
December 17th, 2011, 10:53 AM
In 1897 the building at 554 Broadway was joined with the neighbor to the south at 552 Broadway. The two-story cast iron front topped by a four-story masonry facade was installed at that time and can still seen there now (if you look beyond the signs for Banana Republic):

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/5/55/Cast_iron_store_front.jpg

Prior to that the building at 544 Broadway housed a purveyor of furs, L. Zichiel, who specialized in Sleigh Robes (http://papermatters.blogspot.com/2010/01/jingle-bells-in-january-with-sleigh.html).

Back then the cast iron fronted lofts of SoHo were filled with furriers of all sorts, supplying NYC with a wide assortment of pelts as dictated by the fashions of the times. The business of fur was chronicled in the Fur Trade Review. Some clips from 1887 ...

14562.

14556

14560

14561

14559

14557

14558

lofter1
December 17th, 2011, 11:58 AM
In 1863 the building at 554 Broadway was home to C. H. Covell & Co. "Manufacturer of and Dealer in Patent Duplex Lamps, etc. Importer of Bisque and China Novelties." In the mid-1870s Covell moved north, to what was becoming the more fashionable stretch of Broadway near Madison Square.

A Covell advert from 1870:

http://wirednewyork.com/forum/attachment.php?attachmentid=14564&d=1324138132&thumb=1 (http://wirednewyork.com/forum/attachment.php?attachmentid=14564&d=1324138132)

In 1870 Covell bought out the Arion Piano-Forte Company (http://www.antiquepianoshop.com/online-museum/arion-piano-forte-manufacturing-co/) and added those to his inventory at 554 Broadway...

http://wirednewyork.com/forum/attachment.php?attachmentid=14563&d=1324138129&thumb=1 (http://wirednewyork.com/forum/attachment.php?attachmentid=14563&d=1324138129)

Arion Piano-Fortes were built in a succession of factories farther uptown:

The pioneer was the Arion Piano-Forte Company. Begun by George Charles Manner who patented an invention he called “arion,” the company was sold to New York piano manufacturer J. Simpson & Company which moved the factory to 149th Street and Third Avenue in 1872. Two years later, it opened another plant at 150th Street and St. Ann’s Avenue. Simpson and Arion Piano-Forte was sold to the growing Estey Piano Company in 1885. In 1888, Estey built a large factory on Bruckner Boulevard at the corner of Lincoln Avenue.


The Arion / Estey Factory (1885-1886; later enlarged):

http://wirednewyork.com/forum/attachment.php?attachmentid=14566&d=1324140098&thumb=1 (http://wirednewyork.com/forum/attachment.php?attachmentid=14566&d=1324140098)

The Estey Piano Company Factory (http://www.nyc.gov/html/records/pdf/govpub/2398esteypianofinal.pdf) in Mott Haven was designated a NYC Landmark in 2006.

From the Designation Report (http://www.nyc.gov/html/records/pdf/govpub/2398esteypianofinal.pdf) [pdf]:



ESTEY PIANO COMPANY FACTORY, 112-128 Lincoln Avenue (aka 15-19 Bruckner Boulevard and 270-278 East 134th Street), Borough of the Bronx. Built 1885-86; A.B. Ogden & Son, architects; additions: John B. Snook & Sons, 1890; Hewlett S. Baker, 1895; S. Gifford Slocum, 1909; George F. Hogue, 1919.


http://www.esteyorgan.com/PianoFactory.JPG

http://www.fosland.net/img7D.jpg

http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2741/5856394579_7ef33a9bcc.jpg

Ninjahedge
December 19th, 2011, 10:09 AM
http://wirednewyork.com/forum/attachment.php?attachmentid=14555&d=1324135840&thumb=1


MUCH better.

Merry
December 29th, 2011, 10:21 PM
^ Shame they always seem to routinely remove cornices from beautiful old buildings. Even if damaged/dangerous, whatever happened to restoration? (yeah, yeah, I know, the cost)



\/ Quite nice.


Stepped Up Condo Set to Rise at Soho's 182 Spring Street

by Pete Davies

http://cdn.cstatic.net/cache/gallery/7155/6591096507_0c701294f8_o.jpg
182 Spring Street.

http://cdn.cstatic.net/cache/gallery/7012/6591094883_e0c3bd08cb_o.jpg


http://cdn.cstatic.net/cache/gallery/7014/6591096793_e8f09662dd_o.jpg
The 1920s taxpayer now on the SW corner of Thompson and Spring.


http://cdn.cstatic.net/cache/gallery/7156/6591095635_418927e1f4_o.jpg
What Nordica will bring to the South Village and Soho.

http://cdn.cstatic.net/cache/gallery/7158/6591095155_ccb4cef301_o.jpg
182 Spring modeled.



A little 1920s taxpayer sitting on the southwest corner of Spring and Thompson at the edge of Soho will soon be coming down to make way for a 7-story mixed-use plan from the Canadian development team at Nordica Soho, who bought the plot earlier this year for $10,100,000. What will rise at 182 Spring Street are two floors for retail and an ambulatory care facility, all topped by five tiered floors of residential condos. The plan, featuring a set-back balconied duplex penthouse and a third floor terrace overlooking Spring—all perfectly positioned for eyeing handball tournaments across the way—comes from the creative team at Currimbhoy & Co. and Gruzen Samton Architects.

Pre-cast concrete will be used for the exterior, the paneling provided by the Canadian crew at BPDL, the same team who did the exteriors at the new Fiterman Hall for CUNY. Detailing will surround the setbacks, and the penthouse will be topped by rings of Jaisalmer limestone from India, carved with images inspired by the Tree of Life. Floorplans for the three 2BR full-floor units offer open living, and the roomy duplex penthouse displays over 100 feet of wrap-around terrace topped by two big bedrooms, each with a balcony. The 2,845-square-foot plot is in the hoped-for South Village Historic District and the proposed demolition at 182 Spring Street is cited by a whole list of political preservationists pushing for protections around the old neighborhood. There are some zoning issues still pending, but signs for this project point to a "go" in 2012.

