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Slovak
May 25th, 2004, 03:02 PM
WHO IS Winer?

Jasonik
May 25th, 2004, 03:22 PM
http://www.fec.gov/

A poll might be appropriate for your question.

"WHO IS Desired?" may be more accurate at present.

Freedom Tower
May 25th, 2004, 04:04 PM
I hope President Bush wins. I can't imagine how our country would be if it was run by someone who puts the "rights" of terrorists ahead of national security (AKA Kerry). Kerry opposes the Patriot Act, which is enough to make me oppose him. The Patriot Act is legislation ensuring that the FBI, CIA, etc. have more power to spy on suspected terrorists. Now I don't know everyone elses opinion but I'd much prefer the government snoop around then having another huge disaster killing over 3,000 Americans and destroying planes, buildings, and everything else. But of course, the terrorists have the right to privacy :roll:

ZippyTheChimp
May 25th, 2004, 04:40 PM
What is the popular opinion in Slovakia?

RandySavage
May 25th, 2004, 05:38 PM
"Those who would give up an essential liberty to purchase a little temporary safety deserve neither liberty nor safety."

This Ben Franklin quote is used alot in opposition to the Patriot Act. Personally, I'd rather take my chances with the terrorists than have some government analyst or super-computer scan my every phone conversation and email.

These times call for a progressive not a reactionary. Bush's inner cabal and the way the man thinks scare me a lot more than any outside threat. At the same time, I have not heard any great ideas from Kerry about ending the terror threat.

Both candidates hold very similar positions on the Isreal-Palestine situation - positions which the Arab world rejects. So no matter which candidate is elected president in the next term, the roots of Arab hatred torwards the West will remain unchanged and the world will be no closer to an end in the "war on terror."

Since both Kerry and Bush as president will continue to fail in Middle Eastern policy, I will base my vote on who will be better for domestic policy and non-Middle East foriegn policy. In my opinion, that will be Kerry.

krulltime
May 25th, 2004, 07:01 PM
:D KERRY!!! 100%

krulltime
May 26th, 2004, 12:01 AM
I think Bush is really a horrible president in the present and the history of the USA. I don't understand why people like him so much...Maybe because he likes to use religion alot in his speeches and stuff...The 911 sure make him look like a good guy but he isn't kids! Believe me.

I dont think Kerry is a good candidate but he is all we have at the moment! so vote for Kerry...You wont regret it.

Jasonik
May 26th, 2004, 01:39 PM
http://www.johnkerryisadouchebagbutimvotingforhimanyway.c om/

ZippyTheChimp
May 26th, 2004, 02:06 PM
I don't understand why people like him so much.
If you were going...
to a baseball or football game,
to a bar or club,
on a fishing or hunting trip,
to the ESB observation deck,
on a family picnic,
etc...

would you want Kerry or Bush to go along with you?
Be honest.

The sad state of politics.

Slovak
May 26th, 2004, 03:58 PM
I prefer Mr. Kerry

Slovak
May 26th, 2004, 03:59 PM
I prefer Mr. Kerry

Freedom Tower
May 26th, 2004, 04:18 PM
"Those who would give up an essential liberty to purchase a little temporary safety deserve neither liberty nor safety."

This Ben Franklin quote is used alot in opposition to the Patriot Act. Personally, I'd rather take my chances with the terrorists than have some government analyst or super-computer scan my every phone conversation and email.



But what essential liberty is being given up? NONE. People argue it is the "Right to privacy" that is being lost. But guess what, the "Right to privacy" isn't even in the constitution.

Essential liberties are the right to life (which is violated if your government lets terrorists kill you without using something like the patriot act to protect you), property, safety, fair trial, etc. Personally, I would rather have the government scan my phone calls (which they aren't even doing to normal people) than be killed by terrorists!

First of all I have nothing to hide, and secondly I WANT the government to have the power to spy on terrrorists. To scan every phone in the country and listen to them all is impossible! The government is only scanning people on terror-lists. Unless you are on a list of potential terrorists you shouldn't worry. And if you are, then you shouldn't even be allowed to have an opinion on it, if you are a terrorist you should be in jail.

Just having the Democrats oppose a vital thing like the patriot act sums up why i would never vote for them. they can only win the votes of ignorant people, terrorists, and hard core liberals by opposing something that will protect americans. Arguing that the right of terrorists to privacy is more important than the right of life to every american is ridiculous.

ZippyTheChimp
May 26th, 2004, 05:37 PM
All the things I told you over the past year that would happen are now happenning.

ZippyTheChimp
May 26th, 2004, 05:41 PM
Transferred from a deleted thread:



Mind you where is Skovakia?


Are you lost :?: :!:


http://www.mapzones.com/world/europe/slovakia/slovakia.jpg

Lemonsoda
May 26th, 2004, 05:51 PM
In my opinion.

Randy - The Israeli-Arab disagreements are by no means the root cause of Arab self-loathing. May I simply point out the yawning and humiliating gap between age-old Arab aspirations and contemporary Arab life, especially compared to modern societies? There is a reason our "decadent free societies" are so vilified by the fanatics. It is very reminiscent of a prevalent German mindset of supposed superiority, righteous indignation before and utter humilitation after World War I - except that the Germans were more dangerous than a bunch of Arab crazies could ever have been before the advent of modern killing devices. These are difficult times. In this context, Americans are simply the new Jews, and many people all over the world hunger for such a construct. It's shameful to see. One might recall that even the most proudly German Jews who had been awarded Iron Crosses in WW I and had spoken quite indignantly of "perfidious Albion" were sent to their deaths two decades later. Had they been able to hold their breath and bundle up into a little ball, they still would have been murdered - for what their killers decided desperately to need.