Project Soho NY (http://nordicasoho.com/#page_7/) [Nordica Soho website]
Projects - Spring Street (http://www.currimbhoy.net/res-links/spring.html) [Currimbhoy & Co.]

http://ny.curbed.com/archives/2011/12/29/stepped_up_condo_set_to_rise_at_sohos_182_spring_s treet.php

londonlawyer
December 31st, 2011, 09:12 AM
This looks nice!

lofter1
December 31st, 2011, 11:38 AM
All the glass at the 2nd floor is odd. The Schedule A (http://a810-bisweb.nyc.gov/bisweb/JB2ScheduleAServlet?requestid=3&passjobnumber=120617485&passdocnumber=01&allbin=1007359) shows that will be used for "RETAIL SALES AND AMBULATORY HEALTH CARE FACILITY" aka medical offices. Seems the last thing you want for that type of business are picture windows overlooking a street crowded with wandering pedestrians. Unless what they're planning is for yet another pseudo medical facility aka a "spa" for botox and other beauty regimens.

lofter1
May 13th, 2012, 10:14 AM
Soho is under siege

Maddening crowds, vendors push historic neighborhood to the brink (http://www.nypost.com/p/news/opinion/opedcolumnists/soho_is_under_siege_4li1BIVvwz2FbBrjXRqiVK)

NY POST (http://www.nypost.com/p/news/opinion/opedcolumnists/soho_is_under_siege_4li1BIVvwz2FbBrjXRqiVK)
By SUSAN EDELMAN
May 13, 2012

SoHo has become NoGo.

YoGo trucks, Halal food carts, and companies promoting hair gel to online hookups have invaded the sidewalks, straining the historic enclave to a breaking point.

Hawkers squeeze in tables, chairs and wares along a stretch of Broadway illegally lined with shops from Hugo Boss and Steve Madden to H&M, and Old Navy.

Peddlers and pedestrians spill onto the Prince Street bike lane the community never wanted. Smoke from grills wafts into fancy stores. Trash and cigarette butts blanket the streets as bins overflow.

And residents are angry that the city is doing nothing to stop it.

“It’s a horror. Everybody wants to make money down here, like we’re whores,” said resident and filmmaker Camille Billops, 78.

Adding to the crush, the mayor’s office gives fee-producing permits for special events and promos — 22 in SoHo so far this year.

Kate Spade sent a hot-pink bus with fashion models, a diesel generator — and music blaring. Pantene bought a glass-enclosed truck, spread furniture on the sidewalk, and offered blow-outs. Badoo, a social Web site, held a three-day photo shoot on Mercer Street.

Street traffic clogs, too. Bike and bus lanes leave single lanes for cars, which bottleneck when someone turns.

“It’s a mess,” a resident said.

Sean Sweeney, a local activist, said SoHo, a landmark on the National Register of Historic Places, rings up among the city’s highest property and sales tax revenues, but is treated like “a playground.”

“SoHoland — where tourists walk five abreast, peddlers rule the sidewalks, and residents are captives in their own homes,” he said.

Tension can be thick. Last Sunday, a YoGo seller with his truck parked alongside the Prince Street subway stop and on the crosswalk — vendors must be 10 feet from both — shoved his iPad camera in a resident’s face and ranted about “harassment.”

The sidewalk was so clogged last Thursday, a 52-year-old New Jersey man in flip-flops bumped into two women going the opposite way. They exchanged words. The women punched his face, causing a cut below an eye, knocked him to the ground, and kicked him.

Three plain-clothes cops jumped in to bust the women.

The crowds make perfect prey for pickpockets. One of the artists who live in their SoHo studios said a thief lifted his teen daughter’s wallet and keys on her way home two weeks ago: “She was caught in the maelstrom.”

On weekends, residents have counted more than 79 vendors just on the three blocks on Broadway between Houston and Broome streets alone.

But city Department of Consumer Affairs rules — which bans them within 20 feet of a building entrance — leave legal spots for only about three on each side of each block.

“The biggest problem,” said a cop, “is that you write them a ticket, and the next day they’re back.”

Residents call enforcement, especially on weekends, lax because the 1st and 5th precincts are spread thin and diverted elsewhere, such as Occupy Wall Street protests.

Vendors complain about a “crackdown.” Fines start at $50 and escalate to $1,000 for the sixth violation.

“Why do they want to prevent people from making an honest living?” asked tobacco pipe peddler Willie Davis, who beat a ticket by arguing the cop wrongly measured his distance from a door. Davis noted that alert vendors foiled a terror attack in Times Square in 2010.

But SoHo is stretched beyond limits, said Bob Gormley, district manager of Community Board 2.

“It’s overwhelming congestion,” he said. “Eventually, someone is going to be forced out onto the street, and get hit by a car or killed.”

londonlawyer
May 13th, 2012, 11:17 AM
I would like to see street parking removed from Broadway in Soho and the sidewalks made wider and landscaped. The sidewalk vendors, but for artists, should go to.

lofter1
May 13th, 2012, 12:15 PM
The problem with removing street parking along Broadway is the on-street space needed for deliveries & service vehicles for retail, residences and businesses. The law already states "No Standing" all along this stretch and signs are clearly posted. Tickets are given out all day long, but it doesn't keep cars -- many of which are vehicles for vendors -- from clogging the curb.

Ninjahedge
May 14th, 2012, 10:24 AM
So, lemme get this strait.

The ticketing police force is stretched thin because of OWS?

BS.

The clue here is simple. If vendors are getting up to $1000 in fines in a day and STILL come back, that must mean that the spots are worth MORE than that for the ones that return.

Also, someone coming in with a little hot dog cart (as much as I really do not like them) is much less of a disturbance than these "look at me" trucks doing the makeovers and such. These guys are spending boku bucks for the promo to begin with, it is like they already plan on the $1000 as a space rental. Maybe additional stipulations like square footage should be brought into these regulations?

londonlawyer
May 14th, 2012, 09:23 PM
The problem with removing street parking along Broadway is the on-street space needed for deliveries & service vehicles for retail, residences and businesses. The law already states "No Standing" all along this stretch and signs are clearly posted. Tickets are given out all day long, but it doesn't keep cars -- many of which are vehicles for vendors -- from clogging the curb.

I've always wanted to see deliveries outlawed in Manhattan before 8:00 p.m. The extra costs of night-time deliveries could be passed along to consumers. If people want a cheaper life, they can move to Atlanta, Charlotte, Dallas, etc.

lofter1
May 15th, 2012, 11:15 PM
Those only-night time deliveries would be problematic in many neighborhoods where many people live above big retail at street level. Especially in a major mixed use district like SoHo. It's bad enough down here when one clothing mega-retailer gets delivery starting at 4AM and for hours on end it's the sounds of heavy thudding cardboard hitting the sidewalk down below and little mechanical carts moving goods from truck to store. If all the stores did that getting proper sleep would be a real issue.

ZippyTheChimp
May 16th, 2012, 12:43 AM
If you want a quiet life, you can move to Nuuk. ;)

Ninjahedge
May 16th, 2012, 08:50 AM
I am in partial agreement with LL on this one. They need to try to find some way to get those box trucks OFF the streets during the day... especially if they are doing nothing for several hours.


Many I see come in early, drop their goods, and then just STAY there for hours (or even the day) until they leave that night.

A lot make the drop, get ticketed, and move on, but too many claim a space and never move....

Preventing them from making deliveries during the day might not be the answer, but there has to be some sort of financial incentive to make deliveries off-peak....

londonlawyer
May 16th, 2012, 07:58 PM
If there were a window between 6:00 pm and 11:00 pm for deliveries, it would not impact people's ability to sleep.

lofter1
May 17th, 2012, 12:01 AM
That schedule would work.

londonlawyer
May 17th, 2012, 06:48 PM
It will never happen though.

Ninjahedge
May 18th, 2012, 11:13 AM
Sure it would!!!
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In your dreams!

lofter1
May 19th, 2012, 12:57 AM
Now that the weather is getting better lots of the stores along Broadway in SoHo are staying open until 10PM. That's entirely new down here.

londonlawyer
July 1st, 2012, 08:28 AM
I was in SoHo on June 30, 2012. Every time I go there, I have the same thought: Broadway has the potential to be magnificent. It has stunning buildings but is dirty and has too many parked car, trucks, and vendors. I would love to see it more pedestrianized like B'Way just north of Union and Herald Squares. More walking space and greenery would be great.

Derek2k3
July 1st, 2012, 12:21 PM
Well, they're in the process of creating a BID. I noticed yesterday how many of the buildings have been cleaned and restored. Quite a bit of renovations going on south of Canal as well.

lofter1
July 1st, 2012, 12:36 PM
Who's behind the Business "Improvement" District proposal?

londonlawyer
July 2nd, 2012, 01:26 PM
Well, they're in the process of creating a BID. I noticed yesterday how many of the buildings have been cleaned and restored. Quite a bit of renovations going on south of Canal as well.

The buildings are stunning. The streetscape needs work.

It would be nice if they put planters in, but I doubt that since the sidewalks are clogged. The city needs to eliminate parking and car lanes and replace them with a pedestrianized area like it did in Union Sq.

JFK-CDG
August 25th, 2012, 02:12 AM
Soho is beautiful but...

Why is that stretch of Broadway so trashy? I don't understand. For being so upscale, the Soho stretch of broadway seems to be the trashiest street in all of New York City. Why?! 5th Avenue is just as packed and it's spotless. Times Square is unbearable but it's so tidy compared to Soho's Broadway in the evenings.

lofter1
August 26th, 2012, 12:12 PM
Too many food trucks & food vendors. Not enough trash cans. Regulations require that food vendors of all sorts supply trash receptacles and clean up the area around where they vend, but down here nobody does that and nobody enforces it. Locals are working hard to get it under control, but there's little will among the related City agencies to tackle the problem in a responsible way.

londonlawyer
September 6th, 2012, 10:08 PM
Today, I walked north along B'Way from Union Sq. The landscaping and the lack of parked cars on that stretch is so nice. They should do that elsewhere in Manhattan.

IrishInNYC
September 11th, 2012, 09:09 AM
I pains me when I travel to other cities, like San Francisco or Chicago (not to mention most parts of Europe) and I look around and think, wow this place is a lot cleaner than NYC. It's a real shame that the greatest city in history is still victim to trash bags, litter, festering puddles, noise, smog, CARS, dog crap!! and myriad other detractors. The city really is about 30 years behind in terms of cleaning up the streets, lowering the number of cars and setting up zoned (both by time and geography) deliveries, garbage pick up etc.

Broadway in Soho? How about shutting it down, forever, to all traffic between 9am and 7pm? Deliveries after that...I can't think of many more amazing pedestrian plazas in the world. Make Crosby a cabs only street, for drop offs and pick ups...we have to keep the shoppers happy after all. Too much? How about following the model of La Rambla in Barcelona, a single lane either side with a main central island?

It'll never happen. "I'm a dreamer"...but hopefully not the only one. Yeah, it would create all sorts of traffic problems but you know what, they said the same about Times Sq and Herald Sq and life goes on...like London, heavy tolls need to be implemented for cars in parts of the city...it is inexcusable that hundreds of thousands of commuters drive, singly, into the city each and every day....that is unheard of in most other developed cities. Too. Many. Cars.

Manhattan is the perfect place to overhaul the system and control the influx of cars, to control the garbage and box trucks...it's an island, it's a grid, for the most part, it's segmented...damn this got long quick. Stream of consciousness...end.

ZippyTheChimp
September 11th, 2012, 12:02 PM
The level to which NYC residents litter is far above that in many other similar cities, and it annoys me to no end. Those with any sort of responsibility might leave cups and bottles on any flat surface; others might just toss them in the street. And the argument that the trash bins are full is a poor excuse. My neighborhood is relatively clean, and hosts a large group of outdoor lunchtime diners. Even if the trash bins are full, you'd expect the litter to be deposited around them. But walk down the esplanade, and you find litter on or under the benches. People just leave it and walk away. Who the hell does that?

The level of garbage - and I guess the level of traffic - is another matter, and before you can make comparisons with other cities, you have to take into account Manhattan's dynamic population (when we talk about these issues, we usually talk about Manhattan).

You can talk about reducing and eliminating traffic in certain areas, but that's a matter of rerouting traffic that's already on the island. But any comprehensive traffic reduction in most places will have to address the number of vehicles that enter the island.

Garbage is a similar problem, compounded by the fact that there are few alleys and service streets in Manhattan where trash can be stored for collection.

A report was issued earlier this year by the Wagner School of Public Service at NYU. Some excerpts:


The residential population count does not include the 1.6 million commuters who enter Manhattan every weekday, or the hundreds of thousands of visitors who use Manhattan’s tourist attractions, hospitals, universities, and nightclubs. This report analyzes the volume of people flowing in and out of Manhattan during a 24-hour period; we provide an upper estimate of the actual number of people in Manhattan during a typical work day.


Manhattan’s daytime population is approximately 3.94 million; the census-defined daytime population omits almost one-fourth of the total, or nearly 800,000 people.