FT - You may have nothing to hide (did your grandparents have any genetically borne diseases? can we check if you really never have unprotected sex with strangers? what can you tell us about your suspicious friends?).

But you certainly seem willing to forfeight the noble cause of this country - namely, individual freedom guaranteed by ever imperfect organized liberty in the form of a government so divided, beset, bound and gagged, that its powers shall not ever, not ever permanently interfere with the rightful station of its constituents.

I urge you to reconsider. Thousands of Americans have waded ashore far more inhospitable beaches than our daily commute in this time of terror. Our enemies will never win if we steadfastly refuse to dim that Lady in the Harbor 's light.

That does not mean we should not hasten their demise or refuse to countenance the horror of a great American city's annihilation. We can and should fight, and be merciless towards those who refuse to submit. But to suppose that every Democrat is a soulless, vindictive automaton, and to despise every dissenting voice, consumes more freedom than a man could ever create.

Pilaro
May 26th, 2004, 09:23 PM
I hate being 17 during an election year :x ! I am counciling my friends to vote for me though, and they will be voting Kerry. Who votes Republican- yuck. It is time to shake things up, it has been far too conservative over the past several decades.

MidnightRambler
May 27th, 2004, 01:52 AM
Anyone who has faith in the Patriot Act, or who believes that expanded government power will keep them safer should see Brazil.

Slovak
May 28th, 2004, 02:06 PM
Transferred from a deleted thread:



Mind you where is Skovakia?


Are you lost :?: :!:


http://www.mapzones.com/world/europe/slovakia/slovakia.jpg No and I am gladly that somebody knows. Slovakia is interesting landscape. I very admire New York.My grammar fall bad level

Slovak
May 28th, 2004, 02:07 PM
Transferred from a deleted thread:



Mind you where is Skovakia?


Are you lost :?: :!:


http://www.mapzones.com/world/europe/slovakia/slovakia.jpg No and I am gladly that somebody knows. Slovakia is interesting landscape. I very admire New York.My grammar fall bad level

dbhstockton
May 28th, 2004, 02:19 PM
Anyone who has faith in the Patriot Act, or who believes that expanded government power will keep them safer should see Brazil.

One of my favorite movies, MidnightRambler. Twenty years on, and it's still frighteningly relevant on several different levels.

TonyO
May 28th, 2004, 02:51 PM
Who do you think will benefit if/when we have another terrorist attack? Bush or Kerry?

I think it would probably benefit Bush since that has defined his presidency. While in Spain, the conservative government was thrown out but they were not attacked in a major way prior by Al Queda.

Schadenfrau
May 28th, 2004, 04:45 PM
I honestly don't know which party would benefit more from a terrorist attack on American soil at this point. However, I am certain that if the Bush administration responds in the same frightened manner it did last time, they will not benefit.

MidnightRambler
May 29th, 2004, 04:12 PM
i wouldn't call their reaction frightened. you can't be frightened of something you know is going to happen.

krulltime
May 29th, 2004, 07:33 PM
I think that Bush will benefit. He and his 'friends' will do anything to win the election. :cry:

Pilaro
May 29th, 2004, 09:14 PM
Well if another terror attack occurs I don't possibly see how it could benefit Bush. Wouldn't this new attack prove that the president is incapable of dealing with, and preventing future terrorist attacks? Thereby frightening the already panicky American people into anti-Bush action? That is my 17 year old philosophy so it is more spontaneous and poorly planned than most, but maybe it is possible.

MidnightRambler
May 30th, 2004, 04:24 AM
In the end it'll all come down to how they spin it. They might able to convince the American people that they would've been able to stop it, if only those faggy Democrats in Congress let them renew the Patriot Act.

Of course, this is all assuming they aren't the ones orchestrating the attacks. Which is certainly possible.

Lemonsoda
May 30th, 2004, 07:15 AM
MR

Everything is possible, but not equally probable.

Do you think the company that reaped extra profit by making shoddy boots for the Union Armies was complicit in fomenting the Civil War?

At what point did shall we say Donald Rumsfeld turn into a money-laundering automaton? Instead of trying to impose his much-vaunted "army transformation" for instance by ending the program to build the most advanced artillery system in the world just before its production-go-ahead. Or, equally nonsensically, proposing an army of 80'000 to zip into Iraq and zoom right out again after a couple o' weeks. His "Eric Shinseki" moment.

One can, of course, explain everything by espousing a sufficiently narrow field of vision of world events and the human condition, an exceedingly dangerous habit. And to boot, human beings have that awkward penchant of engaging in nonsensical acts, which makes trusting the results of "Occam's razor" so much more precarious. Putting it to use though, is not merely mental acrobatics.

One more thing: being poor doesn't turn someone into a suicide bomber. Or being oppressed. It takes momentarily lost and vulnerable individuals, a specific ideology of contempt and cold, calculating actors who implement it. Those actors are as much a product of their society as were the Nazis. They are however not the sole product, or else we would have to resort to quite drastic measures.

One can talk endlessly of foreign influences, but where a power vacuum exists, it will be filled (which is a powerful argument in favor of a globally engaged America). A good thing the French meddled on our side some two hundred years ago, by the way. We don't have to do everything right to be successful - only sufficiently right. And here, I think I'm not alone in assailing the current administrations high-handed thoughtlessness, an incendiary combination.

ZippyTheChimp
May 30th, 2004, 07:21 AM
Generally, people expect the government to protect them, from crime, terrorist attacks, loss of jobs, etc.

A second attack would be seen as the incumbent government not fulfilling their mandate. But this election year is the most perplexing I have ever seen. By now at the very least, several Pentagon resignations should have been "accepted with regret."