52% of Manhattan’s Census-defined daytime population consists of individuals who do not live in Manhattan and commute there for work. Every day, 1.63 million commuters enter Manhattan for work, while 132,000 Manhattan residents commute elsewhere for work


Peak population events, or “day-trip” events, draw in people from across the city and region could potentially push Manhattan’s daytime population well above 4 million, perhaps even 5 million, depending on the conditions and circumstances


population flows into, out of, and within Manhattan are no longer occurring only at peak commuting hours

Dynamic population density in CBDs


An analysis of tract-to-tract worker flow data from the 2000 Census Transportation Planning Package indicates that census tracts in Midtown and Financial District (typically less than one-tenth of a square mile) have up to 70,000 commuters and residents in skyscrapers and office buildings during the day with a population density of up to 980,000 people per square mile (to achieve an equivalent level of density for all of Manhattan, the entire population of Texas would have to relocate to the borough).

Full report (http://wagner.nyu.edu/rudincenter/publications/dynamic_pop_manhattan.pdf)

Ninjahedge
September 11th, 2012, 12:31 PM
There seem to be several different kinds of litterbugs.

One that annoys me the most is the "it ain't my job" deliberate litterers. The ones that will unwrap a pack of cigarettes and drop the wrapper, or get cash from the machine, crumple the receipt, and drop it while walking. The look on many of the faces is one of deliberate indifference. I believe that many feel this is there way of insuring that there is someone "below" them that picks up after them. Combine that with just being messy and lazy and you have a weird situation.

There are others that are worse. Deliberately leaving things on benches, or going out of their way not to use what is right in front of them. I saw a guy in the subway get up and throw his trash on the tracks when there was a can right next to him at the bench.

And then there are just the lazy peeps from all demographics that can't be bothered to carry a piece of garbage 20 yards along their way to a trash can.

Add to this the incidentals, the streetside stands, the garbage crews that "do their job" and nothing more, the butt-flickers and the occasional homeless that can litter an entire block with one free paper.

NYC is EXTREMELY dirty, and maybe the guys in charge should have been more concerned with giving tickets to litterbugs than jaywalkers.


But then again, I have never seen someone killed by garbage... so.

Merry
September 25th, 2012, 05:48 AM
$30M lot in SoHo sits empty

By Annie Karni

It’s a black hole of development.

An 11,432-square-foot lot in SoHo on Sixth Avenue between Spring and Broome streets has sat fallow for six years, growing tall weeds behind barbed wire while it gets flipped by developer after developer who never break ground.

The star-crossed tract in prime SoHo is something of a real-estate mystery: How can valuable space in a crowded city sit vacant for years on end?

In 2008, developer Joseph Mattone secured city permits to develop a 19-story hotel on the barren site that sits a block from high-end boutiques like John Masters Organics and multimillion-dollar condos at Trump SoHo.

http://www.nypost.com/rw/nypost/2012/09/23/news/web_photos/23.1n020.Lotofgold--300x300.jpg
(Helayne Seidman)

http://ny.curbed.com/uploads/Screen%20shot%202012-09-23%20at%2010.29.53%20AM.jpg
(Google Maps) http://ny.curbed.com/index.php?page=3

Mattone had owned the property for years and leased it to a Mobil gas station that went out of business in 2006. When he was offered $33.5 million for the undeveloped land in 2008, he couldn’t refuse.

“It’s a disadvantaged site for development because it’s zoned for manufacturing, and right next to it is what we call ‘Trump zoning,’ ” said Mattone, referring to the 46-story Trump SoHo hotel at Spring and Varick streets, one block over. Donald Trump procured special zoning for his flashy high-rise hotel, which neighborhood activists thought was a violation of zoning rules.

On the vacant Sixth Avenue lot, a zoning variance could be secured for only the 19-story building and not a bigger one. A larger high-rise hotel, like Trump’s, would require rezoning and entail a neighborhood battle.

“The lot doesn’t have equal zoning to the areas around it. This piece for some arbitrary reason was zoned for less-intensive development. We were going through a proceeding to build when we were approached by a buyer and decided to go elsewhere,” Mattone said.

The new owner, who bought the property under the name of an LLC, sat on the depressed lot for two years before unloading it at a loss for $20.25 million in 2010 to the LA-based CIM Group, which was rumored to be eyeing the site for a glitzy hotel.

But last month, the sad plot switched hands again before any blueprints were unveiled. Developer Robert Gladstone of Madison Equities spent $30.5 million for it.

“We have nothing to report at this time,” Gladstone said of his plans.

Approved permits for a 19-story hotel remain active at the Buildings Department through April 2013, a city spokeswoman said.

The ugly lot even irks residents who usually fight new development in the historic district. “It’s a vacant, grungy, weed-filled lot, à la South Bronx 1976, in the middle of one of the city’s most visited, prosperous and trendy districts,” fumed Sean Sweeney, director of the SoHo Alliance.

“From our perspective, the lot looks awful and we’d be happy to see it developed,” said Andrew Berman, executive director of the Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation.

The empty lot “shows the inherent risk in development, a risk that only increased following the financial crisis of 2008,” said Mike Slattery, senior vice president of the Real Estate Board of New York. “The current zoning no longer reflects the land use in this area. It is no longer a manufacturing district. However, zoning changes, especially when changing from manufacturing to a more suitable land-use regulation, are costly and never certain.”

Butthe weedy patch retains its value even though it never becomes a construction site.

“I’d be very happy to buy it back,” Mattone said. “We might need some help in getting rezoning but I’d be very happy to try again and develop that piece of Manhattan.”

http://www.nypost.com/p/news/local/lot_in_soho_sits_empty_we6vuATKBx4WhLhdPUcdhM?utm_ medium=rss&utm_content=Local


(http://www.nypost.com/p/news/local/lot_in_soho_sits_empty_we6vuATKBx4WhLhdPUcdhM?utm_ medium=rss&utm_content=Local)

Ninjahedge
September 25th, 2012, 09:03 AM
However, zoning changes, especially when changing from manufacturing to a more suitable land-use regulation, are costly

How are they costly?

In an area that has surrounding zones that are not the same in a city that already supplies the power, water and sewerage (most likely) needed, "costly" seems a misnomer.

I think they may be talking about time more than money... and time inherently costs money...... *shrug*

Derek2k3
February 5th, 2013, 06:40 PM
Pretty amazing what these phone apps can do to cell phone photos.

http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8355/8448238383_b71417cfdd_c.jpg


http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8194/8448238539_0184c73ffa_c.jpg


http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8186/8448238293_f904be6b41_c.jpg

Ninjahedge
February 6th, 2013, 09:13 PM
Derek... first of three is the most impressive. It jumps out at you.

The second is interesting.. the third... meh.

mariab
April 30th, 2013, 11:37 PM
Delta opens high-tech haven for travelers in SoHo promoting new JFK Airport hub

The new Soho hotspot will be open for three weeks and offer free WiFi and high-end comfort food. A replica terminal will feature a 'baggage claim' serving boxed lunches.

By Jason Sheftell (http://wirednewyork.com/authors?author=Jason Sheftell) / NEW YORK DAILY NEWS

Tuesday, April 30, 2013, 8:05 PM
Craig Warga/New York Daily News

The new Delta Air Lines Terminal pop-up shop at 376 West Broadway in Lower Manhattan features a replica of what can be expected at the new JFK Airport terminal.




SoHo is ready for takeoff.
Delta Air Lines has converted a historic cast-iron building on West Broadway and Broome St. into a mini-airport — a three-week promotion for the company’s state-of-the-art, $1.4 billion Terminal 4 opening May 24 at JFK.
http://assets.nydailynews.com/polopoly_fs/1.1331582.1367363241!/img/httpImage/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_635/delta1n-14-web.jpgCraig Warga/New York Daily News

The new Delta Air Lines Sky Club in SoHo will have plenty of room to plug-in and chill out.


RELATED: DELTA INVESTS $1.4B AT JFK AND LGA (http://www.nydailynews.com/new-york/queens/delta-invests-1-4-billion-laguardia-jfk-airports-article-1.1061456)
The new Kennedy Airport terminal — equipped with USB ports, plenty of electrical outlets, swank luxury lounges with free WiFi, and high-end comfort food — will be a modern hub servicing today’s traveler.
http://assets.nydailynews.com/polopoly_fs/1.1331593.1367363299!/img/httpImage/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_635/delta1n-3-web.jpgCraig Warga/New York Daily News

Get a feel for what's coming to JFK Airport at Delta's new SoHo tech haven.


“Whatever a 21st century passenger needs, it’s there,” said Gail Grimmett, Delta’s senior vice president New York. “We have a Shake Shack and Blue Smoke plus two entries from Marcus Samuelsson. Our lounges are equipped with showers and full media offering. Travelers will want for nothing.”
RELATED: SPIRIT AIRLINES TO CHARGE $100 FOR CARRY-ON BAGS (http://www.nydailynews.com/news/money/spirit-airlines-charge-100-carry-on-bags-gate-article-1.1072019)
http://assets.nydailynews.com/polopoly_fs/1.1331595.1367363309!/img/httpImage/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_635/delta1n-1-web.jpgCraig Warga/New York Daily News

Gail Grimmett, senior vice president of New York for Delta, poses in the new Delta Air Lines Terminal 4 pop-up shop, 376 West Broadway in SoHo.


The replica terminal, dubbed “T4X,” opens at 376 Broadway on Wednesday at 11 a.m. It will have all the amenities of the coming JFK portal — plus $4 lunch boxes served on a conveyor belt simulating baggage pick-up.
“We wanted to give New Yorkers something they can touch,” said Grimmett.
http://assets.nydailynews.com/polopoly_fs/1.1331571.1367363186!/img/httpImage/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_635/delta1n-27-web.jpgCraig Warga/New York Daily News

Delta will provide free WiFi at the SoHo pop-up terminal during the three-week promotional period starting Wednesday.


RELATED: DELTA REUNITES 7-YEAR-OLD BOY WITH LATE DAD’S TREASURED OLD T-SHIRT: REPORT (http://www.nydailynews.com/news/national/delta-reunites-7-year-old-boy-late-dad-treasured-old-t-shirt-report-article-1.1323942)
The entire second floor of the SoHo pop-up recreates Delta’s Thom Filicia-designed Sky Deck and its Sky Club, both available via annual membership or to premium ticket holders.
http://assets.nydailynews.com/polopoly_fs/1.1331591.1367363288!/img/httpImage/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_635/delta1n-5-web.jpgCraig Warga/New York Daily News

The new Delta Air Lines Terminal 4 pop-up shop at 376 West Broadway in SoHo is setup to be a traveler's haven.


Delta paid close to six-figures for the six-week rental of the building, which formerly housed a Tommy Hilfiger boutique and Johnny Walker pop-up.
RELATED: AIRLINE WORKER AVOIDS SECURITY, BOARDS FLIGHT AT JFK (http://www.nydailynews.com/new-york/airline-worker-avoids-security-boards-flight-jfk-article-1.1308303)
http://assets.nydailynews.com/polopoly_fs/1.1331589.1367363274!/img/httpImage/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_635/delta1n-7-web.jpgCraig Warga/New York Daily News

The Delta pop-up will feature plenty of lounge space for travelers looking to unwind and plug-in.


After Wednesday night’s gala bash — featuring football stars Victor Cruz and Justin Tuck, supermodel Coco Rocha, and Bravo’s Andy Cohen — “T4X” will be open Tuesday to Sunday from 11 a.m. till 3 p.m. through May 22.
On a mobile device? Click here to watch the video. (http://landing.newsinc.com/shared/video.html?vcid=24780188&freewheel=90051&sitesection=nydailynews)
http://assets.nydailynews.com/polopoly_fs/1.1331585.1367363255!/img/httpImage/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_635/delta1n-11-web.jpgCraig Warga/New York Daily News

A replica baggage claim will offer boxed lunches for visitors.


http://assets.nydailynews.com/polopoly_fs/1.1331588.1367363270!/img/httpImage/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_635/delta1n-8-web.jpgCraig Warga/New York Daily News

The SoHo Sky Club is accessible to annual members or premium ticket holders.


http://assets.nydailynews.com/polopoly_fs/1.1331578.1367363224!/img/httpImage/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_635/delta1n-19-web.jpgDrawing by Corvin Matei

This is a drawing of the new JFK Airport terminal Sky Deck, designed by Thom Filicia.


http://assets.nydailynews.com/polopoly_fs/1.1331597.1367364002!/img/httpImage/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_635/split-delta-0430.jpgCorvin Matei

These renderings show the before (left) and after of the new JFK Airport Delta Airlines terminal, set for opening next month.





Read more: http://www.nydailynews.com/life-style/real-estate/delta-opens-high-end-tech-haven-soho-article-1.1331596#ixzz2S0ZIEpqR

lofter1
May 1st, 2013, 03:07 AM
The article is incorrect. This building was built about 10 years ago. It's not historic or cast iron. It's made of pre-cast concrete panels. For a number of years it was a Tommy Hilfiger store. It's been empty for a few years, rented out for events and pop-ups:




... Delta Air Lines has converted a historic cast-iron building on West Broadway and Broome St. ...
http://assets.nydailynews.com/polopoly_fs/1.1331591.1367363288!/img/httpImage/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_635/delta1n-5-web.jpg

mariab
May 1st, 2013, 04:08 PM
Are you positive about that? I mean I know you know your stuff, but maybe you're thinking about another corner?

ZippyTheChimp
May 1st, 2013, 07:35 PM
It was a gas station in the early 1990s.

mariab
May 1st, 2013, 09:50 PM
I wonder if that classic cast iron description will be part of the marketing.

lofter1
May 2nd, 2013, 01:19 AM
Really?


Are you positive about that? I mean I know you know your stuff, but maybe you're thinking about another corner?

I mean, Really?

The 2001 DEMOLITION Permit (http://a810-bisweb.nyc.gov/bisweb/JobsQueryByNumberServlet?requestid=2&passjobnumber=102134165&passdocnumber=01) for the site at 372-376 West Broadway (aka 504-506 Broome Street).

The DOB NEW BUILDING Application (http://a810-bisweb.nyc.gov/bisweb/JobsQueryByNumberServlet?requestid=2&passjobnumber=102925578&passdocnumber=01) from 2001.

The site with the new building under construction (http://digitalgallery.nypl.org/nypldigital/dgkeysearchdetail.cfm?trg=1&strucID=2344509&imageID=523558&total=112&num=0&word=Broome%20West%20Broadway&s=1&notword=&d=&c=&f=&k=1&lWord=&lField=&sScope=&sLevel=&sLabel=&sort=&imgs=20&pos=11&e=w), by Dylan Stone.

A different angle showing the steel frame going up (http://digitalgallery.nypl.org/nypldigital/dgkeysearchdetail.cfm?trg=1&strucID=2344504&imageID=523553&total=112&num=60&word=Broome%20West%20Broadway&s=1&notword=&d=&c=&f=&k=1&lWord=&lField=&sScope=&sLevel=&sLabel=&sort=&imgs=20&pos=77&e=w). And another (http://digitalgallery.nypl.org/nypldigital/dgkeysearchdetail.cfm?trg=1&strucID=2344507&imageID=523556&total=112&num=60&word=Broome%20West%20Broadway&s=1&notword=&d=&c=&f=&k=1&lWord=&lField=&sScope=&sLevel=&sLabel=&sort=&imgs=20&pos=80&e=w).

The finished building at the NW corner of West Broadway & Broome:

http://s01.agorafy.com/46f6cf5d33798b20324b2562effdc5a5.428x285

That corner, along 504-506 Broome Street by Berenice Abbott, 1939 (http://digitalgallery.nypl.org/nypldigital/dgkeysearchdetail.cfm?trg=1&strucID=407677&imageID=717879f&total=112&num=0&word=Broome%20West%20Broadway&s=1&notword=&d=&c=&f=&k=1&lWord=&lField=&sScope=&sLevel=&sLabel=&sort=&imgs=20&pos=1&e=w) (notice the building to the left) ...

http://wirednewyork.com/images/nycbw/101.jpg


But who knows? Maybe I am wrong and thinking of another corner altogether. :cool:

lofter1
May 2nd, 2013, 01:50 AM
You can see that corner at Broome and West Broadway through the sculptures that took up the little triangle bounded by Broome & Watts, back when the lot was empty:

Broome Street sculpture (http://www.sohoblues.com/Mondo_Art/broome%20street%20sculpture.htm)

© Allan Tannenbaum

http://www.sohoblues.com/Mondo_Art/broome%20street%20sculpture_std.jpg

The sculptures were created by Bobby Bolles. Now they're gone.

The sad saga of the artworks is outlined here:

Bolling Green

SoHo Memory Project (http://sohomemory.com/2011/12/17/bolling-green/)


Remember those fabulous welded metal sculptures that used to live on that triangular piece of land where Broome and Watts came together, over near where the old Film Forum used to be? People called it Bobby Bolles Park, though it didn’t officially have a name. I don’t even think it was considered a park before the sculptures arrived.

A sculptor named Bob Bolles, a diminutive man in jeans and a red scarf who was a regular fixture at the Broome Street Bar, installed his work at this location in the 1960′s, without permission from the City or Parks Department, but nobody seemed to mind. In fact, the sculptures made an otherwise unremarkable intersection on the way to and from the Holland Tunnel quite interesting. The rusted metal forms rose out of the street. Children (and probably some adults too) climbed on them, garbage from twirling trash cyclones got caught under them.

The sculptures thus remained, until one day at around the turn of the millennium when the Parks Department decided that we needed a park there as part of their Greenstreets program ...

mariab
May 2nd, 2013, 04:12 PM
I'm sorry, lofterpedia. I did not mean to question the Great and Powerful Oz in such a manner:). Embellishing news articles or outright lying is nothing new to the news media, I just don't know what they have to gain by saying that it was a prewar classic rather than a new one, especially for something like this.

ZippyTheChimp
May 2nd, 2013, 04:50 PM
I doubt they lied; just lazy.

I don't see where they said, prewar-classic, just cast-iron historic. The lot is in the historic district extension (since 2010), so I can see where they goofed.

Can't see how they mistook the concrete for cast iron, but again, it is called the SoHo Cast Iron Historic District.

lofter1
May 2nd, 2013, 10:09 PM
I'm sorry, lofterpedia.


I like it! I'm going to have to change my moniker.




I did not mean to question the Great and Powerful Oz in such a manner :).


All is forgiven :cool:

lofter1
July 23rd, 2013, 12:13 PM
They've been doing facade work at the Little Singer Building for many months, and all the details have been hidden away, along both Broadway & Prince.

Today the netting & scaffolding are starting to come down, so folks should soon get to see this one in all its glory ...




http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8355/8448238383_b71417cfdd_c.jpg

http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8186/8448238293_f904be6b41_c.jpg

londonlawyer
July 25th, 2013, 07:53 AM
B'Way in SoHo deserves an extension of the landscaped B'Way boulevard. These stunning buildings warrant more than a filthy, overcrowded sidewalk lined by vendors selling crap off of folding tables.

Ninjahedge
July 25th, 2013, 08:47 AM
And you CAN'T BUY THE FOLDING TABLES!!!!!


The OUTRAGE!

lofter1
July 25th, 2013, 12:04 PM
Take up the vendors, the vast percentage of which are setting up shop in places not allowed under vending regulations, with the NYPD and other City Agencies that could get things under control and you'll find that they could basically care less that what's going on along Broadway in SoHo is, in many many cases, illegal.

Merry
July 25th, 2013, 10:12 PM
Couldn't find this building anywhere. It's a beauty.


Penthouse Rental at 55 Thompson (http://ny.curbed.com/archives/2013/07/25/penthouse_rental_at_55_thompson_park_union_sells_o ut.php)

by Jessica Dailey

http://cdn.cstatic.net/images/gridfs/51f197f1f92ea11105004ae0/image002%20%281%29.jpg

http://cdn.cstatic.net/images/gridfs/51f197e6f92ea11105004aa4/ka9QzRGRqhGlZjWcCVuOPXcsVVvmqd9JHuPuJObVSLY.jpeg

(http://cdn.cstatic.net/images/gridfs/51f197e6f92ea11105004aa4/ka9QzRGRqhGlZjWcCVuOPXcsVVvmqd9JHuPuJObVSLY.jpeg) (http://cdn.cstatic.net/images/gridfs/51f197e8f92ea11105004aae/image001.jpg)http://cdn.cstatic.net/images/gridfs/51f197eaf92ea11105004abb/image002.jpg (http://cdn.cstatic.net/images/gridfs/51f197e9f92ea11105004ab8/image002.jpg)http://cdn.cstatic.net/images/gridfs/51f197ecf92ea11105004ac5/g-Dm_8liCm7fYwlgLHQB6fDOQ6smbI0ym9hQfNg083E.jpeg (http://cdn.cstatic.net/images/gridfs/51f197ebf92ea11105004ac2/g-Dm_8liCm7fYwlgLHQB6fDOQ6smbI0ym9hQfNg083E.jpeg)htt p://cdn.cstatic.net/images/gridfs/51f197eef92ea11105004acf/4Wu1kC0gokzsoIgkPuEARt37f7_Mkm3AFvyvHoKExwM.jpeg (http://cdn.cstatic.net/images/gridfs/51f197edf92ea11105004acc/4Wu1kC0gokzsoIgkPuEARt37f7_Mkm3AFvyvHoKExwM.jpeg)h ttp://cdn.cstatic.net/images/gridfs/51f197eff92ea11105004ad9/4H3QV0X8Oao2OmZSUCQAKEvnYIYqmQB1Q6-qIJOntGc.jpeg (http://cdn.cstatic.net/images/gridfs/51f197eff92ea11105004ad6/4H3QV0X8Oao2OmZSUCQAKEvnYIYqmQB1Q6-qIJOntGc.jpeg)http://cdn.cstatic.net/images/gridfs/51f197f4f92ea11105004aed/PHB-Floor-plan.jpg (http://cdn.cstatic.net/images/gridfs/51f197f3f92ea11105004aea/PHB-Floor-plan.jpg)

SOHO—We haven't heard anything from 55 Thompson since the original renters moved in, but the building has had some turnover in the last two years. One of the penthouse units recently returned to the rental market, asking $17,500/month. It's a two-bedroom, two-bathroom corner unit with floor-to-ceiling windows and a skylight. More details on the building's website (http://www.55thompson.com/).

http://ny.curbed.com/places/55-thompson-street

http://ny.curbed.com/archives/2013/07/25/penthouse_rental_at_55_thompson_park_union_sells_o ut.php

lofter1
July 25th, 2013, 11:36 PM
A beauty? Not in person. It's clad in clumsy concrete panels. The street level retail space remains empty, despite the fact that it's been completed and open to residents for nearly 3 years. Plus the fact that right outside the windows is one of the worst traffic jams (and dirtiest air) in all of Manhattan: the bottleneck of East River bridge traffic cramming and honking its way into the two lanes of the Holland Tunnel.

But from the PH the view to the east over SoHo must be nice.

londonlawyer
September 2nd, 2013, 12:11 PM
I think that it's ok, but sadly, they razed a nice old building that could have been refurbished.

ZippyTheChimp
March 3rd, 2014, 10:11 AM
52 Wooster St

Long stalled project at Wooster and Broome, filling in a narrow corner lot, finally underway.

http://imageshack.com/a/img38/7797/zjjl.jpg

http://www.cityrealty.com/graphics/uploads/1160163555_woos52bs.jpg

http://www.cityrealty.com/nyc/real-estate/carters-view/revised-design-52-wooster-street-approved/14281

ZippyTheChimp
July 27th, 2014, 07:37 PM
52 Wooster St

http://imageshack.com/a/img538/7927/sV4SPK.jpg

lofter1
July 27th, 2014, 08:31 PM
^ Not the new building that's gone up there, but rather the supporting structure for the old one to the east as 52 Wooster digs out the foundation.

Merry
September 16th, 2014, 10:18 PM
Landmarks Praises Updated Plans for Glassy Spring St. Retail

by Evan Bindelglass

http://cdn.cstatic.net/gridnailer/500x/http://cdn.cstatic.net/images/gridfs/54189922f92ea1177b01070d/144springstreet_20140916_B05.jpg (http://cdn.cstatic.net/images/gridfs/54189922f92ea1177b01070d/144springstreet_20140916_B05.jpg)

Fashion company investor Ralph Bartel's plans to construct a glassy four-story retail building on a vacant Soho lot (http://ny.racked.com/archives/2013/12/04/glassy_retail_space_coming_to_former_soho_flea_mar ket.php) were unanimously approved by the Landmarks Preservation Commission (http://ny.curbed.com/tags/landmarks-preservation-commission) today. The design for 144 Spring Street saw minor changes from the June presentation (http://ny.curbed.com/archives/2014/06/05/glassy_soho_retail_building_is_beautiful_but_needs _context.php), but the discussion among the commissioners turned more to the future than whether the proposed building was appropriate for the present.

http://cdn.cstatic.net/gridnailer/500x/http://cdn.cstatic.net/images/gridfs/54189a2cf92ea15643012629/144springstreet_20140916_B07.jpg (http://cdn.cstatic.net/images/gridfs/54189a2cf92ea15643012629/144springstreet_20140916_B07.jpg) http://cdn.cstatic.net/gridnailer/500x/http://cdn.cstatic.net/images/gridfs/54189a43f92ea12673000077/144springstreet_20140916_B08.jpg (http://cdn.cstatic.net/images/gridfs/54189a43f92ea12673000077/144springstreet_20140916_B08.jpg)

Ward Dennis of the preservation firm Higgins Quasebarth & Partners (http://www.hqpreservation.com/) and Architect Frank Grauman of Bohlin Cywinski Jackson (http://bcj.com) presented the updated proposal for the building, which will have two floors and two mezzanines and be built of structural glazing without metal support. The updated design accentuates the base slightly and draws inpspiration from the Lever House (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lever_House) and Seagram Building (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seagram_Building). Dennis also pointed out that many other small lots have structures built differently from their neighbors.

http://cdn.cstatic.net/gridnailer/500x/http://cdn.cstatic.net/images/gridfs/54189abbf92ea1422802324a/144springstreet_20140916_B04.jpg (http://cdn.cstatic.net/images/gridfs/54189abbf92ea1422802324a/144springstreet_20140916_B04.jpg) http://cdn.cstatic.net/gridnailer/500x/http://cdn.cstatic.net/images/gridfs/54189af2f92ea1051a00a036/144springstreet_20140916_B03.jpg (http://cdn.cstatic.net/images/gridfs/54189af2f92ea1051a00a036/144springstreet_20140916_B03.jpg)

http://cdn.cstatic.net/gridnailer/500x/http://cdn.cstatic.net/images/gridfs/54189b03f92ea1177b0126c7/144springstreet_20140916_B06.jpg (http://cdn.cstatic.net/images/gridfs/54189b03f92ea1177b0126c7/144springstreet_20140916_B06.jpg)

Grauman noted that the size of the air handlers on the roof was reduced, that a slightly modified paneling design links the two faces of the building, and that the cornice was enlarged. He also highlighted the interior glass elevator, meant to direct people up to what he said the still-unnamed retailer called "objects of significant value, but not of significant size."

http://cdn.cstatic.net/gridnailer/500x/http://cdn.cstatic.net/images/gridfs/54189b18f92ea17612017993/144springstreet_20140916_B01.jpg (http://cdn.cstatic.net/images/gridfs/54189b18f92ea17612017993/144springstreet_20140916_B01.jpg) http://cdn.cstatic.net/gridnailer/500x/http://cdn.cstatic.net/images/gridfs/54189b21f92ea11549012048/144springstreet_20140916_B02.jpg (http://cdn.cstatic.net/images/gridfs/54189b21f92ea11549012048/144springstreet_20140916_B02.jpg)

The commissioners really liked the building and approved it unanimously. New commissioner Adi Shamir-Baron said it was "innovating and testing the limits" of structural glass. She did question whether the long vacant space should be left that way, but chair Meenakshi Srinivasan pointed out that the lot was intented for a building. Of the design, Srinivasan said it "fits well." Commissioner Roberta Washington liked it, but worried about setting precedent for glass buildings to be approved, while Diana Chapin called it an "appropriate modern interpretation." Frederick Bland said he continued "to be impressed" and called it "extraordinary" and "thoughtful" and said it "fits in like a glove."

http://cdn.cstatic.net/gridnailer/500x/http://cdn.cstatic.net/images/gridfs/54189b38f92ea1177b012a0f/144springstreet_20140916_B09.jpg (http://cdn.cstatic.net/images/gridfs/54189b38f92ea1177b012a0f/144springstreet_20140916_B09.jpg)

As when the building was presented in June (http://ny.curbed.com/archives/2014/06/05/glassy_soho_retail_building_is_beautiful_but_needs _context.php), Bland professed his love for the interior and his hope for it to be landmarked. In order for a building interior to be landmarked, the building must have existed for 30 years and must have been accessible by the public. Here's where the discussion went to the future. This will be a transparent building and the worry is that, one day, it might be sold and the new owner would want to put up a wall and change the nature of the building. Unless an interior is landmarked, it falls outside the purview of the commission. There was reference made to the glass-heavy Apple stores (http://nymag.com/listings/stores/apple_store/). In the end, to satisfy concerns, raised largely by Bland and commissioner Michael Goldblum, the approval resolution included an amendment that any significant changes to the transparency within 24 inches of the exterior must be reviewed by the commission.

http://ny.curbed.com/archives/2014/09/16/landmarks_praises_updated_plans_for_glassy_spring_ st_retail.php

Merry
November 19th, 2014, 03:14 AM
Despite the writer's comment about Soho, this part of Greene Street appears to have changed very little, thank goodness (SoHo Cast Iron Historic District). Even the lovely old (?) lamp post has survived.


Greene Street Then & Now, and the Return of Spectra

November 7th, 2014

About twenty years ago, I peered out my living room window on East 12th Street to discover that it was a misty, atmospheric day after an early morning rainfall. As I had the day off, I grabbed my trusty Maxxum 400si…then newly fitted with a wide-angle lens, and set out to take some pictures.

While strolling around foggy SoHo, I found myself on Greene Street, strangely bereft of any cars. I raised my camera, pointed it to the south and snapped. A few days later, I repaired to the Spectra Photo Lab on LaGuardia Place and picked up my film, delighted to discover how certain ones had turned out, notably my Greene Street shot. That shot is below….

(click images to enlarge)

http://vassifer.blogs.com/.a/6a00d8341c18b253ef01bb07a7e255970d-450wi (http://vassifer.blogs.com/.a/6a00d8341c18b253ef01bb07a7e255970d-popup)

At the time, I was still finding my way with photography as an eager novice. I’d taken a crash darkroom course at the Maine Media Workshops in Rockport, Maine, so I had a vague idea of what I was doing, but being that I didn’t have access to a darkroom myself, I took all my film to Specta, and they always did an amazing job. While I could take credit for the composition, Spectra made my images positively shine. This Greene Street shot remains a particular favorite, so much so that I had the Spectra folks blow up a version and it now hangs on our living room wall. I love how you just make out the hint of the World Trade Center towers behind the street lamp.

As I mentioned in this post from 2008 (http://vassifer.blogs.com/alexinnyc/2008/07/death-by-digital.html), when my first child was born in 2004, I switched to a digital camera out of sheer convenience, and sadly never went back. Clearly, I wasn’t alone, as the advent of digital photography basically seemed to put photo labs like Spectra out of business. They had to give up that massive space on LaGuardia Place as a result. It sort of broke my heart.

Six years later, however, I recently noticed that Specta has re-appeared at 333 Fifth Avenue just off 33rd Street. I’ve recently been kicking the idea around of shooting film again, so it might be time to go visit.

And just for the Hell of it, I was down on Greene Street again yesterday, and tried to replicate that earlier shot. Suffice to say, SoHo is no longer the same place that it was all those years ago.

http://vassifer.blogs.com/.a/6a00d8341c18b253ef01b7c7029d8e970b-450wi (http://vassifer.blogs.com/.a/6a00d8341c18b253ef01b7c7029d8e970b-popup)

http://vassifer.blogs.com/alexinnyc/2014/11/greene-street-then-now-and-the-return-of-spectra.html